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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 7, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello. it's 9am. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. well, it's here, the last full day of campaigning in the general election. have you made up your mind yet? let me know either way and who you think you're going to vote for tomorrow and why. we will have all the latest from the main parties as they push for votes up and down the country. last day of campaigning means our last election blind dates where we've been playing matchmaker to well—known faces who are poles apart on politics. today it's the turn of former labour advisor ayesha hazarika and the snp's tommy shepherd. things have changed and they have changed dramatically. you know brexit changes everything. stop banging on about it for a while and talk about the other issues, the really, really important issues. find out more at 9.15am. also, "you need to do it", the text sent by a woman on trial in america for urging her boyfriend to kill himself. prosecutors say michelle carter drove conrad roy to take his own life so she'd get attention.
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hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until 11am. so much for you today coming up. this hour we are talking to a mum who is calling for a vaccine that is exclusively given to girls to be given to boys too. it's to protect against a virus called hpv which can cause different types of cancer and sexually transmitted diseases. have you got sons and do you want them protected? an official decision has yet to be made as to whether boys should get it. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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plus have you made up your mind how you are going to vote? let me know who and why, and if you're still undecided, what is it that you're weighing up? our top story today. it's the final day of campaigning in the general election and the party leaders will be on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain in a last push for votes. the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security following the london bridge attack and manchester. our political guru norman smith is at westminster. who is doing what and where today, norman? there isjust frenetic activity today, so mrs may started early doors down in smithfield market. that's the old meat market in central london, not the place to go if you're a squeamish about coming face—to—face with a cow's carcass first thing in the morning, but mrs may started there. jeremy corbyn is starting out in glasgow. he's winding his way down through wales and ends up in his home patch
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in islington in central london and tim farron is dotting around to various key target seats for the lib dems. often sort of university towns where he's trying to hoover up some of the remain support. so that blizzard of last minute activity to claw in as many votes just before election day. now, news about diane abbott. she isn't very well, is she? she isn't, no. i guess a lot of us we re she isn't, no. i guess a lot of us were sort of raising eyebrows when she pulled out of that woman's hour debate yesterday at the last minute and we all thought aye—aye the labour leadership told her not to do it because she has been unsteady in some of her public appearances. you remember that time when she had a very difficult time trying to remember the police numbers and how much it was going to cost to implement labour's policy. this morning, jeremy corbyn was asked about diane abbott and he said she was still not well and now we've had a statement from labour saying actually her shadow is going to
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stand, her number two is going to stand, her number two is going to stand in for herfor a stand, her number two is going to stand in for her for a few days. that suggests this isn'tjust passing migraine or a dickie tummy, it suggests diane abbott really might be quite ill. it seems she will be out of action for a bit. 0k. 0k. the will be out of action for a bit. 0k. ok. the question that people like you probably don't like very much, but everybody wants to know! who is going to win this election, norman? 0h going to win this election, norman? oh my god. you might as well ask mystic meg! why ask me. i have got just about every political call wrong in the past five years. i think anything could happen because frankly who knows what people out there are thinking. we seem to live in volatile uncertain times. you think of brexit. you think of donald trump. i would just say fasten your seat belts and hold on and let's see! what a wonderfully,ic and
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gorgeous answerment more from norman later. joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. that's a good summary of how we're all feeling about it! the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch—list. the italian authorities said they had issued warnings about yousef zaghba, whom they suspected of supporting the islamic state group, after he tried to travel to syria. nick quraishi reports. these are the three men who brought terror to the streets of london in a matter of minutes. the third confirmed as youssef zaghba was an italian national born in morocco who lived in east london. the 22—year—old wasn't regarded as a security threat by police or mi5, but today questions for the home office. zaghba was stopped at bologna airport last year on suspicion of heading to syria. italian police say he was placed on a watch—list with british authorities tipped off. border security staff are accused of still allowing him to return to the uk. the home office has
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declined to comment. the australian government says two of its nationals were among the seven people killed. their names haven't been officially confirmed. kirsty boden, a senior nurse at guy's hospital, murdered as she ran to help people who had been knocked down on london bridge. described as selfless, caring and heroic. the family of sara zelenak, a nanny from brisbane, say they are fearing the worst. she's one of those people that doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't do anything wrong. she's amazing and she's 2! years of age. french media have also confirmed the death of alexandre pigeard, a borough market restaurant waiter from normandy. sebastien boulanger‘s family are travelling to the uk from france to find out what's happened to the chef. desperate searches and desperate days for so many who found themselves caught up in this tragedy. our correspondent sara smith is at
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new scotland yard. what's the latest? officers from new scotla nd what's the latest? officers from new scotland yard carried out a search warrant in east london, in ilford overnight. at 1.30am they arrested a 30—year—old man. now, searches are carrying on at that address as they are at other addresses in east london. this man, this 30—year—old, was arrested on suspicion of commission, preparation, or instigation of terrorist acts and he's being held for questioning at a police station in south london. there are also other arrests yesterday in barking. so far we know that 12 people have been arrest, who have been arrested have been released without charge. there are two people in custody. there was a man in his 30s arrested in ireland, in wexford, just south of dublin. he is arrested on his connections with
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one of the killers, rachid redouane. there was an arrest made at heathrow. that's in connection with the manchester bombings. a 38—year—old man was arrested there. all in all, there are seven people in custody as far as that investigation is concerned. thank you, sara. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed, have arrested a 38—year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation. he's the 19th person to be arrested. seven are still in custody. detectives say they've found evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi, had stored parts for his device in a white nissan micra seized in rusholme. reports from iran say a security guard has been killed in a shooting in the country's parliament in tehran. an armed man is said to have entered the building and opened fire, wounding members of the public. across the city, at a this rhine a suicide bomber reportedly shot several people before detonating
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explosives. president trump has spoken to the king of saudi arabia to discuss his country's decision to cut ties with qatar because of its alleged support for extremist groups. mr trump had earlier backed the move, saying it could be "the beginning of the end to the horror of terrorism". a white house spokesman said the president had stressed the need for unity in the gulf. there are calls for the hpv vaccine, which is currently only given to girls, to be received by boys too. the human papilloma virus jab is offered to teenage girls in the uk to protect against cervical cancer. experts say there is increasing evidence on links between hpv infection and other cancers. after 10am, we'll be talking to a mum, who's had a hpv—related cancer herself, and wants her sons to receive the vaccine as well as her daughter. the american—based taxi firm, uber, says it has sacked 20 employees after an investigation into complaints of sexual harassment, bullying and other issues. uber has been underfire over its treatment of women staff since a former employee wrote a scathing blog post
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about her experience. most complaints came from workers at the firm's san francisco base. a iii—year study of nearly a million people at risk of developing heart disease, found those who were married fared much better than those who were single. researchers from aston medical school found married people with high cholesterol were i6% more likely to be alive at the end of the study. it also found that married people with diabetes had a 14% higher chance of survival. and married patients with high blood pressure were 10% more likely to be alive. researchers believe, although they cannot prove it, that a loving spouse may encourage you to stay fit and well. it could be a whole range of things ranging from having someone, a close relative to be able to offer you support in taking your medications, being your rehab programmes and things and also seeking help from a
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doctor when you know you need it and in particular men are notoriously bad for doing that and it's having a spouse bad for doing that and it's having a spouse can bad for doing that and it's having a spouse can help with that. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. thank you very much. one viewer in dundee says i normally vote snp, but i will be voting conservative because the snp want to stay in the european union. and this text from adrian, "i'm voting labour. we have had yea rs of adrian, "i'm voting labour. we have had years of austerity with no improvement." get in touch with us throughout the morning. who are you going to vote for and why and if you're undecided tell me what it is that you're weighing up at this late stage. if you're texting, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport with hugh woozencroft. the british and irish lions are in action on their tour of new zealand — how's it going? one media outlet in new zealand
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describing warren gatland's side as reaching levels of mead ok rity. before the match there was a minute's silence held in memory of the victims of the recent terror attacks in london and manchester. the lions faced down a traditional chant. the blues showed some class. the blues went ahead early on. the lions had a try narrowly ruled out before the back row bundled over to square things up. a conversion and further penalty edged the lions ahead. there are ten minutes before half—time and that one the lions much improved so far, but still
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plenty to play for in the coming minutes. the fa seem determined to tackle hooliganism. tell us about the bans they've handed out to supporters. two supporters club members made nazi gestures in the match against germ in march. there was booing of the german national anthem and singing about the second world war as well ahead of the match in dortmund. the fa has taken a strong line now. the two fans who made nazi references towards german fans have been handed lifetime bans from the england supporters travel club. that's the only way to get england tickets away from homement they are forbidden to attend all of their country's away games. 27 people have seen their membership suspended for varying lengths of time. six handed written warnings and other cases pending as well and the fa taking a
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strong stance. they‘ re pending as well and the fa taking a strong stance. they're determined to tackle what they fear is a new generation of hooliganism. now, you've got some really dramatic pictures to show us from the america's cup. what's the latest from sir ben ainslie's challenge? they are into the semifinal of qualifying taking on new zealand, but look at this for a moment of drama yesterday. new zealand's catamaran suddenly ca psizing forwards on the run—in to the start of one of the races. some crew were left suspended in the boat's hull above the water. three were thrown overboard, but all the crew were safe and accounted for. some cuts and bruises, of course, but they did say it was entirely their fault. ba r captain sir ben said he'd never seen anything like it in his 30 yea rs of seen anything like it in his 30 years of racing. it does mean they got a helping hand, ben ainslie's team. they trail new zealand 3—i got a helping hand, ben ainslie's team. they trail new zealand 3—1 in
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the best of nine series. plenty of work. they should be back on the water in bermuda later on if the weather conditions are suitable. time for the sixth and final edition of our election blind dates. over the last week, we've been playing matchmaker to some well—known faces who are poles apart when it comes to politics. nigel farage and racheljohnson, peter stringfellow and mary beard, gina miller and godfrey bloom — our unlikely couples have ended up having some fascinating conversations and quite often, got on pretty well. you've told us that you've really appreciated seeing people who disagree with each other on some fundamental issues, talking about them in a civilised, grown—up way. a today, the snp's tommy sheppard — who set up the stand comedy club — meets ayesha hazarika. she was once advisor to labour's ed miliband, now she's a stand up comedian. but when the conversation turns to the question of scottish independence, will either of them be laughing? there's an election on and people
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are talking politics. so what happens when you send two people with opposing views on a lunch date? i'm well nervous. i'm like, oh my god, this has been so long. literally. will sparks fly? you see people that are sat there and can go and work but they choose not to. they choose to go and sign on — it angers me. or will things hot up? you look gloriously distinguished. hit me with it. slightly hunky. you're quite a pretty lady. laughter. get that on camera! and will the political... when people stand at the dispatch box and tell me there's more money in education, i look around and wonder where it's gone. because it's not in my children's school. ..get personal. what are you going to do? snog her? no! well... yeah. i went on a date with a guy
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and he drank so much. he actually threw up in the cab. terrible date. he did then said to me, you couldn't pay for the cab, could you? laughter. my name is ayesha hazarika. i'm a former labour adviser. gordon brown, harriet harman, ed miliband — that went really well. now i'm a political commentator and a stand—up comedian. when i was growing up in the west of scotland you had religion, the labour party and you had rangers and celtic. both rangers and the labour party. i think i'm the kind of person on a date i'll have strong initial reactions to somebody. do you think sparks are going to fly? it depends who it is. hello, i'm tommy sheppard. i'm the snp candidate for edinburgh east. i used to run the stand comedy club. it's been a long time since i've been on a date. i'm a wee bit apprehensive. i'm really curious as to who it's going to be, you know. who would you not want to be
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going on a date with? laughter. well, um... i'll take all comers. is there anyone i wouldn't go on a date with? do you know, i'm that desperate, probably not. i will recognise the person, will i? ah! hiya. hello, tommy! how are you? do you know what, i thought it was going to be alex salmond. i thought it was going to be a tory! wow, well, this will be fun. this will be fun. we're going to agree with each other too much, i think. are you still based in london? yes. but i'm going all round the country. are you still labour? yes, i'm still labour. are you ready for prime minister corbyn? well... can you handle it? can you handle it, tommy? i don't know. you know, given that she was 2a points ahead in the polls, he started off the campaign with a photocall in a toilet, it was sort of like, everyone was, i think we know how this story ends.
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well, here we are, six days out and it's incredible. i know. she's gone from strong and stable to not willing to turn up on woman's hour. also, she's had such a stinker of a campaign. it's a car crash, isn't it? who would have thought it? what's interesting, right, she's been a lucky general. she didn't even have a proper leadership contest. she had to go up against andrea leadsom. that is like winning wimbledon against a wheelie bin. laughter. i actually feel sorry for her. why wouldn't you do woman's hour? i know. the thing is, woman's hour is not an easy game. people make the assumption that women's media is like a soft ride. they do it with mumsnet and with woman's hour. they sometimes do it with women's magazines. and actually it's just really insulting to think that because you have a female journalist the questions aren't going to be as tough or anything like that. but to be honest, the fact that theresa may won't even turn up to do it, that speaks absolutely volumes. i feel she's in a witness
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protection scheme now. laughter. you've got to give it a go. thank you. i was on this week last night with andrew neil. and you know what he's like. so i spent — not hours, days — it was like cramming for an exam. i knew the price of every single spending commitment in the snp manifesto. did he ask me about any of them? did he bleep. were you like, damm, ask me, ask me? i could have just gone in there and chatted like this, to be honest. i've got to eat something which i'm not going to get all over myself. i think we're all cautious of not having a miliband moment. laughter. cheeky! so, listen, you're in touch with the right wing of the labour party. don't call it the right wing of the labour party! that's not fair, the right wing of the labour party. well, there's a right
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and left of everything. 0k, how would you describe it, then? well, people who just don't agree with corbyn. 0k. well, those people, what are they going to do if corbyn actually doesn't lose dreadfully? another five years ofjust trying to knife him in the back, it's a bit... that's going to be boring, apart from anything else. on that, we are a party that exists to win parliamentary seats, that is what the labour party exists to do, to get into power, to do all the good things we want to do. so if you tick that box, everything else is forgiven? no, i'm not saying that, hear me out. what i will say is that corbyn has had a good election campaign. so i think the truth is, even if he loses the election and even if loads of labour mps lose their seats, i reckon he will still be around as the leader of the labour party. why do you want another scottish referendum ? don't you think the people of scotland have had enough of referendums? things have changed quite dramatically. the united kingdom that people voted to be part of in 2014 is not going to be there in the future.
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and i think... if you go to a shop and you buy something, and you get it home... fantastic, that looks amazing. wow, that's big. wow. if you go to a shop, you buy something, you take it home and you open it up, and what you find is not what it says on the packet, well, you take it back and you say, "this isn't what i wanted." and i think a lot of people are finding that the decision they took in 2014 isn't what it said on the packet. there's been a lot of democracy in scotland. i think the good thing about that is people are really energised about politics in scotland. but i think the plea from people is, can we just move off the obsession about the referendum for a while? who's obsessed? nicola sturgeon is like the beyonce of scottish politics. she's a woman obsessed with her independence. and i think she's a strong leader. that's a great soundbite but it's not true. she's a good performer. and let's just see some of that focus on the big dayjob stuff. every time somebody goes to the chemist and gets a prescription and doesn't pay £8.60
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— that's doing the dayjob. every time a kid in a scottish university doesn't get a bill for £27,000 for their fees, that's doing the dayjob. sure. if you look at nicola's speech, she was very very clear, that now was not the time for a second independence referendum. we need to know the shape of brexit first. otherwise, the whole thing is... so why bring it up now? this is the thing. that's what's so sneaky about it. it's like saying "i don't want to have this conversation now, i want to have it in three years' time." well, wait and have it in a few years' time. can i tell you exactly why? we're all frustrated with theresa may about brexit. you're being unfair. she's treating the public like potatoes, best kept in the dark. it's not helping anybody. we don't know how brexit is going to pan out. but we live in a democracy. we do. and my goodness, we've had plenty of democracy. and people have the right to change their minds. 0k. i thought it was a once in a generation? no. only when it suits. there's no point asking the question again if no—one has changed their mind
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or if circumstances haven't changed. but things have changed. they've changed dramatically. you must accept that. you know brexit changes everything. stop banging on about it for a while and talk about the other issues, the really, really important issues. you know, you have been in government for a long time in scotland. ten years. there are lots of issues to be dealt with. i'm not saying things are perfect. there is much more that needs to be done but i would ask you to note two things. one, that the actual performance of the health service in scotland is better than it is in england. not good enough, but it is better. the second thing to note, we do that within a framework of scottish parliament operating within the rules and within budgets which are mainly set in number 10 and number 11 downing street. come on, you live in london. i do. but my mum and dad... my dad was in hospital recently and was lying on a trolley in a corridorfor quite a while before he got into bed.
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so you can see the health service north and south of the border. you can't sit there with a straight face and tell me that it's just as bad in scotland as it is in england. i wouldn'tjudge the fact... just because people are not rioting in the streets, that's not a barometer that everything's going well. but then look at education. we've had stuff out recently, literacy and numeracy has taken a big hit. we've got children from poor backgrounds not making it to university. there is a social mobility issue. well, actually, the figures are improving for children from working—class backgrounds getting to university. well, there has been an issue. even your education minister has said there has been an issue. the point is, in scotland, you have a scottish government that is focused on doing something about those problems. admits that they are there, understands why they are there. whereas in england, what's the education policy here? the tories just want to bring back grammar schools. on that we can agree. which by definition isn't going to help most people. listen, on that we can agree. are you guys worried that you're going to lose some seats to the conservatives? i can't believe i'm even saying those words. we used to talk about there being more giant pandas than tory mps. scotland had become
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a tory free zone. laughter. truth is, there has always been scottish tories and there probably always will be. we are seeing a couple of things. we're seeing them be more confident and turning out in greater numbers than they've done for some years. and do you think part of that is down to the fact that ruth davidson, she's quite a big figure, isn't she? quite charismatic, she's very funny. do you think that has had a big factor in it? i think she's been very effective at sort of humanising and modernising the brand. do you ever try and use humour? i think i do gravitas quite well. 0h! and seriousness, you know. get you, tommy! but i really can't...
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i like to have a laugh and i canjoke about stuff but i don't put it in speeches. because i can't do it right. i mean, it's a gift. having done stand—up gigs for a long time, pmqs has an element of the late—night show at the comedy store when it's just incredibly rowdy. and the level of heckling. and i do have to say, it strikes fear and terror into the heart of every politician that has to do it. and i think there, if you can have a good line or something funny to use, it can be quite powerful. the killer one—liner. yeah. the funniest bits are not the scripted one—liners. the funniest bits are the adlibs or the heckles. do you remember there was this terrible thing when david cameron was under loads of pressure, it was around the murdoch phone hacking stuff? and it turns out he had been horse riding on rebekah brooks' horse. ages and ages ago. and one of our backbenchers just started going, "neigh!" and it was so juvenile, but i'm afraid everyone absolutely wet themselves laughing. it was very good.
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and the prime minister just looked ridiculous. and then there was that thing with the animal's head. but... oink oink. laughter. i've got a funny story about that. during the remain campaign for the referendum, we went on a cross party bus, myself, harriet harman, lots of other people including david cameron. and we went to this farm in the south west to speak to these farmers. and the press team basically said to us beforehand, don't even think about getting a picture of the prime minister and the pig. laughter. are we splitting this? how much is it? 0k. if we're generous with the tip... well... 20? i'll put in the bulk of it which is ironic. shall we have a discussion about the barnett formula now? laughter. we'll put in equal measures and look forward to an equal partnership between scotland and the rest of the uk. ah!
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it was good. yeah, it was good. i had a fun time. the independence thing does obviously annoy me because the snp is obsessed with the independence question. and they always will be. they are a sort of single issue party. that's ridiculous. ifeel like we're going round and round and round again. it's like deja vu, it's like groundhog day. i expect i haven't changed your mind and you haven't changed my mind. but there we go. i think tommy and i could be really good friends but i don't think we've got a political future ahead of us. no. it's just as well politics isn't the only thing in life, isn't it? laughter. so you're heading back up the road? four o'clock train, yeah. allen says these election blind
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dates have been lol. that was the last in the election blind date series. do not worry, you can catch up series. do not worry, you can catch up on all of our couples on our programme page. and let us know what you think using the hashtags election blind dates and #victorialive. and with the news that one of the london attackers was able to enter the uk, despite being on an eu—wide watch list — we ask "how safe are our borders?" here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. it is the final day of campaigning
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in the general election. the closing stages of the campaign have been dominated by the issue of security, following the london bridge attack. theresa may has said if the conservatives are re—elected she would scrap any human rights laws that prevent her from introducing tougher anti—terror measures. the former liberal democrat leader, nick clegg, accused her of trying to make up clegg, accused her of trying to make upfor clegg, accused her of trying to make up for her lacklustre election campaign. jeremy corbyn said the shadow home secretary, diane abbott is unwell and is taking a breakfrom secretary, diane abbott is unwell and is taking a break from the campaign. he said diane abbott who withdrew from a debate on woman's hour had received totally unfair levels of abuse. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch list. the italian authorities said they had issued warnings about yousef zaghba after they suspected that he was a supporter of the islamic state group who'd been trying to travel to syria.
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in a further development, detectives have arrested a 30—year—old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford, east london. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed have arrested a 38 year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation. he's the 19th person to be arrested. seven are still in custody. an inquest into the 22 deaths at the manchester arena will open tomorrow. reports from iran say seven people have been killed and four have been taken hostage at the country's parliament in tehran. an armed man is said to have entered the building and opened fire, wounding members of the public. across the city, at a shrine housing the tomb of ayatollah khomenei founder of the republic, a suicide bomber reportedly shot several people before detonating explosives. president trump has spoken to the king of saudi arabia to discuss his country's decision to cut ties with qatar because of its alleged support for extremist groups. mr trump had earlier backed the move, saying it could be "the beginning of the end to the horror of terrorism". a white house spokesman said the president had stressed the need for unity in the gulf.
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that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10am. thank you. here's some sport now with hugh. the british and irish lions are trailing in the second match of their tour to new zealand. they were leading against the auckland blues at half—time thanks to a try from cj stander. as part of the football association's vow to tackle hooliganism, they've handed out lifetime bans for the first time — two supporters who made nazi gestures at the friendly against germany in dortmund in march will never again be allowed to go to an away game. two wins from two took england's cricketers through to the semi—finals of the champions trophy. they beat new zealand by 87 runs in cardiff and they'll top their group and knock out australia, if they beat them at edgbaston on saturday. and there was a dramatic race win for sir ben ainslie's team
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in the america's cup semi—finals when the new zealand boat capsized — all the crew members were fine — and they still lead the british team 3—1, with the first to five going through. that's all the sport for now. i will have more at 10am. thank you very much for letting me know who you're going to vote for. this viewer says, "i'm switching to labour. the conservatives have failed me in every way." sheila says, "i'm voting conservative." this text from sam, "i believe that democracy only votes based on our values. therefore, i'm voting lib dems even though they are unlikely to make it into government. they will never have a chance to lead the country if they don't gain any momentum." keep those coming in. if you're undecided, what is it that you're undecided, what is it that you're weighing up? what will it be that finally makes the decision for you? let me know. send me an e—mail.
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or you you? let me know. send me an e—mail. oryou can you? let me know. send me an e—mail. or you can tweet which is using the hashtag victoria live. khuram butt‘s uncle in pakistan has been talking to our correspondent. i condemn first of all this incident in this brutal action. i am feeling ashamed talking about this. innocent people are killed in this action. i have very deep sympathies with all the victims, innocent victims, even i would like to say no religion allows this shameful brutal action. khuram butt was born in pakistan, but moved to london as a child.
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he only visited pakistan twice. his uncle said on his last trip in 2013 he noticed he had become more religious, but not extreme. when he came he started off reading prayers and he had a beard also. before that these symptoms, i did not find in him. he found out about butt‘s involvement on the night of the attack. butt‘s mother had seen this photo on the news and recognised her son. i received a call from the uk, from my sister's home, and she was weeping and she only said that something happened with khuram. i switched on my television. i started to listen
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to the bbc and cnn. sometimes they show a flash of that person who was stabbing. i also recognised that this is khuram. are you angry with khuram now? do you feel angry towards him? i can't explain in words. i don't have any words. what message do you have for the families of the victims? we're with them. they are on my mind, even i don't know their names, but i think they
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are my relatives, my brothers. i don't know their names, their nationalities and why they were killed. they came to the city to make their shopping, to make their dinners. who allows anyone to hit them and to die them? that's the uncle of khuram butt, one of the london attackers. meanwhile it's emerged that the third london terrorist, youseff zaghba, was on an eu—wide watch list after being stopped at an airport in italy last year. it's believed he was travelling to syria and it's reported he told officials, he "wa nted to be a terrorist". somehow despite being on that database, he was
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allowed into britain. we can talk now to the former head of the uk borders agency, tony smith. i'm really i' m really interested i'm really interested on behalf of our audience for you to talk through what is supposed to happen when an individual is added to this eu—wide database. first of all, what does that mean? first of all, there isn't an eu—wide database. there are something like 26 different databases in the eu. and the uk does have access to some of those. so i'm waiting to hear precisely what data was shared like everybody else. we do have a national uk database and thatis do have a national uk database and that is accessible by a range of different agencies who can put data directly on to that and that would enable our officers at the uk border
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to intervene if they are asked to do so by an agency. so as we speak we know that this person was put on a watch—list by the italians, but we don't know what they mean by the watch—list and we don't know whether or not that was shared routinely with us or whether it was passed as an individual risk so there is a lot of information to come out. i think it would be wrong to jump to any conclusions. that's fair enough. it was put as i understand it, on something called the schengen database. what something called the schengen data base. what is something called the schengen database. what is that? there is a schengen information system. as you know the schengen group, we are not pa rt know the schengen group, we are not part of the schengen group. that's pa rt part of the schengen group. that's part of the schengen group. that's part of a group of countries that don't have borders between them and they have to have a central information system that enables them to share data. there is however the schengen inaudible which was agreed in the treaty of
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amsterdam which does enable the uk and other eu countries have access to some components of the schengen information system, but i don't know whether in this case that part of the schengen system was shared with the schengen system was shared with the uk or not. right, ok. from what you're describing then, unless youssef zaghba was on the uk watch—list then he wouldn't necessarily be stopped atan airport he wouldn't necessarily be stopped at an airport when he arrives here, is that correct? absolutely. he is a european citizen as i understand it. i don't know if he travelled on his european passport or on his identity card, but either way, european passport or on his identity card, but eitherway, he european passport or on his identity card, but either way, he benefits from freedom of movement. he would not have been asked any questions and there would have been simply a document check either through our e—gates or by an officer which would bea e—gates or by an officer which would be a straightforward watch—list check. so unless somebody somewhere, from another agency or from you
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know, orfrom from another agency or from you know, or from the from another agency or from you know, orfrom the eu had given us the data and uploaded that on to our watch—list there would have been no grounds for a border force officer to stop him and again, of course, when people put data on our watch—lists there are different types of codes and some are called stopping and non stopping codes. that would send a signal to border officers as to whether or not in the opinion of the person putting the data on that there was sufficient risk to stop that person then the border force would stop them and refer to whatever agency was the source. from a lay person's point of view, i'm a member of the public, i pay my taxes and i travel and i get on planes to places like italy and back again, if someone is arrested atan back again, if someone is arrested at an italian airport, suspected of travelling to syria and apparently says to officials, "i want to be a terrorist." i says to officials, "i want to be a terrorist. " i might says to officials, "i want to be a terrorist." i might have assumed and wrongly as you've pointed out that, there would be an eu—wide database
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where this individual‘s name would be placed so that were he to arrive at any other airport in the eu, of which we are still a member, it would flash on a computer screen. is that naive of me? yes. no, that's not an unreasonable assumption for you to make. we had a conference in london bridge where we had representatives from the european union talking about it. it doesn't follow that because somebody is detected on outbound and there is a sufficient reason for that person to be circulated across the eu or elsewhere. it is really a problem and it was identified in paris and brussels of how the eu deals with this. that's integrated to a single system and how risks are spread across all of the member states and it is not just across all of the member states and it is notjust the eu, we have if
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not more intelligence from the us, canada and australia. border agencies are always looking to gather intelligence and data and there has been 5,000 eu passport holders that we know have been to syria and come back again, but they haven't all been arrested and i think this is the problem that we're facing now is how do we track people like this, who are on the radar, but the evidence isn't sufficient to enable us to stop them or arrest them and that's going to all come out in the coming days as the investigation unfolds. is the current system working? well, i can only speak from my experience. i was the head of the border force in the period around the london 2012 olympics. i was responsible for the vetting and checking of many, many people coming to this country at a time when we were operating an alert level of severe and that worked well and we were able to mitigate a
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significant number of threats, but this is a moving feast and i do hope that the public bear with the intelligence services and with the border force. we are quite good at this, but there is no such thing i am afraid anywhere in the world such thing as a perfect border and we will need to learn lessons from this. nor a perfect database. thank you, tony smith. really interesting, former head of the uk border force. and a —— former head of the uk border force. anda —— a... we'll hear more about the 20 year—old woman on trial in america for allegedly urging her boyfriend to take his own life via text. so there's just one more day of campaigning until the general election. for the last few weeks, we've enlisted the help of twitter watchers at the think tank demos, to mine millions of tweets and tell us what people are talking about. twitter users are a small part of the electorate and this non—scientific analysis is not about how people are going to vote. just what they're talking about.
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and what they have been talking about. today it's all about their patterns of behaviour over the last 6 weeks. josh smith, you've been with us for that time. let's go back six weeks. good morning, yes. a lifetime ago. it has been a long and short campaign. we have been looking at the discussion on generic hashtags since the campaign was announced. these are the terms that the public were using about the election. the blue line near is the discussion of the conservatives and theresa may, the red line is the discussion ofjeremy corbyn and the labour party and the grey line is absolutely everybody else combined. what we see here, there are two things that stick out. the first thing is doing this kind of analysis, it lets you see what people are actually concerned with. orat people are actually concerned with. or at least what they are talking about. so we have seen spikes when
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the labour manifesto was launched, and some foreign policy speeches thatjeremy corbyn has given. after manchester, when the campaigning relaxed, there was a halt in campaigning and we saw a similar halt on twitter. at the second thing thatis halt on twitter. at the second thing that is striking about this is this grey line, which might be expected to u pta ke grey line, which might be expected to uptake as the labour and conservative lines have over the last week, it has remained pretty co nsta nt or last week, it has remained pretty constant or even declined as we approach the election. this has been released pricing. you been looking at what 400 supporters of some of the parties have been talking about. absolutely. so what we have tried to do, let me take you back to the beginning of may, two weeks into the campaign. everybody has got over their surprise that the election has been called at all. and these are words that labour were using during that week which are characteristic of that week's discussions. this is
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what labour supporters are talking about six weeks ago was. yes. we have removed the words from conservative supporters. this is one pa rty‘s conservative supporters. this is one party's view. and you can see there is quite a wide discussion, we're still talking about fox hunting, education, the media and fraud. there is one discussion that dominates and this is where labour have traditionally felt comfortable, and that is the nhs. quite a detailed discussion about health, nurses, hospitals etc. fast forward to this week, and this discussion is still focused on the nhs but the shifting patterns of conversation behind that have changed. so all parties, supporters from the conservatives, labour and all the other parties, we saw them reacting to the events of the last few weeks, london bridge and manchester. condemning them, expressing horror and anguish. and again, because this
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is what labour is talking about, we have removed those that were not about this. the way they have talked about this. the way they have talked about the attack has intended to concentrate on cuts, on decisions that the conservatives have made that the conservatives have made that might have contributed to this kind of extremism. and what about the 400 conservative supporters, what have they been talking about, starting six weeks ago? at the beginning of may we have a plural discussion with people talking about diane abbott, there is a feeling of confidence after gains in the mayoral leadership elections, but the main theme tying this discussion together is the thing which the election was meant to be all about, and that is brexit, the european union, brussels. that is what the conservatives were talking about at the beginning of may. again, fast forward to this week and we are living in a different world. two
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things that are interesting, first the conservatives are discussing much more this week than before the polling, which shows a narrowing of the leaves which the conservatives hold over labour, and they are using words like you guv, observation, polling, discussing that, wondering should they be worried? but the main discussion again has been around london bridge, it has been around terrorism and extremism, and instead of talking about policies that britain has taken leading up to this attack, they are talking about the terrorists themselves, the extremists themselves, and the need for us to do something? thank you for us to do something? thank you for your company over the last six weeks. let me bring you this news. norman smith was reporting earlier from westminster that diane abbott is not very well, and is going to be replaced in her role as labour's home affairs spokesperson. this news just in. apparently the period of being replaced is indefinite,
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according to at millbank. she is being replaced and that period of time is indefinite. still to come on the programme, vaccinating boys against hpv. we will tell you exactly what hpv is and we will be hearing from some of those affected by it. a 20 year old woman in the states is being accused of using texts to encourage her boyfriend to kill himself. 20 year old michelle carter has gone on trial in massachusetts, and is accused of voluntary manslaughter. in dozens of messages, carter is alleged to have repeatedly urged 18 year old conrad roy iii to kill himself. on the morning of his death, she wrote: "you need to do it, conrad. you're ready and prepared." nbc boston reporterjohn moroney has been following the case and he joins us on the phone now from outside
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tautonjuvenile court in massachusetts. thank you for talking to us, john. can you hear me ok? i can, thank you. tell our british audience what this trial centres around. the centres around this relationship between these two young people. this happened three years ago, when michelle carter was 17. conrad roy iii was 18. they have a relationship that had developed on social media, in what is really the focus of prosecutors and also the defence, these text messages that they shared over a period of time. i want point in time, the prosecution saying yesterday that she sent him dozens and dozens of messages, 40 in particular, asking him continually when he was going to do it, when he was going to take his life, because
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it was something he had talked about doing for a while, apparently, and in fact doing for a while, apparently, and infact in doing for a while, apparently, and in fact in 2012 he attempted to take his own life at that point in time but was unsuccessful. but then they developed a relationship, and michelle carter was troubled herself. this is when the text started. and she encouraged him, badgering him almost to take his life. that is what the prosecution is arguing. and what are the prosecution saying was her motive? they are saying that she was a student at glenville high school and was not necessarily that popular but by becoming the grieving girlfriend, that she would become popular. she did after his death establish and run benefits to raise money and raise awareness about suicide, not mentioning or telling anyone that
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she had had these conversations and text messages with conrad, putting his family, after he had died, she told his mother that she was sorry about what had happened, and that she had done everything she could to prevent him from taking his own life. i will read some more of the text messages for our audience. i already mentioned one in the introduction. you need to do it, conrad. michelle carter texted him that on the morning of the 12th of july. the day that he took his own life. you are ready and prepared. all you have to do is turn the generator on and you will be free and happy. she told him and another message, you are finally going to be happy in heaven with no more pain. it is ok to be scared and it is normal. i mean, you are about to die. then this: i thought you wanted to do this. the time is right and
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you are ready. just do it, baby. you have explained it was so she could raise funds and raise awareness, but is the prosecution also saying it is about her getting attention? that's correct. she noticed that she would receive sympathy as a grieving girlfriend and she took it a step further, by going out and soliciting, raising awareness about suicide. but it was all motivated by the fact that, according to the prosecution, she wanted attention. but you read the text messages and they were read in court yesterday, and they have been out to some degree but to give them read in court was shocking. her defence team yesterday, the day before yesterday, decided that they would not have a jury decided that they would not have a jury trial, that they would only go before a judge who will decide
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whether or not she's guilty. and i think a lot of the speck elation is that because these text messages are so difficult to hear for a jury, that perhaps they did not want to do that, to have a jury consider it. so instead they are going to a bench trial where a judge will make the determination because hopefully the defence feels, he will take the emotion out of it when a verdict is rendered. the audience will understandable manslaughter means, we have a charge of manslaughter when the person did not have any intent. what has michelle carter been charged with? she has been charged with involuntary manslaughter, which is just charged with involuntary manslaughter, which isjust a different use of the language. in terms of involuntary manslaughter, i
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am nota terms of involuntary manslaughter, i am not a lawyer myself but it is somewhat similar. thank you very much, john. john maroni, outside the court in massachusetts. and we will obviously bring you the defence when thatis obviously bring you the defence when that is a in the court case. let me reduce the messages from you run the country. 24 hours ahead of the voting in the general election. marilyn has e—mailed to say, i am voting lib dem. in a final, desperate attempt to vent our exit from the eu, which was a decision based on so much misinformation. and this from angela. i am undecided, i wa nt this from angela. i am undecided, i want a party that is going to support our police officers and given the resources they need, and i feel that our laws need changing on terrorism. the police should be able to arrest people on their radar and extremists to make it a safer world.
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thank you for those. particularly if you are undecided, we're very interested to hear what it is that you are weighing up, 24 hours before the polls open. you can message us on twitter, or on facebook. the latest news and sport is on the way at ten o'clock but before that, the weather, with matt taylor. and it is called. it certainly has been. and a bit stormy. the wind is particularly strong, unseasonably so forjune. the best of the gusts on the aberdeenshire coast. with the trees in full leaf, and has led to seems like this one, captured in somerset. it was notjust like this one, captured in somerset. it was not just about the cold and the wind yesterday. it was also about the rain. edinburgh, for instance, had well over a month's worth following just a day and a half. 83 millimetres in total. it has stopped raining here now at least but as our weather watchers have shown us, it is still raining
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across parts of eastern scotland. this was aberdeenshire a short while ago. but it is now in the minority because more blue skies are overhead. a better start of the day for the vast majority, probably the best day of the week for many. if you look across the satellite picture, we can see clear skies. cloud in eastern scotland producing heavy rain and gusty wind still around. but the wind will ease, and the rain is pushing away. at the same time, it is clouding over. towards the end of the afternoon we will see better conditions across eastern scotland. it could be still cloudy, damp and windy across orkney, shetland and caithness. elsewhere, dry with sunny spells. the morning sunshine will give way to more cloud in northern ireland, staying dry until late in the day. across much of england and wales, it will be a sunny afternoon. the sunshine turning hazy, but
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temperatures up on yesterday's values. south west wales, devon and cornwall, finishing the afternoon with outbreaks of rain. through tonight, the rain spreading erratically. heaviest and most persistent on the hills. a bit of rainfor persistent on the hills. a bit of rain for northern ireland and southern scotland but it will be dry for much of scotland and northern ireland. with clear skies, a chilly night. elsewhere, it should be a mild start. sorry about that matt. a lot more rain and then it will be sunny. thank you very much. it's 10am. i'm victoria derbyshire. less tha n less than 24 hours until you get to vote in tom's uk general election. we will bring you reports from around the country and the latest in our vic's van share.
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john ashworth doesn't rule out throwing his hat into the leadership hat. can't tell me how much a prescription costs. i was lucky enough to go to university before we had fees. i don't know what i would have done if i had come out with all those debts which young people kout of university with today. we'll hear more from jon later. the hpg jab is given to teenage girls, but not boys, we will be asking why they don't get the same treatment? the battle for raqqa — the so—called headquarters of islamic state — forces make a final push. good morning.
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joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the final day of campaigning in the general election will see the party leaders on a hectic schedule of visits to key towns and cities across britain in a last push for votes. theresa may made an early morning visit to smithfield meat market in central london with her husband philip in the first of a series of campaign stops. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, started his day addressing supporters in glasgow and has a further six events planned across the country. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has said the shadow home secretary, diane abbott, is unwell and is taking a break from the campaign. he said ms abbott, who withdrew from a debate on women's hour yesterday, had received "totally unfair" levels of abuse. lyn brown will stand in for diane abbott as shadow home secretary for what labour says is an "indefinite" period of time. the home office is coming under mounting pressure to explain how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watch list. the italian authorities said they had issued
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warnings about yousef zaghba after they suspected that he was a supporter of the islamic state group who had been trying to travel to syria. in a further development, detectives have arrested a 30—year—old man on suspicion of terror offences in ilford, east london. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed, have arrested a 38—year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation. he's the 19th person to be arrested. seven are still in custody. an inquest into the 22 deaths at the manchester arena will open tomorrow. reports from iran say seven people have been killed. the state media says one of the attackers blew himself up. across the city, at a shrine housing the tomb of ayatollah khomeini, founder of the republic,
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a suicide bomber reportedly shot several people before detonating explosives. president trump has spoken to the king of saudi arabia to discuss his country's decision to cut ties with qatar because of its alleged support for extremist groups. mr trump had earlier backed the move, saying it could be "the beginning of the end to the horror of terrorism". a white house spokesman said the president had stressed the need for unity in the gulf. there are calls for the hpv vaccine, which is currently only given to girls, to be received by boys too. the human papilloma virus jab is offered to teenage girls in the uk to protect against cervical cancer. but experts say there is increasing evidence on links between hpv infection and other cancers. after 10am, we'll be talking to a mum, who has had a hpv—related cancer herself, and wants her sons to receive the vaccine as well as her daughter. that's in half an hour. the american—based taxi firm, uber, says it's sacked 20 employees after an investigation into complaints of sexual harassment, bullying and other issues. uber has been underfire over its treatment of women staff since a former employee wrote a scathing blog post about her experience. most complaints came from workers
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at the firm's san francisco base. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. here's some sport now with hugh. well, the difficulty of the lions tour to new zealand is becoming more and more evident. of course, we knew the test series against the double world champions would be tough, but after a narrow win in their first match, they're currently in a real battle. super rugby side auckland blues had eight all blacks in the starting xv and showed some immediate class. the lions responded well — ireland back row cj stander bundled over to square things up. the lions looked like they'd be up at half—time but sonny bill williams fortunate try has put the blues ahead. they lead 15—10 with around 20 minutes to play at eden park. england cricket captain eoin morgan says they must "beat the best" in australia on saturday if they're to be considered
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contenders to win the champions trophy. they reached the semi—finals thanks to a 87—run victory over new zealand in cardiff. half—centuries from alex hales, joe root and joss buttler guided england past the 300 mark before liam plunkett took four wickets to finish off the kiwis' chase. if we're truly going to be contenders for this tournament we need to beat the best teams and australia are one of the best teams. they always are going into a white ball tournament. they seem to produced limited overs at will so to go intoa produced limited overs at will so to go into a game like that with no other attitude than winning is very important to us. the football association has handed out lifetime bans for the first time, after two supporters made nazi gestures at england's friendly against germany in dortmund in march. the fa has vowed to tackle what it fears is a new generation of hooligans. in all, 27 fans have had their membership suspended. the supporters' club is the only way to obtain tickets to away matches.
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great britain won their first race in the america's cup semi—finals in the most dramatic of circumstances. after going 3—0 down to new zealand, sir ben ainslie's team finally registered when their opponents capsized at the start of race four. luckily all of their crew members were ok. our first ourfirst thought our first thought was for the safety of the sailors on the boat and yeah, looking at the footage since, you know, it's clear they had a misjudgement on the daggerboard and lifted it out of the water too much and ran into an aggressive pitch. i don't think anyone is passing criticism because the boats are so tough to sail and it could happen to anyone. the most important thing is the crew is safe and they will come back and the fight continues. the renault formula one team have revealed that robert kubica has tested an f1 car for the first time since a rallying accident in 2011 partially severed his arm.
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renault posted pictures on twitter of kubica at a session in spain, saying, "so guys, we need to come clean about something. it's true. it really is robert kubica, back in one of our cars after six years." they didn't reveal how quick he was, but it is an encouraging sign for one of the most popular drivers around. that's all the sport for now. we will be back with an update on the lions at 10.30am. over the course of the election i've been giving politicians from some of the main parties lifts between their campaign meetings. it has been quite a responsibility, honestly! the fourth and final passenger in our vic's van share series is the man who hopes to run the nhs in england and wales if his party wins tomorrow. speaking last week, before the london bridge attack, labour'sjon ashworth told me about the stand—up row he had withjeremy corbyn, losing his dad to alcoholism and confirmed labour would lift the freeze on some benefits despite this not
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being in their manifesto. he also failed to rule out throwing his hat in the ring to lead his party one day, but will his singing help or hinder his chances? music. how are you? i'm all right. i've been looking forward to this. i just want to sing songs and pretend to be peter kay. and you can be kayley! that's the only reason i've agreed to do it. really? yeah. don't do the boring policy questions. let's just sing cheesy songs. and we're off. so, the ifs, the institute for fiscal studies, independent, respected, as you know,
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have said that if you, if labour win the election then the poorest 30% of households will suffer a significant hit in their income because you are not promising to reverse some of the cuts to benefits that the conservatives have made. if you're going to be building more houses which is what we want to do, if you're going to be investing in wages, giving people a pay increase by increasing the minimum wage to £10 an hour, obviously that will lift some people out of benefits, but it will mean more money coming into the exchequer. so the ifs... but are you going to reverse the cuts to child tax credits? well, we've opposed the cuts to child tax credits. are you going to reverse them if you win the election? we cannot say we're going to reverse every single cut that's taken place over seven years. so you're not going to reverse the cuts to child tax credits? are you going to lift the freeze on working age benefits? look, benefits would need to be frozen under a labour government look, benefits won't need to be frozen under a labour government because we're going to put
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the money into... ok, so you are lifting that freeze. we're going to lift the freeze on some of the benefits, yes. that's why we've allocated this extra £2 billion. you might well borrow £250 billion over ten years to invest in infrastructure, in roads and new hospitals and in infrastructure, in big building projects. yes, definitely. how much will the economy grow if you spend, if you borrowed £250 billion and spent it on infrastructure? well, the ifs, funnily enough, have said we would grow the economy by a percentage higher than what the conservatives would grow the economy. which is what figure? i think they were talking around 3%. although i don't have that particular figure in front of me. but they certainly were saying we would grow the economy more. when borrowing rates are so low, i think you can invest in the infrastructure of the country, you can invest in schools and hospitals and road—building and extending broadband and things of that nature. our levels of investment in infrastructure are terrible. when compared europe and other countries.
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people are worried about adding to the debt pile, though. the nation's debt pile. £250 billion would add to it. if you can do it, in a way by which by the end of the period you've got debts as a proportion of gdp coming down, it seems to me sensible to be investing in the infrastructure. let's talk about housing. do you know how many council homes the last labour government built? i've not got that figure on me at the moment. shall i tell you ? yes, do tell me. it's about 7,800 under the last labour government. margaret thatcher's government built around 17,000 in one year. are you shocked that her government built more council homes in one year than under the entire period of office that new labour was in? no, no. you're not shocked? no, i'm not shocked, because when we came into government in 97, the housing stock in this country was in such a state that the priority for the first period of the government was to invest in upgrading the housing stock.
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how many properties do you own? do i own? yes. me and my wife have a mortgage on our house in leicester. you own one house? yes, but we're paying a mortgage on it. on the university tuition why are you planning to spend £56 billion on the university tuition fees of students and £37 billion on the nhs? we just don't think it's fair that students are racking up all these debts now. even the sons and daughters of chief executives, bankers, property millionaires, you want to pay their university tuition fees, when they can afford it? a highly educated population contributes to the good of society for all. i was lucky enough to go to university before we had fees. ijust don't know what i would have done if i'd come out with all those debts which young people come out of university with today. you've said you will give nhs staff a pay rise, how much, what percentage of pay rise? a percentage rise is about half a billion,
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2% rise is about £1 billion, so we think it's affordable. we think it can be done. is that cost part of your £37 billion going into the nhs? that is part of the money going into the nhs, yes, but we think it's deliverable, based on the calculations we have made. ok, two years ago you failed to vote against the government's welfare bill, and that was the bill that cut the benefit cap from 26,000 to 23,000, that abolished legally—binding child—poverty targets, that cut housing benefit to the young. why didn't you vote against it? that was the position of the labour party. jeremy corbyn voted against it. but he was not a frontbencher. you cannot have a principled opposition if you are on the front bench? i followed the position of the front bench because i'm a loyal labour party member. i'm a labour mp who gets on and supports the labour party. the position of the labour party front bench was to support
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an amendment which said, "we reject this bill." would you vote the same way again? well, i suspect the position would be different this time, so we would not vote the same way this time. how do you think the campaign is going for labour at this point? i think the conservatives thought they could take people for granted, that they could glide through this election with trite slogans, and there is a feeling they have been trying to take people for fools. when you are driving around, campaigning, in your car with your team, what do you sing? it's really funny — i go out campaigning, you go to somewhere like the north—east or wherever, and you often get picked up by a labour party volunteer and they want to talk about policy, but i like to plug in my iphone and sing along to cheesy music and think i am peter kaye in car share.
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like what? it's really cheesy. go on. do you know starship? nothing's gonna stop us now? as luck would have it... are you going to sing? i don't know the words! # through the bad times. # whatever it takes is what i'm going to do. victoria joins in. i don't know the words! # just fall apart. you ready? here we go. # and we can build this thing together. # standing strong forever. # nothing's gonna stop us now. # when this world runs out of lovers
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# we'll still have each other. # nothing's gonna stop us, nothing's gonna stop us now. i don't know what version this is! it has a modern twist to it! nothing's gonna stop you, except potentially theresa may? i think i have just ended my career by singing that in such a daft way, but anyway, you've got to have a bit of fun in an election campaign. does that represent how you are feeling, "nothing's gonna stop us, not even the conservatives and theresa may" ? i don't know, it's just a bit of fun. we've got to stop theresa may, i think she's a rotten prime minister. jeremy corbyn would be a better prime minister? theresa may... hang on a minute, i have just asked you. jeremy corbyn is principled and honest. would jeremy corbyn be a better prime minister? of course. i'm a labour party member. it took you three goes to answer. don't read anything into that. you have spent your whole adult life in politics, you started off as a researcher —
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what were you next? a special adviser. then a deputy political secretary, then a political secretary, then head of campaigns, then a candidate, then an mp. have you ever had a properjob? no. you've never had a proper job in the real world? people who work in politics, they are jobs. we still have to pay the mortgage, i still have to get the kids from school and get them breakfast in the morning. i'm from a very normal working—class background, my mum was a barmaid, my dad was a croupier in a casino. a lot of my life i spent looking after a father, who was an alcoholic. weekends, as a teenager i would go back to stay with my dad, i would open the fridge and it was just big bottles of white wine and cans of beer, no food. i would have to go and sort it out myself.
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i went home one christmas and my dad said, "i'm off, i'm going to thailand." he literallyjust went off to thailand, i didn't see him again. i got the call two years later, saying that he was dead. and it was drink, he had been drinking a bottle of whiskey a day. so you're right, i have been a special adviser and researcher and all the rest of it, but i have had some experiences of life. do you want to have a crack at the leadership one day? we've got a leader of the labour party. there are plenty of other mps. do you want to have a crack at it one day? . —— not tomorrow or the week after. in the future?
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i wouldn't have thought so. you are not ruling it out? there are loads of labour mps who would fancy their chances one day. are you ambitious for that role? i always wanted to be an mp. i'm not going to pretend i didn't. it is my dream job, every day i feel honoured that i got it, and i am hoping the people in my constituency re—elect me, but all of the other jobs in politics, i'll have to see where it takes me. you are in politics to make a difference, to change people's lives, to do the best. you will think, "what a cliche," but actually that is what motivates me. if that means i'm a health secretary, shadow health secretary, or a different role, we'll see where it goes. have you ever taken illegal drugs? no. seriously? yeah, i know politicians are now meant to say yes, make it look like they had an interesting life, but i didn't. jeremy corbyn or gordon brown? oh, gordon brown.
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sorry, i know i will get the corbynistas tweeting me, having a right go at me, but gordon gave me a job. he gave me a job when i was a young man, he gave me an opportunity, i'll always have a loyalty to gordon. finish the line of this song, "i'm in love with the shape of you." i'm in love with the shape of you? it is going to be really obvious now? the biggest—selling track of this year, 18 weeks at number one. my six—year—old would probably know. is it byjess glynne or something? "i'm in love with the shape of you, push and pull like a magnet do." you lost me. i only know stuff from the 80s. "although my heart is falling too, i'm in love with the shape of you." ed sheeran. let me give you some from the 80s. "i was working as a waitress in a cocktail bar." # i was working as a waitress in a cocktail bar when i met you.
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is it that one? have i got the wrong one? # don't you want me, baby? that's it, human league. what's the cost of a prescription? oh, no, it's one of those questions where you catch us out. everybody is saying, shadow health secretary, and he can't remember! £8.60. that's terrible, isn't it? they are all going to be tweeting about it now. how many times have leicester city been finalists in the fa cup? not this year. four times? yes. name me a band that you love from the 1980s. i love singing along to cheesy songs from the 80s, like together in electric dreams, or a bit of madonna. 0k. borderline is a good song. do you know the words to like a virgin? haha, i'm not singing that one! no way! last time you had an argument
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with jeremy corbyn? probably when he took me off the national executive committee. what was the argument? i wanted to stay on. it was a right old hoo—ha. was itjust you and him shouting at each other? we had words, let's put it like that. i probably shouldn't reveal that. one for the memoirs, really. why did he take you off it? to be blunt, on some of the votes i voted the way he didn't want me to vote. i'm done. are you? 0h. do you want some more? thank you, thank you very much. i'm sure victor dharmesh said that
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john ashworth could sing. she lied! —— victoria derbyshire said. so today is the final day of political campaigning before you cast your votes in the general election tomorrow. here's a look back at the past 7 weeks of campaigning. i have just chaired a meeting of the cabinet where we agreed that the government should call a general election. not another one! oh, for god's sake, honestly, i can't stand this. there's too much politics going on at the moment. why do she need to do it?
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since i became prime minister i have said there should be no election until 2020. but now i have concluded that the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election and seek your support for the decisions i must take. i welcome the opportunity for us to put the case to the people of britain to stand up against the government and its failed economic agenda, which has left our nhs in problems, our schools underfunded, so many people uncertain. it is very clear that the prime minister's announcement is one all about the narrow interests of her own party, not the interests of the country overall. we want to put a case out there to the people of britain of a society that cares for all, an economy that works for all, and a brexit that works for all. it is an opportunity for the people of this country to change the direction of this country, to decide that they do not want a hard brexit, or to keep britain
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in the single market, and indeed an opportunity for us to have a decent, strong opposition in this country that we desperately need. with the right brexit deal secured, my mainstream government will deliver for mainstream britain. whatever your age or situation, people are under pressure and struggling to make ends meet. our manifesto is for you. now more than ever, scotland needs strong snp voices at westminster. plaid cymru exists to defend and build up our country. we have shown time and again you do not need the keys to number ten to open the door to change. i believe in our great country, i believe in british values, i believe in our way of life.
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the government i lead will build a britain in which the economy is strong. labour is guaranteeing the triple lock to protect pensioners' incomes. can you tell the british people tonight that you support the renewal of trident? we're going ahead with the programme that has been agreed by parliament. do you support it? listen, my views on nuclear weapons are well known. does north korea receive money from the uk aid budget? i don't know the details of that. it's about £4 million in 2015. we have got to tackle and address and challenge extremism wherever we find it. i believe very strongly that we have to do that with the muslim community. we mustn't scapegoat the muslim community. you tried to take personal independence payments away from people with disabilities and then you turned yourselves around in a few days. you're not credible.
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there is no extra payment you don't want to add to, no tax you don't want to rise, but we have to concentrate our resources on the people who need it most. we want to see corporation tax reduced, not raised, because if you raise it, companies will leave this country. if they leave, what happens then? there is lessjobs. that is complete nonsense. ifjeremy cared about having enough money to spend on those who need it the most, to raise living standards, he would not have trooped through the lobbies with the conservatives and ukip to trigger article 50 and make britain poorer. our schools are underfunded, our hospitals are overcrowded, our students are saddled with debt, there is a growing housing crisis. people on the lowest incomes have been hit by welfare cuts. we will always provide that safety net where it is needed. how much will it cost? i will give you the figure in a moment. you don't know it? you're logging into your ipad.
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you've announced a major policy and you don't know how much it'll cost? can i give you the exact figure in a moment? what's the minimum wage? we hope it will be up to £9. what is it now for the under 25s? it's less than £9. correct. what is it? it is about £6. that is way out. why should the public trust anything you say or any of your policies when you have a track record of broken promises and backtracking? why have you never regarded the ira as terrorists? my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today. how can that be fair in light of the job that we do? i recognise the job that you do. then why hasn't changed before now? we have had to take some hard
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choices across the public sector in relation to public—sector pay restraint. but there isn't a magic money tree we can shake that suddenly provides for everything that people want. is labour's manifesto a realistic wish list or is itjust a letter to santa claus? i think it is a serious and realistic document that addresses the issues that many people in this country face. we have been brave enough to put it out there with all the policies that are in it. i think you're losing a lot of votes from snp supporters by continuing with the independence referendum at this time. i am not proposing it now, i accept that point. when are you proposing it? at the end of the process. my simple proposition, it should be our choice, when the time is right and we know what breaks it means for our country, to decide what the future of scotland should be. so what are the conservatives,
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labour and the other main parties doing today to win all those last minute votes? first to chris mason who is with thejeremy corbyn campaign in runcorn. good morning victoria. the marathon is on when all the party leaders dash around all corners of the country to try and convince us that they're hard country to try and convince us that they‘ re hard enough country to try and convince us that they're hard enough and they're go to woo and cajole every person who may not have made up their mind. jeremy corbyn started in glasgow. he will roll up here in runcorn in over an hour's time. some labour activists are gathering. the focus of his speech here will be the nhs. the big challenge forjeremy corbyn is trying to turn the depth of the support that we have seen a lot of
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his rallies in recent days, quite a few people already and plenty more likely to arrive in the next hour or hour and 20 minutes into the breadth you need to become prime minister. you become prime minister not by having a few million people who adore you, you need on top of that plenty who are happy to vote for you and to put up with you as prime minister. the challenge forjeremy corbyn is trying to spread out that support. but they are buoyed up and they are positive labour. they feel like they have had a good last couple of weeks. jeremy corbyn likes it and enjoys it out on the stump. he is off to north wales after he has been here. then he heads to watford and then he ends up in islington, his home patch in north london. so, plenty of miles to go! cheers, chris, thank you very much. sima kotecha is with tim farron and the liberal democrats in st albans. tim farron has just
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tim farron hasjust pulled tim farron has just pulled this pint. this constituency voted tory in 2005. it was a tory seat until 2015. and now the lib dems are hoping that they can win it because overwhelmingly it voted to remain in the eu referendum. so as i said, he has been pulling pints and talking to businesses about the detrimental effects he says brexit will have on businesses here and around the country. now, remember at businesses here and around the country. now, rememberat the businesses here and around the country. now, remember at the front and centre of the manifesto has been and centre of the manifesto has been a pledge if they were to win on friday that they would have another referendum, where they would offer the people a chance to have a say on that crucial deal between brussels and the government. that has been the core of their message. they have also announced other eye—catching policies along the way including legalising cannabis and allowing tens of thousands of syrian refugees to come in the country if they are successful. however, as i said, they've dubbed themselves as the anti—brexit party from day one on this campaign. however, there has
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been a mixed reaction on the doorstep. some people saying they feel irritated and frustrated that they're banging feel irritated and frustrated that they‘ re banging on feel irritated and frustrated that they're banging on about something they're banging on about something they say that happened a year ago. but there are those who say well, hang ona but there are those who say well, hang on a mind the government need to be held to account and they say the liberal democrats are the party to do that. we'll find out if that message has been successful on friday. and ben wright is with theresa may's campaign. there are red and blue bowling balls being rolled along this green in southampton. theresa may is here in hampshire. the first stop of her final day of campaigning. we're in the constituency of southampton test. it has a labour majority of just under 4,000. it is interesting she is here. clearly, it is a seat she is here. clearly, it is a seat she feels the tories might be able to take. it's the start of a day where theresa may will be
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criss—crossing england. hampshire to begin with and then east anglia and we rumble through to the midlands and a rally this evening where this campaign will finish and i imagine we'll hearfamiliar campaign will finish and i imagine we'll hear familiar themes all day about brexit beginning soon after this election wraps up and the need for somebody to is serious about delivering it to be in charge of the negotiations. she will be framing the whole of today about a choice between herself and jeremy corbyn. the questions of security are going to feature. the announcement last night that she made that she maybe prepared to re—open, pick apart and look at human rights law if it helps to tackle extremism has clearly caused political controversy. labour, the lib dems have criticised her approach on that, so that could be the issue we talk about during this final day of general election campaigning. and finally our political guru norman smith
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is in westminster and more on the news that dianne abbott has stepped back from the campaign due to ill health. it seems that diane abbott is not at all well. we have had a statement from the labour party saying she is going to be replaced for the foreseeable as shadow home secretary by lynn brown. some folks saying she will be out of action indefinitely. we don't know what's wrong with her. but obviously, it looks a little more serious than a dickie heart or a migraine. emily thornbury was in here a short time ago saying how strong diane abbott was and she suggested some people should be ashamed of themselves for suggesting that you know she had been pulled back because labour people didn't have confidence in her. now, we don't know what's wrong with her, but clearly, she is not at all well. 0k. but clearly, she is not at all well.
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ok. so the last day of campaigning and fora ok. so the last day of campaigning and for a final time let's look at the moments through the campaign. we need a general election and we need one now. to every city, every village, every town. we state a clear intention. b—the future of this country. the big question here is simply this. at what point... are voters... getting tired of politicians. let me finish if you don't mind. so norman take us through some of your picks of the campaign. so, i guess one of the things in an election campaign is it's a moment to get to know the political leadersment you get a sense of their character and what they are about and what sort of person, but theresa may, any time anyone tried to get a sense of her likes and dislikes, they have been biffed away. theresa may will not give us anything about the sort of person she is. you remember, she did that sort of quick
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fire interview when she was asked, you know, do you prefer broad church or line of duty. she was asked do you like indian or chinese take—aways. she said she didn't do ta ke take—aways. she said she didn't do take aways and she was asked if she preferred whisky or wine? she didn't answer. a journalist on preferred whisky or wine? she didn't answer. ajournalist on itv preferred whisky or wine? she didn't answer. a journalist on itv had preferred whisky or wine? she didn't answer. ajournalist on itv had one last effort in the dying days of the campaign to try and crowbar out a little more sell of personal information about theresa may! what's the naughtiest thing you ever did? oh goodness me, well, i suppose, gosh, do you know, i'm not quite sure. there must have been a moment? nobody is ever perfectly behaved, are they? i have to confess when me and my friends used to run through the fields of wheat, the farmers weren't too pleased about that. evil. evil. how has theresa
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may managed to live with that all her life. if i was a farmer, i would be on the blower, i would say, "it was that theresa from the vicarage, she was running through the fields of corn. what are you going to do about it?" of corn. what are you going to do about it? " what of corn. what are you going to do about it?" what aboutjeremy corbyn? if you're going to launch a policy, the basic rule is get your facts sorted out and above all, know how much it's going to cost. second, tip to politicians, if you're going a radio interview, don't think no one can see you. we have cameras in the studio. we can see you tapping away on your ipad trying to get the a nswers! on your ipad trying to get the answers! look atjeremy corbyn! on your ipad trying to get the answers! look at jeremy corbyn! how much will it cost to provide unmeans—tested childcare for 1.3 million children? maria miller, it will cost maria miller, it will obviously cost a a lot to do so. will cost maria miller, it will obviously cost a a lot to do solj presume obviously cost a a lot to do sol presume you have the figures. obviously cost a a lot to do sol presume you have the figuresl obviously cost a a lot to do sol presume you have the figures. i will give you the figure in a moment. you
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don't know it. you're logging into youripad don't know it. you're logging into your ipad here. you've announced a mabelingor policy and you don't know how much it'll cost. what a nightmare! last off, nicola sturgeon, the snp have been quite good at arranging lots and lots of events to get scotland's first minister out and about. but, some of these photo opportunities have become sort of photo opportunities from hell and you can see nicola sturgeon just from hell and you can see nicola sturgeonjust thinking, from hell and you can see nicola sturgeon just thinking, "what am i doing here?" like aerobics. you can see her thinking, "who on earth decided on this?" she thinking, "who on earth decided on this? " she hasn't thinking, "who on earth decided on this?" she hasn't got her high heels. ice creams, be careful of ice creams. this one is melting quickly. it's going to dribble all over the place! and what on earth is that? i
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mean, i'm not a place! and what on earth is that? i mean, i'm nota great place! and what on earth is that? i mean, i'm not a great cook, but honestly, that does not look that appetising. it's a meat pie, ain't it? everyone knows it's a meat pie. i'm not feeling enthusiastic about that meat pie. it's not exactly making me hungry. maybejon ashworth should have been crowbared with the disco dancing in the van. that was very good. i liked that. he loved it. he loved it. i don't know what that says. what does it say if a politician really wants to sing and ifa politician really wants to sing and if a politician doesn't want to sing? let's not answer that. let's leave it hanging there. thank you very much, norman. our election programme on the bbc tomorrow night with david dimbleby and emily maitlis, with all the people you'd expect throughout the night on the bbc bringing you the results. still to come:
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we'll be asking why hundreds of thousands of teenage boys are being denied a potentially life saving vaccine which is routinely given to girls. and as the battle for raqqa — the headquarters of so—called islamic state in iraq — rages, we'll hearfrom an organisation helping those who've escaped the city. almost 400,000 teenage boys a year are currently denied a vaccine that could save their life. the human papilloma virus, or hpv, jab is only offered to teenage girls in the uk to protect against cervial cancer. the virus which is transmitted through sexual contact leads to lots of different types of infection and in some cases fatal cancers. in the uk, girls aged 12 to 13 have been vaccinated routinely since 2008. so why are boys not getting the same treatment? steve bergman was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2015 through
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the hpv virus. jill de nardo was diagnosed with anal cancer in 2009. she has a daughter who received the vaccine and two sons who haven't. tristan almada is the founder of the hpv and anal cancer foundation. welcome all of you. thank you for coming on the programme. explain what the human papilloma virus is. it's a virus that everyone comes into co nta ct it's a virus that everyone comes into contact with at some point in their life. we think that 80% of sexually active people will test positive at some point for hpv. it causes 5% of all cancers and some of the fast increasing cancers in the uk today for example throat cancer are caused by this virus. we don't know why some people who get diagnosed with hpv such as my mother, progressed to cancer and end up mother, progressed to cancer and end up passing away. we don't know why
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others resolve the virus on their own. ok, but you said it was ubiquitous so we all have it. we have the propensity to have it? ubiquitous so we all have it. we have the propensity to have it7m you have had sex once, you have come into co nta ct you have had sex once, you have come into contact with hpv, you have it, i have it, joe has it. it is unavoidable. you can pass it through passionate kissing or through any means of contact. ok. you mentioned your personal experience. tell us a little more about that if that's ok? in 2010 my mother passed by away from stage four apv related cancer. she invested every ounce of loving energy into the upbringing of my sisters and myself and when she passed away, my sisters and i thought well, is there something that we can do to prevent the devastation that happened to our family from happening to anyone ever ain? family from happening to anyone ever again? watching someone deteriorate in your hands, the most important
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person in your life and it's not just the side—effects from the chemotherapy that cause your hands to feel numb so for the case of my mother, she had this dream to be a landscape architect and she used to work in public relations and she don't draft because her hands were so numb. but in addition to the emotional anxiety and the stigma associated with hpv because people don't understand what it is, so she couldn't relate her diagnosis to her friends and family because she was afraid of what they might say. hpv, how do you get that, anal cancer, how do you get that, anal cancer, how do you get that, anal cancer, how do you get that? the only thing that made her at risk was that she was a human being. jill, you were diagnosed with anal cancer in 2009. can you relate to what tris tran is saying about the stigma? diagnosed at the same age. i did not
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really tell anybody that it was anal cancer at the time, i said it was bowel cancer but the more i realised, the more i thought about it, the less i would be aware. it was tristan's family that made me aware of the hpv connection with the cancer. that is when i start to get very angry. the fact that it was not known to many people. my daughter was potentially protected against it, but my sons were not. and we are awaiting a decision as to whether teenage boys will be routinely vaccinated. what is the argument for only vaccinating teenage girls?l vaccinated. what is the argument for only vaccinating teenage girls? i do not think there can be an argument. look at this picture here. these are my three children. they all went through routine vaccinations, they we nt through routine vaccinations, they went through the normal inoculations that children have. why would any parents choose to discriminate against one child, in favour of the
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other two? my sons are too old for the vaccination to be properly protected, but if they had had the vaccination at the same age as my daughter, they would be protected. it is not good enough to say that they heard situation, where 85% of they heard situation, where 85% of the girls are protected... if my son is having relationships with older people or girls from countries that have not been vaccinated, they are atjust as much risk. let me bring in steve, who was diagnosed with cancer in 2015. how are you at the moment? i am great, thank you. you thought it was glandular fever. yes. my wife and i, we looked at the consultations on the internet, and i had all the symptoms of glandular fever so we went along and somebody whacked me round the head and said, you have got cancer. and how did you react to the fact that it was throat
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cancer caused by hpv? it took a while for me to digest what it was about. i think it is important to say that i am a heterosexual man. i have family and a daughter, and this can happen to anyone. what happened to me, all of a sudden my whole world was completely consumed by trying to get healthy again. within eight days i was whipped into hospital and i had a massive tumour removed from my throat and my right tonsil. i had a tracheotomy put in there. and i started seven months of recovery, settling into that, and thena recovery, settling into that, and then a couple of months of chemotherapy, and then quite radical radiotherapy because this part of the body, it's a really busy part of
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the body, it's a really busy part of the body. and it had a massive impact on everything, saliva, food, everything. and then there is the after—shock, that once recovery has taken place, it is the emotional stuff, that has to be repaired. and that has taken a while. do you mind me asking how old your doctor is? she is 23. so she is too late for this vaccine? no, she was the first year. let me ask you the same question i asked gill. is there any argument for teenage boys, apart from cost, which is an issue with the nhs in england and wales?m from cost, which is an issue with the nhs in england and wales? it is not that much. tell me why you believe teenage boys are not routinely vaccinated? there are 11 countries in the world that
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routinely vaccinate boys, including austria, brazil and italy. routinely vaccinate boys, including austria, braziland italy. norway, switzerland, the united states. we think it is a matter of time before eve ryo ne think it is a matter of time before everyone realises that this is, that this is the solution to solve a preve nta ble this is the solution to solve a preventable cancer. the questionnaires, is the uk going to be the next country or a country that will make this decision a few yea rs that will make this decision a few years down the road. the argument to not vaccinate boys is that if you protect enough girls, and boys just have sex with the vaccinated girls, in theory you have protected those boys but if the boys travel or are older, or like older women or are gay, or meet women from other countries, they are not protected. it isjust a very countries, they are not protected. it is just a very narrow way of viewing it. i think there is a lot of misinformation about hpv. we think about it as a cervical cancer jab. it is not that, it is a 5% of
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all cancers jab. ten years ago there was a lot of data pointing to the fa ct was a lot of data pointing to the fact that this was mostly about women, but since then we have realised that the burden also falls on them. thank you very much, all of you, thank you for educating us. we await a decision. let me bring you this sad breaking news. it is to do with a victim from the london bridge terror attack. detectives searching for the frenchman, xavier thomas, who disappeared on saturday night, have recovered a body from the thames. scotland yard say that his next of kin have been informed. xavier thomas, who has not been seen since the terror attacks on saturday night, his body has been recovered from the thames near limehouse. scotla nd from the thames near limehouse. scotland yard say his next of kin have been informed. next, we're going to talk about
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raqqa in syria, technically the headquarters of islamic state. it is a city with a population of 200 or 300,000, the size of a town like rochdale. and now others are trying to ta ke rochdale. and now others are trying to take back control from is, a selection of fighters known as the syrian democratic forces, backed by the united states. they launched an offensive this week to try to retake it. the us coalition said that the battle would be long and difficult and it is thought that between three and it is thought that between three and 4000 is prisoners are holed up inside raqqa. islamic state have lost a lot of territory, as you can see from these maps, that they control at the start of last year. in march of this year, they lost the historic city of chameera in syria while the battle for mosul, an important city in iraq, is still ongoing. —— palmyra. it would be a
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serious blow for islamic states to lose raqqa, where there organisation has been based for a number of yea rs. we can chat about this more now with charlie winter who does lots of research on islamic state for the international centre for the study of radicalisation at kings college london and paul donohoe from the international rescue committee — an aid organisation who've been helping people who've escaped from raqqa. hello to you both. thanks for talking to us. charlie, how important is raqqa to is? well, symbolically it is very important. i think if it is taken from islamic state over the next few months, and it will take one time, it will be a big win the coalition. over the last six months or so, islamic state has been moving away from raqqa to easter syria, so the thing is, the
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groups is raqqa as its capital, but it is only a symbolic thing. obviously it is going to be hugely important if it is taken. poll, tell our audience about what life has been like inside raqqa over the last few yea rs ? been like inside raqqa over the last few years? well, unfortunately there have been 200,000 civilians trapped under ice is controlled raqqa for three and a half years. we know from those who have escaped that every day has been terror, and in addition to the harsh rules that people know that those living under isis have to adhere to, you can be executed for the slightest infraction. and in re ce nt the slightest infraction. and in recent days we have heard that some people have been executed for being found to not be fasting or for trying to make contact with anyone outside the city. you can imagine it has been a very traumatic experience and a real ordeal, so one of the
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things we try to do as an aid agency, things we try to do as an aid as things we try to do as an aid agency, as well as providing life—saving aids, is to make sure that people get the proper specialist support they need to ove rco m e specialist support they need to overcome what they have gone through. but things are going to get tougher as this battle rages? it's true. we are worried for the civilian still in the city that they are effectively being used as human shields. it is a tactic that ice of used and that means that they will be at real risk of being caught up in the fighting, as the assault makes it way through the city. of course, also as locations and buildings are used by snipers, the civilians living in those buildings will unfortunately be killed. for those who have the opportunity to escape, they still face real risks, and we have met people who have seen family members killed as they crossed minefields. and some have been targeted by snipers. charlie, is it accurate to say that islamic
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state are struggling in syria and iraq or not? absolutely. there is no two ways about it. they have lost a lot of seniorfigures two ways about it. they have lost a lot of senior figures in the leadership, they have lost thousands and thousands of square kilometres of territory. the most important resource is people. they need to be able to drop on people for recruits and supporters, and they have lost a lot of them along with the territory. they have lost access to the local population. the insurgency is struggling. and i am afraid to say that as its insurgency in iraq and syria is struggling, it has looked to attack elsewhere. and are we an increased threat because they are struggling in syria?l we an increased threat because they are struggling in syria? i think we are. we need to be careful about drawing to linear relationship, and certainly there is no two ways about it, terrorism as propaganda, it absolutely is propaganda. and as its momentum slows, as the ideology
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continues to flounder to ring the insurgency, it means that it needs to be able to derive that momentum from somewhere else and terrorism happens to be a very good way of doing it. there will be some people talking and listening to how you have described the lives of civilians in raqqa you will want to do something. what can people do? well, organisations like my own, the international rescue corps mitzi, we have teams inside north—east syria providing health care to people who have escaped and supporting people to rebuild their lives. one of the things that we're worried about is that over the years that the children have lived under isis, many of them have not been in school and they have lost in education. we do not want a lost generation so long—term, any of the children that have escaped isis areas in syria and iraq, that has to be part of the solution. thank you very much, both of you. charlie went from the international centre for the study
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of radicalisation and paul donohoe from the international rescue corps mitty, thank you very much. thank you for your messages today, whether you for your messages today, whether you are undecided or whether you have made a decision about who you will vote for tomorrow. robert says, it is my decision to vote conservative because i cannot trust jeremy corbyn with the safety of the country. john says it is now time to support our national health service. becky bumic favelas. —— thank you much for those. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. after the heavy rain and strong winds yesterday, today is looking quite for much of a country with that area of low pressure responsible for the wet and windy conditions lingering across eastern parts of scotland. some rain for a time at first and still strong winds across much of the country. but it will be easing down and for much of the day it is looking dry with spells of sunshine. but cloud and rain pushing in two southwest england and wales later in the afternoon. ahead of that, in light
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wind and a bit of sunshine, we could see highs of between 16 and 20. a band of rain overnight pushing north and these words. it could be heavily over the welsh hills and up into northern england, probably not reaching scotland until tomorrow. rows of seven or eight celsius. elsewhere, 10—14. a fairly mild night but it will be a wet day for some of us tomorrow as rain pushes north and east, eventually getting into scotland and northern ireland through the day. i did, heavy showers. if you get caught in one of those, there will be a lot of rain ina those, there will be a lot of rain in a short amount of time. temperatures between 14 and 19. this is bbc news.
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these are the top stories developing at 11am: political leaders make a final push for votes across the country in the last day of campaigning before the general election. theresa may visits a meat market in london and promises brexit will lead to morejobs, homes and better transport links. jeremy corbyn started his day in glasgow, as labour warns voters there are only "24 hours to save the nhs". in other news: the home office faces questions over how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk, despite being on an international database of suspects. police searching for the body of a french national, missing since the london bridge attack, have recovered a body from the

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