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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 7, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am: political leaders make a final push for votes across the country in the last day of campaigning before the general election. theresa may visits a meat market in london and promises brexit will lead to morejobs, homes and better transport links. jeremy corbyn started his day in glasgow, as labour warns voters there are only "24 hours to save the nhs". in other news: the home office faces questions over how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk, despite being on an international database of suspects. police searching for the body of a french national, missing since the london bridge attack, have recovered a body from the thames. armed attackers storm the iranian parliament and take hostages. and a suicide bomber has attacked the mausoleum of ayotollah khomenei. and, remembering ronnie corbett, a
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memorial service at westminster abbey to celebrate his life. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the leaders of the main political parties are crisscrossing the country on the final day of campaigning before the general election tomorrow. the conservatives and labour say there is all to play for, with the polls narrowing in the closing stages. the prime minister theresa may is promising brexit will lead to morejobs theresa may is promising brexit will lead to more jobs and theresa may is promising brexit will lead to morejobs and homes, and better transport links. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn is to speak at rallies in england, scotland and
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wales, with a warning that there are 24 wales, with a warning that there are 2a hours to save the nhs. the lib dem leader tim farron has urged people to vote tactically in order to prevent a landslide conservative victory. let's go live night to westminster and get the latest from oui’ westminster and get the latest from our assistant political editor, norman smith. it has been a short campaign, but it feels like we have come a long way since the start of it. it has also been one of the campaigns where the parties have been further apart than i can recall for many, many years. when the issues have been so profound, above all, of course, brexit, which poses all, of course, brexit, which poses a huge challenge and raises, depending on your point of view, huge opportunities or huge dangers for britain, the conservatives have sought to put that at the heart of their campaign. and then jeremy corbyn has sketched out a very, very different path. not simply halting austerity, but in many ways
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reversing posterity with a massive programme of spending and plans for a considerable expansion in the role of the state, nationalising key utilities, giving the state a bigger say in the role of business. and all that, of course, at the same time as we have had these two terrorist attacks, which has shaped the last stages of this campaign and lead last night to theresa may unveiling these new anti—terrorist measures, suggesting that if she is elected as prime minister, she will look at introducing tougher restrictions on terror suspects, perhaps going back more to the sort of control order system which she abolished when she was home secretary, also talking about drafting new deportation laws to make it easier to expel suspects, and above all, suggesting that she may have two out of some human rights because she believes terror
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suspects are using that to avoid being deported. this morning, her close ally damian green insisted, despite the criticism, that these measures were met the mac are necessary to protect people in britain. well, we didn't know three months ago that we were going to get three terrorist attacks in the course of three months, so really what the prime minister is doing is what any responsible leader must do, reacting to a really serious situation to make sure that the british people are kept as safe as possible. if we need to change the law, if we need to make it easier for the courts to deport people and for the police to impose controls on people who may pose a threat, then this is a responsible thing for a government to do. if theresa may is elected, it is likely to be extremely difficult and
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already we have seen leading human rights organisations like amnesty international warning that taking britain out of some human rights legislation would undermine the very democratic rights which the terrorists are seeking to destroy. the liberal democrat former leader nick clegg suggested that theresa may had simply put forward these proposals because she had been forced onto the defensive over cuts to police numbers, and this was the response of the labour leader, jeremy corbyn. we won't defeat terrorism by ripping up our basic rights and our democracy. we defeat terrorism by our communities, by our vigilance, and by police action to isolate and detain those that would wish us harm. obviously, if somebody is a foreign national resident in britain who is committing crimes, then clearly the law is there to take its course now. the issue is police numbers and police security. norman, as the are in the absolute final stages of this campaign, what else is going to be happening today?
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well, the smaller parties will be trying to rally their supporters in what has been a fairly difficult campaignfor what has been a fairly difficult campaign for them. they have had a difficult time, really, trying to make themselves heard above the focus onjeremy corbyn and theresa may. tim farron again trying to win over some of those 48% of people who voted against brexit, promising he would press for a second referendum on any deal cut. and paul nuttall of ukip nicking his campaign all about opposing what he would call islamisation, banning the burqa. and in scotland, nicola sturgeon again looking for a big mandate to press her case for another independence referendum. 0k, norman, thank you. well, the latest polls ahead of the
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general election suggest the conservatives lead has narrowed against labour. but in the last six weeks, how much have the polls changed? and which marginal seats will be the key battlegrounds but in the last six weeks, how much have the polls changed? and which marginal seats will be the key battlegrounds that decide the result? jeremy vine in our election studio has been taking a look at this, and how it compares with the 2015 election results. we will try to fix our technical issues and bring you that report a little later. you can also look online. the polling, as i'm sure you are aware, has changed dramatically over the course of the past few days. at the start it was looking like the tories were well ahead in the polls but they have narrowed considerably. but we all know what can happen in the end with poles. let's bring in our political correspondent who is in the labour
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campaign in runcorn. one subject preoccupying campaign in runcorn. one subject preoccu pying labour today is campaign in runcorn. one subject preoccupying labour today is what is going on with diane abbott. jeremy corbyn said she is not well. yes, absolutely. we have learned this morning, after those interviews that diane abbott has given, a couple at least, during this campaign, where she has been widely derided for not being sufficiently across her brief, we learned this morning that she is standing down from her shadow home affairs brief indefinitely, being replaced by her colleague lynn brown. we understand that she is going to take some time to recover from illness. we don't know any more information than that at this stage. but are clearly a decision has been taken that now is not the time for her to be taken that now is not the time for herto be in taken that now is not the time for her to be in a front of house role, if you like, and at least that make
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offer some explanation for some of those media performances of the last couple of weeks. so that is the news from labour this morning. asjeremy corbyn embarks on a masochistic marathon of dashing around the country and dropping in on seats that labour had to hold or to win, and you try to introducejeremy that labour had to hold or to win, and you try to introduce jeremy vine dancing around his virtual reality map of the uk, but who needs him when you can have a reporter dancing around a part in a marginal seat. there are many reasons whyjeremy corbyn will be here in the next hour. this was a narrow conservative victory two years ago. it has been a marginal for some victory two years ago. it has been a marginalfor some time. the victory two years ago. it has been a marginal for some time. the focus of this campaign, you might be able to see over my shoulder the advertising ban, curiously coloured blue, this isa ban, curiously coloured blue, this is a labour rally, and that is a focus on the nhs. jeremy corbyn focused on pensioners in glasgow this morning, and the nhs is the
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focus for this rally. from here, key heads to north wales, and then he heads to north wales, and then he heads on to london. so yes, a mad hash of planes, trains and automobiles forjeremy corbyn, as it is for all party leaders. yes, we did enjoy you being in that field, but nowjeremy vine as well. what a bonus. let's have a look at the latest polls ahead of the general election. they have, of course, changed quite dramatically over the course of the past six weeks. let's getjeremy to navigate what has happened for us. let's have a look at the result of the last election and you can see the last election and you can see the conservatives winning on 38%. if they get the same percentage again they get the same percentage again they will have one again. labour could improve from 31% and still not win. the liberal democrat way down
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on 8%, and ukip on 13%. a lot of ukip voters there. we will come back to that in a year, this is the story. the conservatives dominant in the polls and for the whole year, leading labour by quite some difference. you can see why she called the election. but the story changes if we look at the polls since the calling of the general election. week one up to week six, he we go. have a look at what happens to this conservative lead, see the way it narrows, see the way jeremy corbyn takes the conservatives to within 8%, according to the polls. either way, look at ukip and the liberal democrats, how far they are here. if there were millions of ukip voters last time and they have been dislodged, which parties have they gone to now? really interesting. the map tells the story of the election
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result in 2015. 650 parliamentary constituencies, each one an individual battle between parties. i will show you the conservatives first, in blue. look at the way they washed over england, all the way down across the south—west. a different story for labour, their seats more densely packed in the cities. smaller seeds, lots of people in them, manchester, birmingham, sheffield, and so on. they served labour very well indeed. they served labour very well indeed. the liberal democrats had a terrible time in 2015 with only eight ayotolla h time in 2015 with only eight ayotollah khomenei and they will be looking to improve, disastrous if they don't. dash—macro seats. let's not forget the other parties, the welsh nationalists, the greens, the welsh nationalists, the greens, the parties in northern ireland. in the parties in northern ireland. in the end, this election surely comes down to the marginal seats, the ones that were closest last time. here are the top 120 marginal. these are the seeds that labour need to win.
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if the observed as can hold onto the blue ones here, theresa may is almost certainly back in number ten. jeremy vine they're looking back and also forwards. let's get more on this from the political analyst, professorjohn curtice who joins us live from the bbc election centre in elstree. we spoke immediately after theresa may called the election, called at a time when the tories were riding high in the polls but things have changed quite a lot. what is your analysis of how things have changed over the past six weeks? they have indeed changed. when we spoke hours after the prime minister's announcement, i did suggest this was not necessarily a risk free operation for the conservatives, despite their large lead. i think in truth that has come clear in the cause of the last six weeks. we are now looking at an opinion poll lead for the conservatives, on average, of around a half of the size she had them. you must remember that getting
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a landslide of the kind of the prime minister wants is difficult. she needed to hang onto most of that 16 point lead on and no pollster gives her anything like that at the moment. as compared with her original expectation, this may be a relatively disappointing result. why does this matter? well, if she does get a majority of around 60 or 70, which is the high end of the expectations of opinion polls, she will probably just about expectations of opinion polls, she will probablyjust about managed to emerge, having persuaded her party that in the end she has delivered, although even there they will be a tinge of disappointment. but if the majority starts to come down substantially majority starts to come down su bsta ntially low majority starts to come down substantially low that, so maybe the majority is not much bigger than it was in 2015, in truth a lot of the blame for what has happened will lie with the prime minister, or be laid at her door, not least because the opinion polls indicate that the voters view of the prime minister as being a good leader has gone down during the course of the campaign,
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and asa during the course of the campaign, and as a result of that, rather than emerging from the election with her authority enhanced, she could find it diminished and she could find her collea g u es it diminished and she could find her colleagues want to operate in a more collegial manner. above all, she may not necessarily have liberated herself from the pressure from that section of her parliamentary party that wants a hard brexit. she will still has to take into account their views because she won't have that big commons majority that she was looking for six weeks ago. what is your sense on what the issues are that our particular concerning voters, what has left to these shifts, and how engaged voters actually are? on the first point, i think what seems to be true is the labour party clearly have focused primarily on the domestic agenda. they focused particular on the question of the state of the public services in the wake of the cuts in public expenditure that have taken place doing the last seven years. for some voters at least, they seem
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to have touched something of a concern. certainly, the labour party ma nifesto, concern. certainly, the labour party manifesto, which is basically saying we are going to spend more money on public services without increasing most people's taxation, has proved relatively popular. certainly more popular than the relatively austere message of the conservative ma nifesto message of the conservative manifesto which talked about the challenges that face the country, rather than having the tone of optimism that the labour party has. certainly, the labour party clearly has, above all, ensured the election was not just about has, above all, ensured the election was notjust about brexit. they have moved it on to its terrain, and for voters for whom public services is that most important issue, they are among those who have been inclined to move back towards the labour party. thank you very much. detectives searching for a french
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national, xavier thomas have found a body in the river thames. pressure is mounting on the home office to explain how one of the london attackers was able to enter the uk despite being on an international watch list. youssef zaghba was stopped at bologna airport after authorities suspected him of travelling to syria to join islamic state. let's bring in our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. xavier thomas was missing and there we re xavier thomas was missing and there were concerns that had been pushed into the thames by the van. yes, you was with his partner, walking across london bridge on saturday night. his partner is in hospital, being treated for her injuries, but ever since the events of saturday night, seats has been missing and his family have been desperately trying to work out where he is. overnight, police at
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limehouse, a specialist marine unit, have recovered a body from the river thames at about 7:45pm last night. they have some procedures to go through a to ensure it really is xavier thomas, but it does look as if he was knocked off the bridge by the van as it drove at high speed. so he would then become the eighth victim of this terrorist attack. what is the latest on the investigation and the arrests? most of the people arrested on the sunday, in fact all of them, were released. we had 127—year—old man arrested yesterday, and overnight a 30—year—old man was arrested. we have seen a house in ilford being searched this morning. clearly, the police investigation is still opening up new leads, but it is not moving at the pace it was moving in the early days. to a degree, it is
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eighth contained investigation. it looks as if at the heart of it were the three men shot dead by police, but counterterrorism detective is still checking out extra leads. thank you. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22 people were killed, have arrested a 38 year—old man at heathrow airport in a planned operation. he's the nineteenth person to be arrested. seven are still in custody. detectives say they've found evidence that the suicide bomber, salman abedi, had stored parts for his device in a white nissan micra seized in rusholme. our news correspondent sima kotecha is with the liberal democrat campaign in hertfordshire. what is going on with their campaign today, the last eight of campaigning? well, we havejust left saint bones am aware tim farron was willing pines. dash—macro st albans. he spoke to business owners about
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the detrimental effect brexit could have on their finances. front and centre of the liberal democrats's ma nifesto centre of the liberal democrats's manifesto site has been another referendum to allow the people another vote on that deal between brussels and the government. they say people completed to leave the eu, but now people should be given the opportunity to say on what terms. so, st albans voted overwhelmingly to remain in the eu, and now we are off to twickenham which also voted to remain. the party has also spoken about how they wa nt to party has also spoken about how they want to legalise cannabis, bring in tens of thousands of syrian refugees into the country if they are successful in the election, but as i said, right at the centre of their ma nifesto said, right at the centre of their manifesto has been this pledge. it is that anti—brexit sentiment that they have been riding for the last five weeks. whether it will be
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successful or not remains to be seen. successful or not remains to be seen. thank you. president trump has spoken to the king of saudi arabia to discuss his country's decision to cut ties with qatar because of its alleged support for extremist groups. mr trump had earlier backed the move, saying it could be "the beginning of the end to the horror of terrorism". a white house spokesman said the president had stressed the need for unity in the gulf. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins is in qatar and said the country is under unprecedented pressure following trump's support for saudia arabia. you can almost sense the political pressure being piled on this tiny but very wealthy and influential state of qatar and lined up against ita state of qatar and lined up against it a very powerful coalition, including saudi arabia and egypt, and lead effectively by the united states with those tweets from donald trump making it clear he thinks it
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is absolutely right to isolate qatar, accused, although it denies it, of being a founder and supporter of radical extremism in the region. you can see more of radical extremism in the region. you can see more and more of radical extremism in the region. you can see more and more small countries within the arab league lining up against qatar. jordan, mauritania, all coming up in favour of this policy of isolation. you can also sense the increasing efforts within individual countries to persuade their publics to isolate qatar as well. so the united arab emirates, for instance, is saying it will become illegal to express any form of support for qatar. it explored me pressure must have an effect, surely. the mea of kuwait is try to act as a mediator to bring these alleged cooperation states back together. that also may mean some form eventually of either private or public pronunciation of aspects of its foreign policy by
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qatar, but we have not got there yet. saudi arabia is making a clear that nothing less than a significant change of course will be enough. however, some countries, notably turkey, france, with president macron intervening, and elements within the us administration, expressing some misgivings about driving qatar too far. this crisis still has some way to go, but it is fairly clear that qatar is under unprecedented pressure. armed attackers have opened fire at two prominent locations in iran's capital, tehran. at least five people are reported to have been killed at the iranian parliament. across the city, at a shrine housing the tomb of ayatollah khomenei, founder of the republic, a female suicide bomber reportedly shot several people before detonating her explosives. with me is our world affairs
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correspondent. what is the latest on this? as you say, it does appear to bea this? as you say, it does appear to be a continuing situation at the parliament. we are not quite clear if the same can be said for the event at the mausoleum. that is appear to be over, following one or two suicide bombs. but in parliament, i can see some people talking about hostages, possibly including the family members of mps. there was a rather dramatic picture ofa there was a rather dramatic picture of a child being lowered down from a window of the parliament building. at the same time, elsewhere presumably in that complex, mps do appear to be meeting. the speaker of the parliament has said that everything is under control, and yet we have heard from the interior ministry saying the whole country is ina ministry saying the whole country is in a state of emergency. so, the authorities seem to be somewhat at sixes and sevens as to the extent of the danger that these attacks have
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presented. and islamic state is claiming it was behind these attacks? yes, a statement and our or so attacks? yes, a statement and our or so ago saying fighters attacked this shrine and be parliament but they are not saying much more than that. in the last couple of months, there has been a ratcheting up of so—called is rhetoric against iran. there was a video in persian in march, highly unusual. and for issues subsequently of that online publication have appeared also in persian with some pretty incendiary rhetoric directed against shia muslims, who, of course, the sunni jihad these regard as worthy of being murdered. the background to thatis being murdered. the background to that is that iran is heavily involved in the two conflicts in iraq and syria, where islamic state is one of the warring parties, and
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there are uranium advisers and iranians militias involved in the attack on mosul. and, of course, iran is heavily involved in supporting the regime of assad in syria. so lots of reasons why islamic state might choose to target iran, but it is worth noting this has not happened before. certainly nothing of this kind, the two coordinated attacks, bearing all the hallmarks of an is operation. more than 2,000 people will attend westminster abbey for a final farewell to ronnie corbett, who died last year aged 85 of motor neurone disease. the service has been organised by the bbc where corbett starred for 16 years with his long—time partner ronnie barker in the two ronnies. there will be tributes and readings from michael parkinson, jimmy tarbuck, rob brydon, joanna lumley. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is at westminster abbey. the service is due to start in the
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next half hour. yes, we have seen many people arriving already, about 2000 people will becoming through and many members of the public, the people who loved ronnie corbett and his work over so who loved ronnie corbett and his work over so many who loved ronnie corbett and his work over so many years. we have seen work over so many years. we have seen the likes of dame barbara windsor, harry hill the comedian was a huge fan of his and we have seen him come in. today is likely to be a sad occasion because it is looking back on the life of a much loved figure, but also a happy occasion, reminding everyone of the way he made us laugh over so many years. for candles will be set up in the chapel, reflecting that wonderful sketch by the two ronnies. also his chair from sketch by the two ronnies. also his chairfrom which he did his monologues. there will be prayers and readings, and an appreciative audience looking back on an entertainer whose career spanned more than half a century. so, a sad occasion in many ways, but a very happy one as well.
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after the turbulent weather yesterday, much quieterfor after the turbulent weather yesterday, much quieter for many of us. still some rain clinging to the east coast of scotland. another band of cloud and rain approaching from the south—west later in the day. for much of the country for much of the day it looks to be mainly dry with some spells of sunshine. the strong winds at first will ease down, and the clouds will increase from the south—west later in the afternoon. highest today of 15—19dc for most. rain continues overnight on its northern and eastward journey, not much into southern england, 0rd scotla nd much into southern england, 0rd scotland and here temperatures could drop to six celsius in more rural spots. still some rain around tomorrow affecting northern ireland, wales, north—west england, eventually reaching scotland. behind that rain, some fairly hefty
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showers. a lot of rain in a short amount of time. you're watching bbc newsroom live. the headlines. parties return to their core themes as political leaders make a final push for votes across the country in the last day of campaigning before the general election. the home office faces questions over how one of the london bridge attackers was able to return to the uk, despite being on an international database of suspects. youssef zaghba was stopped at an italian airport on his way to syria last year. police searching for the body of french national xavier thomas — missing since the london bridge attack — have recovered a body from the thames. gunmen and suicide bombers carry out co—ordinated attacks in the iranian capital, tehran, killing a number of people. the islamic state group has said it carried out the attacks on the parliament, and the tomb of ayatollah khomeini, the founder of the islamic republic.
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time now for the latest from the bbc sports centre. well, the difficulty of the lions tour to new zealand is becoming more and more evident. following a narrow win in their first match, they lost this morning, 22—16 against the blues in auckland. super rugby side auckland blues had eight all blacks in the starting xv and triess from winger rieko ioane and sonny bill williams put them ahead at the break. the lions took the lead late on after two leigh halfpenny penalties. williamson providing an assist. but a sensational try and conversion from ihaia west gave the visitors a memorable victory. an improved performance from the weekend but a missed opportunity for warren gatland's lions ahead of the next match against canterbury crusaders in on saturday. england cricket captain
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eoin morgan says they must prove their worth against australia on saturday, if they're to be considered contenders to win the champions trophy. they reached the semi—finals thanks to a 87—run victory over new zealand in cardiff. half—centuries from alex hales, joe root and joss buttler guided england past the 300 mark — before liam plunkett took four wickets to finish off the kiwis' chase. if we are truly going to be contenders for this tournament we need to beat the best teams and australia are not the best teams. they always are, going into tournaments, the produce world class cricketers, at will, so to get into a game like that and winning is very important. the football association has handed out lifetime bans for the first time, after two supporters made nazi gestures at england's friendly against germany in dortmund in march. the fa has vowed to tackle what it fears is a new generation of hooligans.
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in all, 27 fans have had their membership suspended — the supporters' club is the only way to obtain tickets to away matches. tra nsfer transfer news, and manchester city's women's team have signed a danish international defender from brondby. andy murray plays his french open quarterfinal against kei nishikori later — all four men's quarters are being played today, after heavy rain in paris yesterday. and rafael nadal is already through, after his opponent pablo carreno busta was forced to retire through injury. that was in the second set of their match. great britain won their first race in the america's cup semi—finals in the most dramatic of circumstances. after going 3—0 down to new zealand, sir ben ainslie's team finally registered when their opponents capsized at the start of race four. luckily, all of their crew members were ok. our first ourfirst thought our first thought was for the safety of the sailors on the boat. having
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looked at the privilege since it is clear it is just a slight misjudgement which lifted out of the water too much and it went into an aggressive pitch. nobody is passing criticism because these boats are so tough to sell and it could happen to anyone. the most important thing is that the crew are safe. i'm sure that the crew are safe. i'm sure that they will come back and the fight continues. the renault formula 1 team have revealed that robert kubica has tested an f1 car for the first time since a rallying accident in 2011 partially severed his arm. renault posted pictures on twitter of kubica at a session in spain, saying: "so guys...we need to come clean about something... it's true. "it really is — robert kubica, back in one of our cars after six years." olympic gold medallists jack laugher and chris mears are in a 12—strong british team for the world diving championships in budapest next month. the pair missed the british championships through injury but as well as the olympic 3m springboard title in rio, they've won three world
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series medals this year. tom daley and dan goodfellow will again team up. that's all the sport. we'll have more on the bbc news channel throughout the day. for most of us tomorrow, we'll be able to pop down to the local school or library to vote. but spare a thought for remote communities who may to travel the extra mile to have their say. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon has been to the inner hebridean island of eigg to visit the people who use one of britain's most remote polling stations. i'm on a journey to an island where they cherish the right to vote. around 100 people live on eigg. on this small isle, elections are a big thing. the turnout here has, it's rumoured, on some previous occasions, reached 100%. postal voting can prove convenient for many, and across the country it's on the rise. but the pace of life
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is different here. i vote in the polling section and the fact that you are putting your cross on and putting it in the box, you are doing your bit, and you feel like you've contributed, and nobody can take that away from you. here on eigg there was a polling place and people relish the opportunity to cast their vote by hand. i am the presiding officer so i ensure that the process is done properly. you have a fun time of your sandwiches and your flask and our neighbours from further down the road bring ‘s ice creams. our neighbours from further down the road bring 's ice creams. charley is the only taxi driver on the island. it isa the only taxi driver on the island. it is a bit unusual. he has not seen any election campaigning when driving around the single—track roads. do you feel left out? quite
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the opposite, i feel quite roads. do you feel left out? quite the opposite, ifeel quite happy about that. i think people coming to the door make a best of themselves. you have already made up your mind, you don't need someone knocking at the door and taking up your time. there's power here at a local level. it's 20 years since the people bought out the island, taking control of the land. so how close do they feel to the parliaments where national power resides? edinburgh feels a long way away, and westminster even more so. because of the community buyout 20 years ago, we feel a lot more conscious that people can effect a change, and the democratic process can work, so i think people here while it can feel very distant here from the frenzy of the campaign on parts of the mainland, islanders are determined to make sure their voice is heard when it comes to this election. in scotland the first minister will be in leith later as part
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of herfinal push in the campaign. nicola sturgeon is holding an event in the snp—held area. edinburgh north and leith could be a close fight between nicola sturgeon's nationalists and the conservatives. our correspondent catriona renton is in central glasgow. the last day of campaigning. the campaign is welland the last day of campaigning. the campaign is well and truly at its fever pitch now. this morning jeremy corbyn held a rally in glasgow. he was hoping he will be able to win back some of the votes even scotland. of course labour only has one seat, having gone from being the most dominant party in scotland before the last general election to being wiped out, effectively, by the snp bringing them down to one seat, when they took 56 of the 59 seats. he was as usual asked about the
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independence question. that is key to the election up here. there was debate amongst party leaders last night. snp leader nicola sturgeon said that the scottish labour leader kezia dugdale had told though, privately, that she would not be opposed to a second independence referendum. kezia dugdale said that it was nonsense and that she would fight for the uk. but this position that labour would not be opposed to a second scottish independence referendum would be at odds with jeremy corbyn's position. we put that to him this morning at his rally and he said that getting a labour government elected and getting a good deal negotiated in brexit where his priorities, so he didn't directly answer that question, but the scottish tory leader rick dennison seized upon this and said labour cannot be trusted with the independence referendum issue and that only her party will oppose it. —— ruth davidson. and the lib dems have been
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out campaigning also. there is going to bea out campaigning also. there is going to be a rally this afternoon with nicola sturgeon, and we will be able to put those issues to the scottish national party, there. the snp say that if they get the majority of seats this time around this is yet a further guarantee that there should bea further guarantee that there should be a scottish independence referendum. in their view, there has already been support for it from the holyrood elections last time around. shortly we will get first minister's questions. that'll be the last time in scotland that the leaders of the main parties will be able to go head—to—head once again to discuss these things. i am sure that the constitution is bound to come out in that debate, as it regularly has done throughout the course of this general election campaign. it is interesting, listening to that piece from lorna about people exercising a
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right to vote. that is what party leaders will be concerned about, turnout, that if turnout is high, maybe they can all pick up seats. ukip are campaigning in great yarmouth on the final day of the election. some of their main policies include completing the brexit process by 2019 without paying a divorce bill, and cutting net migration, operating a one in, one out policy. the ukip immigration spokesperson laid out how the party planned to cut immigration. we would set up an immigration control commission and their job set up an immigration control commission and theirjob would be to prioritise visas for people who could earn at least £30,000 a year, and we would put a moratorium on labour that is already here because they are ready here and can continue to come here for the next two — three years before we leave the eu.
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the green party manifesto pledges include holding a second referendum on the terms of the brexit deal with the option of staying in the eu, and a move to a four day working week. the party leaderjonathan a move to a four day working week. the party leader jonathan ba rtley was asked on bbc breakfast why voters should vote green over the labour party, who have similar ma nifesto labour party, who have similar manifesto pledges. in 2050 b got more votes than in all the previous general elections put together and that shifted the labour party in a different direction. but there is no commitment to modern democracy and the post and representation, we cannot expand roads and airports, there was no commitment to the big ideas like the basic income, reform of the welfare state, looking at how we change patterns in our working lives. it is only the green party thatis lives. it is only the green party that is looking ahead and saying that is looking ahead and saying that we have got this wave will automation coming in and we have got to think about how we tackle those job losses. and we wasting £110 billion renewing trident which labour says it would probably never use? it is ridiculous, it is hms
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pointless! the shooting incident in the iranian parliament is over. reuters is picking up on that, coming out of iran. the islamic state group has claimed it has been behind two attacks in tehran, one targeting parliament, and one at the shrine of the revolutionary founder, ayatolla h shrine of the revolutionary founder, ayatollah khomeini. in the reigning parliament it has been reported that four attackers are dead. —— in the iranian parliament. across wales, a0 seats are up for grabs. labour hold 25 of them. north wales has seen some of the most fierce election campaigning over the last few weeks. anglesey is seen as a 3—way battle between labour, the tories and cloud
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cymru. an iconic view of anglesey, it isa cymru. an iconic view of anglesey, it is a constituency that paints an interesting picture. since 19a5 the colour of the political landscape here has changed? times. labour is defending a majority ofjust 229. cloud cymru held the seat before that and at the height of margaret thatcher's popularity, anglesey was blue. members of this art group are considering how they will vote this time. anglesey is an area that, i believe it is very important for me to vote for a party who will invest in national resources. i think that this election is all about brexit. it is important for wales to get a good deal and to have a voice which will be heard. benefits have been
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cut drastically for a number of people. and a lot of people i am aware of are struggling at the moment. the main thing is brexit. control. we have just got to pull together and get that done with and move on. like wales as a whole, the majority of people on anglesey chose to leave the eu. support for ukip grew in the run—up to the referendum. the party gained seven assembly members in the welsh elections last year. labour has traditionally been the most popular party in wales, but in marginal seats, experts say that what happens to the ukip vote could be interesting. there are suggestions that ukip will not perform as well as in 2015, so which way will those voters swing? will they go to the conservative parties, or the lib dems? it may be a way of registering a different kind of protest vote. some voters might go to cloud cymru.
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for more than a generation of political picture in wales could be described as a still life with few changes of detail. could this be the moment that the scenery really does change here? in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. political leaders make a final push for votes across the country in the last day of campaigning before the general election. police searching for the body of french national xavier thomas — missing since the london bridge attack — recover a body from the thames. the home office faces questions over how one of the attackers was able to return to the uk, despite being on an international database of suspects. and now the business news. house price rises are slowing down. that's according to the uk's biggest mortgage lender, the halifax.
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it says prices rose by 3.3% over the year, that's down from 10% last year. more on that shortly. efforts continue to resolve a major diplomatic row between qatar and its gulf neighbours over its alleged funding of terrorism. the country — which imports most of its food and water — is said to be talking to iran and turkey to secure supplies after the united arab emirates and saudi arabia cut trade and diplomatic ties. and european stock markets are in wait and see mode ahead of voting in the general election, tomorrow. the pound is near a seven—month high despite conflicting polls on the outcome of the vote. the pound strengthened against the dollar after theresa may called the snap election. the markets are pricing in a majority for the conservatives. house prices — the subject you either love or hate. last week, the nationwide said prices weren't rising as fast as they were last year. and today a similar view from the halifax. it says prices in may rose
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by 3.3% compared to 10% this time last year. and there has been "virtually no change" in house prices over the last three months. martin ellis, halifax's housing economist, joins us from our leeds studio. as always, good to see you. i said in the introduction it is one of the stories that we love or loathe, you love it if you're on the housing ladder, you load it if you're not, because prices are still going up but less quickly. this is a more sustainable market. we had a period where house prices have increased rapidly. going back one year prices we re rapidly. going back one year prices were rising 10% in annual terms. that could not be sustained. it is much quicker than the rate at which incomes are rising. that has made it more difficult for people to be able to afford a home. we are naturally seen to afford a home. we are naturally seen that decline in the annual rate of inflation and ashley over the last few months we have seen very
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little movement in house prices, certainly nationally. it is very easy to get caught up in month by month figures. what we should be looking at is a trend. what is the trend saying? the last three months isa trend saying? the last three months is a good guide to the underlying trend. prices were very slightly down on the previous three months. that is quite a contrast to what we we re that is quite a contrast to what we were seeing last year, when we saw that quarterly rate of change, prices rising by 2—3%. there has been a big slowdown and we are seeing very little movement in the market at the moment. both in terms of prices and in terms of sales. those have levelled out. what is behind it? is itjust uncertainty because we're not sure what is happening, with brexit, a general election, there is lots of uncertainty. our people worried about what happens next? is not the uncertainty, just a natural reaction to the fact that we have had high
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house price inflation, prices have risen quickly for a sustained period. and incomes have not been able to keep pace. when that happens it naturally limits the number of people who can actually afford to buy at current prices. that puts a limit on house price inflation. we have seen the market is slowing down. looking at the economy, we have seen inflation rising, now more quickly than earnings. that is putting pressure on people'sspending power. we're going to head to runcorn. jeremy corbyn is speaking there in his last day of campaigning. let's hear what he has to say. you can see the van parked behind me and you know what this election is about. never before has there been a clear choice in british politics about which way we go. the real election of a tory government tomorrow will mean five more years of cuts to the nhs, five more years of cuts to the nhs, five more years of increased waiting lists and waiting times, five more years of
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more and more people waiting for social care, five more years of more and more people not getting the mental health support they need. five more years of austerity and cuts for the vast majority of the people of this country. our nhs, i think, is the most precious and civilised thing that we have in this country. health care, free at the point of use, for everybody. something very special about that. under these tories, it has been underfunded and privatised. staff are on a pay freeze and, in reality, 1496 are on a pay freeze and, in reality, 1a% pay cut over the past seven yea rs. 1a% pay cut over the past seven years. you know the reality of it, i know the reality of it. a labour government on day one will suspend the sustainability and
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transformation plans and look at it all again to ensure that there are a&e departments covering the whole country. we will properly fund the nhs, we will properly fund social ca re nhs, we will properly fund social care and set up a national care service, so that you are treated if you get cancer in a hospital, you will just as well you get cancer in a hospital, you willjust as well be treated, if you have dementia. at the moment you get cancer free, but not the manger, free. it is all part of our belief ina caring free. it is all part of our belief in a caring society. i also feel strongly about the mental health crisis facing this country. too many people, particularly young people, suffer alone, they suffer stigma and abuse. we want to properly fund mental health services but also, all of us together can do something about it. we can do something about it by supporting each other, ending the jokes it by supporting each other, ending thejokes and it by supporting each other, ending the jokes and the stigma and isolation. we can all be in a bad
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place. communities bring people together. this election is also about the future of our young people. there is a change in the funding formula in schools. headteachers have been told, if you cannot afford to pay teachers, can't afford to sustain your school, then tough, or go and collect some money from parents. well, sorry, iwant tough, or go and collect some money from parents. well, sorry, i want to live in a society where, yes, we all pay taxes, we pay taxes so that children can be properly educated in our schools. and so, starting at the youngest age, we will bring in free preschool places for all 2—a —year—olds irrespective of parental income background, so that those children get to grow up together. their first experiences doing things together, growing together. and then in the primary schools, two big
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things i am keen on doing. the tories brought in some limited numbers of free school meals in the country. they have now decided to ta ke country. they have now decided to take that away. and they are very challenged where maths is concerned. so we did some songs on there for school breakfasts and it turns out that the just shy of 7p per day, per child. i don't quite know what the exact price of rice krispies is today, but i think you could manage about an egg cup full of rice crispies with that sort of money. it isa crispies with that sort of money. it is a joke and an insult, quite frankly. hungry children do not learn and cannot concentrate, hungry children don't achieve in primary and that goes all the way through the years. and so i'm determined, it will cost, but i'm determined to do it, that we will bring in free school meals for every child in every primary school, across the whole country and they will eat
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together. education is about schools, about learning, about subjects, but also about children unlocking their imagination. there is poetry and art in every child, and music. and so, we will bring in and music. and so, we will bring in a pupil arts premium so that every child can get to learn a musical instrument while they are in school. and i see that as part of the kind of society and community we want. as they go through the school years, many other things are also very important. you take away, as the tories have done, the education maintenance allowance, take away the grants, the maintenance grant for those going on to university, raise university fees up to 9000 a year, introduce college fees, introduce fees for adult education, what happens? you know what happens. poorer students from ed ling, or
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poorfamilies go poorer students from ed ling, or poor families go to college there see what they want to end life, and two things happen, they lose out because they are not following the career they wanted, they are not learning a trade or profession that they wanted to do, they lose out and we lose out because we do not get that nurse, engineer, doctor or skilled person who contributes to all of our society. and so, i am very keen that we will, instead, invest in young people and so, we have costed it, and it does cost and it is expensive and i think it is absolutely the right thing to do. we will end university fees altogether. and reintroduce the maintenance grant. it cannot be right that so many of our young people leave university with debts of between a0,000- £50,000, university with debts of between a0,000— £50,000, merely because they
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wa nt to a0,000— £50,000, merely because they want to get educated. we have got to invest in the future for all of us. this election is about the kind of society and world we want to live in. we want an economy that works for all. i don't want an economy where 6 million people earn less than the living wage, 1 million people are ten hours contracts, i wa nt i nstea d people are ten hours contracts, i want instead of real living wage of £10 an hour by 2020. i want an end to the indignity of zero hours contracts, where, you wake up every morning wondering if you have got work that day. that's not right. so we will be changing quite a lot on employment law. we will also be investing in our economy for the future and so, we will be establishing a national investment bank. that national investment bank will invest over ten years, £500 billion across the whole of the uk. regionally based, so that all the
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transport and infrastructure investment doesn't just go transport and infrastructure investment doesn'tjust go to london and the south east, it goes to every pa rt and the south east, it goes to every part of the country. and we will be investing, yes, in the infrastructure that i talked about, but also in new technology and sustainable industryjobs. but also in new technology and sustainable industry jobs. as but also in new technology and sustainable industryjobs. as a country, we have to improve our manufacturing capacity. it is half that of germany, and connectivity is much lower. we have to do better and provide good quality, skilled jobs for the young people of the future. those things, timmy, are very, very important. and people say timmy, well, this manifesto for the many, not the few, they say, well, it's going to cost a lot of money. yes, it is, i know that. but we are very clear about this. we have fully costed it. 95% of the population will pay no more in tax and national
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insurance and vat. taxation for corporations will go up for the big ones, and we will at the same time be supporting small businesses and there will be some tax rises for those on very large incomes. i think thatis those on very large incomes. i think that is the right thing to do, because we have a seven years of austerity, seven years in which the banking crisis of 2008 — nine has been paid for by the low wages of the public sector, by unemployment, by insufficient housing, by public services being cut all over the country. this generation is being damaged by the austerity created by the banking crisis. our manifesto offers something very, very different for the future. it offers
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opportunity for the whole country, change in our attitudes. we are putting to the british people this programme because we believe very strongly in it. tomorrow, we have got the chance to vote for it and if you elect labour mps let mike and many others to carry through. and when they carried through we want to be measured by the numbers of people that are no longer homeless, the numbers of children that are no longer poor, the number of people no longer poor, the number of people no longer living in poor quality, overcrowded housing, with better chances that everybody has got. and by our environmental sustainability, by our environmental sustainability, by the way in which we approach the whole of society. and i'm very, very excited by the opportunities offered by it. and so the election of a labour government tomorrow will be the election of labour mps to make sure that it is carried out, that's
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true, but do you know what? over the seven weeks of this campaign, much has changed. because the tory party thought it was going to be a walk in the park. we are in a lovely park today, enjoy your walk. they thought, a walk in a park, what have they got off a? we have got something very important to offer here. the difference is this. a tory government will continue with all the policies they are doing at the present time. continue with the it dignity of the way they treat those with disabilities, the way they treat those that are hardest up in our society. the way they walk by on the other side when people are in desperate need. we offer something very different. if you look around yourself in this cloud here today, this fantastic cloud here today, look at all of us. we are young, we
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are old, we are black, we are white, we are men, we are women, we are lots of different things. but, do you know what? did you know what unites us together? it is a common belief in humanity, a woman belief in what we can achieve together. dash—macro a common belief. either you go down the road of tory privatisation, tory cuts, tory inequality, or you take the other road. those bold and brave people that lead our party in the desperate days after the second world war had that vision of a national health service, of an inclusive society. this labour party in the 21st century has that vision, that vision that you share the wealth, you share the ability, you contribute to your society, and your community, and you
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leave no one, no community and no place behind. i am very proud of the positive campaign we have fought all over the country. i am very proud of the positive messages we have put forward. to those young folk on top of the rock, please be careful, do not fall because i will be getting the blame if you do! and, we have refrained from personal abuse because i do not believe that gets us because i do not believe that gets us anywhere. i understand because my neighbours tell me that some people have said some very unkind things about me. i forgive them all. i forgive them all and i ask all of you in the few hours that remain until the polls open tomorrow morning, think very hard, talk to your friends, talk to your
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neighbours, talk to everyone in the community of the choices before us tomorrow. to me, it is a choice of the kind of world, the kind of country we want to live in. it is a choice of this all cuts, closure and privatisation. it is a choice, quite simply, of hope orfear. applause .caniask applause . can i ask you all to work hard today to get people to vote tomorrow so today to get people to vote tomorrow so that we elect a government that can work for the good for all of us. thank you very much! that is jeremy corbyn campaigning in runcorn in cheshire on the last day of campaigning for the country goes to the polls tomorrow. he is speaking at rallies in england, scotland and wales today. theresa may's day started in london and she will be going up the south coast, heading up
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to norfolk, nottinghamshire and the west midlands, and we will check in with theresa may in about ten minutes because she will be speaking in norfolk. jeremy corbyn speaking again. i think we will leave that now. we will hear from theresa may in the next ten minutes. the leaders of all of the parties are out on the final campaign push before tomorrow's general election. the conservatives and labour say there is all to play for in the closing stages. theresa may promises brexit will lead to morejobs, homes and better transport links. jeremy corbyn is speaking at rallies in england, scotland and wales, and he warns that are 2a hours to save the nhs. meanwhile, lib dem leader tim farron has posed people to vote tactically in order to prevent a landslide conservative victory. our political correspondent, chris mason is with the labour campaign in runcorn. a very passionatejeremy corbyn
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they're behind you, chris. yes, he has just finished, we they're behind you, chris. yes, he hasjust finished, we heard they're behind you, chris. yes, he has just finished, we heard the conclusion of his speech. he has been chaired all the way back to his car. let me step out of the shot and you can see the leader of the opposition being mobbed by his supporters. a good couple of hundred people here in runcorn. we arejust over the border into the very, very marginal seat of weaver vale. it has been held by labour in the past, but held by the conservatives by a few hundred votes in the last couple of elections. a mad dash around the country by all the party leaders. this is an insight into an element of the choreography don't always see, which is how to get out of one location and into the next. so, of jeremy corbyn heads in the direction of north wales. as you heard in that speech from jeremy corbyn, and we will get this from all of the party
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leaders today, they are returning to their big themes, playing their hits records, if you like. what they think will resonate most keenly with the people they hope to attract in their direction tomorrow. so, a big focus of the speech today byjeremy corbyn on the nhs. labour see this asa corbyn on the nhs. labour see this as a key plank of their campaign. you said that he has been there today because of the fact that it is such a tight marginal seat. they are probably getting sick of the sight of politicians there, but not much longer to go. how important our feeds like that going to be? absolutely crucial. jeremy corbyn is going to move forward if labour are going to move forward if labour are going to move forward if labour are going to gain seats they have two wind in places like weaver vale. warrington south is pretty close here as well. that is a marginal seat labour have held in the past. these kinds of seat are absolutely
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crucial. i was chatting to some labour campaigners here who said their knuckles were bruised from the number of doors they have knocked on over the last couple of days. is there one activist i spoke to earlier, going off to knock on doors. but we are very nearly there now. thank you, chris. theresa may has been campaigning in southampton, saying she and the conservatives were best place to deliver brexit. i have been out and about across the country and this campaign has been struck by those two terrible and horrific terrorist attacks that took place, but i think the questions at the end of the campaign are the same as at the beginning. it is about who people trust to have the strong and stable leadership to get the best deal for britain in europe, and who has the
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will and, crucially, the plan to deliver on brexit. you are saying pretty much the same thing as when you started the campaign. have people had any answers from you, on brexit in particular? we have... as i say, the questions in this campaign are the same. but have you a nswered campaign are the same. but have you answered any of them? yes, i have. read our manifesto. on brexit, i have set out the 12 objectives to ta ke have set out the 12 objectives to take into those negotiations. the labour party, i think, have had seven plans in nine months. we have been very clear about what our objectives are. we want a deep and special partnership with the eu in the future. we want a trade agreement and to continue to cooperate on matters like security and defence. our 12 objectives are very clear. theresa may is now is norfolk. lets get the latest from our bbc east political editor, andrew sinclair. why that particular spot, andrew?
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well, the prime minister hasjust arrived here from southampton. east anglia largely a conservative area, and to be fair, there has not been much campaigning going on in this pa rt much campaigning going on in this part of the region, but this area is an exception. this is a conservative marshall, they only hold the seat with a dry to a000. and just up the road is north norfolk, currently held by the liberal democrats. the conservatives have been putting a lot of effort into that, and they believe, particularly with their message on brexit, that they will be able to take that seat tomorrow. we shall find out. today, theresa may will address supporters in the building behind me, but her message is trying to be a very up heat one about brexit. she will say that brexit will be able positive experience after we have left the european union there will be more money available for housing, infrastructure and research and development. opposition parties say she really should be talking about
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social care. on the doorsteps here in norfolk which has a very large elderly population, the issue of social care, the winter fuel allowa nce social care, the winter fuel allowance and so on, are issues which play big and could cost the conservatives some votes tomorrow. so, the prime minister is in norfolk, and then she will head for the midlands. it is interesting coming to you from where we just we re coming to you from where we just were with jeremy coming to you from where we just were withjeremy corbyn in runcorn in cheshire. visually, a big contrast. a big matt lively crowd where he was. you are saying that she will speak in the building behind you. what is the setup there? it seems quite indicative of the way the campaigns have gone. yes, this very nondescript building hides what is rarely going on inside. there is a very large crowd of supporters inside. it is not the biggest room, but there are a lot of supporters inside with banners and posters and they will make a lot of noise and it will look good on television. for the conservatives, it is solved and
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what the pictures look like which is most important in this. yes, thank you. we will listen in when she does start to speak in the next few minutes. the liberal democrat leader tim farron have called on labour supporters to tactically back his party where it is the main challenger to conservatives. we began the campaign with theresa may saying this is all about brexit, and the electorate said no, it isn't, and you need to listen to what the voters have to say. undoubtedly, theresa may's decision to go for the demented tax, the exposure she has now received over her mismanagement of policing exposure she has now received over he“ mismanagement of policing .j be» éé’s’é/e’eé’éijiééiéé- {1 i-ieéhéh/eij 2:37” .. . .. . . secretary ifez» =fffei§=fefef§=fef§ej£=fefez=fei effi ifeefeeuthfeej 2:31 .. . .. . . secretary and ifez» =fffei§=fefef§=fef§ej£=fefez=fei efei ifeefeeuthfeej 2:31 .. . .. . . secretary and prime iez» =fffei§=fefe2=fe2ej£=fefez=fei efei ifeefeeuthfeej 2:31 .. . .. . . secretary and prime minister, home secretary and prime minister, there are 20,000 fewer police officers in the country, it will make many people think twice that what we need is a set of mps who will hold the government to account to prevent theresa may taking us all for granted. let's cross now to westminster and get the thoughts of our assistant political editor
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norman smith. it is almost over, norman. what is uppermost in your mind today as we head for the polls tomorrow? it strikes me that very often in recent elections we hear people saying they are all the same, there is no difference between the parties, it doesn't matter who you are lacked. you genuinely cannot say this at this election. we have a more profound choice than we have had in any recent election. the different directions and agendas of the party is striking. under theresa may, clearly, everything in her view hinges on delivering a good deal on brexit and that determines our future prosperity, the well—being of this country if we fail to secure that she wants the consequences, her words, will be dire. forjeremy corbyn, this is a moment to end austerities, to turn away from the remorseless deficit reduction, which remmsetess deficit redo c‘l'i'dtitwittizhe he remmsetess deficit redo c‘l'i'dtitwittizhe g g remcrreeteee deficit tedd cti'onfwidche he theséff: on lee‘e‘: ffffh'as ff ”7:
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future greater. for ineater- for in i‘ffrfe how ,,,, ,, in ilefé how business government in, shaping how businessj government in shaping new businessj and government in shaping haw ha-sinessii and then, the liberal operates. and then, the liberal democrats, offering the opportunity ofa democrats, offering the opportunity of a second referendum on the brexit deal that theresa may negotiates. lastly, of course, ukip. they are if} agenda f'" ' say .c. if} agenda f'" ' say is .c. a moratorium on all future faith schools, so a very, very diverted agenda, and of course in scotland, nicola sturgeon hoping for another massive mandate to bolster her mandate for a second referendum.
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breaking f , breaking if 131 , breaking if 13 people , breaking if 13 people have; some breaking news, 13 people have been convicted of abusing adult with learning difficulties at two private ca re learning difficulties at two private care homes in devon. a series of trials heard that the residents at the two homes were routinely punished by being held in empty rooms without food, heating or a toilet. it looks like an exilic place for a ca re it looks like an exilic place for a care home, but the prosecution says what happened in this remote care home was cruel and uncaring. adults with learning disabilities routinely imprisoned in empty rooms as punishment. what i heard no mother should ever hear. this woman's son was held in isolation nearly 200 times. sometimes overnight, in a so—called quiet room, without food, heating or even a toilet. it was not
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a quiet room. it was farfrom a quiet room. how would you describe what happened there? barbaric, disgusting, unnecessary. it is shameful. we should be ashamed of this care. it is not care. before he was placed here, her son was a resident at the notorious winterbourne view homework he was assaulted. his mother says she can't believe he was let down again.|j can't get the images out of my mind of what has happened to him. he tells me day after day, night after night, it is awful. the manager on the left here was jailed for 28 months for false imprisonment and perverting the course ofjustice. his wife and fellow manager rachel marshall was given a suspended prison sentence. what do you say to the residents? paul hewitt, who set up a team, said he was not aware of any punishment
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rooms. no message to the resident or their families? they played false improvement, he was fined for breaching health and safety laws. the judge said was fined for breaching health and safety laws. thejudge said he had been the company, guiding force and had shown wilful blindness. as well as paul hewitt and the marshals, ten other members of staff have been convicted in a series of cases. they either pleaded guilty, or were found guilty of falsely imprisoning vulnerable residents. 11 others have been cleared. for the first time in the country, we have a case where not only the workers who have been dealing with victims individually, but also the senior managers and the owners have been prosecuted for allowing a culture of abuse to exist in theircare allowing a culture of abuse to exist in their care homes. the prosecution claimed that what went on at this driveway amounted to systematic neglect. with residents routinely deprived of their liberty for the sake of convenience. the judge said this was not so much care in the community as lack of care in the community. the trial heard it was a
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culture of control, notjust here, but also at a sister home nearby. culture of control, notjust here, but also at a sister home nearbym was clear to me within five minutes of walking through the door that something was seriously wrong. this man, who does not want to be identified, told me he quit hisjob here after one month. he told police here after one month. he told police he did not like the way residents we re he did not like the way residents were treated. they just he did not like the way residents were treated. theyjust had fear on their faces. all the time. there was no laughter, there was nojoy. they we re no laughter, there was nojoy. they were treated like third class citizens. the issues at these two ca re citizens. the issues at these two care homes were eventually uncovered by the care quality commission in 2011, following a call from a whistle—blower. but families want to know why previous inspections had failed to spot what was really going on. we can't be in a service all the time, and we are very reliant on people giving us good information to help direct our inspections. but
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actually, the inspectors did find what was going on in these services and we took action to make sure it could not continue. this cqc says the inspection process has improved. meanwhile, the two care homes have closed and the properties have new owners. the headlines: political leaders make a last attempt to win over voters on the last day of the political campaign. police searching for french national xavier thomas, missing since the london bridge attack, recover a body from the river thames. the home office faces questions over how one of the attackers was able to return to the uk, despite being on an international data base of suspects. time now for the latest from the bbc sports centre. well, the difficulty of the lions tour to new zealand is becoming more and more evident.
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following a narrow win in their first match, they lost this morning, 22—16 against the blues in auckland. super rugby side auckland blues had eight all blacks in the starting xv and tries from winger rieko ioane and sonny bill williams put them ahead at the break. the lions took the lead late on after two leigh halfpenny penalties. williamson providing an assist. but a sensational try and conversion from ihaia west gave the visitors a memorable victory. an improved performance from the weekend but a missed opportunity for warren gatland's lions ahead of the next match against canterbury crusaders in on saturday. andy murray plays his french open quarterfinal against kei nishikori later — all four men's quarters are being played today, after heavy rain in paris yesterday. and novak djokovic is lacking form
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coming into the tournament. he is a breakdown in the third set. that is all the sport for now. it is less than 36 hours now before the polls close, so let's make the most of that time, right up until the polls close. being in government, serving in government, isa government, serving in government, is a huge honour, but it is also a great responsibility. i think at no time has that responsibility been greater than it is now because our country is facing great challenges, but also huge opportunities are opening up to us. as we go out campaigning in this remaining time, i want us to take out the message to people of the clear choice that is
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there for them when they vote tomorrow. and the message of the vision that we as conservatives have for building a stronger, fairer and more prosperous britain than it is today. and it is only the conservatives that have the plan and the vision and the determination to do that. i am absolutely confident that we can do that because i believe in britain, and i believe in the british people. i want to see us building a country where nobody and no community is left behind. i want to see us building a country where it doesn't matter where you came from, or who your parents are, actually how far you go is down to you and your hard work. i want to see a country as we leave the european union, we do see opportunities opening up to us, and i think the promise of brexit is great. i want to see us as a global, outward looking nation. i want to
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see us outward looking nation. i want to see us out there, trading our way around the world. i want to ensure that economic prosperity and opportunity is spread across the whole country. i want to ensure that this is a country that feels more confident in itself. as i say, i believe in britain and in the british people. that is the message that we will take out in these remaining hours. there are great things that we can do together. i wa nt things that we can do together. i want us to reignite the british spirit. to show the opportunities and what we can be as a country. when it comes to the election tomorrow, i think the choices, and the questions that people need to ask, are the same today as they were right at the beginning of the campaign. the first is a question of who do they trust question mark who do you trust to actually have the
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strong and stable leadership that is going to deliver the best deal for britain in europe. brexit matters. exit is the basis of everything else. we need to get that brexit deal right. another question is, who has got the will and, crucially, the plan to just get on with the job and deliver brexit? remember, those brexit negotiations start 11 days after polling day tomorrow. so, in less tha n after polling day tomorrow. so, in less than a fortnight. the prime minister and the government has to be ready to go out and negotiate for britain and to stand up and fight for britain. there is one simple fa ct for britain. there is one simple fact nobody should forget, which is if we lose just six seats, the government loses its majority, and that would mean that coalition of chaos with labour, the lib dems and the snp. it would meanjeremy corbyn... in
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the snp. it would meanjeremy corbyn. .. in number ten. john mcdonnell at the treasury. and, what accommodation that would be. we know they would wreck our economy. what we also know with labour is that it is ordinary working people who a lwa ys is ordinary working people who always pay the price. in that coalition of chaos, of course, there isa coalition of chaos, of course, there is a third element, we would see the snp and nicola sturgeon pulling the strings. so we can prevent that from happening. every vote for a conservative candidate, here and around the country, can prevent that from happening. every vote for conservative candidates will strengthen my hand in those brexit negotiations, and every vote for conservative candidate is a vote to build that better, writer future for our country. so, let's go out there with renewed determination over these last hours, let's put every effort into that campaign. let's go out there, not for ourselves, but for the future of our country. i
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have a very simple message to people. vote conservative in the national interest. give me your backing to leave britain —— leads britain. give me the 30 two lead britain, strengthen my authority and with your backing, i will deliver for britain. thank you. theresa may on the final day of campaigning. we will stay with these pictures for a moment in case she is asked questions, in which case we will continue listing for a bit. she is of travelling around, having started her day in london. she has gone along the south coast, nottinghamshire and the west midlands. some questions now, so we will listen. when you called the selection, a lot of people were talking about a landslide. no one is talking about a landslide. no one is talking about a landslide. no one is talking about that any more. isn't the reason for that the campaign that you have lead has been a disappointment. there is only one
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poll that matters. i have never talked about predicting the result ofan talked about predicting the result of an election. i never do that. there is one simple thing you need to do in an election, which isjust go out there to work to earn the support is voters. that is exactly what i have been doing. that is what my colleagues have been doing and candidates all around have been doing. that is what all these activists have been doing. the only poll that matters is the one that ta kes poll that matters is the one that takes case tomorrow. and right from the bbc. throughout this campaign you said you have a plan for brexit. but, after seven weeks, voters are no clearer to knowing how you plan to pull britain out of the single market, what bill you might pay brussels, what the consequences of youths failing would be. you have not given voters a clear choice on brexit at all, have you? yes, i have. i let the macro point out that i gave a speech injanuary where i set out the objections for brexit. we have set those out clearly in
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your manifesto. in the article 50 letter, triggering the start of negotiations, i set out clearly object is that we have got. eight comprehensive free trade agreement, a special partnership with the eu in the future, it is right that the eu remained strong, continuing to cooperate on security and defence matters. there are 12 objectives that i have set out for the brexit the gauche asians. i have been clear what our plan for brexit is. jeremy corbyn has had i think seven brexit plans in nine months. you need to know what you want and how you are going to go about it, and we do. sky news, after the 7/7 bombings, the conservatives accused the labour governed of a knee jerk response. aren't you doing exactly the same by warning of tightening human rights legislation? no, what i have set out is clear. we are seeing the terrorist threat changing. we are
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seeing it evolve, and we need to respond to that. as i said, enough is enough, and things have to change. that is why i have said i believe we do need to do more to tackle the ideology that is motivating the perpetrators of these attacks. we do need to have those international agreements to regulate cyberspace so terrorist cannot plan online. we need to do more to stamp out extremism here and in communities in britain. we do need to look at the powers for police and security intelligence agencies to make sure that, as the threat evolves, they have the powers they need. i have talked about some of those powers, such as making it easier to deport foreign terror suspects, and able to do more to restrict the freedom and movement of terror suspects when we know they area terror suspects when we know they are a threat but we are without the evidence to prosecute fully in court. and longer sentences for terrorism related offences for those
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who are convicted of terrorism related offences. what i have been clear about is that if human rights laws get in the way of us doing those things, which i think are necessary as the threat has evolved, then we will change those laws. how would the measures on human rights you have mentioned in the last 2a hours prevented attacks recently when all the perpetrators we re recently when all the perpetrators were known to the security services? i'm talking about how we adapt to a threat that is evolving. what we have seen in the last three ones is three terrorist attacks, we have seen three terrorist attacks, we have seen five attacks being foiled by the police and security services, so the police and security services, so the tempo has increased, we are seeing terrorism breeding terrorism, and we are seeing the type of attack
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including the crude methods used. the threat is evolving and we need to add that our response to that. as home secretary i was clear that when the police and security services wa nted the police and security services wanted the laws and powers to enable them to do theirjob, that we gave them to do theirjob, that we gave them to do theirjob, that we gave them to them, we gave up on these new powers and set in place legislation for the security services and the police, but now that the threat is becoming more complex and evolving, we need to look at adapting our response to make sure that they have the powers that they need. prime minister, thank you, steve hawkes, of the sun. there may be scores of labour voters who cannot bear to vote forjeremy corbyn but they are not sure about backing the conservatives were the first time in their lives. what message can you give them about how brexit will change their lives for the better over the next five years? is not a question of how people
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voted before but who they want to see taking this country through next five years and setting the direction of this country for the future. and i would say to those voters, i think many of them would be the sort of people i met when i stood up in north west durham some years ago. people who are fiercely patriotic, very proud of their part of the country, who want to see good jobs for their children, who want their children to get a good quality of education, he won public services to be there to support them when they need it. and it is the conservative party, because we will build a strong economy that will see more jobs, better paid jobs, we will be on the side of people, we will help them with the cost of living through capping those rip—off energy tariffs and through developing that strong economy, growing the economy, we can make sure that we invest in the nhs and provide a good school place for every child, and we will, crucially, provide proper technical education for young people for the first time
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in this country. yes, sorry? prime minister, in 2011 as secretary you it's clap control orders and replaced them with less restrictive powers over terror suspects. now you wa nt powers over terror suspects. now you want to beat those powers up again. isn't this another u—turn? we did that because the courts were increasingly knocking control orders down. so we have subsequently enhanced that measure. now we are seeing the threat of robbing and becoming more complex it is right that we look again at what powers are needed —— the threat evolving. i will take a couple more questions. yes? sorry, yes? the gentleman in front of the man here. you have
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talked about reigniting the spirit of the british people. have you come to the conclusion that it was our membership of the european union that snuff it out? what i think is that snuff it out? what i think is that there is a real opportunity of coming together as united kingdom and grasping the opportunities that are available as we come out of the european union. to do that, we have to have that spirit of optimism and of getting out and trading across the world, encouraging investment here, seeing morejobs coming here and ensuring that there is opportunity for everybody. as i said, it is about ensuring that people know that that is not about where they come from but then and their hard work that will get them on in life. i think that is so important. applause emily morgan, itv news. you said you would not make up policy on the
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hoof, but isn't that what you did la st hoof, but isn't that what you did last night in a desperate attempt to persuade voters that you're tough on terror, and ifi persuade voters that you're tough on terror, and if i may, you fight your ups and downs over the last few weeks. what have you learned about yourself over this campaign? what i know from this campaign and i have a lwa ys know from this campaign and i have always known about myself is that when it comes the campaigns i like to get out and about and meet voters. it is what i have always done throughout my entire political career. what i am doing is setting out the people, as we have seen a change in the threat, that greater complexity and that higher tempo, the steps that we will take. many of these are not things that have suddenly come on, i have spoken about these issues before, about deporting foreign terror suspects, i had quite a job that we got the hate preacher abu qatada out of the country, but i did it. i will take a couple more, write to the back. i
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can't see all the faces. ov and bennett of the huffington post. jeremy corbyn is attracting thousands of people to rallies and you have appeared in front of activists. does that worry you at all? i have been into workplaces and actually spoken to people in their workplace about the issues that matter to them and taken their questions. and yes i am here with activists today. this is the last stages of the campaign. i am encouraging everyone to get out over the next 36 hours and get those boats out tomorrow. my last question. —— those votes. boats out tomorrow. my last question. -- those votes. prime minister, can you promise brenda from bristol and the nation's bulega sketch writers that there would not be another general election, another
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referendum, for the next five years? —— beleaguered. referendum, for the next five years? -- beleaguered. i call the election because i thought the other parties wa nted because i thought the other parties wanted to frustrate brexit negotiations and because the country needed stability over the next five yea rs. needed stability over the next five years. on the question of the referendum we are the one party that will deliver on and respect the will of the british people and make sure that the come out of brexit and there is no second referendum, unlike other parties. thank you very much, everybody, thank you. that wraps up the event in norfolk. she is going to be heading on from the and elsewhere around the country on this final day of campaigning, and the same with the other political leaders, making the most of that last push for votes in the campaign. detectives searching for the
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a5—year—old french national xavier woods thomas who disappeared during the london bridge terror attack have recovered a body from the thames, near limehouse. his next of kin have been informed. the home office is under pressure to explain how one of the attackers was able to return to the attackers was able to return to the uk despite being placed on a watchlist. the italian authorities said that they had issued warnings about youssef zaghba. our correspondent sarah smith is at new scotla nd correspondent sarah smith is at new scotland yard. what is the latest? police think they have found an eighth victim, a a5—year—old from france, xavier thomas. he was with friends on london bridge. his girlfriend was hit by the van and badly injured. he has not been seen, since. his family were worried he might have gone into the river but they were hoping for a miracle. now there is news from the police that
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there is news from the police that the body has been recovered about 2.5 miles down river, at limehouse. police say that happened at 7:a5pm yesterday. specialist officers from the marine police unit found the body. formal identification has not yet ta ke n body. formal identification has not yet taken place but mr thomas's next of kin have been informed of developments. so we are assuming that it developments. so we are assuming thatitis developments. so we are assuming that it is mr thomas and that would ta ke that it is mr thomas and that would take the death toll up to eight. as far as the police investigation is concerned, they have had search warrants in ilford in east london overnight. at 1:30am they arrested a man in his 30s. he has been held for questioning at a police station in south london. they have two people under arrest, 12 people have been released after being arrested earlier, and searchers are being carried out at addresses in east london. police investigating the manchester bombing in which 22
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people died have arrested a 38—year—old man at heathrow airport and a planned operation. use the 19th person to be arrested. seven are still in custody. detectives say they have found evidence that the suicide bomber had stored parts of his device in a white nissan mike. let's return to the election campaign. our political editor for the region,helen catt, joins us now from crawley in west sussex. in 2015 the conservatives took all but two seats across kent and sussex and with this being dubbed the brexit election this is a big lead area. many people thought this would bea area. many people thought this would be a walk in the park for theresa may. when you speak to people about brexit in kent and this part of west sussexit brexit in kent and this part of west sussex it seems to be the conservatives who are coming out on top. but there have been lots of social issues that have come up as
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strong factors in this campaign. in crawley, west sussex, this is one of the new towns. there are problems with social deprivation in parts of crawley. the rail line that runs through this town is the main line into london. there has been massive disruption on that over the past year. so the labour policy of renationalising the railways is cutting through here. social care, that has been a massive issue. it has been raised with voters across kent and sussex. and house prices in the south east are strictly high. many people will get caught under that £100,000 asset threshold for paying for care. that is something that people have been raising with me. this is the brexit election, as it has been dubbed, and this is causing ripples elsewhere in the south east. in brighton, they voted heavily to remain. labour defending the seat, the greens offending a seat, there, and labour are looking
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to pick up the one tory held seat in brighton, kemptown. brexit playing the opposite way round there for theresa may. one worth looking at is brighton pavilion, the seat of caroline lucas, she has a very strong personal vote in the city and she's expected to hold it, but it is worth remembering that this time she's competing with the same demographic for the same voters on same issues as a labour party on this time, so that is one to keep an eye on, on election night. the west midlands is a two—party affair — more so than most regions in the uk. but given the narrowing of the polls, what effect could this have on the vote? the bbc‘s midlands political editor is patrick burns and hejoins me now from birmingham. patrick. on that point, in the early stages of this campaign it is fair to say we saw the conservative ambitions sky—high. there are signs
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that activists on the ground were fanning out from the low hanging fruit, places like newcastle—under—lyme, walsall north, birmingham edgbaston, branching out to more ambitious targets. we have that perception of the narrowing of the opinion polls and i am hearing that they are drawing back into those more obvious targets. so you could say that the conservative aspirations have been down side somewhat. one key factor in all of this is, what happens to the ukip voters we have been hearing from elsewhere. there is a sense that the brexit on its way, and nigel farage no longer leader, there was a sense that in some key areas around the black country and north staffordshire, stoke—on—trent, they are not the force that they once were. that is absolutely critical, what will happen there. remember that ukip are not contesting 20
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constituencies in this part of the country. on the other side of the political battlefield, the so—called progressive alliance between the lib dems and the greens, got absolutely no way up. —— nowhere, here. bring those threads together with the parties of the latter continuing to fight one another, and the conservatives hoping that with that shrinkage of ukip, to draw together a kind of consolidation of the centre ground and the right. meanwhile, labour really would break absolutely new ground. they are trying to win this general election, not from the centre ground, where conventional wisdom has it that elections are won and lost, labour i try to win it from the left. and we are seeing evidence of that on the ground with campaigning flat—out in this region of clusters of marginal seats. we will know, enough. let me
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bring you some news about diane abbot. she has been replaced as shadow home secretary because of ill health. she has put out a tweet saying that she is still standing and will rejoin the fray soon, vote labour. one shadow cabinet colleague has said that she has a long—term condition which may have played a part in how difficult interview performances during the general election campaign. there was one on bbc radio london which she forgot some figures and then won on sky news when she did not know the details of a security report. after that she pulled out of a radio interview and has been replaced by shadow home affairs spokeswoman, lyn brown, during the period of ill health. although she is on twitter, saying that she is still standing and that she will rejoin the fray, soon. the headlines on bbc newsroom live:
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political leaders make a final bid to win over voters in the last day of campaigning before the general election. police searching for french national xavier thomas — missing since the london bridge attack — recover a body from the thames. that takes the death toll from the london bridge pack up to eight. —— london bridge pack up to eight. —— london bridge pack up to eight. —— london bridge attack. the home office faces questions over how one of the attackers was able to return to the uk, despite being on an international database of suspects. more than 2,000 people have gathered in westminster abbey for a final farewell to ronnie corbett, who died last year aged 85, of motor neurone disease. the service — underway now — has been organised by the bbc where corbett starred for 16 years with his long—time partner ronnie barker in the two ronnies. there are tributes and readings from michael parkinson, jimmy tarbuck, rob brydon, joanna lumley. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is at westminster abbey. it has been a very moving service so
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far. unfortunately sir michael parkinson was supposed to be making a reading. we are told that he is not well enough to attend, so his place was taken by somebody else. it has been a roll call of huge entertainment figures from the last 30-50 entertainment figures from the last 30—50 years. we've had dame patricia routledge, dame barbara windsor, people like barry cryer, stephen fry, the comedian harry ill, so many big figures coming through. and many hundreds of members of the public, the people that ronnie corbett perform for. it has been a sad service in many ways because it reflected on his death, but it has also been a very happy occasion with people remembering the way that he made people laugh. they have had four candles brought through the
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abbey, and the chairfrom four candles brought through the abbey, and the chair from which four candles brought through the abbey, and the chairfrom which he did his monologues in the two ronnies and some of his famous sketches were played out to laughter in the service. the service will be drawing to a close in the next 10—15 minutes. people remembering one of the great entertainers who entertained the nation for well over half a century, ronnie corbett. some of the biggest names in the music world came to, togetherfor the one love manchester concert. one of the most emotional moments was when the parrs wood school choir sang with ariana grande. here is a flavour of that moment. the bbc reporter helen
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hamilton spoke to some members of that choir earlier today. you were there on sunday night. what was that like? it was magnificent. the atmosphere was completely amazing. i'm still speechless now, speaking about that, it was amazing. and emotional. it was, i tried backstage. looking back at the video clip, what is it like you watching that? it is weird watching is back on tv, but it is nice to know that it has been recorded and i can look back at it in future. cheering eve ryo ne back at it in future. cheering everyone up and making them happy. we have seen that video clip. ariana grande came onto the stage and joined the choir. one of the ladies making a solo appearance that night which was really scary, i can imagine, with ariana grande next to you, what was that like, natasha? imagine, with ariana grande next to you, what was that like, natasha ?m was so you, what was that like, natasha ?m was so cool and overwhelming. i was speechless at the time. because my
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favourite singer ever, like, my idol, who look up to so much, was performing with me and the whole choir. i wasjust so performing with me and the whole choir. i was just so overwhelmed. performing with me and the whole choir. i was just so overwhelmedfl was just amazing. when she came up and put her arm around you like that, what were you thinking at the time, is this real? i was thinking, i'm going to wake up tomorrow thinking this is all a dream. like, oh, gosh. well, it was not a dream, it was real and you did everyone very proud. so, well done. let me just tell you that donald trump has put out on twitter the person he will nominate to be the new director of the fbi. it is christopher a wray, who he describes as having impeccable credentials. meanwhile, the man who was fired as head of the
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fbi, james comey, will be testifying before congress in front of the senate intelligence committee tomorrow, which will be his first public remarks since he was fine. we will await more details from donald trump about the man years nominating, as well. for most of us tomorrow, we'll be able to pop down to the local school or library to vote. but spare a thought for remote communities who may to travel the extra mile to have their say. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon has been to the inner hebridean island of eigg to visit the people who use one of britain's most remote polling stations. i'm on a journey to an island where they cherish the right to vote. around 100 people live on eigg. on this small isle, elections are a big thing. the turnout here has, it's rumoured, on some previous occasions, reached 100%. postal voting can prove convenient for many, and across the country it's on the rise. but the pace of life is different here.
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i vote in the polling station and the fact that you are putting your cross on and putting it in the box, you are doing your bit, and you feel like you've contributed, and nobody can take that away from you. some scottish island communities have no choice but to cast their vote by post. here on eigg there was a polling place and people relish the opportunity to cast their vote by hand. i am the presiding officer so i ensure that the process is done properly. you have a fun time with your sandwiches and your flask and our neighbours from further down the road bring us ice creams. charlie is the only taxi driver on the island. it is a bit unusual. he has not seen any election campaigning when driving around the single—track roads. do you feel left out?
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quite the opposite, i feel quite happy about that. i think people coming to the door make a pest of themselves. you have already made up your mind, you don't need someone knocking at the door and taking up your time. there's power here at a local level. it's 20 years since the people bought out the island, taking control of the land. so how close do they feel to the parliaments where national power resides? edinburgh feels a long way away, and westminster even more so. because of the community buyout 20 years ago, we feel a lot more conscious that people can effect a change, and the democratic process can work, so i think people here are more politically engaged. while it can feel very distant here from the frenzy of the campaign on parts of the mainland, islanders are determined to make sure their voice is heard when it comes to this election. one person's rubbish can be
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another‘s treasure. emptying the bins in the colombian capital, bogota, one man found a copy of the tolstoy classic anna karenina, and kept it. he has since amassed a library of more than 20,000 discarded books. here's the bogota bin man with a taste of literature. but the 20 years, jose alberto gutierrez has been keeping the streets of the city clean and risking unwanted books. his nickname is now lord of the books. and this is now lord of the books. and this is his free community library. translation: i think we are the only library in the wardrobe they come to borrow a book and we give it to them
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as present. -- in the world. the collection started with a thrown out novel by tolstoy. now one floor at his house is filled with around 25,000 books and it is open to schoolchildren. he never got past by — self. now he travels around the country delivering free books to poor areas. he's providing books for fighters from the farc rebel group who will have to retrain as a rejoin civilian life. translation: i come from ignorance, from a place affected by poverty. books transport me, so this is a symbol of hope, of peace. now, jose alberto gutierrez plans to go back to study for a school leavers exam which he missed the first time round. time now for the weather forecast with louise lear.
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by by the end of may, gardeners were crying out rain. the first week of june has change that with this area low—pressure bringing june has change that with this area low— pressure bringing low june has change that with this area low—pressure bringing low pressure, and rain, before more wet weather arriving tomorrow. in edinburgh we saw 84 millimetres of rain in 24 hours, above the average for the whole of june. some hours, above the average for the whole ofjune. some of that was quite heavy if we take a look back through the night, particularly across eastern scotland. it is starting to move away now with brighter conditions following on behind. a better afternoon for many. we still have some rain for the northern isles and the eastern fringes, but elsewhere, sunshine, and pleasant at 15 celsius. that breeze will make it cooler, and a similar story for northern ireland. lots of sunshine across england and wales, in contrast to yesterday, with highs of around 20 celsius. by
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the end of the afternoon across cornwall and the southern fringes of wales, you can see that next system arriving. that will move north and east through the evening rush hour and overnight. it will bring some rain with it as it does so for all of england, wales and into southern scotland. to the north of that, clearer skies and lower temperatures. to the south, a blanket of cloud and rain. it will be chiefly sitting out to the west. a tricky one on thursday, the heaviest rain during daylight hours. eventually stretching up into the scottish borders and northern ireland. not getting through daylight hours to the far north of scotland, and not seeing much in the way of significant rainfall at all during the day across the south—east. just the odd spot. 21 celsius the high if we get some sunshine in the south east. that frontal system moves away and we see a repeat performance of the weather today by friday. drier and quieter before the next low—pressure waiting
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in the wings for the start of the weekend. friday will be more straightforward with the wind swinging round to the south west, feeling warmer, but we will see some scattered showers before more wet weather pushes into the weekend. the weekend remains unsettled some sunshine, and some rain at times. the final day of the election campaign, as party leaders travel the length and breadth of the uk. the conservatives and labour return to their core themes. for theresa may, brexit. forjeremy corbyn, investing in public services. who do you trust to actually have the strong and stable leadership that is going to deliver the best dealfor britain in europe? because brexit matters. brexit is the basis of everything else. you've got a choice. five more years of tory cuts. longer waiting lists,
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underfunded schools in many parts of our country, and hope under labour. seven weeks after the snap general election was called, the parties are all making their last big push for votes. we'll have the latest from the campaign trail
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