Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  June 6, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

6:00 pm
they are dangerous individuals, and that information was passed on to $015, counter—terrorism police. police raid a house in ilford, only one of the 13 people arrested since the attacks is still in detention an australian nurse — kirsty boden is the third victim to be named — herfamily say is the third victim to be named — her family say she was killed as she ran to help others during the attack. she never saw bird in any witty, even if they were having a bad day, kirsty was the person who was going to help you smile. around the country, another minutes silence to remember the victims of terror. superb emblem brothers agent from jos buttler, helps to put england in good evening and welcome
6:01 pm
to the bbc news at six. the metropolitan police have named the third man who carried out the deadly attack on london bridge. he was 22—year—old youssef zaghba, who was an italian national of moroccan descent. it's emerged that last year italian authorities stopped him travelling tojoin so—called is in syria. it is being reported in italy that he was placed on a watchlist and the british authorities were tipped off. tonight there are questions about how one of the other two killers — khuram butt — slipped through the net after he'd been investigated two yea rs net after he'd been investigated two years ago. our home editor mark
6:02 pm
easton reports. the faces of a self appointed death squad, we now know the identities of all three men who went on a killing spree in london on saturday night, today, police naming youssef zaghba is the third member of the gang, born in morocco, to a moroccan father and italian mother, 22 years old, he recently moved to these london where he worked in a restau ra nt, london where he worked in a restaurant, last year he was stopped by security forces at bologna airport, in italy, on suspicion of trying to make his way to fight in syria, literature relating to so—called islamic state was in his bag. based on the italian terror watch uk police today said neither they nor mi5 regarded him as a person of interest. in italy, a prosecutor claimed today that british authorities had been tipped off about youssef zaghba, who lived at this house in bologna, one of his relatives said he hoped to find a job in the uk. translation: he went to london, he was away for two or three months and then he came back, he was here for a
6:03 pm
month and then he told his mother, i'm leaving, he there is nothing and in london i can work. the fact it was a terror suspect in italy adds to the pressure on british security services to explain why they were called blind ahead of saturday's terrible attack, another member of the gang, khuram butt, was well—known to police and mi5, fronting searching questions as to whether more could or should have been done to prevent mass murder. we will look at how this, how the processes we re will look at how this, how the processes were followed, what they did. they will be wanting to look at that, they want to learn lessons for the future, if there are lessons to be learned. he appeared in this channel 4 be learned. he appeared in this channel a documentary. on radical islamist, last year, linking into extremist preacher anjem choudary, now injailfor extremist preacher anjem choudary, now in jail for encouraging support for so—called islamic state. despite this, security service interest in him was scaled down. the bbc has described his cv, he describes
6:04 pm
himself as a motivated, said bass ellis and trusted individual who has worked in security, welcoming guests and securing buildings. he worked on the london underground last year, but claimed his responsibilities included assisting customer evacuation where necessary. in pakistan today, his uncle said he was ashamed and said his nephew ‘s victims were constantly on his mind. i don't know why he would do this. what they would do this. who would know anyone to push them and to hit them. nobody knows. some have suggested the killings might have been prevented if any of the men had been prevented if any of the men had been subject to a court order known asa t—pim, been subject to a court order known as a t—pim, restricting freedom of
6:05 pm
terror suspects not convicted of a crime. the man who until recently officially reviewed let is legislation for the government said they would need thousands of orders to stop such attacks. they have been useful and they could be used more, if that is what police and mi5 decide is appropriate but they will never be used on a mass scale and thatis never be used on a mass scale and that is because they are designed for people in respect of whom we have strong evidence that they are involved in terrorism. more detail emerged today about the last member of the three—man gang, north african born rachid redouane, living in dublin for a time before relocating to east london and married to a british citizen. was this where he lived? a british citizen. was this where he lived 7 a house british citizen. was this where he lived? a house in ilford was targeted and a counterterror operation earlier today. at iiam, britain was encouraged to stop for one minute, to pause and reflect on the events of saturday night. through the minds of many will run the question, why did this have to
6:06 pm
happen. joining me from new scotland yard is our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. looking back, in each of the last three terror attacks, at least one of the perpetrators has been known to authorities. it is all having a rather familiar ring to it. to authorities. it is all having a ratherfamiliar ring to it. did not ta ke ratherfamiliar ring to it. did not take us long today to find out that the third of the men to be named, youssef zaghba, had been stopped by italian police at bologna airport in march, last year, on his way to turkey, leave to be travelling to syria. they did not have enough evidence to prosecute but they had put him on to the europe—wide information system, the schengen information system, the schengen information system, the schengen information system, accessible here in the uk, and italian prosecutors insisted they had also told british intelligence officials directly. scotla nd intelligence officials directly. scotland yard would not comment on that today, but yesterday, they did tell us that the first of the men to be named, khuram butt, had been investigated by them and mi5 since
6:07 pm
2015, and investigated by them and m15 since 2015, and of course, that, that, that led to him slipping down the list of priorities, because they had not seen any evidence of attack planning. that is the problem we have got, it used to be the security services were looking out for men trying to get hold of bomb—making equipment, trying to get hold of weapons. all these men had to do was go to be and queue, hire a van and get hold of some knives, you could have planned it in an afternoon. —— b&q. that is very difficult to spot. as we heard, across the country, from glasgow to cardiff and london, a minute's silence has been held to remember the victims of saturday's attack. today australian kirsty boden became the third victim to be named. and, in the last few minutes, a french national who was killed, alexandre pigeard, french national who was killed, alexandre pigea rd, has french national who was killed, alexandre pigeard, has also been named. alison holt reports on how
6:08 pm
the second time in a fortnight people have been paying tribute to those killed and injured in an act of terror. v0|ceover: a time to voiceover: a time to remember, a time to reflect on an attack at the heart of london. time to stand together, on the streets where it happened. the ambulance crews who fought so ha rd to the ambulance crews who fought so hard to save lives, london's mayor, at their side. manchester, still roar from the violence inflicted here, just two weeks ago. —— raw. and beyond.
6:09 pm
in these quiet moments, for some, the anguish is too much. nicola smith wanted to remember her ex—boyfriend. james mcmullan was one of the seven people killed on saturday, and she is struggling to understand why. i feel anger, saturday, and she is struggling to understand why. ifeel anger, buti can't let that override my feeling forjames and our memories, because i know that is what he wanted. me, asa i know that is what he wanted. me, as a person, i am extremely angry. because i have been with james, i know that i cannot let anger when. and today, 28—year—old australian, ki rsty and today, 28—year—old australian, kirsty boden, was also named among those who died, she was a newly
6:10 pm
promoted senior nurse at guy ‘s hospital, who ran to help others that night. there was absolutely nothing at all she would not do for somebody. she never saw bad in anybody. even if they were all having a bad day, kirsty was the person who was going to make you smile. others are still missing, including a woman working in london asa including a woman working in london as a nanny, she is also in london, she is is trailing, and herfamily have heard nothing of sara zelenak since the attack. she doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong, she is amazing, a very spirited person, she is 21 yea rs very spirited person, she is 21 years old. and for those caught up in the attack and their families, there remain many questions still to be answered about what happened. in the days since the london bridge attack, stories have emerged of extraordinary courage, notjust among the police,
6:11 pm
but by onlookers caught up in the atrocity. as our special correspondent lucy manning reports, they had just seconds to react and they did so without thinking of their own welfare. stabbed in the side of my stomach and chest. i have got slashes on the neck, head, and here. a football fan, roy, a man who took on the terrorists with shouts of, "i'm millwall!" i said, john not getting in here! i don't know why i did it, but i did. i said, don't attack the children and families. —— i said, you're not getting in here. the police were firing on them, straightaway, as i was turned black
6:12 pm
and blue. for me, stopping them getting in there and hurting a lot of people, being shot around me... feel quite bad myself. doing what i did. a spaniard also fought the three attackers, with his skateboard, and he is still missing, he has been named as ignacio echeverria. his friend will was with him and he did not want to be identified. he did not even think about it, he just jumped identified. he did not even think about it, hejustjumped in and was hitting the terrorists. -- will. he was hitting them with his skateboard, several times. the next thing i remember, itried to approach the group, then i realised they had knives, and one of them stabbed my friend. he is a hero. bloody hero, cracking man. isaw
6:13 pm
stabbed my friend. he is a hero. bloody hero, cracking man. i saw the policeman running to tackle them. as soon policeman running to tackle them. as soon as policeman running to tackle them. as soon as he got to the group, he got knocked. if the policeman in that moment had a gun, everything would be solved. nobly would have been injured. the family of ignacio echeverria say they are in pain and they are appealing to spanish and british authorities for information. this guy is a real hero, you know why, no you are, i'm being real. jeff ho, with friends sitting up in a hospital bed, the stab wound in his hospital bed. thejournalist a hospital bed, the stab wound in his hospital bed. the journalist who used martial arts skills to tackle the terrorist, chatting about boxing. rj ward has got the skills, he is going to prevail! fight! in a statement today, mr ho described how he took on the attackers.
6:14 pm
i think ithinkl i think i got a hit in on one of them, but either he or the accomplice got me with a shot to the throat. terrible injuries for many, the scars from fighting back. a leading organisation in the fight against extremism in britain has revealed that four years ago a staff member was involved in a confrontation with khuram butt, one of the three killers. dr usama hasan, of quilliam international, reported butt to counter—terrorism police. he's been telling our special correspondent, ed thomas, about his surprise that nothing was done. known to police, known to m15, and today, the bbc has been told of another warning, that corum but was another warning, that corum but was an extremist. i had to run for my safety a nd an extremist. i had to run for my safety and for my life that day. this man says he came face—to—face with the london attacker, at a familyfunfair in with the london attacker, at a family funfair injuly with the london attacker, at a family funfair in july last year during eid. he said, how do you come
6:15 pm
toa during eid. he said, how do you come to a muslim event, you are a nonbeliever, he began screaming abuse at me, he said, you take money from the government to work against muslims. you spy on muslims. you believe in gay marriage! and you are an apostate. his family took these photographs of khuram butt at the festival, moments later, violence. physically, what did he do? he tried to assault me, iran at me, he ran at me within its ration of hatred in his face. did he touch you? a scuffle broke out and at one point, i pressed into the ground. he says that he ran, while his family took more pictures for evidence. he believes he was targeted because of his work countering extremism at the foundation. full of hate... ifelt intimidated. enter he was kicked out of the local mosque. banned from the local mosque for causing trouble. did you ring the police straightaway?”
6:16 pm
for causing trouble. did you ring the police straightaway? i ran 999, as you do. i said, "i've been the victim of an assault." he had also says he told officers he believed the man who attacked him was part of the man who attacked him was part of the banned islamist extremist group, al—muhajiroun. the banned islamist extremist group, al-muhajiroun. yes, itold the banned islamist extremist group, al-muhajiroun. yes, i told them, the banned islamist extremist group, al-muhajiroun. yes, itold them, i said in my view they are a threat to national security. they must be monitored they are clearly part of the pro—isis network. monitored they are clearly part of the pro-isis network. what happened? he was cautioused and tracked down after six months and cautioned. i feel desperately sorry... we asked the police to respond to these allegations. last night i couldn't sleep. i felt very upset and angry that we, as a society, had not been able to stop this man. regret, because within six months khuram butt had killed seven people, injurying dozens more. our political editor laura
6:17 pm
kuenssberg has been looking at how it is affecting a campaign that has seen it is affecting a campaign that has seen not one but two terror attacks. a spot of rain after seven weeks on the road, not enough to put them off. has everyone got one? placards at the ready as the pm was about to arrive, but the subject is serious — security. after the london attacks. reporter: morning prime minister. morning. who do you trust to maintain your national security? somebody who has boasted that he has opposed every piece of anti—terror legislation since he came into parliament. yes, shame on him. or me and the conservatives. as home secretary i put through strengthened anti—terror legislation. secretary i put through strengthened anti-terror legislation. do you fear, as many be members of the
6:18 pm
public might do, that there were intelligence failures in this case or do we have to accept in 2017 that, no r no matter how hard we try, some terrorists may slip through? is the police and security service have done a good job in foiling a number of plots, just five in the last three months, and a significant number since in the last few years. they will want to learn lessons for the future. if there are those lessons to be learnt. thank you very much everybody. thank you. with repeated questions on her record, security could be a hindrance as well as a political help. we have the tory party having to ask very serious questions about whether or not the security was good enough. we answered those questions. people feel safer in their beds supporting theresa may. i certainly do. for all this looks like a traditional election campaign. thank you. it has been anything but. two terror attacks, disrupting the oh so casual conversations. the smile for
6:19 pm
the cameras. but that hasn't dimed the cameras. but that hasn't dimed the corbyn crowds enthusiasm. jeremy corbyn is cheered to the rafters almost everywhere he goes. just as theresa may faces questions about her security record he, too is under pressure. everywhere we go, the crowds get bigger... how would labour plan to combat terror? i'm worried if they haven't got the resources to do the job. there has to bea resources to do the job. there has to be a report on both manchester and london as to what level of information was available on those people and then be decide if more resources a re necessary people and then be decide if more resources are necessary in order to prevent this sort of thing happening again. you can't cut 20,000 policemen off the beat and expect the same security you had before they were cut. that'sjust not possible. it's not the ideological approach that theresa may is taking that we have to police people's minds. it really is about the numbers of people on the ground. minds. it really is about the numbers of people on the groundlj think we need to just look after each other. love one another. i think that's more important.
6:20 pm
strident bely different tone from ukip. islamist extremism is a cancer within our society and it is a cancer that needs to be put out. also on the back foot in the campaign, the lib dems, urging caution. sadly, we discovered that those people guilty of the pathetic, cowardly murders in manchester and london in the last fortnight are people known to the security services. the question is not intelligence and new powers, it's having the resources to keep us safe. security, the one issue that matters in every corner of the country. we have an opportunity in scotla nd country. we have an opportunity in scotland to send a real message about the kind of country that we wa nt to about the kind of country that we want to be. theresa may's on the ropes in this election. it's no longer inevitably she will get a bigger majority. events, events mean this elections has not gone according to her carefully worked out plan. in an election that after all she didn't have to call. laura
6:21 pm
kuenssberg, bbc news, telford. so security may be dominating the closing stages of the election campaign, but overall it's been the economy, the nhs and brexit that have divided the parties. so where do each of the parties stand? in a moment we'll hearfrom do each of the parties stand? in a moment we'll hear from our health editor hugh pym and our europe editor, katya adler, but first here's our economics editor, kamal ahmed. whether you're a voter out shopping or battling to be the next prime minister, there are three big economic challenges that are pretty familiar. that living standards squeeze, the state of the public finances and that brexit deal. the parties have laid out pretty different approaches, but there is one central promise from all of them — they will balance the books, they say, when it comes to government financing. the conservatives say that only they can provide the foundations
6:22 pm
for a strong economy, for enhanced workers' rights and a good brexit deal. but critics say that a theresa may win would only lead to harsher levels of austerity for longer. for labour, the talk is all about a fairer economy. fewer cuts, more public investment. yes, they say, that borrowing would rise and there would be higher taxes for the wealthy and for business. when it comes to the eu, they say they want a close relationship. the big challenge, do their sums add up? now for the liberal democrats, they have also pledged an increase in income tax and have said they will reverse those public sector pay freezes. for the snp, they want higher taxes for the wealthy and more investment in those public services. whoever we vote for on thursday, the economic challenges will remain. economic growth is slowing, prices are going up. quite frankly, there are no easy political fixes. the election debate on the nhs
6:23 pm
is largely about england, health is devolved and the administrations in scotland, wales and northern ireland don't have elections this time. money is the dominant issue, how much more will be needed to cope with rising patient demand and the complex health needs of an ageing population? the conservatives say they'll spend a bit more than under current plans. labour and the liberal democrats are planning bigger funding increases, paid for by specific tax rises. but some health think tanks say none of them have come up with enough. staffing and recruitment is another major challenge. labour and the liberal democrats both say they'd end pay restraint to allow bigger pay rises for nhs staff. the conservatives want to see thousands more mental health staff recruited. as for social care, the debate's been dominated by a row over how much people should have to pay to be
6:24 pm
looked after in a care home or for carers to go to where they live and how much of the bill the state should pick up. longer term, in varying degrees, the larger parties have all called for greater health and social care integration. well that's fine in theory, but it certainly won't be easy to deliver. brexit will be a huge issue for whoever ends up in here, one of their firstjobs will be to appoint a chief brexit negotiator, pack them off to brussels and get them to agree with the eu how often they'll meet, what they'll talk about and in which order before real negotiations can begin. the new government will be under big time pressure because under eu rules it only has until march 2019 to agree an exit deal, never mind a future relationship, trade or otherwise, between the uk and the eu. the larger parties differ considerably in their approach approach to brexit.
6:25 pm
theresa may promises to be "a bloody difficult woman." the conservatives want out — out of the european single market and out of the customs union. whereas labour wants to retain the benefits of the single market and customs union though it wants to curb european immigration. the liberal democrats insist that the brexit deal must be put to a popular vote. whereas the snp want a new independence referendum, so scotland can stay inside the eu. and ukip has been campaigning on a promise to hold the new government to account over brexit. whatever happens in these elections, the new prime minister and government will largely be judged on what kind of a brexit deal they can get and what impact it has on lives here. some of our bbc editors complaining a few of the issues at the heart of the election. you can read more details about where the parties stand on a special section on the
6:26 pm
bbc website. visit bbc.co.uk/election2017. the actor george clooney and his wife amal have become parents to twins. amal clooney gave birth to ella and alexander this morning. george clooney‘s publicist said the twins are "happy, healthy and doing fine" and joked that "george is sedated and should recover in a few days." time for a look at the weather, here's louise lear. hello. hi. it felt like autumn when we stepped outside this morning. we have seen images like this. bizarre forjune. the reason these trees have been swept aside, the gusts of winded that we see widely across england and wales today, in excess of 50—60mph in many places. we have also seen heavy, persistent rain. look at this shot from st andrews in fife. it will continue to rain in scotla nd fife. it will continue to rain in scotland this evening, through the night, and in eastern scotland first thing tomorrow morning. bulk of the rain will clear away, it will be windy with squally showers. this rain in scotland that is the real
6:27 pm
issue through this evening, as much as 100 mm, four inches of rain could fall before it eases away. it will do so. the gales will start to ease away through the night as well. quitening down out to the west. we still keep the persistent rain clinging to the far north—east of scotla nd clinging to the far north—east of scotland first thing tomorrow morning. some will be heavy. eight to 11 degrees to start. there will be more sunshine in the story for tomorrow. lighter winds. with the sun it will feel better. yes, the rain will continue up into the far north—east for a time eeshgsing into the afternoon. north—westerly breeze might make it feel cooler on those coasts in scotland, 15 degrees for northern ireland,. of northern england, dry with sunshine. if we are lucky we will get sunshine to the south—east, 19-20. get sunshine to the south—east, 19—20. could be betterfor this time of year, nevertheless, it's better than today. the cloud, the rain gathers to the south—west and for
6:28 pm
south wales. another system will move in as we push into thursday. it will bring wet and windy weather sitting across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england. sunshine and showers follow on behind it. george. thank you, louise. that's all from the bbc news at six, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines. the third man to carry out the london bridge terror attack has been named as 22—year—old moroccan—italian youssef zaghba. a minute's silence has been held across the uk for the seven people who were killed and the dozens of others injured, in the attack on saturday. one of those who died was a nurse from australia,
6:29 pm
who ran to help some of those who'd been injured.
6:30 pm

53 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on