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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 6, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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big ben tolls silence good morning from central london as
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people across the capital and across the united kingdom observed a minute's silence to remember those that died here at london bridge on saturday night. sadiq khan is there with members of the london ambulance service. police officers here still at the cord and, still in place at london bridge, were among those who stood as a mark of respect to all those killed and injured this weekend. you see the number of flowers left, people paying their own small tribute. the sea of flowers has grown since saturday night, and people just flowers has grown since saturday night, and peoplejust wanting to remember those who died, and some of those who were so very badly injured as well. and this, the third terrorist attack in the united kingdom in three months. the police
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and emergency services were among those who showed such remarkable courage. you are probably familiar now with the story of the off—duty police officer, who rushed towards one of the attackers, the officer was armed only with a batten. remember, those three attackers who we re remember, those three attackers who were shot and killed by armed police officers were wearing what appeared to be suicide vests. they turned out to be suicide vests. they turned out to be suicide vests. they turned out to be fake, of course, but that police officer didn't know that at the time. he rushed forward to try to do what he could to bring that attacker down in the face of extreme danger. and that police officer is among those who are still in hospital this morning. so we remember all those who lost their lives, and it reminds us of cars as well of the grim events in manchester only a couple of weeks ago. so many people up and down the
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country, and in countries around the world, affected by terrorism now here in the united kingdom. you are watching bbc news. let's now try to bring you up to date with the investigation, with everything in relation to this attack, here in central london, at london bridge, and nearby borough market. our first report this hour on the developments so far will stop nick quraishi reports. as the investigation into saturday night's attack continues at a fast pace, seven women and five men arrested in barking on sunday have been released by police without charge, leaving the focus firmly on the three attackers. this is the face of one of them. 27—year—old khuram butt was well—known to the police and mi5 as an extremist, though they insist there was nothing to suggest he was planning an attack and downgraded their inquiry into his activities. the group display the black flag of islam... he featured in a channel 4
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documentary last year about radical islamists in britain. twice, people in his barking neighbourhood reported the pakistani—born father of two to the authorities. in recent years, he worked at kentucky fried chicken and was a customer services advisor at transport for london. less is known about the second attacker, 30—year—old rachid redouane, also from barking and claimed to be of moroccan—libyan descent. police are yet to confirm the identity of the third attacker. yesterday evening, a vigil took place as londoners came together for a dignified show of solidarity. among the victims, 30—year—old christine archibald, who'd moved to europe from canada to be with herfiance. she died in his arms. james mcmullan's family are struggling to come to terms with the news his bank card was found on a body outside a london bridge pub.
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while our pain will never diminish, it is important for us to all carry on with our lives, in direct opposition to those who would try to destroy us. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is outside new scotland yard. bring us up—to—date with all the developments there where you are this morning, daniel. first of all, i should say that, an italian newspaper has now started naming the third man, but at this stage, the request of the police is to not go ahead and name the third man shot by police in the attack on saturday night. another person was arrested this morning, police haven't confirmed that formally, but we saw somebody being arrested, and i believe the police will confirm that in the next few minutes. that was at
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one of the properties that had previously been raided by police on sunday. there was another raid in ilford overnight. but at the moment, apart from the fresh arrest today, nobody else is in custody, because all of the people that were arrested in the initial raids on sunday were released last night without charge. meanwhile of course, the metropolitan police still wrestling with these very difficult questions about why it was that koran but, one of the men shot on saturday night was invested by police on suspicion of extremism —— no criminality was found on the therefore he was still free to carry out the attack. daniel, thank you very much indeed. let's talk about the politics of all of this as well. here's our assistant political editor, norman smith.
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one of the three men was known, people were aware of him. that has enormous political ramifications, norman. it does because labour are suggesting the cuts to police numbers, particularly of community and neighbourhood policing has meant that the security services have been deprived of critical information about such individuals. that has damaged the fight against terrorism. the row over police numbers really has stepped up a level this morning with the mayra blunden suggesting it is not just historic with the mayra blunden suggesting it is notjust historic cuts which the metropolitan police will face over the next four years. sadiq khan suggesting that they could amount to somewhere between 3000 and 12,000 police officers going. that, he says, would be the equivalent of 10%
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and 40% of the total metropolitan police force. that is a really huge figure based on the fact that he says there are something like £400 million worth of cuts to be commended over the next four years. listen to what sadiq khan said this morning. under a renewed theresa may government, as a consequence of the cuts to our policing budget, we'd have fewer police officers. and all the experts tell me, by the way, that one of the ways we counter terror is by fantastic police in the community. numbers of the community of all backgrounds report intelligence to police officers in the community. they pass it on, and it helps keep us safe. so there's no doubt, fewer police officers means we're in more danger. borisjohnson boris johnson disputed a borisjohnson disputed a direct link between police numbers and terrorism. when jeremy corbyn says it's all a function of police numbers, i have to say i think that,
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first of all, is wrong. police numbers in london have remained high. and secondly, we protected police budgets in 2015. and the labour party, as i recall, actually wanted to cut them by 10%. but all of that argument detracts from the responsibility of these scumbags of what they have done and we should not allow that to happen. although it is clear the prime minister wants to try to poll the election agenda back to the issue of brexit, it is very hard at the moment to see how she gets off this issue of police numbers, which is really dogging her in the final days of this campaign. thanks very much for now, norman smith, our assistant political correspondent from westminster. people continue to lay flowers. in fact, westminster. people continue to lay flowers. infact, behind me westminster. people continue to lay flowers. in fact, behind me here at london bridge, where the police are among those that have observed the
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one—minute silence, people still arriving to lay flowers in memory of those who died here on saturday night. let's pick up on what norman smith was telling us there. sadiq khan was in waterloo in self london with members of the london ambulance service and joins me from there now. good morning to you. this is the second time that the nation has had to fall silent in less than two weeks because of terrorist attacks in this country. if there were more police on our streets, would those attacks have been foiled? firstly, the responsibility of the attacks lays squarely on the shoulders of the terrorists. they are to blame and are responsible for the terrorist attacks, and we shouldn't forget that. but it is a fact, and i have said this for a number of months now, after speaking to many experts, including counterterror
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experts, including counterterror experts, having more police officers, having community police, restoring neighbourhood police, members of the public have confidence to report things to them. the police can do theirjobs in the communities come up which ultimately keeps us safer. and over the last four years, after the death of fusilier lee rigby, up to the attack on westminster bridge, it was successfully thwarted, 13 attacks because of that intelligence and the ha rd because of that intelligence and the hard work of the police. it is the case, i'm afraid, in the last three months, there have been three attacks which have been "successful". we have ported another five, but the more police we have in communities, the safer we are going to be. so it is pure and simple for you, a question of resources, war money on the police so that there are simply more police officers up and down the uk out in the community? can ijust reassure your
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views of this. i work closely with the police, and i have worked with the police, and i have worked with the met police over the last 13 months, they are producing efficiencies. they are trying to get rid of any wastage they can. they have got rid of any savings they can make with back office staff, but at the end of the day, there is nothing left to cut. there is nothing left but the bone now. in the last seven yea rs, but the bone now. in the last seven yea rs , we but the bone now. in the last seven yea rs, we have but the bone now. in the last seven years, we have lost in london, the met police, £600 million. there are plans from the conservative party, the current government, to cut a further £400 million from the met police. there are plans to change the police funding formula, meaning we lose another £700 million, £1.7 billion pounds. there is nothing left to cut. in terms of what happened here at london bridge, though, on saturday night, people watching will say one of those three men was known, and thatis of those three men was known, and that is not a failure of police officers, that is nothing to do with
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bobbies on the beat, it is a failure of intelligence. the priority of the police and intelligence services is to investigate what happened on saturday night. i have no doubt, they will look into any lessons that can be learned, what went wrong, did they know about this man, did they act rightly? am sure, in due course, they will let us know what went on. it is important for me to not comment on that, but clearly there are good it at questions raised, not unreasonably, journalists and members of the public, and i am asking about, and i can assure you, the police take these concerns very seriously and will respond in due course. some of those intelligence failures linked to resource in, as far as you are concerned? we know how many members of staff it takes, how many members of staff it takes, how many members of staff it takes, how many members of security services it takes to monitor one single individual. i can't talk about this individual case, but what ican about this individual case, but what i can say in general terms is, when
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members of the public do their duty and report things to the police, ringing the anti—terror hotline, police officers need to respond to that. specialist staff need to respond to that. you will be aware from reports already in the media on giving away state secrets, there are a considerable number of people under surveillance. there are many, many, under surveillance. there are many, any under surveillance. there are many, many, many more who are potential liabilities, and the police and security services do a fantasticjob with limited resources they have, but theirjob is made much hard up when cuts are made to their resources . when cuts are made to their resources. while you are with us, sadiq khan, can i ask you about donald trump, president trump. you have been outspoken in any plans for a state visit, what is your key reasoning now for wanting to cancel a visit when the invitation has already gone out? i've not changed my position. as soon as theresa may
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announced that she had offered donald trump a state visit, she offered to roll out the red carpet, it was in the context of donald trump as the president having a muslim ban. donald trump as the president, changing the usa's richest array around refugees, and the point i made is that state visits are award for world leaders who have esteemed relationships with our country. i thought in those circumstances, a state visit was improper. of course, we should have good relations with our closest ally. of course, we have a special relationship. of course, it is right and proper the prime ministers pigs regularly with donald trump as the president, but i think it is wrong to roll out the red carpet in the circumstances where we disagree so much with many of the things he does asa much with many of the things he does as a president. —— proper the prime minister meets regularly. sadiq khan
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talking from the headquarters of the london ambulance service. just to bring you breaking news here on bbc news, confirmation of the third attacker here in this attack on london bridge. let's go straight to daniel sandford. tell us what we know, daniel. a newspaper in italy is naming the third attacker as i should say that the metropolitan police have not confirmed the name as the name of the third attacker. it is quite likely, given that it has come out of italian sources, then they will put out their version of the name quite shortly. but certainly, the italian media and a number of other sources that we have spoken to naming the third man believed to have been involved in
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that attack on saturday night, and also of course, believed to have been shot dead by police on saturday night. that means the three attackers are being named officially by the police. khuram butt, rachid redouane, and a third man. he was based in london, travelling to and fro between london and italy quite a lot. we think it is a remarkable brocken name —— moroccan name. and again, all of this coming from that publication, but the newspaper says as i read this now that he was stopped in 2016, trying to fly to syria. again, istress stopped in 2016, trying to fly to syria. again, i stress this is from
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the italian media specifically, but a suggestion that the 40s there had stopped him. he was wanting to go to syria. i appreciate it is coming in, but how much do we know about all of that? the answer is, from other sources, we have also heard similar things about him having been involved with the italian authorities. the specifics of the port stop, i believe, on the way to turkey, we have not had it confirmed. we do believe that he had run ins with the italian authorities. clearly, he was a man travelling backwards and forwards between the uk and italy, and we would have hoped the italian authorities and uk authorities might have stopped him on his way to
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syria. daniel, thanks very much indeed. daniel sandford, the home affairs correspondent with the latest from scotland yard. we can speak now to adam deen from the quilliam foundation, who was also former al muhajiroun member, an islamist extremist organisation. your reaction to one of the men being known about here, and in the last half an hour we have had the name of the third man. mixed emotions when i heard that one of the attackers was linked to about 70 terrorist plots. we know that the murderers of drama lee rigby, that horrific butchering on the streets of which were also associated with this extremist islamic organisation. on the other hand, i am extremely
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surprised that someone who was so brazen about their views, so open about their activities and in support of is was able to slip through the net. i am completely bewildered that someone like this, and so well—known, on the radar of intelligence services, was able to commit such an horrific attack.|j apologise, adam, because it is quite tricky to hear some of what you are saying, but i think i am able to pick up on some of what you are saying. i think i am right in saying you are surprised that he slipped through the radar. does all of this go again to what we have been discussing so much this morning, the pressure on resources, where is the flaw as far as you are concerned? up until we had reports of the
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identities and their connections to various organisations, like khuram butt, i had the feeling that this was because of the reason we have had three attacks in three months is because the intelligence services are overstretched. but on this particular case of khuram butt, it has to be seen as a case of negligence. some of your viewers may not know of the group, but it can only be described as a franchise of isis. for someone that was so well—known for supporting is, they should not have been overlooked. this person should have been on 24—hour surveillance. these are the most dangerous people in our society that openly support is. i don't think it is a case of being under resourced in this particular case. it is sheer negligence. and we
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should explain, you yourself were once a member of that organisation. absolutely, yeah. i know this organisation very well and the intelligence agencies probably know as much as i do. i was a memberfor about eight years in this organisation. and over the years, it's become more and more extreme, more and more violent, and become more and more violent, and become more jihadists. more and more violent, and become morejihadists. we know that more and more violent, and become more jihadists. we know that a more and more violent, and become morejihadists. we know that a lot of these members have actually gone to syria. either they are dead, or they are still there, or some of them have come back. again, it highlights a grave, grave error here, and someone should be responsible. thank you for now, adam deen, from the quilliam foundation. here at london bridge this morning,
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we observed, as so many people did up we observed, as so many people did up and down the united kingdom, that one—minute silence to remember those, to reflect on the events here on saturday night. the gordon is behind me. the blue tarpaulin that you may be able to see there, that is where the van veered into pedestrians, crashed there, along the bridge. we know seven people died, and they were from all over the world, a canadian lady, a french national, they were killed, australians were caught up in this, and 48 people were injured. all those nationalities, just a reflection of the diversity of london as a city. people affected all over the world by events here in london bridge, and all of that a matter of a couple of weeks after the attack in manchester in which 22 people died. we will have coverage
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from here throughout the morning, another extraordinarily blustery day here at london bridge, but we will try to bring new continuing coverage as the investigation continues tom and all three attackers have now been named. that is the latest in the investigation. more from here to come. for now, i will hand you back tojoanna. australian police say they're treating a siege at an apartment in the australian city of melbourne as a "terrorist incident". police shot and killed a lone gunman who had been holding a woman hostage on monday. another man was found dead in the foyer. the so—called islamic state terrorist group has claimed responsibility but authorities say there's no evidence so far to suggest it was a coordinated attack. hywel griffith reports. wounded in the crossfire when the armed police ended a siege carried out in the name of islamic extremism. 29—year—old yacqub khayre had a long criminal history.
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in 2009 he was accused of planning to attack an australian military base but acquitted. he'd since been in prison for violent crimes. last night, he came to this apartment block to meet a female escort. on the way in, he shot a male apartment worker before taking the woman hostage. he made a call to a local tv station claiming to act for both islamic state and al-anda, two rival organisations. the islamic state's since claimed he was acting for them. we are aware of online, them having claimed responsibility, but then they always tend to jump up and claim responsibility every time something happens. gunfire the siege ended after khayre started shooting at the police, who returned fire and killed him. australia's prime minister says the attack is part of a growing threat but he also questioned why khayre had been released
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from prison in november. he had a long record of violence. a very long record of violence. he had been charged with a terrorist offence some years ago and had been acquitted. he was known to have connections, at least in the past, with violent extremism. but he was a known violent offender. how was he on parole? the siege brings back painful memories of 2014's sydney attack in which two people died after being taken hostage by a gunman. he was on bail and was known to have extremist views. in melbourne, the police are still trying to piece together how much planning went into this attack and whether there were any warning signs that meant it
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could have been prevented. hywel griffith, bbc news. let's bring you news about the royal bank of scotland. we are hearing it has reached an out—of—court deal to settle a lawsuit that was alleging investors were misled during a £12 billion cash call launched before its near collapse in 2008. around 9000 people who lost money on shares we re 9000 people who lost money on shares were demanding £520 million in compensation from the bank am and fourformer compensation from the bank am and four former directors, compensation from the bank am and fourformer directors, including compensation from the bank am and four former directors, including the former world bank of scotland boss fred goodwin. they say they were misled in the run—up to the government bailout. the directors denied any wrongdoing. —— royal bank of scotland. it was heading towards trial, and it had been expected that fred goodwin would be testifying, amongst others. it has been going on
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now for around five years. this particular case. but it is understood that an out—of—court settle m e nt understood that an out—of—court settlement has been agreed and it is effectively shareholders being offered 82p per share, which will cost the bank roughly £200 million. the 9000 people who were demanding compensation were demanding £520 million, and it looks like a deal has been reached, which means that case has been settled. we will bring you more on that as we get it. let's catch up with the weather. heavy rain and gale is not often talked about in june heavy rain and gale is not often talked about injune but a feature of the forecast today. this is where it has been falling in the past few hours. heavy downpours in scotland stretching down to east and southern england. pushing eastwards through
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the afternoon, some blustery showers blowing through quickly on the north—westerly winds, touching gale force in places. we have gusts in excess of 15 mph, a cool field to the afternoon, 15 to 17, typically the afternoon, 15 to 17, typically the hide. this evening, strong wind, blustery showers. the rain bandwidth reading north and east, confining to north east scotland. elsewhere is dry. to bridges between nine and 11 overnight. tomorrow, a better day for many. starting to pull away eastwards through the afternoon. elsewhere, sunshine and rain returning to western areas later in the afternoon. warmer tomorrow in the afternoon. warmer tomorrow in the sunshine, highs of 15 to 21. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11:30 — the third suspect who carried out the attacks in london on saturday night has been identified in italian media as a moroccan—italian man — youssef zaghba. the country has observed a minute's silence in remembrance of those
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who lost their lives and all others affected by the attacks in london on saturday night. scotland yard has defended its decision to downgrade an inquiry into one of the men who carried out the london bridge attack. khuram butt was investigated two years ago, but no evidence was found that he was planning an attack. the political row over police numbers has intensified. the mayor of london is warning that planned cuts to the numbers of police officers will make it harder to prevent against future attacks. qatar calls for talks to end a major diplomatic row with other gulf states, as some of its neighbours close their airspace to qatari planes. now time for a look at the sport headlines. england's cricketers have lost an early wicket in their champions trophy match against new zealand in cardiff. jason roy was bowled by adam milne for 13.
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they're now 50—1 after ten overs. victory would take england through to the semifinals. ——now 46—1 after 13 overs. --64-i. the cause of death of former newcastle player cheick tiote, is still being investigated, according to chinese club beijing enterprise. tiote collapsed in training with his new team and later died in hospital. he was just 30 years old. he enjoyed some of the best years of his career at newcastle where he played for seven seasons, only moving to china in february. british cycling have called an emergency meeting next month to vote on reforms and the entire board of directors is set to be replaced. all the current members will have to reapply for their jobs with a report due next week on the investigation into the culture at british cycling following accusations of bullying and sexism. chris froome isjust over a minute off the lead after two stages of the criterium du dauphine in france.
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he finished safely in the peleton on what was a day for the sprinters into arlanc, with frenchman arnaud demare taking the stage win. froome should make his move later in the week, in the climbing and time trial stages. sir ben ainslie's land rover bar team have had a major setback in the america's cup challenger semifinals in bermuda. they're 2—0 down to new zealand after damaging a wing in the first race they couldn't fix it in time so they had to forfeit the second. it's a best—of—nine series so this was a real blow to the crew. we are gutted because we thought it was our day today. in three years of sailing, we have only had one when breakage, and then in the first race of the semifinals, it goes pop. absolutely gutted, but is another day, there is a fantastic forecast. britain's ibf world super—middleweight champion james degale is having surgery on his right shoulder tomorrow. he says he's been carrying an injury for over 12 months but he should be able to spar again
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within ten weeks and he definitely expects to fight again before the end of the year. he's already talking about a possible rematch with george groves. england manager gareth southgate will take training today ahead of their world cup qualifier against scotland on saturday and it's likely to seem quite mundane, after their experience over the weekend. southgate arranged a trip to a commando training centre in devon for a 48—hour bootcamp. 20 members of the squad, along with members of the fa backroom staff, completed exercises designed for marine recruits, with southgate himself getting involved. they spent the night camping under the stars. southgate said he wanted to show the players there was another world out there, and make them think differently about working asa team. that's all the sport for now. let's return to our main story this morning.
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the third attacker has been named after the attack on saturday night. he is youssef zaghba, a 1022 —year—old man from bologna. jane hill is at london bridge. —— 822—year—old man. —— a 22—year—old man. we are going to reflect for a moment on the minute's silence at 11 o'clock. bong silence
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people across the united kingdom remembering the seven people who we re remembering the seven people who were killed and the 42 were injured, many of them still in hospital. in the last few minutes, we have had a statement from the family of one of
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of the seven who was killed here on saturday night, kirsty boden. this is what her family said this morning. kirsty was loved and adored by herfamily, morning. kirsty was loved and adored by her family, friends and boyfriend. she was the most kind and outgoing person, who loved to help people. she helped people in herjob asa people. she helped people in herjob as a nurse, as well as in her daily life. she ran towards danger to help people on the bridge, kirsty lost her life. we are so proud of her brave actions which demonstrate herself hoarse, killing and her work she was, not only on that night, but throughout her life. kirsty, we love you and will miss you dearly. the family of kirsty boden issuing that statement in the last few minutes. that young woman, a nurse, one of
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seven people who died here on saturday night. one of the people still missing after the attack at london bridge is sara zelenak from australia. her aunt tara spoke to reporters outside the family home in brisbane. my name is tara. i am sara's auntie, and julie's sister. i just wanted to say that we are obviously very upset and emotionally distraught at this time. the family is trying to keep it together, but bracing for the worst, obviously. at this stage, we have been advised that if you want any further information, you need to go to appropriate representatives to get any further information. but we are just literally bracing for the worst at this stage, and we would really appreciate if everybody is able to respect the family.
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sara is absolutely beautiful. she is the girl next door, she is a very special, kindred spirit. she is one of those people that doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong. she is amazing, and she is 21 years of age. the aunt of sara zalanek, who is still missing following the attack on saturday night. we now have more information on the attackers themselves. a woman who knew the wife of one of the attackers told the bbc that she came to know him as just a normal man. he would sometimes show our photographs on his phone of his hobbies, including
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baking cakes. she would only speak to us anonymously, but she has described her shock at learning that a man who lived at her block of flats could carry out such an atrocity. her words are spoken here bya atrocity. her words are spoken here by a bbc ijust went in and had a coffey, spoke about our normal day. he showed me pictures of cakes he had a on his phone. i never left and thought, that was a bit weird, i never got that from him at all. i just 30 was a genuine, normal person who showed me photos of his hobbies that he does, a general man. and then you realise what happened on saturday night. how does that make you feel? it is quite worrying to know that you can live in the same building as somebody and think they area genuine
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building as somebody and think they are a genuine person, and then find out a few months later that they are harming other people. i never thought he was that kind of person who would do that to anybody. i never heard of him being violent towards anybody, so to find out that he went into london and killed loads of people for no reason, it is quite worrying, really. here is a statement that has come through in terms of the victims of saturday night, a statement on behalf of of a journalist with the sunday express who has been in hospital. he has issued a statement saying that he would like to thank eve ryo ne saying that he would like to thank everyone at the royal london chapel in whitechapel —— the loyal royal london hospital. geoff ho goes on to
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talk in some detail about the attack, he was in a pub in by the market, and he talks about that. he says that the people who attacked him were not representative of islam and he stands in solidarity with his muslim brothers and sisters, and he thanks everybody who has helped him and thanks to the red cross and the london ambulance. a statement from geoff ho, who works for the sunday express and was in borough market on the night of the attack. we will have more from london bridge and keep you updated with any further developments in the investigation. as people continue to come here to the bridge and lay flowers and
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member —— in memory of those affected. will keep you updated on developments but we will now turn our attention to the election. throughout the election campaign, we've been taking a closer look at some of the key issues in the debate. today, with the help of our specialist editors, we are focussing on brexit. our europe, business and political editors have been explaining what challenges may lie ahead, for politicians and voters. the first thing the new government has to do on brexit is to choose a chief brexit negotiator. they then need to come here to brussels, and agree with the eu how often they are going to meet, what they are going to talk about, and in which order. the eu is very clear about its priorities. it says there will be no talk about future trade relations until there has been progress in three key areas. money — how much britain owes the eu in outstanding financial commitments.
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people — the eu wants to pinpoint the exact rights of european citizens living in the uk and british citizens living in the eu after brexit. and ireland — how to avoid reintroducing a hard border between the republic of ireland, which is in the eu, and northern ireland, part of post—brexit uk. of course, britain's new government will almost certainly have their own ideas about the choreography of brexit talks. whatever happens, they will be judged on the quality of the brexit deal they get. not from the brussels perspective, but in the eyes of british voters. a pretty quite day in the city behind me, and in fact, in this election, it is one where the voice of business has been strangely silent, and yet, on some of the biggest issues, brexit, immigration, regulation, taxation — these are issues that fundamentally affect the way business and the wider economy works. and yet, some business leaders feel that politicians are not speaking to or
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listening to them. the conservative party, for example, wants to intervene in energy markets. that's a departure for them. the labour party wants to see a sharp rise in corporation tax. the lib dems would like the ability to reject any final brexit deal. and parties in northern ireland are worried about what the imposition of a land border with the eu will do to people's working lives. in the past, most parties wanted to portray themselves as business—friendly, but since the financial crisis and a series of big corporate scandals, that is much less true. put simply, on regulation, on taxation, on immigration, what businesses want is predictability. but, with brexit negotiations just around the corner, that predictability is going to be very hard to deliver whatever the election result. another reason, perhaps, that business feels that no one is listening. what people want from brexit, of course, isn't what
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will make up every single member of the public‘s minds, but it is important because it is the main reason that theresa may called this election, and it is important because both of the main parties have had to spell out what they would do and what they would seek to achieve as we enter the biggest change in our country for decades and decades. what has been difficult, though, for voters, is that both labour and the tories are relatively reluctant to give us too many of the details. the lib dems and the snp, in contrast, have been much more explicit about what they would like to see. but for the two main parties, it is probably the biggest issue of all. theresa may thinks she is on safer ground with the public when she is talking about brexit. she wants this to be a contest about, "who do you trust to do "something difficult?" "who do you trust to get and secure a good deal "for britain against 27 other countries? " but for the labour party, they know that in the closing days of this campaign, they know they have had to say more about how jeremy corbyn would handle it, and their pitch to voters is that they would put jobs first,
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people's livelihood first, rather than what the tories, they say, would seek to achieve. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. the third suspect who carried out the attacks in london on saturday night is identified in italian media as a 22—year—old moroccan—italian man, youssef zaghba. a minute's silence was observed at 11 o'clock in memory of the victims of saturday's attack. the metropolitan police defends a decision to downgrade an enquiry into one of the men who carried out the terror attack. in the business news — retail sales have fallen and online trading is slowing down. but we are still buying food and drinks. the findings from the british retail consortium suggest that rising inflation is contributing to us keeping our wallets
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and purses closed. separate figures from barclaycard showed consumer spending has fallen to a 10—month low of 2.8% in may with shoppers spending on experiences rather than goods. the electrical retailer a0, previously known as appliances online, has warned of a sharp slowdown in it's uk business as it reported poor sales. the group has reported losses of £7 million for the last financial year. it has blamed what it calls a "challenging" climate since the brexit vote. the company looks set to fall out of the ftse 250 index later this month. qatar has called for talks to end a major diplomatic row which has seen saudi arabia and several other countries cut links with the gulf state. the foreign minister said all sides should resolve their differences through dialogue. saudi arabia, bahrain and egypt say they're closing their air space to qatari planes. royal bank of scotland has reached an out—of—court deal to settle a costly and embarrassing lawsuit
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alleging it misled investors when it raised 12 billion pounds from investors just before its near collapse in 2008. we're still awaiting official confirmation of the deal. sources familiar with the situation said a majority of shareholders in the group look set to accept an offer after days of intense talks the deal will cost the bank roughly £200 million pounds the deal draws a line under a five—year lawsuit that was due to call disgraced former ceo fred goodwin to testify and has been unprecedented in english legal history for its compexity. we will have more details later on. another day, another indicator that we tightening our belts. the latest figures from the british retail consortium show that spending fell last month partly due to rising inflation. it said like—for—like retail sales dropped by 0.4% in may, down from 0.5% growth last year.
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online sales of non—food products also slumped to the lowest level since records began in 2012, growing by 4.3% last month compared to a 13.7%jump in 2016. let's speak to rachel lund, insight and analytics spokeswoman at the british retail consortium. let's talk about this comparison, because last year, there was strong growth, and yet a big reversal in the latest set of figures. there are two mac things going on. conditions in the wider environment has changed and is last year. consumers have had to think about where they placed their spending, and as a consequence, they are spending more on food and slightly less on non—food. last year, in comparison to this year, may was pretty good.
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we had the european football championship, which meant that people went out and bought electronics as well. i have to keep it brief as we have some breaking news here. back tojoanna. we now have confirmation of the third attacker at the london bridge incident. the metropolitan police have now confirmed that what we have been reporting for the last hour is accurate, the third man believed to be one of the attackers on saturday night is a man called youssef zaghba. they have given some official metropolitan police information about him now. he is 22 yea rs information about him now. he is 22 years old, from east london, and believed to be an italian national of moroccan descent. his name first came out to the italian media. he
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was not a police are m15 subject of interest, but it is worth remembering that the italian media believes that he was stopped trying to travel to turkey from bologna airport in 2016 and that the british had been told about that. the police are saying that all three men involved in the attack were confronted by armed police and shot, as we already know. the three men now are all named, youssef zaghba, 22 years old, of italian descent. khuram butt, 27 years old,. the third man is rachid redouane. police are asking for any information about these three men, or where they may have travelled to
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in recent weeks. police have put out an image now as well of this third man, youssef zaghba, which is on the screen now. man, youssef zaghba, which is on the screen now. this will hopefully help people with trying to give police any information about youssef zaghba, 22—year—old italian man of moroccan descent, the third man believed to have been involved in saturday night's attack and shot dead by police. italian police are saying that he had been on their radar and reports were put forward to the metropolitan police, so that will be looked at as time goes on. in terms of khuram butt, who featured in a channel 4 documentary, a lot of information now in the public domain about him, what he had done. the police were very honest
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with us about khuram butt last night, we spoke to the assistant commissioner, who said that this is a man they had investigated. he was in an investigation in 2015, into violent extremism. they looked at him, and he remained a subject of interest for m15, but there was no reason at that time to believe that he was planning an attack, so decisions at that time were made to downgrade his priority, and u nfortu nately, downgrade his priority, and unfortunately, that allowed him to go ahead with the attack this weekend. thank you, daniel, the three attackers all now named. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. it does not feel like june it does not feel likejune out there. lots of rain around. you can
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see where the rain has been falling in the last few hours, but behind it, some spells of sunshine coming in. a lovely picture in cornwall not so long ago, but watch out for some headache, blustery showers. some strong gusts of wind, some in excess of 50 miles an hour along the dorset coast. the combination of the wind and rain will lead to some tricky travel conditions for the rest of the day. heavy rain and still some deals for the rest of the day. —— still some gales for the rest of the day. as the rain moves eastwards, we will see some spells of sunshine, and those blustery showers may have and those blustery showers may have a rumble of thunder or a flash of lightning. here is 4pm today, rain
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is starting to clear from parts of kent and essex, there will be some showers pushing through quickly on those strong winds. sunshine and blustery showers for northern ireland, and the rain keeps on following across scotland. some potentially large accumulations by the end of the afternoon, and possibly some localised flooding. the rain moves eastwards across eastern parts of scotland and england, but for wales and northern ireland, the rains will eastern moving towards don. for tomorrow, low pressure eventually starts to pull away from the east coast of scotland. still windy for a time through the morning, and pressured to the south west later in the afternoon. once we clear that rain in the east coast of scotland, tomorrow looks to be a better day,
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with the inducing down and some more sunshine. another spell of rain will push in later, but lighter winds before that rain arrives, it should start to feel a little bit warmer. thursday is another unsettled day, another spell of rain pushing in from the south west, but it may not reach scotland until later in the day. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'mjane hill live in london bridge. the third suspect in the london attacks is named as 22—year—old moroccan—italian, youssef zaghba. an italian newspaper says he was stopped trying to go to syria in 2016. australian nurse kirsty boden, who ran to help people on the bridge, is the third person to be named among the dead. at 11 o'clock, a minute's silence across the uk, to remember the
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victims and all those affected by the attack. the political row over police numbers intensifies, as the mayor of london warns that planned cuts will make it harder to protect against future attacks. having more police officers, having community police in, restoring neighbourhood police in means, members of the public have confidence to report things to them. the police can do theirjob in the communities, which ultimately, keeps us safer. police numbers in london have remained high. and secondly, we protected police budgets in 2015. and the labour party, as i recall, actually wanted to cut them by 10%. rbs reaches a settlement with investors who claimed they were duped into handing over £12 billion to the bank during the financial crisis. and qatar calls for talks to end a diplomatic dispute
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with neighbouring states, saudi arabia has closed its airspace to qatari planes. hello and good afternoon from london bridge, the scene of the attack here on saturday night that killed seven and injured 48, many of whom are still in hospital. people still come to the bridge periodically to lay flowers in memory of those who died. another blustery day here at london bridge, but we will try to keep you up—to—date with the investigation. the latest that has come through in the last hour here is the third london bridge attacker has been named as youssef zaghba,
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a 22—year—old moroccan—italian man. italian media have reported he was stopped in the city of bologna last year when he was trying to travel to syria. the italian authorities tipped off the uk about this man's movements. that is the third name we have. we have the names of all three attackers, that is the latest name. the other two being pakistan—born khuram butt and rachid radouane, both from barking were the other two attackers. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is outside new scotland yard for the latest on the metropolitan police investigation. watmore are we learning about these men? the way the wet hippolyta and police are putting it in their formal statement to do with the identification, while formal
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identification, while formal identification hasn't happened, they believe it to be youssef zaghba, and his family have been informed. he is, as you said, a 22—year—old man, but he's italian by citizenship, but was born in fez in morocco in 1995. he comes from a one moroccan father and a mother from he comes from a one moroccan father and a motherfrom bologna in italy. he is believed to be one of the three men that drove across the bridge on saturday night, killing people on the bridge, then climbing out and stabbing more people, and killing more people, seven dead in all. along with the two men that we re all. along with the two men that were previously named, khuram butt, at 37—year—old man, british man, born in pakistan, and rachid redouane, whose nationality is unclear, he was either libyan or moroccan, marrying a british woman in ireland. all three men, it turns out, were living in east london. and
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while police acknowledged a new khuram butt, and they investigated him for violent extremism recently, they said to us yesterday that the other two men were not known to them. we are not sure that is entirely correct now. the italian media are reporting that the italian authorities had stopped youssef zaghba travelling from bologna to turkey, believe to be en route to syria. italian media say italian police had informed the british authorities about that, a man living in london at the time, going backwards and forwards between london and italy. if that is correct, it means that what we were told yesterday wasn't entirely accurate. and this all points again to continuing pressure on the intelligence services, what signs we re intelligence services, what signs were missed miz still a huge number of questions. —— were missed.
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were missed miz still a huge number of questions. —— were missedm were missed miz still a huge number of questions. -- were missed. it is difficult territory for both the security service m15 and the metropolitan police and terrorism command, and the other anti—terrorism units around the country. in the ira and al-qaeda base, the way you quote people plotting to launch bomb attacks were you picked up the signs of planning, trying to acquire certain ingredients for bomb making, electronics and maybe weaponry. you could spot certain things that show people of moving towards making a bomb. remember the airline plot of 2006, the men were watched carefully as they construct of their bombs. the police moved in quite late on in the plot. the attacks we are seeing at the moment, it only takes someone to pop down to a homeware store, how do you pick up on people planning that kind of attack? that is the problem we face. although the police
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investigating khuram butt back in 2015, they see to us, even looking back now on that investigation, they not quite sure were any signs of attack planning there. in retrospect, of course, he is a man that went on to plan an attack, but how are they supposed to know that from what they saw at the time? it shows the difficulties that the police and intelligence services have at the moment. we will talk more about that over the course of the day. thanks for now. let's talk about some of those who were caught up about some of those who were caught up in events here on saturday night. another name has been released this morning one of the seven people that died. the family of australian woman kirsty boden, who killed in the london bridge terror attack, have paid tribute to her. in a statement the family said: "as kirsty ran towards danger, in an effort to help people on the bridge, kirsty sadly lost her life. we are so proud of kirsty‘s brave actions, which demonstrate how
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selfless, caring and heroic she was, not only on that night, but throughout all of her life." ki rsty kirsty boden, one of the seven people killed here on saturday, who was a nurse. we have also had a statement from jeff pope, who was caught up in the attack in borough market, he is a journalist with the sunday express. he has been in hospital, releasing a statement about his experiences, he says, "most of my friends and the staff hid under tables in the restaurant he was in, but one of my friends was frozen behind me. i knew i had to face the attack is down. they were armed, andi face the attack is down. they were armed, and i had the best chance of delaying them until the police arrived, otherwise the attackers would get everyone. i had to shield my friends and the people there. then i noticed they had suicide vests on. i tried to slow them down. it all happened so quickly. " quite
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a lengthy statement released by him, and he wanted to give thanks and pay tribute to staff at the nhs and staff in the hospital in whitechapel where he has been looked after. at 11 o'clock this morning people fell silent across the uk to remember those killed and injured in london on saturday. and to reflect as well on the remarkable work done by the police and emergency services. let's reflect on that. big ben tolls people up and down the united kingdom remembering those affected by events here on saturday night. we know that those who died came from all over the world. extra security measures in place since then. there have been more armed police on
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britain's streets since the manchester attack two weeks ago. one of the changes in the capital is that we are seeing more defences go up that we are seeing more defences go up on the bridges. we can show you the image from behind me here at london bridge where that hired van drove into pedestrians. and strong barriers are now being erected all the way along london's bridges, the idea being that vehicles will be separated from pedestrians walking across the bridge. you might have seen across the bridge. you might have seenin across the bridge. you might have seen in the past couple of days, images from westminster bridge, where those pollard ‘s or barriers are very where those pollard ‘s or barriers are very much already there, built in light of the westminster attack. london bridge with similar security measures being put in place, one of the changes that people living and working in the capital are seeing as a result of this wave of terrorist attacks. the issue of resource and policing is very much on the cards again today. let's go to norman
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smith because this whole issue of resources , smith because this whole issue of resources, in particular. particularly now that we know that one of the attackers was on the radar, norman, this is a huge matter of debate now. it is, because the accusation from labour is that community policing, neighbourhood policing, is absolutely critical in terms of providing the security services with information about these sort of terror arrests. indeed, the mail of london sadiq khan saying they are the eyes and ea rs of khan saying they are the eyes and ears of the security services, which is why the criticism we have heard from him this morning is potentially so from him this morning is potentially so damaging, because he is suggesting the reduction in police numbers, which there has been over the past five—year is between 2010 and 3015 is continuing, he says, for the next four years. he says the met is facing more than £400 million worth of cuts, potentially up to £1
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billion worth of cuts. he says that could reduce the number of officers available in london by between 3000 and 12,000. that would be, he says, and 12,000. that would be, he says, a reduction of somewhere between either 10% and 40%, so an absolutely potentially colossal production in the size of the force. in turn, he says it would make it much harder to thwart future terrorist attacks. under a renewed theresa may government, as a consequence of the cuts to our policing budget, we'd have fewer police officers. and all the experts tell me, by the way, that one of the ways we counter terrorism is by fantastic police in the community. members of the community of all backgrounds report intelligence to police officers in the community. they pass it on, and it helps keep us safe. so there's no doubt, fewer police officers means we're in more danger. the conservatives dispute those
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dammers. boris johnson saying the conservatives dispute those dammers. borisjohnson saying this morning that if the mayor of london wa nted morning that if the mayor of london wanted more police for london, he could pay for that. also disputing the idea that there are some direct links between police numbers and vulnerability to terrorist attacks. it boils down to a clear and civil choice between a strong and determined woman in the form of theresa may, who in my view has a fantastic plan for brexit, understands what we need to take this country forward, and jeremy corbyn, who is at best week and vacillating on terror. he says he is now in favour of shoe to kill, he wasn't until the events of the weekend. ido wasn't until the events of the weekend. i do not see how we can trust him with the safety of our country. boris johnson and other senior members of the conservative party trying to raise questions about labour's record in voting against terrorism legislation. but
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theissue against terrorism legislation. but the issue around police numbers has really got traction, and part of the reason i suspect it has got traction is because it is seen as so personal to theresa may. of course, she was home secretary presiding over the cuts of 20,000 or so to overall police numbers. thanks very much for now, norman smith. we arejust we are just hearing there has been another arrest in relation to these attacks, a 27—year—old man has been arrested in barking, east london. a 27—year—old man arrested, we are just being told. we will keep you up—to—date with the investigation, of course, as people periodically still come to london bridge here behind me and lay flowers in memory of those who died, the seven people who died here on saturday night, many people still in hospital, of course. more from london bridge to come. for now, i will hand you back
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tojoanna. picking up on the details four that arrest, a 27—year—old arrested at 8:05am in barking, a suburb of east london, the focus of police raids since the attack on saturday. police had previously released without charge all 12 people arrested so far. but they say they have now made a new arrest over the attack. let's get reaction from a risk and security expert and former metropolitan police officer. thank you very much forjoining us. we also now have the names of all three suspects in the attacks, and it seems that all of them had at some stage been on the radar of the intelligence services. the first suspect, youssef zaghba, the italians say tried to go to syria in
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2016, what do you make of the fact that they had all been on the radar at some stage? it is some sort of serious disconnect where all of these people have previously come to notice, and for some reason they haven't been followed on with. now, there are only a finite number of resources that the police and intelligence services have, and they have two categorised who they think is the biggest risk. and as frank garden very wisely said a few weeks ago, you are going to deal with the alligators closest to the boat, not the ones on the bank. it seems to me, in the last few events we have had, these are individuals low down the pecking order. so maybe somebody somewhere is thinking, instead of using the guys that we know are under surveillance are being focused on by the intelligence services, let's use the guys way down the ladder who haven't yet had a big enough profile to become serious
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interests to the police and intelligence services. so what would make things better, do you think, going forward? i don't know. it's a city $4000 question. but one thing we do have is a number of uniformed officers, retired uniform officers, retired detectives, retired special branch officers that may well have the interest to come back and actually start dealing with this information when it comes in from the public, so you have experienced police officers, who have experience in dealing with the public, asking the right questions, getting the right information down and making sure that somebody notices that this individual has now come up twice. somebody needs to start looking at this guy a little more seriously, and perhaps put a little more effort into the people at the lower level that are perhaps slipping through the net. because finite resources have to deal with the more serious
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targets. let's not forget, the intelligence service and police have indicated several incidents the public did not know about. when you look at the number of cars coming through to the terror hotline, 22,000 calls lasted, 23,000 known terrorists being closely looked at, khuram butt, one of the three attackers was one of the 3000. as you were describing, the pecking order effectively of where people are, he was at the bottom of the wrong on that. what level of resources is needed to effectively and efficiently pick through the number of calls coming m, through the number of calls coming in, the number of people who are out there and are potentially cause for concern? it is all about woman power, manpower, whatever you want to call it. it is having experienced people who you can put in place that can pick this information up right at the start when it comes in on the
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terrorist hotlines, when it comes in from the community. people who have the experienced on this, who can full back on their experience, and say, "this is somebody that instinct tells me we need to be looking at." don't forget, the instinct you develop over 30 of doing this job, it's what makes the difference between having civilian staff brought in and trained that don't have that expertise, or that sixth sense to look at something and go, "this is one we need to look at." it isa "this is one we need to look at." it is a resource issue. let's get in people who have the experience, the understanding, who can start gripping this and break whatever disconnect is going on at the moment. thank you very much. a third suspect in the london attacks has been named as 22—year—old moroccan italian youssef zaghba. an italian newspaper says he was stopped trying
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to go to syria in 2016. an australian nurse, kirsty boden, who ran to help people on the bridge on saturday night is the third person named among the dead. and that 11am, a minute of silence was held across the uk to remember the victims, and all those affected by the attack. the debate over security and police funding has become a central election issue following the terror attacks in london and manchester. with two campaigning days left, the remaining parties are focusing on what they can do to prevent further attacks in britain. along with their plans to handle the upcoming brexit negotiations with brussels. the primaries to has defended the way she has led the conservative campaign, while on a visit to a farm in wrexham in north wales.
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i have been out and about around the country, as have my cabinet colleagues, as have other ministers, and our candidates are out there on the ground. there is a clear choice for people when they come to vote on thursday. there is only one person who will be promised on thursday, me orjeremy corbyn. the clear choices, who do they trust to get the best dealfor britain in europe? who has got the will? who has got a plan for those brexit negotiations, because they start only 11 days after polling day, and they are the basis of everything else. this is your third visit to wales, a lot of effort going into the welsh seats, but there is in fighting here, and you are falling flat in the poll said. the only poll that matters is the one that takes place on thursday. the infighting taking place is between carwynjones and the welsh labour party, and jeremy corbyn's labour party. they can't agree on how much money will be available for wales under a labour government. it is conservatives that
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have signed a deal with carwynjones that have the arrangement in place to guarantee and reassure sustainable funding for wales into the future. theresa may out campaigning in wales. two years ago east renfrewshire was like almost every other part of scotland, a few months after the independence referendum a majority of voters choosing to throw their weight behind the snp. since then, however, issues like brexit and a conservative push to capture the pro—union vote have complicated the electoral picture. with two days to go until the polls open, steven godden's been to the area to assess the challenge facing nicola sturgeon and her dominant party. we hope to bring you his report. for more on the how the election may play out in scotland, i'm joined by our correspondent catriona renton in edinburgh. two days to go until we go to the polls, what is the state of play?|j think you can see on the pictures here what a wet day it is here in
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edinburgh. the historic old town, the mound, if you can see it through the mound, if you can see it through the raindrops. but it has not stopped us to talk to you about the election. of course, those matters, the terror issues and security are playing out on the stage here during the election, but this is a very different election in scotland on the whole than it is to other parts of the uk. to give you a picture of that, this isn't the conservatives against the labour party, the snp is the dominant party the last time around when they won 56 of the 59 seats here in scotland. the other parties, of course, trying to make inroads into that vast majority. the conservatives have seen a research and, they came second in the holyrood elections in 2016. they have seen a bounce in the polls this time around. they are expecting to ta ke time around. they are expecting to take a time around. they are expecting to takea number of time around. they are expecting to take a number of seats. the lib dems
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are strong in some local areas, so they are ones to watch, too. again, they are ones to watch, too. again, they only have one seat as well. labour, who had been the dominant party in scotland at the last general election before the 2015 wipe—out, when they were left with one seat, they will hope to hang onto that and try to make some gains there. as you were saying, s renfrew shire is one of the areas the conservatives hope to gain, labour hope to gain, too. it was a safe labour seat for 20 years. before that, it was the safest conservative seatin that, it was the safest conservative seat in scotland. those parties hoping that with brexit and the scottish independence referendum playing out that they might have something to gain here this time around. it is all to play for as mike colleagues steven gordon reports. some friendly competition on the golf course, a place really short on opinion. today's topic, the election. snp, i told you. sometimes you're all over the place,
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that's the labour party. the tories are so far right, i cannae vote for them. so i'm stuck with them. that's my snp drive, straight down the middle. the snp have such a hold, which i don't think they should have, because of the way they've acted, they've not solve any problems. in fact, they've made a lot of the problems worse. and it has become very difficult as to who to vote for. polarised views that reflect the wider debate in scotland. the question of independence never far away. i don't know if she should mention it as much as she's doing. i'm a fan, by the way. but i think she should put that on the back burner at the moment. the scorecard at the last westminster election contained some impressive snp numbers, 56 mps elected, compared to just one each for the conservatives, labour and lib dems. as the third largest party
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at westminster, the snp success was unprecedented, even coming close to repeating that was always going to be a challenge. there are now attempting to do so in a very different political climate. it's just got a bit more difficult for the party. some of the enthusiasm for the yes campaign has dissipated, not least because, some of them voted to leave the european union, and that's to some degree put distance between them and the snp. nicola sturgeon is not so popular, and the scottish government's domestic record is also the subject of some dissatisfaction. a nearby gymnastics club provides another measure of that appeal. our time should be spent on processes in scotland and working on education, which they have had the opportunity to do. concentrate on the dayjob. i voted for independence, in the referendum, and i would do so again, just because i feel the powers for scotland should be decided in scotland.
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the snp is the party that's obviously fighting for that. everyone agrees the snp will win this election in scotland. assessing the scale of that victory and its wider consequences will start as soon as the handshakes are over. steven godden, bbc news, east renfrewshire. joining me now is mark from the polling organisation, thank you for joining us in the ring. the snp won 56 of the 59 seats last time around. what do you think from what you hear in the polls the outcome could be this time in terms of losses for the snp? undoubtedly, the snp will win the election in scotland. but with a reduced majority, i expect. both in terms of the vote share, where they got 50%, in 2015, which is
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unprecedented. they are down around the sort of early to mid 405, so some fall off there. the main issues that have been the tories. what we don't know yet, but what the exit poll will tell us a bit on thursday night, which we will find out on friday morning, is how that affects the seat and attribution. 5-12 seats for the tories? somewhere around tho5e, there are 5eat5 for the tories? somewhere around tho5e, there are seats in the borders where the snp majority is paperthin, borders where the snp majority is paper thin, actually, so it won't ta ke paper thin, actually, so it won't take much to out 5eek paper thin, actually, so it won't take much to out seek the snp candidate. in the north—east, there are some interesting 5eat5 around murray, aberdeenshire and so on, where the snp'5 margin, the majorities are much better, where the tories will hope that 5wing5 majorities are much better, where the tories will hope that swings to them are much larger than the national picture shows, 5o therefore, they will hope to oust therefore, they will hope to oust the likes of angu5 robertson and so forth. but the majorities are quite
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considerable. let's have a quick chat about the lib dems and labour, both on one seat. the bookies seem to think the lib dems could do well this time. the lib dems are really concentrating their fire on the area5 concentrating their fire on the areas where they think they have a chance, 5o areas where they think they have a chance, so here in edinburgh and edinburgh we5t, they have ploughed a lot of resources into that seat, they won the seat in holyrood, 5o they won the seat in holyrood, 5o they think they have a good chance. labour will be happy to hold on to edinburgh south. there are another couple of seats where they might have an outside chance. but at this 5tage, have an outside chance. but at this stage, it is watch this space. thank you for braving the rain to come here to talk about the election in scotland. as we were saying, a different race here, dominated largely by the constitution, whether people want to see indy ref two as it is called, and the brexit negotiations. the snp saying they can provide a strong voice for scotland. they are the party saying they want to stay in the union and
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make sure the snp don't get the opportunity for that second independence referendum. all to play for in this election, which may pan out differently, and it will depend on turn out what we see when we wake up on turn out what we see when we wake up on friday morning. but from a very wet edinburgh, back to you. very un—summerlike, as you have just seen very un—summerlike, as you have just seenin very un—summerlike, as you have just seen in edinburgh. if you are out on the roads, take care, because there is the potential for some travel disruption due to the persistent rain and the strength of the wind. more on that in a moment. the heaviest rain has been in the south—east this morning, but the emphasis now on the far north and scotland, where the rainbow continue all day. gale force winds across
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england, some showers going into the afternoon, it will not be a great one in terms of the feel of things. highs ofjust 18 one in terms of the feel of things. highs of just 18 degrees one in terms of the feel of things. highs ofjust 18 degrees in the south—east. the wind will ease through this evening and overnight, rain lingering across northern england and much of eastern scotland, but then brighter conditions developing from the west. wednesday will be drier with some sunshine coming through, and slightly warmer, but not for long, more wet and windy weather set to arrive before the end of the day the south—west. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12:32 —
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the third suspect who carried out the attacks in london on saturday night has been named as youssef zaghba, a 22—year—old italian of moroccan descent. it's being reported that he was stopped from travelling to syria last year. scotland yard says detectives have also arrested a 27—year—old man in barking, in east london, this morning in connection to the attack. the address is being searched. one of the seven people killed in the london bridge attacks has been identified as a nurse from south australia. the family of kirsty boden — who was 28 — said she'd run towards the bridge to help those who'd been injured. people across the country observed a minute's silence at 11:00 this morning in remembrance of those who lost their lives and all others who were affected by the attacks in london on saturday night. the political row over police
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numbers intensifies, as the mayor of london warns that planned cuts to the number of police officers will make it harder to protect against future attacks. the third london bridge attacker has been named. he was youseff zaghba, a 22—year—old italian of moroccan descent. italian media say he was stopped from travelling to syria last year. the two other attackers were named yesterday as pakistan—born khuram butt and rachid radouane, both from barking. my colleague, jane hill, is at london bridge for us now. as we've been reporting, scotland yard is facing questions a lot of questions about policing,
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resources , a lot of questions about policing, resources, and the security services today. as we've been reporting, scotland yard is facing questions over a decision to downgrade an inquiry into one of the other men behind saturday's attack — khuram butt, a known extremist who'd been monitored in the past by the security services. we can now speak to mohammed shafiq, from the muslim anti—extremism charity the ramadhan foundation, who says he argued with him at a protest in 2013. he's in salford. thank you for your time, and i am interested specifically in information about khuram butt, you run into him at once, explain what you know about him. in may 2013, i was at college green doing a bbc news interview when i saw khuram
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butt, and i went over to confront him. ifelt that butt, and i went over to confront him. i felt that this was a man who has spent many years qualifying terrorism, encouraging violence, celebrating the brutal killing of innocent people in our country, and here he was, trying to be interviewed on television and tried to celebrate the fact that lee rigby had been killed. and i had a debate, and khuram butt shouted out in an arabic term for traitor, and cold me a government stooge. so we know that this circle of people has been actively involved in glorifying and celebrating terrorism, yet our authorities, despite the muslim can mean it is reporting that, have not done anything. the government
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cutting police numbers and police budgets is a serious problem, but more importantly, what information did the security services no? what did the security services no? what did they do with that information? what lessons can be learned? we cannot allow what happened on saturday and what happened in manchester to happen again in our country. what the security services would say is that they did monitor him, but there was no sign that he was planning an attack. they may have been aware of his attitude, his opinions, but there was no concrete evidence that he was planning something. what tuc to that? the prime minister said that she thought authorities were too tolerant of extremism. what do these people have to do before the authorities take action? we have had so many terrorist attacks in our country, going back to july terrorist attacks in our country, going back tojuly the 7th two today. it is not good enough for the
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authorities to say they were not plotting a plan. we know that they we re plotting a plan. we know that they were plotting a planned because they have killed so many people on our streets. it is not good enough. the authorities have to take action, and so authorities have to take action, and so do we in the muslim community. it is no longer acceptable to say it is not a problem for the muslim committee, it has got nothing to do with us. we have to confront the ideology of violence and bring them to justice because unless we do that they will put more of our citizens at risk from terrorism. at that time when you had that confrontation with him, at that stage, what would you have liked the authorities to do? if he had not actually done anything concrete, are you talking about internment? are you talking about locking someone away? i am julius about what actually could or should have been done —— i amjulius. —— i
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am curious. these people for years have been involved in glorifying terrorism, and there is already a low against that. we do not need a new low, it's just needs to be applied by the authorities. —— a new low. if you think that that should be celebrated, then i think you are a sick individual and i make no apology for that. our children might because up in terrorist activities, and parents worry about that, and i will not apologise for my consistent record against terrorism. thank you. let's ta ke
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record against terrorism. thank you. let's take a few minutes to talk about the people who were killed on saturday night, seven people killed from all over the world. we have heard a little bit from the former girlfriend of james mcmullen. heard a little bit from the former girlfriend ofjames mcmullen. he was a londoner, 32 years old, and he died here on saturday night. his former girlfriend attended the minute's silence observed here at 11am this morning. she spoke to journalists after the silence. he was so journalists after the silence. he was so kind, he was incredible. he was so kind, he was incredible. he was so was so kind, he was incredible. he was so sensitive as well, the most sensitive man. and when did you hear about what had happened? when i was at my mum's and my sister heard that
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she had been missing, and my sister rang my mum to tell her, and i overheard it on the phone. ijust had a bad feeling, i knew something would have happened because he would have called or something. ifeel angen have called or something. ifeel anger, but i cannot let that override my feeling of love for james in my memory. that is not what he would have wanted. i am an extremely angry person, but because i have been with james i know that i cannot let anger when. you cannot, because things like this happen, and thatis because things like this happen, and that is because of anger. you have to just have love, that is all there is left. the former girlfriend of james mcmullen, one of those who died here on saturday night, clearly
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extremely distressed as so many people are in the wake of this attack. you can see the blue tarpaulin behind me, that is where the hired van drove into pedestrians. people are still weighing flowers at that point. there has been an increase in flowers left following the one minutes silence at 11am. many people still in hospital as a result of the actions of three men here on saturday night, who were all shot dead by armed police officers. we will keep you up—to—date with the investigation, but back to the studio now. the former leader of the liberal democrats, nick clegg, has launched a scathing attack on both labour and the conservatives over their plans for brexit. he accused theresa may and jeremy corbyn of not being clear with voters, and of collusion in their shared vision for a hard brexit. we are no closer today than we were a month ago to knowing what mrs may or mr corbyn really believe britain
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will look like after brexit. yet the brutal truth is that both of them have already made fateful choices about britain's future while refusing to explain those choices to the british people. strip away the contrast in tone and the differences in language, and a striking reality emerges. both the conservative and labour positions on brexit are now more or less identical. we can now speak to our political correspondent, chris mason, in cheadle, where the liberal democrat leader, tim farron, is campaigning this afternoon. chris, frustration from nick clegg that labour and the tories are giving no offer to the public rather
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than a hard brexit, but when you look at the polls, it does not look as though talking about brexit is serving the lib dems particularly well. yes, and that has been the fundamental challenge for the liberal democrats. at the beginning of this campaign, the prime minister's pitch was that the justification for an election was brexit, and give her a bigger majority to make more —— as some people are sceptical about. some people are sceptical about. some people are sceptical about. some people are claiming that the uk should be tied to youtube as closely as possible, and have a second referendum at the end of the brexit process “— referendum at the end of the brexit process —— tied to europe. what we are seeing is a return to all of the main parties to their big arguments, the one that they think they have
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stated positions on, and brexit is clearly one for the liberal democrats. i am clearly one for the liberal democrats. iam in clearly one for the liberal democrats. i am in a care home in cheadle in a seat which is a conservative and liberal democrat marginal seat. the liberal democrats are keen to win it back from the conservatives, pressing on the social care, since we saw that you from the prime minister having announced a policy in her conservative manifesto and then doing a u—turn on it, saying there would be a cap on social care cost without putting a price on it. tim farron has been here making his pledge for putting up income tax to ensure that social care could be funded. this room is set up to look like a funded. this room is set up to look likea pub. funded. this room is set up to look like a pub. we have the table football here, and i have still not
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managed to score a goal. this is a specialist dementia care home, to try to allow the residents here to have the memories provoked of the past. there is a small shop out in the garden, all of the cottagers have street names, and there is a post box as well. the idea is that as people have shorter term memory losses, memories of early in their lives can be provoked by villager landmarks that are scattered through this home. the liberal democrats are using this as a backdrop to try to talk about their two policies that they are keen to emphasise in this mad dash towards polling day. brexit and social care are there remain to policies. the ukip leader has just given a
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speech in central london saying that he will increase prison guards. here is part of what he had to say. we must open a debate to whether we should routinely arm our police forces, particularly in major cities. at least, we must double the number of armed police officers as soon as number of armed police officers as soon as possible. some have said that some of my proposals have been extreme. however, i make no apologies for taking nothing of the table to ensure that our people are kept safe, whether this includes tagging or in the future detention orders. paul nuttall of ukip. some are breaking news from the high court in glasgow, the former rangers
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owner, create whyte, has been cleared of fraud. he had been accused of fraud in the may 2000 and 11. -- accused of fraud in the may 2000 and 11. —— craig whyte he had denied that charge under the companies act. it had been alleged that he had pretended to the then owner, sir david murray, that funds were available on an uncontrolled basis to make all payments for acquiring a sta ke to make all payments for acquiring a stake in the glasgow club —— a controlling stake. he had pleaded not guilty, and the judge controlling stake. he had pleaded not guilty, and thejudge had told thejurors to keep not guilty, and thejudge had told the jurors to keep clear heads, and he has now been cleared of a fraudulent takeover of the club. we will get more reaction to that and bring it to you. now the headlines —
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the third suspect in the london attacks has been named as youssef zaghba. he was stopped when to go to syria in 2016. an australian nurse, ki rsty syria in 2016. an australian nurse, kirsty boden, is the third person who has been named to have died in the attack. australian police say that they are treating a siege is an apartment in the city of melbourne as a terrorist incident. police shot and killed a lone gunmen who had been holding a woman hostage on monday. another man was found dead in the fire.
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authorities say there is no evidence so authorities say there is no evidence so far to suggest it was a co—ordinated attack. in 2009, the man was accused of planning to attack an australian military base. he has since been imprisoned for violent crimes. last night, he came to this apartment block to meet a female escort. on the way in, he shot a male apartment worker before ticking the woman hostage. he calls a local tv station, claiming to work for both islamic state and al-qaeda. islamic state have since claimed he was acting for them. we are aware that they have claimed responsibility, but they always tend to claim responsibility every time something happens. the siege ended after he
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started shooting at the police, who returned fire and killed him. australia's prime ministers says that the attack as part of a growing threat, but also questioned why he had been released from prison in november. he had a long record of violence. a very long record of violence. he had been charged with a terrorist offence some yea rs he had been charged with a terrorist offence some years ago, and had been acquitted. he was known to have connections, at least in the past, with violent extremism. he was a known violent offender. how was he on parole? the siege brings back painful memories of 2014's sydney attack in which two people died after being taken hostage by gunmen. he was on bail at the time, and was
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known to have extremist views. in melbourne, the police are still trying to piece together how much planning went into this attack. and whether there were any warning signs that meant it could have been prevented. the state of the nhs is consistently one of the most important problems in the mind of voters. in a training hospital in bradford, two people who love the nhs. two people who agree the nhs needs help. i am a 33-year-old junior doctor working in cancer medicine. they disagree about the best way to help this patient. the current government is cutting the
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nhs budgets on a historical level. that is not true, is at? it is. sustainability and transformation partnerships, they plan to close one in six acro55 partnerships, they plan to close one in six across the country. the real amount of money being spent on the nhs has gone up and up. it is unbelievable the crisis in the community. people died in my day, too, and it was as heartbreaking for as as young doctors and consultants as as young doctors and consultants as it is for you today. but the way in which you are unable to get people home, where they want to be, is entirely the fault of the last labour government. what you are failing to recognise, gordon, is that waiting lists went dramatically down, mortality went down under the labour government. we have lost 50% of our bed5 5ince labour government. we have lost 50% of our bed5 since the 19805.
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labour government. we have lost 50% of our beds since the 1980s. this obsession with hospital beds is unfounded. it is history, the patient wants to be at home, not in a hospital bed. opening more and more hospital beds is not the answer. go to manchester, they have taken over the whole of health care from general practice, community care, the lot. manchester health service ministers do not go whingeing to whitehall, they sorted out in manchester. asked manchester what their deficit is. you're talking about devolution, devolving responsibility for a crisis. the party i trust most to sort out the nhs now is the conservative party, without any shadow of a doubt, because they are trying to bring the delivery of care and administration back to a local level. the
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absolutely cannot be trusted, jeremy hunt cannot be trusted, he has ove r5een hunt cannot be trusted, he has overseen a humanitarian crisis. the labour party wa nt5 overseen a humanitarian crisis. the labour party wants to fund it properly and staff it properly. we are seeing none of that in the conservative party manifesto. everything is not going to be fine with the nhs. i work in it, i see it every day. this election will be about whether or not the nhs exists in five years or not. 40 years ago, i felt the way that she does about the nhs, i was very worried about its future, but 40 years later, the british people have made the nhs work. they will always make the nhs work. as pa rt of as part of our election coverage, at 5:35pm on the bbc news channel, we will be speaking to the commissioner of plaid cymru, adam price. you can
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get in touch on twitter or by e—mail. coming up, the news at one o'clock, but first the it has been a miserable starts to tuesday, wednesday in excess of 50 mph. ido tuesday, wednesday in excess of 50 mph. i do not expect it to improve much. heavy wind and gales expected to continue as we go through the afternoon. the heaviest rain has beenin afternoon. the heaviest rain has been in the south—east, but brighter conditions following on from the west. a different story from scotland, an area of low pressure sitting across the far north—east, and the rainbow linger here for much of the afternoon. —— the rain will
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linger here. scattered showers and blustery winds through northern ireland, gusts of wind still possible in excess of 40 mike to 50 miles per hourfurther possible in excess of 40 mike to 50 miles per hour further inland. possible in excess of 40 mike to 50 miles per hourfurther inland. —— 45 to 50. blustery conditions elsewhere, some showers heavy, possibly with hail and even some thunder. top temperatures disappointed by this time of year, factor in that wind, it is not going to feel great out there. the wind. to ease down through the night as the area of low pressure slowly moves north and east, but it will linger across north—east england and eastern scotland for quite some time. elsewhere lows of 11 celsius, a quieter start to wednesday, and thatis a quieter start to wednesday, and that is the theme. eventually that will pressure will move away, we will pressure will move away, we
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will see a brief ridge of high pressure building, before more wet weather waiting in the wings for the end of wednesday and on to thursday. wednesday will be much better than today, wind still coming from a north—westerly direction, so just making it feel a little bit fresher, and some rain arriving into the south—west by the end of the day. highs of 20 celsius if we are lucky. more wet and windy weather arrives on to thursday, showers and longer spells of rain throughout the day. the third london bridge attacker is named — 22—year—old youssef zaghba — an italian of moroccan descent — lived in east london. italian authorities had reportedly tipped the british off about him. this morning a minute's silence was held across the uk
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people who were killed in the attack and the dozens of people who were injured. an australian nurse, kirsty boden, is the third victim to be named. her family say she was killed as she ran to help others during the attack. another australian, 21—year—old sara zelenak, has been missing since saturday — her aunt says they're fearing the worst. she's one of those people who doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong. she's amazing and she's 21 years of age.
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