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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 7, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello — this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the final day of general election campaigning, as political leaders make one last push for your vote. opposition parties round on the prime minister as she declares she'll change human rights laws to fight extremism. a day before the polls open, we're talking to representatives from all the main parties throughout the morning. good morning — it's wednesday 7 june. also, the home office comes under pressure to explain why one of the london bridge attackers was allowed back into the uk, despite being on a watch list. i'm live here at warwick castle. in sport, it's two wins from two
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for england in the champions trophy — they're through to the semi—finals after beating new zealand in cardiff. our marriage keeps you healthy, couples faring better with heart disease than those were single. for most people, a dry, brighter and warm day. the day feel more like june and yesterday did. first, our main story. the final day of campaigning in the general election will see the party leaders on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain, in a last push for votes. the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security following the london bridge attack. last night, in a speech widely criticised by her opponents, theresa may said if the conservatives are re—elected, she would scrap any human rights laws that prevent her from introducing tougher anti—terror measures. here's our political correspondent tom bateman.
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just one day to go in and it is over to you. the closing stages of this campaign have been dominated by the argument over security. theresa may said last night the conservatives would toughen up anti— terror laws. i mean longer prison sentences for those convicted of terrorist offences. i mean making it easier for the authorities to deport foreign terrorism suspects back to their own country. and if our human rights laws stop us from doing it, we will change the laws so we can do it. its opponents accused the tories of changing direction on human rights laws. their manifesto promises to stick with the european system that protects people's rights. the conservatives denied a u—turn. the liberal democrats accused them of a nuclear arms race on terror laws while labour said they would pay for more police.
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theresa may has announced nothing new today. she's been banging on about her dislike for human rights for a very long time. that's not the message we should be sending to communities or terrorists. what we need is more money for policing and four prisons. —— for. after a campaign called three years early marked by unforeseen events, this is an election none of the parties will be taking for granted. let's go to westminster. but specifically talk on this last final day of campaigning on this announcement by theresa may, but there is last detail. labour immediately cried foul, saying it was another conservative u—turn. the liberal democrats criticised to meet
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—— theresa may to what they said was a nuclear arms race on terror laws. the conservatives have flatly denied that, saying they will not be pulling out of the european convention on human rights, the european system which protects people's rights. they want legal opt outs of certain aspects. theresa may's team was saying this is not a last—minute policy change, the facts are the terror threat has changed so much since the beginning of the campaign, theresa may wanted to make clear that if elected, she would be prepared to change the law. so we've just got over 2a hours to go before the polls open and i imagine it will be busy. what can we expect? the party leaders will be criss—crossing the country in the final push. 2a hours to go. jeremy corbyn will be making campaign scots in scotland —— stops in scotland and wales and
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england, reinforcing labour's message on public services, highlighting plans for £37 billion of extra funding for the nhs, warning the nhs cannot cope with another five years of what he says is conservative austerity. theresa may will be campaigning along the south coast and in the east of england and east midlands. she will be pledging billions of pounds the housing and infrastructure and of course returning to the conservatives core message in this campaign that to make a success out of brexit, you need to have those strong negotiations and strong people around the table doing those negotiations. it will be a hectic day with the party is trying to galvanise their own members but also trying to win over any wavering voters who haven't yet made up their minds. thank you very much. yesterday was a politician free zone on the programme. it is not so this
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morning. we are speaking to all the main political parties. including jeremy corbyn at 740. damien green from the conservatives at 810. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch list. the italian authorities said they had issued warnings about yousef zaghba, whom they suspected of supporting the islamic state group after he tried to travel to syria. nick quraishi reports. these are the three men who brought terror to the streets of london in a matter of minutes. the third confirmed as youssef zaghba was an italian national born in morocco who lived in east london. the 22—year—old wasn't regarded as a security threat by police or mi5 that today questions for the home 0ffice. youssef zaghba was stopped at bologna airport last year on suspicion of travelling to syria. italian police say he was placed on a watchlist british authorities tipped off.
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border security staff are accused of still allowing him to return to the uk. the home office has declined to comment. the australian government says two of its nationals are among the seven people killed. their names haven't been officially confirmed. kirsty boden, a senior nurse at guy ‘s hospital, murdered as she ran to help people who'd been knocked down on london bridge, described as selfless, caring and heroic. the family of sara zelenak, a nanny from brisbane, say they are fearing the worst. she is one of those people that doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong. she's amazing, and she's 21 years of age. french media have confirmed the death of alexandre picard. sebastien boulanger‘s family have travelled to london to find out what has happened to the chef. desperate days for so many you've found themselves caught up in this tragedy. an update to you. detectives
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investigating the london attack of arrested a 30—year—old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford in east london. prince harry has paid tribute to the victims and survivors of the london terror attack as he marked 100 days until the next invictus games in australia. the prince, who is patron of the sporting event for injured and sick service personnel, offered his condolences to the families of the australian victims. i would also like to start by sending my thoughts to those affected by saturday's attack on london bridge. australians form an important and vibrant part of the fabric of life in london and we are reminded of that in good times and in bad. 0ur reminded of that in good times and in bad. our hearts go out to the victims, their friends and families. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed have arrested a 38 year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation.
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he's the 19th person to be arrested, but only seven are still being held under the terrorism act. detectives say they've found evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi, had stored parts for his device in a white nissan micra seized in rusholme. australia has matched what is believed to be the longest period of economic growth in the world. latest figures released overnight show that the country's economy has avoided a recession for 25 years and 9 months, matching a record set by the netherlands. a host of showbiz names willjoin family and friends for a memorial service for ronnie corbett at westminster abbey this afternoon. the comedian and entertainer died last year. he was 85, and his comedy career spanned six decades. the service will include readings from famous friends including michael parkinson and joanna lumley together with tributes from fellow comics rob brydon and jimmy tarbuck. good news if you're married.
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apparently eing married appears to be good for your heart. a 14—year study of nearly a million people at risk of developing heart disease found that those who were married fared much better than those who were single. researchers from aston medical school found that married people with high cholesterol were i6% more likely to be alive at the end of the study. it also found that married people with diabetes had a i4% higher chance of survival. and married patients with high blood pressure were 10% more likely to be alive. researchers believe, although they cannot prove it, that a loving spouse may encourage you to stay fit and well. i suppose it is those research criteria, being alive helps. that's better than not being alive. clearly, c. and good news to people if you are married. i don't know why it delighted me. when we were
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talking about this earlier, what is it? what difference does it make? the answer was brilliant. she said nagging. you need somebody to nag you to do everything. do the washing up, whatever it is. somebody has probably done a similar survey. single people. no one is nagging them to put the things out. england's cricketers are tough to the semi—finals of the champions trophy. they beat new zealand in cardiff to make it two wins from two. victory over australia on saturday and they'll top the group and knock the australians out. in a couple of hours, the british and irish lions play their second tour match in new zealand. they face the auckland blues, with coach warren gatland looking for an improved performance after an unconvincing win in the opening game. the football association has issued lifetime bans to england fans for the first time, after two
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supporters made nazi gestures in the friendly against germany in march. they'll be barred from going to any away games. new zealand capsized in spectacular fashion to give great britain their first race win in the america's cup challenger semifinal but sir ben ainslie's team still trail 3—1 overall, with the first to 5 going through. and they are all 0k? they were all accounted for. a couple of moments after that happened when it was very scary. for everybody involved. they are all0k. scary. for everybody involved. they are all 0k. there is some repair work to do. one of the little jobs i haveis work to do. one of the little jobs i have is to bring the papers. am i going to have to start the nagging? it is your onlyjob. going to have to start the nagging?
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it is your only job. can we get them in? iforgot it is your only job. can we get them in? i forgot this it is your only job. can we get them in? iforgot this morning. it is your only job. can we get them in? i forgot this morning. then we go. thank you so much. shalli do mine? i want to show you this in the daily mirror. andy cole, footballer, who as you might remember has been suffering from ill health recently. he disappeared from public view. lots of people commented he had put weight on. he couldn't work out why, what was going on and listen to this, he was nagged by his wife to go to the doctor who discovered he had a very serious kidney complaint. he has had a transplant, the kidney from his nephew, and now he is returning to full health. that is a couple of months ago. a few months to go before he knows how it is going to look. three more months of testing. this headline. it's only because his wife insisted that he we nt because his wife insisted that he went to the doctor, that you checked
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out. it's incredible. he went to the doctor expected to be checked out in a hospital in the doctor said, you are going home. you will notice already but its 24 hours until voting starts and that is the point we are right in the election campaign, it is reflected in some of the front pages in terms of their allegiances. the front page of the sun talking aboutjeremy corbyn and some of his connections. that is reflected in the daily mail and the daily express. the daily mirror have gotan daily express. the daily mirror have got an interview with jeremy daily express. the daily mirror have got an interview withjeremy corbyn. they are also talking about this man who was allowed back into the uk despite being on what is called a watchlist. we will talk about that as well with the various politicians we have. the front page of the
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times. the daily telegraph. we will pick up some of these issues. damien green will bejoining us. he was pick up some of these issues. damien green will be joining us. he was a former police minister also immigration minister. any questions being asked about how people, and one of the attackers, youssef zaghba, he attempted to leave italy, to go to syria, and was allowed to come here to the uk. the front page of the guardian talking about theresa may's comments last night about human rights laws in the way of the terror attack. this is a picture of kirsty boden and we understand that she ran towards danger to help those injured during the terror attack and actually herself died. and it is the stories in is in it that really bring it home. issues around security are now
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dominating things, so in a way, we look to sport. i am bringing us story here from andy murray. i like him a lot and this makes me like him even more. this is an interview he gave at the french open, saying that he does not want to be eight tax exile. he is always on the road, he barely gets to come home. most of the world's top tennis players are tax exiles. he says he wants to be near his family and friends and stay at home, the money doesn't matter to him. he is doing all rightjust now, isn't it? he has been doing better. he is doing really well now, warming up he is doing really well now, warming up nicely for wimbledon. let's catch up with the weather. we know what it was like yesterday here in salford. it was chilly and rainy. it certainly was. the scene outside
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the window was already showing a big improvement on yesterday. here are some of the wind gusts we saw across the country, peaking just outside sheffield at 63 mph. we don't normally see winds like that at this time of year. it was notjust normally see winds like that at this time of year. it was not just the wind either, it heavy rain has been a feature over the last 36 hours. in edinburgh 83 millimetres has fallen. that is well over what we would normally see during the whole month ofjune. this area of low pressure responsible is close by at the moment and is still producing rain. it will take a bit longer for you to cheer up it will take a bit longer for you to cheerup in it will take a bit longer for you to cheer up in scotland as far as the weather is concerned. heady bursts of rain in the northern portions of the grampians. strong and gusty winds in eastern scotland and into northern england. further south we are seeing the sun already coming out, and lots more sunshine even further south than that. more than we saw during the whole day yesterday. the wind is still on the blustery side and much cooler than we have been used to. in the west
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the wind is starting to ease down, the wind is starting to ease down, the morning showers fading away, and we will see some good sunny spells. make the most of the morning and early afternoon sunshine in wales in south—west england, because we will start to see cloud and patchy rain pushing on. at the same time we can see those clearer skies coming into eastern scotland and certainly north—east england. temperatures this afternoon on the chilly side with the wind across north and east scotland. into this evening and overnight, outbreaks of rain coming and going across much of england and wales. more persistent on the hills in the west, clearer conditions over northern scotland. this is where temperatures will drop the furthest. elsewhere it will be a milder start to this morning. lots of cloud around, out wrecks of rain, and we are dragging ourup around, out wrecks of rain, and we are dragging our up from the south—west in and around this weather system. that will bring in damp weather for thursday. if you are in the south—east corner or east anglia, not a bad day in school. —— in store. 0utbreaks
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anglia, not a bad day in school. —— in store. outbreaks of rain elsewhere across england and wales, heaviest across the north and the west. a day of occasional rain in northern ireland. scotland should stay dry in the north. 20 celsius in the south—east corner. a quick look on friday. rain lingering in scotland, back to westerleigh and south—westerly winds, a blustery day with sunshine and showers. —— westerly winds. it is 6:19am. it has been 51 days since prime minister theresa may called a general election. this morning we are speaking to seven of the major political parties. first, it's the greens. their main manifesto pledges include holding a referendum on the term of the brexit deal, with the option of staying in the eu. a move towards a four—day working week and a universal basic income. and scraping university tuition fees, while funding full student grants. the co—leader of the green party, jonathan ba rtley joins now in the studio.
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thank you for coming in. thank you for having me. this election campaign has been extraordinary for many reasons, taking us to places we weren't expecting to go. i want to ask you about the comments by theresa may last night, in connection with, well, the way this has been reported on is that she is prepared to rip up human rights legislation in order to free herself to do more about terrorism. what are your thoughts on that? pretty weak leadership. we are waiting to find out what actually happened, we are waiting for the investigation and the results. to make those kinds of judgement at this stage is entirely inappropriate. what we know is that after the terrorist atrocities, the terrible events like we have seen, there is always a tendency to have a knee—jerk reaction, that we need to be stronger and clamp down more. we also know that those freedoms are the very things we need to be protecting. as evidence emerges, it
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seems that we were aware, perhaps, of some of these people. human rights issues were not the issues at the centre of this. it was a resource in issue. if we had been able to put the intelligence around those people who were suspected, if we have not had the decline in some of the resourcing, we can see what comes out of the investigation, but that seems to be the issue we should have addressed. lots of people in this election campaign, it has been short but many —— about a very unusual in many ways, they are seeking certainty. can you give us a sense of certainty about where the greens are in relation to brexit and theissue greens are in relation to brexit and the issue of a second referendum? yes. people in my family voted both remain in to leave. i think they did so remain in to leave. i think they did so with the right intentions. both wanted to see a better country. but they also recognised that this is they also recognised that this is the biggest decision since the second world war. we look at brexit harderand harderand we second world war. we look at brexit harder and harder and we realise how
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ha rd harder and harder and we realise how hard it is going to be. we know that we may well lose £6 billion per year from ending freedom of movement. it is only right, if we are going to give a ratification vote to mp5 is only right, if we are going to give a ratification vote to mps in the house of commons, then it should surely go to the british people. this is the biggest decision we have made ina this is the biggest decision we have made in a generation. surely it is rightly put it to the british people, and let's trust the british people. lots of people are confused, many of the things that you want are replicated by the labour party. renationalising the railways, scrapping tuition fees, more money for public services. take just those three, why would somebody vote for the labour party, given that they stand a realistic chance of being in power? why not vote for them? let's go back to the 2015 election. we saw a big vote for ukip. they only got one mp. two years later, we effectively saw ukip running the government. ukip said jump, effectively saw ukip running the government. ukip saidjump, the government. ukip saidjump, the government said how high? even though they only had one mp, because of that vote share that the
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conservatives are trying to vacuum up conservatives are trying to vacuum up for themselves, they shifted the whole direction of the country. the greens have done the same thing. in 2015 we got more votes than ukip did, but the labour party are still not making the right choices. there is no commitment to proportional representation in a modern back —— modern democracy in the 215t century. you cannot tackle air pollution while expanding roads and airports. no commitment to the big ideas like the basic income reform and the welfare state, looking at how we change our working patterns and working lives. it is only the green party looking ahead and saying, we have this wave of automation coming in, you will have to think about how we tackle those job losses. but we're not going to waste £110 billion renewing trident, which labour says would probably never use. that is pointless, isn't it? let's use that money to give a kiss of life to the nhs. we have to look at the money that labour are proposing to spend. it is not really enough. everybody knows how much has to be invested in the nhs. we are
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going to have to go so much further to create a 20 per century health service. on a lighter note, it is wednesday today. it is. which day is the day that you do not want to be pa rt the day that you do not want to be part of the working week? we want to give people choice and flex ability. that is part of being realistic about the 215t century. we have busy lives, we have job shares, like i do with caroline lucas. that is already happening in the civil service, in business, in the charity sector, in westminster. people need those choices. we lead complex lives. let's put the power and people's cans. we will leave it there. jonathan, thank you. to find out more on what all the parties are pledging in this election, head to the bbc website at bbc.co.uk/news/election. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. 0r share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using the hashtag #bbcbrea kfast or follow us for the latest from the programme. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning, it's a question many of us want the answer to. what are the political
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parties planning to do with the taxes we pay? steph has been finding out. she's with the butty van at warwick castle. girder morning. how gorgeous is this? look at this beautiful mediaeval castle here in warwick, built—in 1068 mediaeval castle here in warwick, built—in1068 by william the conqueror. what else would you expect outside a castle in the morning except for some sort of fighters? we have a couple of knights rehearsing for a show they are doing. is this a regular occurrence for these two? every morning. nothing like to wake up in the morning. we are rehearsing for war of the roses live year rat warwick castle. white roses versus red roses. these guys are just showing you a couple of moves from the show. you have more later on, somejousting? the show. you have more later on, some jousting? we have to courses andi some jousting? we have to courses and i do somejousting up and down the rail. we have stunt riding and jousting, you will see to make guys going at it, trying to hit each other. is there something going on
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through the summer? this place as hundreds of thousands of visitors every year doesn't it? this is one of the finest mediaeval castles in england. it is a huge tourist attraction. we open on the 22nd of july and go through the summer holidays. daily shows, seven days a week, two per day. we have your‘s is trevor shay. we have a birds of prey show. and obviously we have the big war of roses show. we are talking about the election and we have some guests coming to talk about that. have you decided who to vote for you? well, you have to choose your side, lancastrians or yorkists. you? well, you have to choose your side, lancastrians oryorkists. i you? well, you have to choose your side, lancastrians or yorkists. i am swinging towards the conservatives at the moment but i'm still on the fence. excellent, well, thank you for your time this morning. we will be talking about this through the programme. we have the butty van with us. we are going to be talking about tax and how much tax we pay. all the different forms of tax. i will be explaining where that money goes and how much of it comes into the government. first this morning,
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let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. detectives have released cctv footage of two man they believe are responsible for the fatal shooting of montana abdu last month. two masked attackers on bicycles opened fire at a playground in kilburn where the 20—year—old was meeting some friends. crimestoppers is offering a £10,000 reward for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of her killers. drinking more than the recommended weekly limits of alcohol can harm a person's brain health, according to london researchers. the study conducted at university college london discovered that the more people drink the more likely they would experience a form of rain damage affecting memory. it looks at the alcohol consumption of hundreds of civil servants over a 30 year period. guidelines say that men and women should not drink more than 14
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units each per week. let's look at travel situation. a good service on the tube this morning. a reminder that london bridge station has now fully reopened. 0n the trains, great northern services have now resumed between finsbury park and moorgate following earlier delays because of overrunning engineering works. 0n the roads, let's look at the london bridge area. this is a high street, which is now fully reopened. the police cordon is now much smaller. southwark street is still close between southwark bridge and southwark high—street, and borough market itself is not reopened yet either. elsewhere, the m3 is close between junction four fifths and junction for the camberley. that is because of emergency repairs to overhead power cables. in full, the traffic lights are not working on fulham broadway at highwood road. we also have traffic lights problems on holland road at shepherds bush, at holland road at shepherds bush, at holland park roundabout. now let's get a check on the weather. good morning. after the strong winds
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from yesterday, a brief bit of respite today. drier and brighter conditions, with some sunny spells. still quite breezy, at least for the morning, but gradually the breeze will start to fall away. patchy cloud around but some decent spells of sunshine. dealing pleasantly warm in the sunshine. we are looking at a maximum of 20 degrees in central london. 0vernight tonight, it is all change began. it starts off 0k. gradually these showers will move in from the west, heavy showers through there. quite a mild night, 14 or 15 celsius is the minimum temperature. quite a murky start tomorrow morning with low cloud around. you may feel some spots of rain, but mostly dry for the morning itself. through the afternoon, more chance of light rain and is all. the maximum temperature tomorrow is around 19, maybe 20 celsius. it stays rather unsettled through friday. the chance of some showers around, at least through the morning. intentionally drying out later on. —— potentially. as we head
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into the weekend, the temperature recovers. quite a humid weekend, lots of cloud around and the potential for some lots of cloud around and the potentialfor some rain. the temperature could reach 22 by sunday. i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in halfan latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, plenty more on our website at the usual address and bbc radio london. for now, back to charlie and louise. hello — this is breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. coming up on breakfast today. it was an incredibly emotional moment for everyone watching the one love manchester concert at the weekend. we'll meet the schoolchildren from parrs wood high school who performed with ariana grande. also this morning, this is one of the most remote polling stations in the uk.
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we'll find out how engaged voters are on the inner hebridean island of eigg. and after nine, it's a feat no one has tried before — moving a giant research centre on antarctica. we'll meet a scientist from the team who had to tow it for 14 miles because of a crack in the ice. the final day of campaigning in the general election will see the party leaders on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain, in a last push for votes. the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security, following the attacks in manchester and london. at a rally last night, theresa may said if the conservatives are re—elected, she would scrap any human rights laws that prevent her from introducing tougher anti—terror measures. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster for us this morning. this seems like a last minute announcement, is there anything
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concrete behind this? labour immediately cried foul, claiming the conservatives were making another u—turn, the liberal democrats criticising theresa may for what they said was a nuclear arms race on terror laws. the conservatives said that wasn't the case, there wasn't a u—turn. sources we re case, there wasn't a u—turn. sources were saying she wasn't making up policy on the hoof but the terror threat had changed so substantially from the beginning of the campaign, she still —— simply wanted to say to the electric that she would be prepared to change the laws and sources said the conservatives were not trying to pull out of the european convention on human rights, the system which protects the rights of people, they said they wanted a legal opt out of certain areas. of people, they said they wanted a legal opt out of certain areasm is not yet seven o'clock but they
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are out and about. that's right. the party leaders are criss—crossing the country today as they enter the final 24 hours of the election campaign and theresa may has already been this morning at a market in east london, the spitalfields meat markets. she is going to be travelling down to the south coast of england, the east of england and across the midlands as well. she will be highlighting plans to put billions of pounds into housing and infrastructure and of course returning to the conservatives core message that you need somebody who is strong around the negotiating table when it comes to brexit. jeremy corbyn is going to be started in scotland, making campaign stops in wales and england and he will be highlighting labour's message on public services, plus —— pushing the message of £37 billion extra for the nhs if labour were to get into power. also warning the nhs could not cope with what he says was
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another five years of conservative austerity. a busy day the politicians, traipsing up and down the country is those party leaders and the parties try to galvanise their own voters but also win over any wavering voters who haven't made up any wavering voters who haven't made up their minds. we'll be speaking to all the political parties throughout this morning's programme. inafew in a few minutes' time, we will be speaking to ukip. and jeremy corbyn as well. yesterday was a politician free zone but not today. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch list. the italian authorities said they'd issued warnings about yousef zaghba after they suspected that he was a supporter of the islamic state group who'd been trying to travel to syria. in a further development,
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detectives have arrested a 30 year old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford, east london. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed, have arrested a 38—year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation. he's the nineteenth person to be arrested, but only seven are still being held under the terrorism act. detectives say they've found evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi had stored parts for his device in a white nissan micra seized in rusholme. australia has matched what is believed to be the longest period of economic growth in the world. latest figures released overnight show that the country's economy has avoided a recession for 25 years and 9 months, matching a record set by the netherlands. that's amazing. a host of showbiz names willjoin family and friends for a memorial service for ronnie corbett at westminster abbey this afternoon.
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he was 85, and his comedy career spanned six decades. something completely different. it sounds like a bit of a joke. a peacock walks into an off—licence and... poor peacock. makes quite a big mess. this particular bird — captured on cctv — caused nearly £400 of damage after it wandered into a liquor store in california. after quite a lot of flapping and a little bit of swearing from the person trying to catch it the peacock was eventually escorted off the premises and released back into the wild, unharmed. the chapters gotten that. i think thatis the chapters gotten that. i think that is the safest way to the peacock, isn't it? the paul burt.
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safely, goes away. i wonder what he went in. was the peacock drunk? no, they said he went into. you are slurring. they heard the word peacock. sorry, iapologise slurring. they heard the word peacock. sorry, i apologise to all peacocks out there. two wins from two took england's cricketers through to the semi—finals of the champions trophy. they beat new zealand by 87 runs in cardiff — half—centuries from hales, root and buttler guided england past the 300 mark before liam plunkett took four wickets to finish off the kiwis‘ chase. they'll top their group and knock out australia, if they beat them on saturday. if we truly i can be contenders for this tournament, we need to be the best teams in australia are one of
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the best teams. they seem to produce limited overs cricket well so to go into a limited overs cricket well so to go intoa game limited overs cricket well so to go into a game like that with an attitude of them and winning is important to us. the british and irish lions face a tough challenge this morning — they take on the auckland blues, one of five games against high—quality super rugby sides before the first test. after a scrappy win over the provincial barbarians in their first tour match, a side which was made up of mostly amateur players, today will be a real step—up. they can play from anywhere. they are fairly efficient with a set piece. they want to attack the ball in hand so i think we will be ready for that and we've got to prepare and try and play our own game, we can't sit back and watch them because they got some fantastic players as you saw on friday night, offloading and scoring from six or seven metres so offloading and scoring from six or seven metres so we offloading and scoring from six or seven metres so we ideally won't be allowing that to happen. the
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friendly match in dortmund was marred by bad behaviour by some of the fans. the football association has vowed to clamp down on what it uses a new generation of hooligans. andy murray plays his french open quarter—final against japan's kei nishikori later today. and because of rain yesterday, all four of the men's quarters will be completed today in paris. there was time for some women's tennis though, and it was bad news for the former world number one caroline wozniacki. the pole beaten by a rising star in the game, 19 year old yelena 0stapenko from latvia. chris froome has downplayed his chances of taking the lead in the criterium du dauphine in today's time trial he finished in the peloton on stage 3 yesterday as koen bouwman took the victory into tullins. the defending champion thinks his gap ofjust over a minute to the leader is too much to make up in the 23.5 kilometres today. great britain earned their first victory in the america's cup semi
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finals in the most dramatic circumstances yesterday. after losing a third race in a row to new zealand, they finally registered when their opponents dramatically capsized at the start of race 4. luckily all of their crew members were 0k. it leaves sir ben ainslie's crew 3—1 down in the best of nine playoffs. my my first thought was for the safety of the sailors on the boat and looking at the footage since, it is clear that there was a slight mist that —— misjudgement and admitted out of the water too much and went into an impressive pitch but i don't think anybody is passing criticism because these boats are so tough to sailand it can because these boats are so tough to sail and it can happen to anyone and asi sail and it can happen to anyone and as i said, the most important thing is the crew are safe and to fight continues. frantic work. they look so elegant
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when they are shifting through the water but not so much when they tip over. the conditions are really tricky out there at the moment. this morning we'll be speaking to all of the main political parties. now we're going to hearfrom ukip, whose main manifesto pledges include: completing the brexit process by 2019, without paying a divorce bill to the eu. cut net migration levels down to zero within five years, operating a one—in—one—out policy. cutting the foreign aid budget and spending it on domestic priorities like the nhs. john bickley, ukip's immigration spokesperson, joins us now. we are talking to seven different political parties this morning. the main issue which is in the news today about human rights and theresa may, saying she may change power and scraps and human rights laws. would
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you agree with that? if you go back to before these atrocities happened, we we re to before these atrocities happened, we were setting the agenda and saying there was an issue that islamic extremism, but we needed to do more about integration and of course we have these horrors in manchester and london. it seems the other part is onlyjust capturing —— catching up with some of the things we've been saying. louise casey last december made it clear there was a problem with integration. trevor phillips on channel for about what british muslims really think was pointing out there are issues there. we feel as though we have been vindicated for having the political courage to say, something has got to change. let's be specific. we don't have the specific details but if i could get what your thoughts are on human rights laws. what specifically are you talking about? people of all
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faiths were british citizens. because what is happening now is unpalatable. young girls being butchered on our streets. this is not something any of us thought would happen. we got to be careful we don't go too far. we need to stop being so tolerant of other people's intolerance. we have to stand up for british values and make short english law, british law is put into play, we need to stop what is going on. let us talk about immigration and policy. you say in five years, one in, one out. many people have been looking over immigration for the last few weeks and will question the last few weeks and will question the nhs, for example. many come from different countries. first and foremost, we don't want anybody to go back home. we've made it clear
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that the 3.2 million people from the eu, we want them to stay here but we hope that it can be done on the basis that the eu will allow british people there to stay there. another five, 600,000 people will be coming here in net immigration. we are not short of people. for the 22 years before labour came to power, we had balanced migration. how would you police one in, one out? we would set up police one in, one out? we would set up an immigration control of commission and ed job would be to prioritise visas for people who have got at least £30,000 a year. we have got at least £30,000 a year. we have got at least £30,000 a year. we have got a moratorium on unskilled label —— labour. got a moratorium on unskilled label -- labour. i'm interested to go back to your first answer. he talked about other parties reflecting what you have been talking about all the
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time, that you agree with theresa may. why would people vote the ukip rather than a party which has a realistic chance of being in power? you have hit on the problem in our electoral system. hundreds of thousands of people tomorrow will not be voting for the party they really wa nt not be voting for the party they really want to vote for. they have to play this tactical game of quake —— of voting for a different party to stop another party getting elected. if people knew we could get mps into parliament based on proportional representation they would vote us like they did in 2015. we should have had about 70 or 80 mps, based on proportional representation. but tomorrow people have to choose between the two main parties. so you fear they will not be voting to you? well, we have said, because brexit is important to us, that when you look at the two choices for the british people, theresa may needs to be given trust that she will deliver brexit. we are concerned she will not. john, thank you. we will be speaking to, i said,
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seven different political parties. we will hear from jeremy corbyn later as well as the lib dems. and you can read more on what all the parties are promising in their ma nifestoes, parties are promising in their manifestoes, all available on the bbc website. there is so much information out there. if you want to go through the ma nifestoes, there. if you want to go through the manifestoes, it is all there. matthew is going to look at the weather for us, and he matthew is going to look at the weatherfor us, and he is promising better weather. it couldn't get much worse. not a good day yesterday. it is like this across much of the uk today, but not all of it. look at this weather watcher shot from aberdeen shah. —— aberdeen shire. in edinburgh we have seen over a aberdeen shire. in edinburgh we have seen over a month and a half's worth of rain falling in the last 36 hours. it is onlyjust starting to ease off. this low pressure system is responsible, slowly pulling away now. we have seen those strong winds
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around it and in the past hour we have seen winds gusting at over 60 mph across eastern scotland. not a pleasa nt mph across eastern scotland. not a pleasant rush—hour at all. going further west, still blustery but much brighter. across northern ireland and north—west england, good sunny at feeling chilly in that strong and gusty wind. —— good sunny spells but feeling chilly. cloud breaking across east anglia as well. going further west, sunny skies for many this morning. winds lightest across wales in south—west england. make the most of your morning sunshine. it will cloud over in the afternoon. and outbreaks of rain will edge their way in. eastern scotla nd will edge their way in. eastern scotland and north—east england, as promised, things will brighten in the afternoon. blustery for a time, but things will eventually come down. it is still going to feel chilly in scotland, 12 or 13. at east anglia and south—east england should be much warmer than
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yesterday. a dry start tonight, outbreaks of rain spreading a radically across england and wales. persistent in the hills to the west. clearer skies in northern parts of scotland, so we will see the chilly as conditions there to take us into thursday morning, temperatures well down into single figures. in eastern england and the south—east we should have a decent day tomorrow, some brea ks have a decent day tomorrow, some breaks in the cloud. it should be warm enough. elsewhere across when and wales, occasional rain, persistent over the hills. maybe some front later on. northern ireland, rain on and off. northern scotla nd ireland, rain on and off. northern scotland stays dry, but still a little on the cool side. to take us through thursday night and to friday, weather fronts eventually moving from england and wales stop one still left over northern scotland, so after a dry and bright day here on thursday, cloudy and outbreaks of rain once again. but for much of you it will be sunshine and showers. that is how it is looking. it's a question many of us
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want the answer to — what are the political parties planning to do with the taxes we pay? steph‘s been finding out for us — she's out with the breakfast butty van at warwick castle. it looks stunning there this morning. what do i see behind you? good morning! this is a bit of jousting. look at this. we have been watching these guys practising, they are doing a show later on. this is the house of lancaster versus the house of york. lots of people come and watch this going on, it will be going all summer. hundreds of thousands of people visit this castle every summer. it looks spectacular, doesn't it? built in 1068 by william the conqueror. there isa 1068 by william the conqueror. there is a reason we 1068 by william the conqueror. there is a reason we are 1068 by william the conqueror. there is a reason we are here, we are talking about the election. i have the breakfast butty van year, and today we are talking about tax. lots of us are wondering, do i pay the right amount of tax? where does that
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money right amount of tax? where does that money go? this is something i have been looking into. tax. not many of us like paying it, and sometimes it feels like we are putting in a lot more than we are getting out. so where is the money coming from and what is it being spent on? you can see that a big contributor is income tax, £175 billion per year. not far behind, national insurance and vat. looking at government spending, you can see lots of money going towards social protection and health. also education and defence are big as well. that all amounts to about £750 billion every year. so how could people feel about the tax they are paying, and what the money is spent on? we have shorn and hannah here. does tax bother you? yes and no. it is taken out as a in the money, so i
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don't really notice it going. 0verall don't really notice it going. overall i would like to see the government tackle big corporations rather than individual people. liz, you think tax is a good thing?|j rather than individual people. liz, you think tax is a good thing? i do. it is not a punishment. it is the payment we give for living in this country. you think it should go up? as long as it goes to the right place. hannah, for you, it is about where the money is spent? yes, it is how it is spent. it needs to be spent wisely. national health was doing really well at 8.8% of our gdp. it is now falling down to 6.7% and thatjust gdp. it is now falling down to 6.7% and that just isn't gdp. it is now falling down to 6.7% and thatjust isn't going to be enough. ok, i will let and thatjust isn't going to be enough. ok, iwill let you and thatjust isn't going to be enough. ok, i will let you get inside. thank you. obviously the amount of tax you pay varies depending on how much you are earning. so let's take the average joe, or in our case, mr punch. now, this person is on a salary of about £26,000 a year. of that, they will pay out about £5,000 on things like income tax and national insurance.
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now, looking at what this person is spending their money on, they are paying about £2000 in vat, and £700 to things like alcohol and fuel duty. all of that adds up to a total of £8,000. about a third of your salary. so what about the rich versus the poor? is there any difference in the tax that they pay asa difference in the tax that they pay as a proportion of income? start additions have estimated what people with different incomes spend on different things. —— statisticians. if you look at the poorest households, or those with an income of about £15,000 per year, they are paying out about 35% in tax. at the other end of the scale, a household with £88,000 per year coming other end of the scale, a household with £88,000 peryear coming in, they are paying about 34%. so the numbers don't suggest there is a big difference. but some people feel that the tax system is unfair. ed, ui and economists. those numbers are averages and the system is much more
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complicated than that. all of this will depend on what that person spends, do they smoke, do they drink, are they driving a car? all of this has an effect on the amount of this has an effect on the amount of tax they pay. it is complicated. thank you very much. whatever your situation, tax is something we all pay in one form or another. in most cases, more than a third of our income goes on tax. given the current pressures on public services, it is unlikely to go down any time soon. so that is a flavour of what is coming in and where it is going when it comes to tax. but what are the different parties saying about it? sarah can tell us more about it? sarah can tell us more about it. other parties very different in terms of what they will do about taxing benefits those? different in terms of what they will do about taxing benefits those ?m seems like whoever is elected, there will be an increase in taxation. it just depends on who is elected as to who faces the brunt of those increases. in terms of the different parties, the conservative party, the telling thing that is missing from
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the manifesto is that they have drop the manifesto is that they have drop the promise not to change national insurance. so there is a chance national insurance will be raised. they have also pledged to protect tyrannosaurus are the increase of the higher rate tax will come up to £50,000 by 2020. labourare the higher rate tax will come up to £50,000 by 2020. labour are focusing on taxation on the higher end, so the top 5% of earners. anybody earning over £80,000 will fall into the 45% tax bracket, and they plan to introduce a 50% tax bracket again for those earning more than £123,000. the lib dems are spreading the pain around more evenly. they will increase tax on all three rates of income tax. that is a basic higher rate, and an additional tax rate, to raise £6 billion for the nhs. their long—term plan is for them to ring—fence that money purely to help. with all of this, everybody wa nts to help. with all of this, everybody wants something, there is so much pressure on the public services now, it is very unlikely that we are going to ever see taxes go down any
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time soon, isn't it? the other thing to remember is that the manifestoes will not have all the information on all the taxes. 0ver will not have all the information on all the taxes. over the years, every political party has been very creative in different ways of finding ways to take money off us, really. whether it is driving a car, alcohol, tobacco, there are always new ways, new and creative ways, to ta ke new ways, new and creative ways, to take money. the full story will not in the manifestoes. i do not think anybody expects that it will be. i think what is important to remember is to look more broadly at the aims of the different parties and to decide which one suits what you are looking for. thank you for your time. it is a bit windy out here. before we go, come and have a look at this. this is so interesting to watch. these guys, as i said earlier, are rehearsing at the moment. they will have this show going through the summer here. the house of york versus the house of lancaster. i will leave you with that adjusting going on. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news.
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a large part of the police cordon around the scene of the terrorist attack at london bridge has been lifted this morning. borough high street and the roads and areas east of the high street have reopened to the public, but borough market and a small surrounding area remain closed. a teenager has been stabbed to death in north london. the night so far this year. the victim, thought to be 17, died in totten yesterday evening. a 16—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder and a 19—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of offence —— suspicion of session of an offensive weapon and affray. detectives have released cctv footage of two man they believe are responsible for the fatal shooting of montana abdhou last month. two masked attackers on bicycles opened fire at a playground in kilburn where the 20—year—old was meeting some friends. crimestoppers is offering a £10,000 reward for any information leading to the arrest
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and conviction of her killers. it is cheaper than ever for businesses to bring staff to work in the uk. a survey has shown that the uk fell the uk. a survey has shown that the ukfell in the uk. a survey has shown that the uk fell in the global cost of living rankings. their report says the fall is largely due to a weakened pound since the brexit vote. let's take a look at the travel situation. a good service on the tubes this morning. london bridge station has fully reopened. this is the m25. big problems earlier, three lanes closed afterjunction 25 for enfield, because of a lorry shedding its load of breeze blocks. elsewhere the m3 is closed betweenjunction 4a, farmborough, and junction 4 for canberra. 0n finchley it is slow on the north circular from the east end road to the a1, henlys corner. now let's get a check on the weather. after the strong winds
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from yesterday, a brief bit of respite today. drier and brighter conditions, with some sunny spells. still quite breezy, at least for the morning, but gradually the breeze will start to fall away. patchy cloud around but some decent spells of sunshine. feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. we are looking at a maximum of 20 degrees in central london. 0vernight tonight, it is all changing again. it starts off 0k. gradually these showers will move in from the west, heavy showers through there. quite a mild night, 14 or 15 celsius is the minimum temperature. quite a murky start tomorrow morning with low cloud around. you may feel some spots of rain, but mostly dry for the morning itself. through the afternoon, more chance of light rain. the maximum temperature tomorrow is around 19, maybe 20 celsius. it stays rather unsettled through friday. the chance of some showers around, at least through the morning. potentially drying out later on. as we head into the weekend, the temperature recovers. quite a humid weekend, lots of cloud around and the potentialfor some rain.
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the temperature could reach 22 by sunday. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, plenty more on our website at the usual address and bbc radio london. for now, back to charlie and louise. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the final day of general election campaigning, as political leaders make one last push for your vote. 0pposition parties round on the prime minister as she declares she'll change human rights laws to fight extremism. a day before the polls open, we're talking to all the main parties throughout the morning, including the conservatives and labour in the next hour. good morning — it's wednesday 7 june. the home office comes under pressure to explain why one of the london bridge attackers
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was allowed back into the uk, despite being on a watch list. good morning from warwick castle for the final and seller —— outing of the final and seller —— outing of the breakfast butty van. we will be talking about tax in the election. in sport, its two wins from two for england in the champions trophy and they're through to the semi—finals after beating new zealand in cardiff. there wasn't a dry eye in the in the house when a high school choir performed at the concert with ariana grande. we will be meeting them later. good morning. it might still be reining in parts of north—east
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scotla nd be reining in parts of north—east scotland and england but the forecast today which looks more like june and october. first, our main story. the final day of campaigning in the general election will see the party leaders on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain, in a last push for votes. (pres) the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated —— the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security following the attacks in manchester and london. at a rally last night, theresa may said if the conservatives are re—elected, she would scrap any human rights laws that prevent her from introducing tougher anti—terror measures. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. just a day to go. the prime minister of the united kingdom. the closing stages have been dominated by the row over security. theresa may said last night the conservatives would toughen up antiterrorism laws. i mean longer prison sentences for those convicted of terrorist offences. i mean making it easier for the authorities to deport foreign terrorism suspects back
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to their own country. all: yes! and if our human rights laws stop us from doing it, we will change the laws so we can do it. its opponents accused the tories of changing direction on human rights laws. their manifesto promises to stick with the european system that protects people's rights. the conservatives denied a u—turn. the liberal democrats accused them of a nuclear arms race on terror laws while labour said they would pay for more police. theresa may has announced nothing new today. she's been banging on about her dislike for human rights for a very long time. that's not the message we should be sending to communities or terrorists. what we need is more money for policing and four prisons. —— for. after a campaign called three years early marked by unforeseen events, this is an election none of the parties will be taking for granted.
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0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster for us this morning. so much discussion about what theresa may said yesterday. also, what details about any possible changes to human rights law? not that much detail but a string of ideas if you like into labour were immediately critical, accusing the conservatives of what they said was another u—turn. the libdems criticised theresa may, saying she was almost going after a nuclear arms race of terror laws. they denied that. they are not going to be pulling out of the european convention of human rights, that system that looks after people's rights. they want legal opt outs of
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certain aspects and that tareeza may was pointing out with the terror threat so changed since the beginning, she wanted to point out that if elected, she would be prepared to change the law and security has come to dominate the campaign, not just after the security has come to dominate the campaign, notjust after the attack on london bridge but in manchester as well. what you think we can expect to see today? the party leaders are going to be criss—crossing the country today, but —— pretty flat out. theresa may has been out at the spitalfields market where she has been campaigning with her husband, philip may, and highlighting that the conservatives would put billions of pounds into housing and infrastructure and returning to the conservatives —— conservative message. jeremy corbyn, he is going to be out in scotland, stops in
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wales and england and will be highlighting labour's message on public services, reminding of labour was to get in, they would put £37 billion of extra money into the nhs, thinking that it cannot cope with what he calls another five years of conservative austerity. the liberal democrats leader has been out campaigning in solihull. the party leaders are out, trying to galvanise their own members at winning over any wavering voters. we will talk as well. we will also —— also be speaking to the work and pensions secretary in the next few minutes. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch list. the italian authorities said they had issued warnings about yousef zaghba, whom they suspected of supporting
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the islamic state group after he tried to travel to syria. nick quraishi reports. these are the three men who brought terror to the streets of london in a matter of minutes. the third confirmed as youssef zaghba was an italian national born in morocco who lived in east london. the 22—year—old wasn't regarded as a security threat by police or m15 that today questions for the home 0ffice. youssef zaghba was stopped at bologna airport last year on suspicion of travelling to syria. italian police say he was placed on a watchlist british authorities tipped off. border security staff are accused of still allowing him to return to the uk. the home office has declined to comment. the australian government says two of its nationals are among the seven people killed. their names haven't been officially confirmed. kirsty boden, a senior nurse at guy's hospital, murdered as she ran to help people who'd been knocked down on london bridge, described as selfless,
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caring and heroic. the family of sara zelenak, a nanny from brisbane, say they are fearing the worst. she is one of those people that doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong. she's amazing, and she's 21 years of age. french media have confirmed the death of alexandre picard. sebastien boulanger‘s family have travelled to london to find out what has happened to the chef. desperate days for so many you've found themselves caught up in this tragedy. —— who've. and one update for you — in the early hours of this morning detectives investigating the london attack have arrested a 30 year old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford, wast london. —— east london. prince harry has paid tribute to the victims and survivors of the london terror attack as he marked 100 days until the next but only seven are still being held under the terrorism act. detectives say they've found
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evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi had stored parts for his device in a white nissan micra seized in rusholme. australia has matched what is believed to be the longest period of economic growth in the world. latest figures released overnight show that the country's economy has avoided a recession for 25 years and nine months, matching a record set by the netherlands. a host of showbiz names willjoin ronnie corbett‘s family and friends for a memorial service at westminster abbey this afternoon. the comedian and entertainer died last year at the age of 85 — his comedy career spanned six decades. the service will include readings from famous friends including michael parkinson and joanna lumley together with tributes from fellow comics rob brydon and jimmy tarbuck. being married appears to be good for your heart. a 14—year study of nearly a million people at risk of developing heart disease, found those who were married fared much better
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than those who were single. researchers from aston medical school found married people with high cholesterol were 16% more likely to be alive at the end of the study. it also found that married people with diabetes had a 14% higher chance of survival. and married patients with high blood pressure were 10% more likely to be alive. researchers believe, although they cannot prove it, that a loving spouse may encourage you to stay fit and well. that might be the reason those figures like that. encouraging, nagging. who knows? the race to number 10 is almost over, with campaigning for the general election ending tonight. we're speaking to representatives from all the main parties this morning. next we're speaking to the conservative party, whose main manifesto pledges include: let's talk to work and pensions
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secretary damian green who's in ashford this morning. thank you for your time this morning, lovely blue skies behind it for this last day of campaigning. cani for this last day of campaigning. can i ask you first about theresa may's comments last night in connection with changing human rights laws. the accusation is she is coming up with policy on the hoof. did you know? we didn't know three months ago we were going to get three terrorists ——3 terrorist attacks so she is doing what any responsible leader is doing, reacting to a serious situation to make sure that the british people are kept as safe as possible and if we need to change the law, if we
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need to make it easierfor we need to change the law, if we need to make it easier for the courts to deport people and for the police to impose controls on people and make those threats, this is a responsible thing for government to do. can you give us an example of human rights that he might change. --? we have seen in the past that some of the human rights laws have made it extremely difficult to deport people who did pose a threat was on it's taken years and years to drag those cases through the courts. you remember people like abu qatada, who we did deport. 0ther you remember people like abu qatada, who we did deport. other countries have changed the laws, france and ireland have done it and it's a sensible response to what is a terrible and continuing threat of terrorism and because not least of course, the basic human right is the
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right to life and what the government and prime minister is trying to do is to make sure that right is not infringed upon for the british people. one of the people --1 british people. one of the people ——1 of the things people will do is judge warn your record and they look at theresa may but the mantra of strong and stable, she was home secretary when control orders were scrapped. does that mean she has changed her mind on that and that control orders could be on the way back? the problem with control orders is that the courts were increasingly saying that they were illegal, they were proving an ineffective way of controlling people who may pose a threat but there wasn't enough evidence to actually take to court and convict. that is why when she was home secretary, the prime minister replaced control orders with a similar sort of control measure but
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one that has been held up in the courts so it's always a case of making sure you can do things legally seek and do things our lawful —— in a lawful way. but that you do provide the right level of protection for people against terrorists and the commonsense measures that the prime minister laid out last night. i am genuinely surprised that other parties think these are controversial. i know we've got 24 hours to go but actually, keeping the british people safe is the first duty of any government and that is what theresa may is seeking to do. the first duty of any government which is why there has been so much concern about the most has been so much concern about the m ost rece nt has been so much concern about the most recent attack on london so specifically, youssef zaghba has been named as the bird of the attackers in london. he was an italian citizen of moroccan descent but we know from the italian authorities, that he had tried to leave italy. he was trying to get to
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syria and had so—called islamic mistake —— islamic state material with him. italian authorities told britain that he wanted to be a terrorist but he manages to be in the uk to carry out this attack. it's obviously, clearly that is a police investigation that is going on so it would be wrong for anyone outside that police investigation to comment on what they knew and so on but clearly, every time there is a terrorist attack, the security services and the police look at what needs to be done, what should be donein needs to be done, what should be done in future and whether anything was missed but i think it would clearly be wrong in the middle of a very active police investigation into a terrible crime, to comment on individual issues. even armed with
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the knowledge and i appreciate the issue, to a degree, we have to step aside from the electioneering around this but people will be concerned that even armed with the knowledge about this man, he was able to come to the uk. be rightly concerned. as you say, it has nothing to do with the election, but what i am saying is that i do not know all the details and neither do you, until we actually have all the details, it would be wrong to comment, particularly because as we speak, the police are mounting a very serious and active investigation. we have had another arrest in the last 24 hours. clearly police operations are still going on. so now is not the time... let's just hold on for a second. is that going to come back to us? the picture seems to have gone. apologies for that. david green,
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speaking to us a moment ago, from the conservatives. he is from the department of work and pensions. we will be speaking tojeremy corbyn later on. apologies for that interruption, he was not entirely finished, but sometimes that happens. jeremy corbyn will be whether senna bout half an hour. if you want all the information on all the manifestoes, you can go to the bbc news website. and of course this time tomorrow or the election nearing will be over. —— electioneering will be over. that was ashfield in kent, we could see blue skies. it looked lovely. what is the picture for the rest of us? much betterfor much better for the vast majority of the uk. this is from one of our
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weather watchers in eastbourne in east sussex, a little while ago. fluffy chinless cloud, not a bad start to the day. a different sort of story in scotland and north—east england. this is a shot from just outside newcastle. still a bit grey. the cloud starting to break, as this low pressure pulls away. it has been responsible for rain and strong winds, and it still is to some degree across north—eastern england and scotland. not a great start to the day. 0ver and scotland. not a great start to the day. over a month's worth of rain has fallen in edinburgh since monday afternoon. winds gusting to 60 mph on the east coast of scotland. further west, blustery across western scotland and northern ireland, but a much brighter start further south. early showers across parts of wales and the midlands, now fading away. for much of england and wales away from the north—east it is a dry and sunny morning. not particularly warm, that breezes a bit chilly, but warmer than yesterday, overall. rain and strong winds across north—east england and
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scotla nd winds across north—east england and scotland gradually easing. towards south—west england, devon and cornwall, and parts of western wales, after sunshine this morning it will cloud over into the afternoon. here we will finished the day with some rain. temperatures up on what we saw yesterday, even in chilly parts of north—east scotland. tonight we stayed dry across northern scotland. rain spread sporadically across england and wales. a little bit of rain at times in northern ireland and scotland. lots of dry weather here as well. it is the breaks in northern scotland which will send temperatures down to single figures. a cool site to thursday. some of the brightest weather to be found here. east anglia and the south—east, not a bad day for thursday. a fair bit of cloud, but when it breaks and the sunshine comes out it will feel quite warm. 0ccasional rain across wales, dampest across north—west england and western parts of wales. we could see the odd rumble of thunder in the west later on. turning wetter and southern scotland, northern scotland probably
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dry overall. that changes on friday. the weather front clears to leave us with sunshine and showers on friday. some of those showers will be heavy and thunder, pushing away from western areas, finishing the day largely dry. temperatures average for this time of year, 16— 24 most of us. for many of us tomorrow we will be able to pop down to the local school or library to vote. but spare a thought for remote communities who may to travel the extra mile to have their say. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon has been to the inner hebridean island of eigg to visit the people who use one of britain's most remote polling stations, to find out how engaged they are with the upcoming election. iamona i am on a journey to an island where they cherish their right to vote. around 100 people live on eigg. 0n
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this small island, elections are a big thing. the turnout here has, it is rumoured, on some previous occasions, reached 100%. postal voting can prove convenient for many, and across the country it is on the rise. but the pace of life is different here. i vote at the polling station. the fact that you are putting your croissant and putting it in the box, you are doing your bit, and you feel like you have contributed and nobody can take that away from you. ashraf cross on it. some of scotland's promote island committees have no choice but to cast their vote by post, but here on eigg there is a polling place, and many here say they relish the opportunity to cast a vote by hand. iam the opportunity to cast a vote by hand. i am the presiding officer. my responsibility is to make sure the whole process is done properly. we have a fun time, sandwiches, flasks, our neighbours further down the road bring us ice cream. charlie is the
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only taxi driver on the island. your very own black cab! yes, it is a bit unusual. he has not seen any election campaigning when driving around the singletrack roads. do you feel left out? quite the opposite. i feel left out? quite the opposite. i feel cloud happy about that. —— quite happy. you have already made up quite happy. you have already made up your mind, you do not need somebody knocking on your door and taking time out of your day. there is powered here at the local level. it is 20 years since the people bought out the island, taking control of the land. how close today fields of the parliaments were national power resides? —— how close do they feel. attenborough feels a long way away and westminster even more so. “— long way away and westminster even more so. —— attenborough. because of the community buyout, we feel a lot more conscious that people can affect a change, and the democratic process ca n affect a change, and the democratic process can work and people here are
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more politically engaged. while it can feel very distant here from the frenzy of the campaign on parts of the mainland, islanders are determined to make sure their voices heard when it comes to this election. bagpipes skirl. that does look absolutely stunning. it looks gorgeous, doesn't it? that does look absolutely stunning. it looks gorgeous, doesn't mm really does. it is 723 a.m.. still to come this morning, last weekend stars including liam gallagher, robbie williams and katy perry took to the stage to honour the victims of the manchester terror attack, but it was the lesser known parrs wood high school who stole the hearts of millions of viewers. holly hamilton is with them now. they were singing so beautifully, weren't they? it really was stunning. arguably one of the most emotional parts of the concert. i
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remember, more than 10 million people watching, as you say, the likes of katy perry, robbie williams, and right in the middle of them, parrs wood high school choir. they really were something else. i think it really touched people in a way that possibly celebrities can't, seeing these young girls and boys up on stage, talking about things and singing about something that was so personal to them. you will have seen that clip that has been doing the rounds, the fact that ariana grande came up on stage and joined them, and joined their soloist, natasha, who had the importantjob of appearing on stage first. natasha joins us now. you were on stage with ariana grande, one of the most important events of the year, how did you feel? my gosh, it was so overwhelming. i have always, she has always been my idol. ijust can't believe that we got a chance to perform with her, it was so amazing. she came up and put her arm around you, what we're thinking at that i have no words. it was so amazing. i
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am just so happy. what did you tell yourfamily? what am just so happy. what did you tell your family? what did they say to your family? what did they say to you when you came offstage? they said well done, and that i was very brave, and stuff like that. yeah. you did really well, they must have been very proud of you. what was very difficult for a lot of the people at the concert, and a lot of the people who were singing in that quiet, and one or two who are actually at the concert, one of them was shiner. how difficult was it for you to perform on stage? it was such an emotional event. it was really emotional but it proves that everybody just comes emotional but it proves that everybodyjust comes together. the atmosphere was incredible. it helped atmosphere was incredible. it helped a lot. you must have been nervous. it was happy nerves, really. it is the got the chance to go and sing to war those people and get the message out that we will not be beaten and everybody will come together. —— singh to all those people. this came
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about because of a youtube video. what happened, and how the chick at the call? well, i am from manchester, we all wanted to do something because we were so devastated after it happened. we got together the day after, arranged a song, rehearsed about date, the next day we recorded in the studio and straightaway we recorded it. we got in touch with ariana grande's manager. you have the power to show usa manager. you have the power to show us a bit of these guys in action. we are going to hear them perform. choir singing. good morning from bbc london news.
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a large part of the police cordon around the scene of saturday night's terrorist attack at london bridge has been lifted this morning. scotland yard say borough high street and the roads and area east of the high street have reopened to the public, although borough market and a small surrounding area remain closed. police investigating the attack have arrested a 30—year—old man in east london on suspicion of terror offences. he was detained in ilford in the early hours of this morning. a teenager has been stabbed to death in north london — the ninth so far this year. the victim, who's thought to be 17, died in tottenham yesterday evening. a 16—year—old boy has been arrested
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on suspicion of murder detectives have released cctv footage of two men they believe are responsible for the fatal shooting of montana abdhou last month. two masked attackers on bicycles opened fire at a playground in kilburn, where the 20—year—old was meeting some friends. it's cheaper than ever for businesses to bring staff over to work in the uk. a survey by eca international has shown the uk fall in the global cost of living rankings. their report says the fall is largely due to a weakened pound since the brexit vote. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning and london bridge station is now fully reopen. this is the m25 where there big problems. anticlockwise, three lanes are closed afterj25 enfield due to a lorry shedding its load of breeze blocks. there have been eight mile queues
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act to j26, but it seems to be moving more freely now. northolt, heavy traffic on a40 eastbound between polish war memorial and target roundabout. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. after the strong winds yesterday a brief respite today. drier and right conditions with some sunny spells. still quite easy, at least for the morning, but gradually that will start to fall away. patchy cloud around but decent spells of sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. a maximum of 20 in central london. overnight tonight it is all changing again. it begins ok, but gradually these showers will move in from the west. heavy showers there. a mild night, 14 or 15. quite a murky start to tomorrow morning.
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low cloud around. you may feel some spots of rain, but mostly dry in the morning itself. in the afternoon, more chance of light rain and drizzle. the maximum temperature around 19 or20. drizzle. the maximum temperature around 19 or 20. it stays unsettled through friday. the chance of showers around through the morning, potentially drying out in the afternoon. those showers could be quite heavy. into the weekend, the temperature recovers. quite a humid weekend. lots of cloud around and the potential for some weekend. lots of cloud around and the potentialfor some rain. by sunday, it could reach 22. hello — this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the final day of campaigning in the general election will see the party leaders on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain, in a last push for votes. the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security following the london bridge attack. at a campaign rally last
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night, theresa may said if the conservatives are re—elected, she would change any human rights laws that prevent her from introducing tougher anti—terror measures. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch list. the italian authorities said they'd issued warnings about yousef zaghba after they suspected that he was a supporter of the islamic state group who'd been trying to travel to syria. in a further development, detectives have arrested a 30 year old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford, east london. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed, have arrested a 38—year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation. he's the nineteenth person to be arrested, but only seven are still being held under the terrorism act. detectives say they've found evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi had stored parts for his device in a white
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nissan micra seized in rusholme. a host of showbiz names willjoin family and friends for a memorial service for ronnie corbett at westminster abbey this afternoon. the comedian and entertainer died last year. he was 85, and his comedy career spanned six decades. the service will include readings from famous friends including michael parkinson and joanna lumley together with tributes from fellow comics rob brydon and jimmy tarbuck. a peacock walks into an off—licence and... poor peacock. it's the noise, really. a pea hen, actually. this particular bird — captured on cctv in california — caused nearly £400 of damage after it wandered
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after quite a lot of flapping and a little bit of swearing from the person trying to catch it the peacock was eventually escorted off the premises and released back into the wild, unharmed. but the bottles were not.|j but the bottles were not. i can't believe you haven't noticed we will “ we believe you haven't noticed we will “ we were believe you haven't noticed we will —— we were talking about the lovely ronnie corbett. that looks like to sketch. —— it looks like a sketch from the two ronnies. in tribute to ronnie. two wins from two took england's cricketers through to the semi—finals of the champions trophy. they beat new zealand by 87 runs in cardiff — half—centuries from hales, root and buttler guided england past the 300 mark before liam plunkett took four wickets to finish off the kiwis‘ chase. they'll top their group and knock out australia, if they beat them on saturday. if we are truly going to be
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contenders for this tournament we need to beat the best teams and australia are run of the best teams. they always are going into a white ball tournament, they seem to produce limited overs cricket is at will so to win a game like that with an attitude other than winning is very important to us. the british and irish lions gameplan is still "in its infancy", according to attack coach rob howley. we'll see how it's progressing in about an hour's time, when the lions take on the auckland blues, one of five games against high—quality super rugby sides before the first test. after a scrappy win over the provincial barbarians in their first tour match, today will be a real step up. they can play from anywhere. they are fairly efficient with their set piece. they want to attack the ball in hand so i think we will have to be ready for that and we've got to prepare and try and play our own game, we can't sit back and watch blues play because they got some fantastic
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players as you saw on friday night, stuff can break through, offload and scoring from six or seven metres so we ideally won't be allowing that to happen. the football association has handed out lifetime bans for the first time, after two supporters made nazi gestures at the friendly against germany in dortmund in march. the fa has vowed to tackle what it fears is a new generation of hooligans. in all, 27 fans have had their membership suspended — the supporters club is the only way to obtain tickets to away matches. the england squad's preparations for saturday's world cup qualifier against scotland have been unusual. manager gareth southgate arranged a 48—hour boot camp with the royal marines in devon. he said he wanted them to find different ways to work as a team — and it certainly paid off for stoke goalkeeper jack butland, who's been out injured for a year. it was tough but it was one of the most rewarding experiences over had.
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we got to experience the way of life, the way they do things, their values and how tightknit they are as afamily and values and how tightknit they are as a family and i think as a squad and players, we all benefited from that and there was a lot to learn and stuff that we are keen to take forward in what we are trying to achieve slow think it was very positive and rewarding for everyone the spot. the squad men up on a friday night and did not know they we re friday night and did not know they were going to train with the royal marines, they got there, were told to put their phones away and put their stuff away, go off and do this training exercise so quite an ambitious thing for the england management to organise but a p pa re ntly management to organise but apparently it went brilliantly well. what was the most alarming? having to leave their phones but the interesting as they dashed thing is they all had to talk to each other at dinner. quite right. that's what we should be doing. andy murray plays his french open quarter—final against kei nishikori
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later — all four men's quarters will be completed today after heavy rain in paris yesterday. there was time, though, for the former world number one caroline wozniacki to be knocked out — she was beaten by the latvian teenager yelena 0stapenko, a rising star in the game. chris froome has downplayed his chances of taking the lead in the criterium du dauphine in today's time trial he finished in the peloton on stage 3 yesterday as koen bouwman took the victory into tullins. the defending champion thinks his gap ofjust over a minute to the leader is too much to make up in the 23.5 kilometres today. great britain earned their first victory in the america's cup semi finals in the most dramatic circumstances yesterday. after losing a third race in a row to new zealand, they finally registered when their opponents dramatically capsized at the start of race 4. luckily all of their crew members were ok. my first thought was for the safety of the sailors on the boat and looking at the footage since, it is clear that there was a slight misjudgement on the dagger board and it camed out of the water too
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much and went into an impressive pitch point but i don't think anybody is passing criticism because these boats are so tough to sail and it can happen to anyone and as i said, the most important thing is the crew are safe and they will keep the fight continues. sailing in bermuda, you think it is nice and sunny but it is tough. as campaigning for the general election comes to an end, we're speaking to all the main political parties. (pres) now we're going to hear from labour who say if they win, —— now we're going to hear from labour who say if they win, traditional things like who will taxi more. we are waiting forjeremy corbyn. hoping to speak to him in the next couple of minutes. steph
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has been finding out about that question. where was the money going to go? she is out with a breakfast butty than. it is beautiful out there. how gorgeous is this? look at this beautiful mediaeval castle and we have been travelling all over the country with the butty than. we also have some joust is this morning. we will tell you a bit more about what has been going on. are we paying a fairamount of tax, has been going on. are we paying a fair amount of tax, which party might give you a better option when it comes to tax is and what is all the money spent on? that is something that i have been looking at. tax, sometimes it feels like we are putting in a lot more than we are putting in a lot more than we are getting out. so where is the
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money coming from and what is it being spent on? look at this chart. you can see a big contribution is income taxed at £175 billion a year. that all amounts to about £750 billion every year. so how do people feel about the tax they are paying, and what the money is spent on? does tax bother you? and what the money is spent on? we have some voters here. does tax bother you? yes and no. it's taken out as i get the money, so i don't really notice it going, not like a small business owner. overall i would like to see the government tackle big corporations rather than individual people. liz, you think tax is a good thing? i do. it's not a punishment. it's the payment we give for living in this country. you think it should go up?
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as long as it goes to the right place. hannah, for you, it's about where the money is spent? yes, it's how it's spent. it needs to be spent wisely. national health was doing really well at 8.8% of our gdp. it's now falling down to 6.7% and thatjust isn't going to be enough. ok, i will let you get inside. thank you. obviously the amount of tax you pay varies depending on how much you are earning. so let's take the averagejoe, or in our case, mr punch. now, this person is on a salary of about £26,000 a year. of that, they will pay out about £5,000 on things like income tax and national insurance. now, looking at what this person is spending their money on, they are paying about £2000 in vat, and £700 to things like alcohol and fuel duty. all of that adds up to a total of £8,000. about a third of your salary. so what about the rich versus the poor?
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is there any difference in the tax that they pay as a proportion of income? statisticians have estimated what people with different incomes we need somebody who can tell you a bit more about it. other parties different in terms of what you meant for tax. there is the chance that national insurance won't increase. it focuses pre— much, the labour party manifesto, on the higher earners. there will be an increase of 50% tax on those earning £123,000. that is across the board
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and it is paying for the nhs, an extra £6 billion. what about the ukip and greens? in terms of the greens, one of the most striking things as they want to increase the wealth tax. they also want to change the way inheritance taxes paid so that the amount you pay and the percentage that you pay is on your own wealth. there are lots of different ways at tax. none of them are going to be cutting tax in any great way. we still have the national debt and we are in deficit at the moment. one of the key things to remember that often the things
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that are not in the manifesto are just as important. if you look at the labour party manifesto, they talked about insurance. all different persuasions are taxing things you never would have thought. thank you very much. should we leave you with a bit ofjousting? this is the house of york against the house of lancaster. i'm feeling a little bit close. that is now thank you very much, it is impressive. the potentialfor some rain. by sunday, it could reach 22. improvement for many competitor yesterday. not across—the—board yet, but we have one image from yesterday which summed it up quite well. strong winds in the last 24 hours.
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the strongest were this morning along the aberdeenshire coast. unseasonable wind, but things are coming down now. this is the view on the banks of loch lomond at the moment. a lovely start competitor what we are seeing in eastern parts of scotland. the rain has not com pletely of scotland. the rain has not completely cleared yet. a month of rain has fallen in eastern scotland in the last 36 hours. this is the low pressure system responsible, but it is moving to the east, so the rain will gradually ease through. scattered rain in parts of eastern scotla nd scattered rain in parts of eastern scotland if you are about to head out the door. that will last into mid—morning, maybe into the afternoon across parts of the east. strong and gusty winds. but western scotland, northern ireland and north—west england double street but dry and sunny. cloud across north—east england is now breaking up. the same across norfolk. sunny spells developing for the rest of the day. the winds are easing down,
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they are already lighter across wales and the south—west. it will continue until we go into the latter stages of the day. and improving picture for those eastern parts of scotla nd picture for those eastern parts of scotland and north—east england. a dry and sunny day for the vast majority. in west and south—west wales we will see rain returning later on. temperatures upon what we saw yesterday almost across the board. stilljulie across north—east scotland. the breeze will take longer to fully east down. tonight, england and wales have outbreaks of cloud coming and going. most persistent on the hills to the west. some slashes of rain in northern ireland and southern scotland. dry in the final of scotland and it is here that temperatures will drop the service. a mild start elsewhere tomorrow morning. if you are in east anglia and the south—east, not a bad day in store. some cloud around initially, but breaks in that, and it will feel pleasant when the sun is out. occasional rain across the rest of england and wales, may be a
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rumble of thunder. it turns wet across the morning and into the afternoon in northern ireland and southern parts of scotland. northern scotla nd southern parts of scotland. northern scotland stay in dry and bright. it could hit 20— 22 can south—east corner. going into friday, after a dry day in the north of scotland on thursday, that weather front will linger. for the rest of the country it is back to a straightforward mixture of sunshine and showers. thank you, matthew. as campaigning for the general election comes to an end we are speaking to all the main political parties here on breakfast. we'll be hearing from labour in a moment, who say that if they win they will be negotiating a brexit deal which puts economy and living standards first. they will nationalise a number of utilities, including rail, posts, water and the national agreed. they will also increase corporation tax to 26% by
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2020, we introduce the 50p tax rate, and increased tax rate for those —— increase income taxes those earning over £80,000 a year. jeremy corbyn joins us from glasgow. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. so much of this campaign has of course been dominated by security. that is again in the headlines this morning. theresa may saying that she might change and rights laws. i want to deal, if we can, with the specifics of what she has said and get your view on that. she has said that she wants to make it easier to deport foreign terror suspects. would you agree with that? we need to make sure we are secure. that means having an efficient, fully staffed police force. she is the one who presided over the loss of 20,000 police officers over the past five years. what we have said is that we would immediately employ 10,000 more police officers and properly fund our security services. we will not defeat terrorism by
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ripping up our basic rights and our democracy. we will defeat terrorism throughout communities, our vigilance, and police action to isolate and detain those who wish us harm. obviously of somebody is a foreign national resident in britain, committing crimes, then clearly the law is there to take its course now. the su is police numbers and police security. i willjust talk about one of those other things as well if we could. she is talking about, the prime minister, restricting freedom of movement of those who present a threat. is that something that you would echo? well, if somebody presents a threat, then you take action against them. what i don't want his executive orders where politicians can make decisions outside of the law and justice side what will happen to an individual. there has to be a judicial process. if our democracy is under threat, you strengthened democracy, in order to deal with that threat. that is fundamental to our way of life and
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our society. deal with the threat through proper policing. one of those involved in the london attacks was allowed to return to the uk. that was despite being on a watchlist. under your government, if you were in government, should that be allowed to happen? obviously we need to report on what happened in his case, obviously there needs to bea his case, obviously there needs to be a full examination of what happened in westminster some weeks ago, what happened in manchester and what happened in london. we will have to c of any procedures need to be changed. i cannot really comment on what happens in interviews with him on his return because obviously i wasn't party to them. i think we need that report. at quite obviously, if somebody is a known and credible threats they shouldn't be returning. just to be clear, if somebody is on a watchlist, in your view, should they be allowed into the uk or not? it depends on what sort of watchlist they are on and
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what sort of threat they are. i think we have to look at it in that sense. it is very difficult to comment on a case when none of us, neither you nor i, were party to the interviews that took place what the level of threat was. but he issue has to be the security of all of us, which means having a properly resourced police service across the whole country. this government cut 20,000 police officers in the last seven yea rs. 20,000 police officers in the last seven years. you mentioned strengthening the democracy. does that include changes to laws, if there needs to be any? what changes might they need to be? our democracy is central to our lives. the independence of our whole judicial system is absolutely central to our lives. i become quite alarmed when the prime minister and others start talking about the need to change our human rights legislation. our fundamental rights are very important. the right to free speech, the right to free assembly, the
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right to free elections, the right to have access to the media, and of course the right to elect our politicians, all of these things are absolutely central to our lives. let's hold those as our central, co re let's hold those as our central, core beliefs. the threat to us from terrorist attacks has to be dealt with by effective policing and effective security services. you do not trade one off against the other. you make sure that our democracy is fully intact and the threat is dealt with by an effective, properly resourced police force. you cannot get security on the cheap. let's talk about the economy and money, of course, because that is central to what people are concerned about. the institute of fiscal studies have looked at your manifesto and the conservative manifesto as well, saying that both fail to set out honest sets of choices, specifically about your manifesto, they say that the proposals cannot work because you cannot hope to raise that amount of money which you have said you
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will do. what they have said is that our manifesto would change society, would end austerity, and would invest in good quality public services. what they have said is that conservative manifesto will lead to a poorer, more divided country as a whole. they have not costed the new taxes that we have put in because they are unable to cost them because they do not exist yet. we are quite clear that we can raise the money necessary in order to bring about real changes. schools properly funded, hospitals properly funded, social care properly funded. none of these things are possible u nless none of these things are possible unless you raise tax from the biggest corporations and the very wealthiest people in order to do that. we have had seven years of austerity. five years more of a conservative government will lead to more children being poor, more schools under funded, more more children being poor, more schools underfunded, more hospitals with more queues and waiting lists, and even more depression within our society. what we offer is hope. what we offer is opportunity. what we offer is a real opportunity for all offer is a real opportunity for all
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of our young people to achieve their best in life. that, surely, is the real choice in this election. let's talk about your shadow home secretary, diane abbott. does she have your competence? she is not well over the last couple of days and she is taking a breakfrom well over the last couple of days and she is taking a break from the campaign. of course diane is somebody who works extremely hard and represents a community very well. i have to say, she has received totally unfair levels of attack and abuse, notjust recently, but over many years. i am sorry to ask, but how long issue taking a breakfor? ask, but how long issue taking a break for? —— is ask, but how long issue taking a breakfor? —— is she ask, but how long issue taking a break for? —— is she taking. ask, but how long issue taking a break for? —— is she takinglj ask, but how long issue taking a break for? -- is she taking. i will be speaking to her later today. she is not well at the moment. ok, it is 51 days. thank you for talking to us. ican 51 days. thank you for talking to us. i can hearfrom your voice that you sound tired. i am not tired and my voice is fine, don't worry about at! how is the allotment going? the allotment is fine. my vegetables are growing extremely well. my voice get
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stronger as the day goes on. i am just about to speak at the 84th rally i have done in this campaign, right here in buchanan street in glasgow, and then i am going on to more rallies all over the country, ending in my constituency at nine o'clock tonight. do you know what? this is the most fantastic, people powered campaign i can rememberfrom any election. and i am really enjoying it, and so other people who are going into this campaign, hopeful that can change this country and give our young people a real chance and our older people the protection they deserve from a community that wants to come together. jeremy corbyn, thank you for your time here on this this morning. thank you very much for having me on breakfast today. that wasjeremy having me on breakfast today. that was jeremy corbyn, having me on breakfast today. that wasjeremy corbyn, speaking to us from glasgow. we will be speaking to nick clegg from the lib dem is a bit later in the morning. and if you would like to learn more about the parties and their manifestoes, they are on our website. you can hear that he has been doing
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a lot of talking. absolutely. the day is just a lot of talking. absolutely. the day isjust beginning, it is a long day isjust beginning, it is a long day for all the party leaders today. they are ready from the early hours, from 6:30am or so, they have all been out and about. you are watching brea kfast. been out and about. you are watching breakfast. this is something nobody has tried before. moving a research centre across antarctica. we will meet a scientist from the team who had to tell it for 14 miles because ofa giant had to tell it for 14 miles because of a giant crack in the ice. —— tow it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a large part of the police cordon around the scene of saturday night's a teenager has been stabbed to death during a fight in north london. he died in tottenham yesterday evening. the police cordon is still in place behind me in this part of tottenham.
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yesterday evening a 17—year—old boy was found with stab wounds and later died from his injuries. detectives have made two arrests. they have arrested a 16—year—old boy on suspicion of murder and a 19—year—old man on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon. detectives are keen to speak to anybody who may have been in this pa rt anybody who may have been in this part of tottenham yesterday evening after 5:15pm, and are appealing for witnesses to contact them. police investigating the attack have arrested a 30—year—old man in east london on suspicion of terror offences. he was detained in ilford in the early hours of this morning. a teenager has been stabbed to death in north london. the victim, who's thought to be 17, died in tottenham yesterday evening. it's cheaper than ever for businesses to bring staff over to work in the uk. a survey by eca international has shown the uk fall in the global cost of living rankings. their report says the fall is largely due to a weakened pound since the brexit vote.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. we still have a good service on the tube, with some minor delays on the district line. in pop, slow on be a102 blackwall tunnel southbound. —— p0p a102 blackwall tunnel southbound. —— pop laugh. that is due to an earlier broken down van at the tunnel exit. good news on the m25, where we now have all lanes reopened anticlockwise. in palm on screen it is slow on the north circular westbound, because of a broken down car. now let's get a check on the weather. good morning. after the strong winds yesterday a brief respite today. drier and right conditions with some sunny spells. still quite easy, at least for the morning, but gradually that will start to fall away. patchy cloud around but decent spells of sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. a maximum of 20 in central london. overnight tonight it is all changing again. it begins ok, but gradually these showers will move in from the west. heavy showers there.
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a mild night, 14 or 15. quite a murky start to tomorrow morning. low cloud around. you may feel some spots of rain, but mostly dry in the morning itself. in the afternoon, more chance of light rain and drizzle. the maximum temperature around 19 or20. it stays unsettled through friday. the chance of showers around through the morning, potentially drying out in the afternoon. those showers could be quite heavy. into the weekend, the temperature recovers. quite a humid weekend. lots of cloud around and the potentialfor some rain. by sunday, it could reach 22. that is all for now. i will be back with another update in half an hour. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with
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louise minchin and charlie stayt. the final day of general election campaigning as political leaders make one last push for your vote. opposition parties round on the prime minister as she declares she'll change human rights laws to fight extremism. a day before the polls open, we're talking to all the main parties throughout the morning. good morning. it's wednesday, 7thjune. also this morning:
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the home office comes under pressure to explain why one of the london bridge attackers was allowed back into the uk, despite being on a watch—list. good morning from warwick castle where i'm hanging out with a couple of knights and the breakfast butty van. in sport, the british and irish lions face a really tough challenge in around half an hour. they take on auckland blues in their second new zealand tour match. and they are the real stars of the one love manchester concert. i'm meeting the choir behind that performance. and matt has the weather. good morning. well, at least the weather is more in tune withjune today. a lot more in the way of dry and sunny weather and even where it's raining, things will gradually improve. i've got the details coming up improve. i've got the details coming up in the next 15 minutes. see you
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then. matt, thank you very much. see you shortly. good morning. the final day of campaigning in the general election will see the party leaders on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain in a last push for votes. the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security following the attacks in manchester and london. at a rally last night, theresa may said if the conservatives are re—elected, she would change any human rights laws that prevent her from introducing tougher anti—terror measures. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. just a day to go. then, it's over to you. the prime minister of the united kingdom, theresa may, thank you. the closing stages of this campaign have been dominated by the row over security. theresa may said last night the conservatives would toughen up anti—terror laws. i mean longer prison sentences for those convicted of terrorist offences. i mean making it easier for the authorities to deport foreign terrorist suspects back to their own countries. and if our human rights laws stop us from doing it,
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we'll change the laws so we can do it. but opponents accuse the tories of changing direction on human rights laws. their manifesto promises to stick with the european system that protects people's rights. the conservatives deny the u—turn. the liberal democrats accuse them of a nuclear arms race on terror laws while labour said they would pay for more police. theresa may has announced nothing new today. she has been banging on about her dislike for human rights for a very long time. that's not the message that we should be sending to communities or to terrorists today. what we need is more money for policing and for the prisons. after a campaign called three years early, marked by unforeseen events, this is an election none of the parties will be taking for granted. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. so many issues we didn't expect to
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be part of this general election campaign that now are, security is top of the agenda and last night the comments from theresa may about human rights that she might change human rights that she might change human rights that she might change human rights legislation if that would her defeat terrorism? yeah, that's right. labour immediately cried foul saying that the conservatives were doing another u—turn. the liberal democrats criticised theresa may for what they said was a sort of nuclear arms race when it came to terror laws. conservative sources flatly denied that. they said that they weren't going to be pulling out of the european convention on human rights, that european system that protects people's rights. they said that theresa may was simply pointing out that if elected she would be prepared to change the law and she said that last night they said because the terror threat had changed so much during the duration of the campaign.
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yes, also there has been a great deal of scrutiny on the figures. diane abbott, there has been a lot of tension on her and how she has been performing and jeremy corbyn has been speaking to this programme about her this morning? that's right. diane abbott, the shadow home secretary, had a tricky interview pa rt secretary, had a tricky interview part way through the election campaign. we have been hearing from jeremy corbyn this morning saying after yesterday when she pulled out of two big election debates, one in the morning and one in the evening, she pulled out of those because she was ill. we are being told by the labour leader that she is unwell and she is pulling out of the campaign for the moment. we have got four hours to go and we will see all the different party leaders crisscrossing the country today. theresa may has been out in east london in the smithfields market. she will be highlighting today that the conservatives would send
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billions on housing and infrastructure and of course returning to that core message that you need somebody strong in the brexit negotiations. jeremy corbyn is already campaigning in scotland. he will be making campaign stops in wales and in england too highlighting labour's messages on public services and reminding people if labour got into government he says they would put an extra £37 billion into the nhs and for tim farron the lib dem leader has been out too in solihull as all the politicians get their early morning campaigning going. of course, they're trying to drum up their own supporters, but to try and win over any waivering voters who might not yet have made their mind up. eleanor, thank you very much. we'll be speaking to all the political parties throughout this morning's programme. nick clegg coming up later on. we've spoken to the green party, to ukip, the labour party, jeremy corbyn, in the labour party, jeremy corbyn, in the last half an hour. dharly mentioned the liberal democrats and
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also the snp and plaid cymru as well. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch—list. the italian authorities said they had issued warnings about yousef zaghba, whom they suspected of supporting the islamic state group after he tried to travel to syria. nick quraishi reports. these are the three men who brought terror to the streets of london in a matter of minutes. the third confirmed as youssef zaghba was an italian national born in morocco who lived in east london. the 22—year—old wasn't regarded as a security threat by police or m15, but today questions for the home office. zaghba was stopped at bologna airport last year on suspicion of heading to syria. italian police say he was placed on a watch—list with british authorities tipped off. border security staff are accused of still allowing him to return to the uk. the home office has declined to comment. the australian government says two
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of its nationals were among the seven people killed. their names haven't been officially confirmed. kirsty boden, a senior nurse at guy's hospital, murdered as she ran to help people who had been knocked down on london bridge. described as selfless, caring and heroic. the family of sara zelenak, a nanny from brisbane, say they are fearing the worst. she's one of those people that doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong. she's amazing and she's 21 years of age. french media have also confirmed the death of sebastien boulanger, a borough market restaurant waiter from normandy. sebastien boulanger‘s family are travelling to the uk from france to find out what's happened to the chef. desperate searches and desperate days for so many who found themselves caught up in this tragedy. and one update for you.
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in the early hours of this morning detectives investigating the london attack have arrested a 30—year—old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford, east london. prince harry paid tribute to the victims and survivors of the london terror attack as he marked 100 days until the next invictus games in australia. the prince who is patron of the sporting event offered his condolences to the families of the australian victims. i would like to start by sending my thoughts to those affected by saturday's attack in london bridge. australians form an important and vibrant part of the fabric of life in london and we're reminded of that in good times and bad and our hearts go out to the victims, their friends and families. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed have arrested a 38—year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation.
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he's the 19th person to be arrested. seven are still in custody. detectives say they've found evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi, had stored parts for his device in a white nissan micra seized in rusholme. a host of showbiz names willjoin ronnie corbett‘s family and friends for a memorial service at westminster abbey this afternoon. the comedian and entertainer died last year at the age of 85. his comedy career spanned six decades. the service will include readings from famous friends including michael parkinson and joanna lumley, together with tributes from fellow comics rob brydon and jimmy tarbuck. this is good news. being married appears to be good for your heart. a 14 year study of nearly a million people at risk of developing heart disease, found that those who were married fared much better than those who were single.
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researchers from aston medical school found married people with high cholesterol were 16% more likely to be alive at the end of the study. it found that married people with diabetes had a 14% higher chance of survival. and married patients with high blood pressure were 10% more likely to be alive. the researchers believe, although they cannot prove it, that a loving spouse may encourage you to stay fit and well. clearly not a good news story if you're single. no, i know. it's not, is it? the sport is coming up. president trump has spoken to king salman of saudi arabia amid the escalating crisis over qatar. our diplomatic correspondent james robbinsjoins us now from doha. what's going on? well, i think you can feel the political screws being
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tightened on qatar. this small gulf state accused by saudi arabia and particularly by the united states of being a sponsor of terrorism, of being a sponsor of terrorism, of being a sponsor of terrorism, of being a supporter and financer of radical islamist organisations in this region particularly the saudis wa nt this region particularly the saudis want qatar to stop sending money to hamas and also to various branches of the muslim brotherhood with which saudi arabia had complete animosity for years. qatar has been used to running a sort of slightly independent foreign policy within the region, but the regional super power, saudi arabia is making it clear that's no longer acceptable and they feel they have got president trump behind them after those explosive tweets he put out yesterday making it clear that he thought saudi arabia was quite right to finger this country qatar, although it, i have to say, denies being a funder of extremism and terrorism. i can't hear you in london, but i'll tell you one other
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thing. you can feel here, i think, the ex—at any time to which the pressure is being applied, notjust politically, but interestingly even football commentators working for qataris channels who are citizens of saudi arabia or the united arab emirates, neighbours of this country have cancelled their contracts with qatari contracts such is the scale of the isolation that other gulf states are trying to impose on this small state. james robins, ever the professional, even though you can't hear me, i will say thank you. this time tomorrow people will be voting in the general election. it has been 51 days since prime minister theresa may called a general election, and this morning, on the eve of the poll, we're speaking to the seven main political parties. the liberal democrats are standing on a ticket of holding a second referendum on the final brexit deal,
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with the option to remain in the eu adding one pence on the pound to income tax to fund an £8 billion investment into the nhs and social care and reversing some benefits cuts, such as the so—called bedroom tax. former deputy prime minister nick clegg joins us now. let's start about the issue of human rights, about how we deal with the threat of terrorism and theresa may says she is prepared to change the way we look at human rights legislation if that will strengthen her hand. but it is a complete and cynical distraction from the more difficult question. we heard this morning that one of the perpetrators of this wicked terrorist attack on london bridge was from italy, and came into the united kingdom even though he was on an eu database alerting the authorities to the possible danger he posed. i get theresa may has a plan of taking us out of the european union in a way which will wea ken european union in a way which will weaken and possibly entirely
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restrict our ability to access those databases in the future. that is the kind of thing we should be talking about and which she should provide an answer for. how will she ensure that with her extreme interpretation of brexiter she will notjeopardise our security further by cutting us off from those databases? human rights legislation does not cause these awful attacks in manchester and london. theresa may has a track record of making these explosive and misleading claims. a few years ago she claimed that someone was not being deported from this country because they owned a cat. that turned out to be publicly untrue. i think it is time and i think we should do the british people the honour, if you like, and show them the respect of focusing on the concrete issues, as we try to keep ourselves safer after these two
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awful terrorist attacks. security has become the primary issue. brexit previously was the major issue. there is a link between the two and the lib dems are making bad, with reference to the access of information that we may or may not have after brexit. this gets a little bit technical but let me simple five. theresa may has declared, in one of the few things and she has revealed about brexit, having ducked all other detailed questions about it over the last 51 days, she has said that the one thing she is clear about is that we will not in anyway abide by european law, rulings, and judgments from the european court ofjustice. if she sticks to that, it will make it illegal for 27 other countries in the european union to continue to share that very valuable data, which our police forces and border forces and intelligence agencies use on a huge scale everyday of every week at the moment, to go after and apprehend would be criminals and terrorists, because legally they would not be able to share their
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data with a country which, under theresa may's plan, would not abide by the rules, the data protection rules and so on which underpin the way that those databases operate. i think it is that kind of thing for which i would have hoped we would have some answers during this campaign. those are the concrete decisions that the next parliament will need to take. and what is such a pity is that we have had a seven—week campaign where theresa may claimed it was all about brexit but then has basically run for the hills and has not said anything of any significance about brexit at all. your party has made it very clear that you are prepared to ignore the first, i say the first, the referendum on brexit. you are happy to ignore the fact that most people in this country want out of the eu? that is not our position at all. our position was first promoted by david davis and john redwood some yea rs by david davis and john redwood some years ago, and it was that there would be a huge gap between the
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decision we took as a country last year, and! decision we took as a country last year, and i regretted but that is the decision stands, a decision to leave the european union, but there will be a considerable amount of time and a huge gap between what was promised to the british people, £350 million to the nhs, remember that, a vat cut and an economic you to be asked, and the content of any deal that theresa may rings back. —— and economic utopia. and then the question comes, not having a second referendum but having a first look and a first referendum at the actual deal itself, which will affect everything from how our fishermen fish and farmers farm, how our universities operate and the great manufacturing cities like this, sheffield, continue to export. and then the question is, is it for theresa may to make a judgment as to whether the deal is right for us, on her own in downing street bunker or
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is it just the her own in downing street bunker or is itjust the politicians who are entitled to decide, or can we, the rest of us, get a look in by way of a referendum. not a second referendum, a first referendum on the deal when it materialises. we have used the word deal a few times, but can you be absolutely clear on the lib dem position going into this general election? i know it has been suggested that there might be an alliance but are you playing with words? people have been talking about some progressive arrangement between the parties, possibly, with the snp, possibly, with labour. either no deals of any kind possible, or is this a bit of a grey area where maybe we will call it something else and there might be the occasional deal? is that still a possibility? tim farron has made it abundantly clear that there will not be any coalition, no deals, no pacts of any description. if there is a hung parliament, so no—one has an absolute majority, and i do not think that is likely remotely. i
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think that is likely remotely. i think conservatives are on to win. i don't think they deserve a majority but i think they certainly will get one. setting my predictions aside, which have often been wrong in the past and might be wrong again, if there is a hung parliament, the country has a choice. either you have a minority parliament to beg and scrape every time it needs to get the votes on its side in parliament, and every time there is a vote in parliament, and it governs in whitehall as a minority administration, or we go back to the polls all over again, after a short period of time. that is the basic choice. personally, ithink period of time. that is the basic choice. personally, i think it is highly unlikely to happen that way. nick clegg, thank you very much for your time this morning. shall we catch up with the weather? matt is talking about slightly warmer temperatures. and now the rain. it will look better than yesterday, especially after that date in soggy
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sa lfo rd. especially after that date in soggy salford. but it was not quite as wet in edinburgh, weather the week has started with well over a month of rain falling started with well over a month of rainfalling in started with well over a month of rain falling in the space of a day and a half. if you are unhappy with those conditions, you are not alone. this weather watcher‘s shot shows us some of the bluetits pretty unhappy. these are the sort of scenes we have seen these are the sort of scenes we have seen this morning that many others are also seeing. this cloud is still in place. we still have strong wind, and there is still rain around at the moment. the rain will remain heaviest across the north—east, around the moray firth, through parts of caithness, and orkney as well. still gusting to gale force in some spots. contrast that with the west of scotland, where it is a calmer start. the wind is light, pleasa nt after a calmer start. the wind is light, pleasant after a cool start. and away from eastern coasts, it is a sunny morning. that is pushing eastwards, with conditions improving
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in lincolnshire and across norfolk very shortly. but across the rest of england, sunny spells, with lighter winds, and it may take into the afternoon before we start to see things dry out in the north—east of scotland. it will stay cloudy in orkney and shetland but for most, a fine afternoon. dry with sunny spells and a bit of rain in parts of devon, cornwall and the south—west of wales. but with the wind lighter than yesterday, it should feel warmer out there. into tonight we start dry across many areas but outbreaks of rain will come and go. northern ireland in southern scotland, there will be rain and dry weather. the driest overall will be northern scotland, because of the cold start to thursday. the best of the dry weather will be here throughout. we will see a lot of dry weather in the south—east. sunshine coming through and it will feel reasonably warm. the rest of england and wales, and breaks of rain coming in during the day, heaviest across
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western areas with a rumble of thunder into the afternoon. rain spreads through the morning and afternoon, but for most of us, it will be chilliest in the brightest conditions. in northern scotland, things are swapping around again. the weather front clearing away from england and wales as well as northern ireland. here we will see sunshine and showers on friday, heaviest during the afternoon across eastern areas. western areas, fewer showers, and a bit more sunshine to finish the day. a quick peek into the weekend, we will see further rain at times. back to you both. thanks, matt. this is where we test matt to see if he has got it right. straight to warwick castle and the sun is shining. steph appears to be in combat. fortu nately, in combat. fortunately, i am not the one doing this sword fight this morning. this is two of our knights, in brussels
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at the moment for sure they will be doing later on. hundreds of thousands of come to visit this medieval castle, built in ten six to -- 1058 medieval castle, built in ten six to —— 1058 by william the conqueror. kohli can tell is a bit more about what is going on here. we have to boys having a bit of a joust, steph. and this is another extract from the show. the guys have been rehearsing some moves. we have wars of the roses, live, a big show we are putting on here during the summer holidays at the castle, and these quys holidays at the castle, and these guys are going at each other. the red rose versus the white rose. a bit of jousting red rose versus the white rose. a bit ofjousting in the morning, it gets you up and out of bed. does it hurt? it does a bit. the guys are hitting hard and they are trying to hitting hard and they are trying to hit each other on the shield. and now you're watching, bang, pickets. we're not full pelt this morning,
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although we do in the show. we are here with the breakfast butty van, travelling all over the country. we have been looking at all kinds of different issues about the economy, what businesses want to hear, and what businesses want to hear, and what people more generally want to hear from the politicians what people more generally want to hearfrom the politicians in what people more generally want to hear from the politicians in the run—up to the election. today we are talking about tax because we all pay it in one form or another. we wanted to find out more about what the parties are saying in terms of what beer tax manifesto ideas are. sarah, thank you forjoining us. what are your thoughts on what the parties say in terms of the tax offerings? there are different amounts of detail in the different manifestos, so not sold by what anyone is promising us. the conservatives have not renewed their pledge to freeze national insurance which means that national insurance which means that national insurance which means that national insurance rates could go up. and we know the pledges they
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have made that they will be increasing the threshold for inheritance tax and also for higher rate tax, so there will be fewer people paying 45%. on the labour party manifesto, they are focusing their tax on the higher earners, those earning £80,000 or more. and there will be a new 50% tax rate coming infor there will be a new 50% tax rate coming in for those earning more than £123,000. the lib dems are looking at increasing the 1p tax rate, to raise £6 billion for the nhs. and find out all about those ma nifestos nhs. and find out all about those manifestos online. becky very much. but now, let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. hello. after the very wet and windy
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weather yesterday, for much of the country it's looking like a quieter day. still some strong winds associated with this area of low pressure. some rain for a time as well. to the south—west, another system will bring cloud and rain later in the day, but in between, for much of the country, for much of the day, it's looking dry and bright and some spells of sunshine, but the cloud increasing from the west through the afternoon. we will see rain heading into devon and cornwall as we head towards the latter half of the day. head towards hampshire and essex and east anglia staying largely dry. lighter winds and it will feel warmer in the sunshine. we will see the rain getting into western parts of wales and into northern ireland by the end of the day. once that rain clears from eastern parts of scotland we should have a largely dry day and spells of sunshine, but always feeling cool in
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the brisk north—westerly wind. so here is our rain pushing its way north and eastwards through this evening and overnight. it could be heavy over the welsh mountains. probably not getting up to scotland until tomorrow, here we could see lows of six or seven celsius. our rain is still with us tomorrow again on its journey north and eastwards. not so much rain getting across to south—east england, but behind that rain there will be a few showers. if you catch one, they could be quite sharp. so nowhere reliably dry tomorrow. temperatures 14 to 20 celsius. low pressure is still with us on friday. another system heading our way as we go into the weekend. yes, further rain around at times. probably quite showery through friday and any sunshine could see highs of 20 or 21 celsius, but the breeze will be picking up again. we will keep the breezy conditions through the weekend. there will be rain at time, but also some sunshine. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. so less than 24 hours until britian
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goes to the polls, so which party has the policies to make voters prosper in a post—brexit world? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 7thjune. we'll hearfrom both main parties on how they'll pay for public services and manage the country's finances. also in the programme: australia sees yet another quarter of economic growth, but is 26 years of growth a world record?
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