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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  June 7, 2017 5:30am-5:46am BST

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this is bbc world news. the headlines: theresa may and jeremy corbyn are making their last pitch for votes ahead of tomorrow's uk general election. the party leaders are spending the day criss—crossing the country as they seek to galvanise their supporters and win over wavering voters. the uk's security services are under mounting pressure after it emerged they were warned about the third london bridge attacker. he's been named as 22—year—old youseff zaghba, a moroccan—italian man who lived in east london. welcome back to westminster. i'm james menendez. we are here lies, just outside the houses of parliament. the leaders of all the main political parties are embarking on the final day of campaigning in this election and the polls will be opening in a little over 2a hours from now and here's a snapshot of the main issues facing uk voters. in the wake of the three terrorist attacks in britain in recent months, security is high on the agenda.
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this includes looking at police numbers and fighting extremism. also, brexit and how the uk negotiates leaving the eu. talks with brussels will fundamentally change britain's relationship with europe, and it'll also affect the issue of eu and global migration. what will brexit mean for eu citizens living in the uk? there's also the question of rules on work and benefits for immigrants. a major concern for voters is healthcare. addressing funding for the national health service, accident and emergency delays, and operation waiting times. brexit negotiations will be one of the biggest challenges for whoever leads the next british government. how is it all likely to play out? here's our europe editor, katya adler. it's almost been a whole year since the uk blindsided the eu by voting
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to leave the european club. since then, there's been a lot of anger, a lot of banks, a lot of insult throwing, but face—to—face negotiations? none. and the clock is ticking loudly. under eu rules, britain's new government only has until march 2019 in order to agree a brexit deal. impossible, says eurocrats, to get all that done and dusted in such a short timeframe, but the government will be under pressure to give it a go. still, as saying goes, it takes two to tango, 01’ saying goes, it takes two to tango, or in the case about 30, because you have the united kingdom on one side, and on the other, the remaining eu member states, 29 of those, plus the eu commission, and the european parliament as well. all of them with their bargaining chips up their sleeves. that is a very bad pun, but we are in belgium, and chips and mayonnaise — very much part of the national diet. and here is the
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blast. the very first thing the government has to do on brexit is choose the chief brexit negotiator. they then have to come to brussels and agree how often they are going to meet, what they are going to talk about, and in which order. the eu is very clear about its priorities. they say there will be no talk about future trade negotiations until there's been progress in three key areas. money. how much written owes the eu in outstanding financial commitments. people. tv wants to pinpoint the exact rights of european citizens living in the uk and british citizens living in the eu after brexit. and ireland, how to avoid reintroducing a hard border between the republic of ireland, which is in the eu, and northern ireland, part of post— brexit uk. 0f course britain's new government will almost certainly have their own ideas about the choreography of
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brexit talks. whatever happens, they will bejudged on brexit talks. whatever happens, they will be judged on the quality of the brexit deal they get, not from the brussels prospective, but in the eyes of british voters. so brexit and the business deals to come. what that means for the economy are among the major issues for vote rs economy are among the major issues for voters here in the uk. to talk more about this, i'm joined by communications advisor richard griffiths and market strategist david buik. good morning to you, bright and early by the houses of parliament. richard, are you happy in general terms about the level of debate there's been about brexit in this campaign? i think it's been a really poor debate and a frankly. for me, what's been most interesting from the communications perspective has been the toll, frankly the appalling tone we've seen from theresa may and the conservative leadership. they've come out with vacuous platitudes. i mean, phrases and slogans that are com pletely mean, phrases and slogans that are completely meaningless from the get
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go. wrecks it means brexit. yesterday theresa may told us she wa nted yesterday theresa may told us she wanted to reignite the british spirit, and i think the challenge has been really giving some substance to those kinds of phrases, andi substance to those kinds of phrases, and i think that's been very misguided from a communications perspective, and obviously in the last few days the debate has changed. now the focus is on what the conservatives might do regarding increasing antiterrorism laws. but i think, for me, what has been really woeful has been the level of debate with regard to particularly the slogans we've seen. the tone has been, i think, slogans we've seen. the tone has been, ithink, unnecessarily aggressive. theresa may has told us she is not scared to be a bloody difficult woman. was that necessary? david, you are a man who likes courtesy. i understand and sympathise with what he is saying about to reason may, and i think the campaign has been very poor indeed,
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but there's been an electoral reason why they've ta ken but there's been an electoral reason why they've taken that attack. starting off withjohn why they've taken that attack. starting off with john goodacre, why they've taken that attack. starting off withjohn goodacre, all the people who will be negotiating — pretty horrible leading up to this, but all of a sudden, having looked very vulnerable, they've got the dutch situation sorted. emmanuel macron is in france, angela merkel is likely to win the action in october, so all of a sudden they are flexing their muscles, and this unnecessary rhetoric is coming out. basically the european union and the united kingdom has to stop this jingoistic nonsense. we need this to work, and it will, but it will require very sensitive negotiations without any question. on negotiation, i think mrs may is wrong. immigration is a very serious pa rt of wrong. immigration is a very serious part of our economy. of course we wa nt part of our economy. of course we want our borders controlled and of course we don't want the european
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justice making our decisions, but the fact remains it's the wonderful students coming over here, that the national health service needs them, the idea you can get to tens of thousands over the next few years is fanciful. do you think this matter has been settled with the electorate, and that's perhaps why it hasn't played so big in the sense that, although there are clearly many in this country that don't want it to happen, there are probably more that want it to happen, and the politicians know that? and you have this strange situation where the leaders of both parties on paper where remainers, but they are basically on the campaign trail saying we have to get out.|j basically on the campaign trail saying we have to get out. i think most people have accepted brexit will happen. some people will be listening to us, ridiculously someone listening to us, ridiculously someone like me, saying, this is a citizen of the global, metropolitan elite, which i find deeply offensive. what we are now going to see is those people who want a very
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strong leader, particularly in the context of the attacks we've seen over the past few weeks, and they will vote for theresa may. i have a bigger concern. like david, i'm concerned about the impact this campaign has had on business. yesterday i was having lunch with a french executives here in london. she is appalled by the level of the debate that we've seen. there's a sort of exclusionary expect to it that simply doesn't fit with us as a global britain. that's what's really damaging. we need it engineers from portugal, france, germany, and business is scared of the lack of engagement from the conservative leadership with mainstream british business. the conservative to's selling point has always been that they are the party of business and they are the party of business and the labour party cannot be agreed with that side of things. the labour party cannot be agreed with that side of thingslj the labour party cannot be agreed with that side of things. i agree, but richard has to concede that this isa but richard has to concede that this is a phoney war. sabre rattling
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about negotiations? yeah, with the heads of agreement of wary want to start and how we should do it. i do think, once we've sorted this out, there's been a lot of comment in the press, certainly the ft, that the two parties are noti million miles apart on where they think the agreement should come, and i find that kind of rhetoric, particularly from the financial times, which is obsessed about remaining, actually making the point that, hang on, let's not terror each other's eyes out, rip the skin off each other's faces, because we've got an awful lot to gain. we have a £40 billion trade deficit in favour of the european union. are they going to say, don't need you, we will do it elsewhere? say, don't need you, we will do it elsewhere ? can you say, don't need you, we will do it elsewhere? can you see the domino effect? likewise the city of london, the rhetoric about thousands of people going to paris, dublin and amsterdam. it's not going to happen. cool heads may prevail. calm down, dear, is the expression! went to
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reason they called this election, it was to strengthen her hand in those negotiations —— when theresa may called this election. it's not been evident from the polls, which have been pretty evenly spread. if she doesn't get that thumping majority, how difficult will those negotiations be? i think there is a phoney war going on, and let's see whether she gets the 100 seat majority that she was originally hoping for. the question is, if the polls, which are shelling a narrowing of the gap between labour and the tories, are proved correct, mrs may may not be the leader of the conservative after tomorrow. so there have been people planning... let's see if david's prediction of a 60 seat majority will be proved incorrect. i think there's all to play for, but we will know more on friday. just a point i really like,
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and it's important that we labour it. we need continuity. it's what business likes. thinking and planning what they are going to do, andl planning what they are going to do, and i think david davis is a top bloke, and if you are going to have somebody that takes us through very tricky situations, particularly if the prime minister is a little prickly without being rude, he has got a very calm head on very broad and old shoulders, and he would do a greatjob. and old shoulders, and he would do a great job. but it's the type of continuity we need, which is a much more pragmatic tory government, if for instance the tories are to remain in power. it's got to be more pragmatic, open and willing to engage, not this horrendous rhetoric we've seen in recent weeks. the last chance i'll have to ask you both what your predictions are. 20 seat majority. 60. for the conservatives. many thanks for joining majority. 60. for the conservatives. many thanks forjoining us. and you can get the very latest on the british election by heading
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to our website: you are watching bbc news. for many of us voting will mean popping down to the local school or library. but spare a thought for remote communities who will have to travel the extra mile to have their say. lorna gordon has been to the inner hebridean island of eigg to visit the people who use one of britain's most remote polling stations. i'm ona i'm on a journey to an island where they cherish the right to vote. around 100 people live on eigg. 0n this small isle, elections are a big thing. the turnout here has, it's rumoured on some previous occasions,
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reached 100%. postal voting can prove convenient for many, and across the country it's on the rise. but the pace of life is different here. i vote in the polling section and the fact that you are putting your croissant and putting it in the box, you are doing your bit, and you feel like you've contributed, and nobody can take that away from you. there's power here at the local level. it's 20 years since the people bought out the island, taking control of the land. so how close do they feel to the parliaments where national power resides? edinburgh feels a long way away, and westminster even more so. because of the community buyout 20 years ago, we feel a lot more conscious that people can effect a change, and the democratic process can work, so i think people here are more politically engaged. while it can
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feel very distant here from the frenzy of the campaign on parts of the mainland, islanders are determined to make sure their voice is heard when it comes to this is bbc news. i am sally bundock. here are the latest headlines: theresa may and jeremy corbyn are making their last pitch for votes ahead of tomorrow's uk general election. the party leaders are spending the day criss—crossing the country as they seek to galvanise their supporters and win over wavering voters. the uk's security services are under mounting pressure, after it emerged they were warned about the third london bridge attacker. he's been named as 22—year—old youseff zaghba, a moroccan—italian man who lived in east london. as we have a ready mentioned, it is
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the last day of campaigning in the uk general election. let's discuss that in more detail on world business report. with voters feeling the pinch and concerned about brexit, we weigh up the economic policies of the main parties. and going, going, gone: uberswings the axe and sacks 20 members of staff following an investigation in to sexual harassment.

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