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tv   Newsday  BBC News  June 8, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is newsday on the bbc. i rico hizon in singapore. our top stories: the former fbi director, james comey, says donald trump did ask him to drop an enquiry into links between a senior white house official and russia. an anxious wait on the ground after burmese military aircraft with more than 100 people on board disappears. i'm babita sharma in london. also in the programme: with just hours to go, the candidates wrap up their final campaigns before britain goes to the polls. every vote for me and my team isa polls. every vote for me and my team is a vote to strengthen my hand in those brexit negotiations. we are labour! we are the people! we are the community! and we will win this election, tomorrow. a new fossils suggest that humans of old 100,000 yea rs suggest that humans of old 100,000 years earlier than previously thought. —— evolved. glad you could join us. it is 7am
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here in singapore, midnight in london, and 7pm in washington, dc, web donald trump is under new pressure over his sacking of the former fbi director. —— where. james comey will give evidence on thursday about whether he was given any pressure to drop an enquiry into links between a senior white has official and russia. and written testimony has been released injames comey. in it, he says he believes that the president asked him to drop the investigation into general michael flynn. here are the key lines from his statement. 0ur washington correspondent says
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that the evidence is eagerly anticipated. they are saying that this could be a bigger box office, if you like, as far as capital hill is concerned, then the clinton impeachment hearings, all watergate. it will very closely watched. we have this opening statement released on the senate intelligence committee website. —— or watergate. on the senate intelligence committee website. —— orwatergate. it reveals, amongst other things, the donald trump called for a pledge of loyalty from the mandate he later
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sacked, james comey, and he called onjames sacked, james comey, and he called on james comey to sacked, james comey, and he called onjames comey to let the investigation into the former national security adviser, michael flynn, drop. what it all amounts to, it is certainly unorthodox. does that constitute obstruction of justice, which could eventually be grounds for impeachment? not on the face of it. this is why in the past few minutes donald trump has said that he feels, and i quote, com pletely that he feels, and i quote, completely and utterly vindicated by what has been put out, today. so, david, will this just be a what has been put out, today. so, david, will thisjust be a one what has been put out, today. so, david, will this just be a one day it is senate hearing or a series of hearings? 0h, it is senate hearing or a series of hearings? oh, i think it is senate hearing or a series of hearings? 0h, ithink we it is senate hearing or a series of hearings? oh, i think we are going to get lots of hearings going forward , to get lots of hearings going forward, and it won'tjust be the senate intelligence committee. there are other committees that are looking into this whole matter of alleged links between the drug administration and the russians. so this is something that will go on and on, but we have had a lot of
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legs up to now and there was not, frankly, a great deal that was particularly surprising. —— trump administration. much of the statement today was leaked in a dance to newspapers like the new york times and the washington post. not least because james comey is a man who is known to have taken scrupulous notes, and he said, actually, in his submission today, that he took those notes throughout his interactions with donald trump, something he had not done under president 0bama. david willis are. —— there. let's take a look at some of the other newsy sour. debris has been found in the sea near where a burmese military plane went missing with more than 100 soldiers and theirfamily on with more than 100 soldiers and their family on board. with more than 100 soldiers and theirfamily on board. the with more than 100 soldiers and their family on board. the aircraft disappeared after leaving a domestic airport. ships and aircraft are
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searching for the plane, currently, which apparently took off in good weather. this plaintive from the city of myeik around lunchtime. half an hour into the flight, it was making the flight towards yangon, the biggest city here. it lost contact with air traffic control. a search and rescue operation has been underweight this afternoon, involving military planes and ships, and we believe that it has not been confirmed —— we believe, but it has not been confirmed, that some wreckage has been found in the sea. 0n wreckage has been found in the sea. on board the military plane, a chinese built military transport plane, were about 100 military personnel, family, and crew. the exact number has not been confirmed. but it is looking increasingly bleak. it is now night—time kaymer here in myanmar. the chances of anyone being found who was on board this plane seem extremely wrote. ——
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night—time, here. a morsel is —— saudi arabia has denied having anything to do with the attack which the islamic state group says it carried out. japanese workers in a nuclear facility have been exposed to dangerous levels of radiation. the accident occurred when workers at the facility north of tokyo were checking on the storage of retroactive materials. a bag containing radioactive dust split open. workers are thought to have inhaled plutonium dust, despite wearing protective clothing. south korea says it will hold off installing remaining component of a us anti—missile defence system until it completes an environment of assessment. this could mean substantial delays in the full deployment of the thaad, because the
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review could take a year. andy murray, he has reached his fourth consecutive french open semi—final with a four set win over kei nishikori in paris. he now faces sta n nishikori in paris. he now faces stan wawrinka who beat marion cilic in three straight sets in the second match. disable sod has a new lease of life at this shelter in taiwan. it can now walk and run, thanks to a wheelchair. these are home—made wheelchairs, using plastic water pipes, and the material cost less than a third of commercially available models. in just than a third of commercially available models. injust a than a third of commercially available models. in just a few hours time, voting begins in the uk's general election. the leaders had been holding theirfinal rallies. the governing conservatives
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remain ahead, but polls suggest that the gap with the cabinet labour party has closed. after the london attack, security has been a key issue, as our political editor, laura kuenssberg, reports. she is being criticised over police custody said the nhs, that most of all, she has been knocked on social care, a policy that might have caused alarm on a few greens like this. keen to promise a lot, but relu cta nt to this. keen to promise a lot, but reluctant to go beyond the goals. this. keen to promise a lot, but reluctant to go beyond the goalsm is about who people trust to have the strong and stable leadership to get the best deal for britain at in europe, and who has the world, and, crucially, the plan to deliver a brexit. legions of his fans want something else. his opponents say the sums are stacked up, but here, they love his manifesto. bigger taxes and spending to pay for free tuition, more healthcare, promises
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ofa tuition, more healthcare, promises of a much bigger state. our manifesto offers something very, very different. they say it is going to cost a lot of money. it is. i know that. but we are very clear about this. we have fully costed it. 95%, 95% of the population will pay fio 95%, 95% of the population will pay no more in tax, no more in national insurance, no more and vat. the 2—man campaigns look so different. —— two main campaigns look so different, because they are. these two politicians have different visions on brexit, immigration, different as the economy. labour would tax more and spend more on schools and hospitals. under the tories, that there would still be cuts, to try and balance the books. they have very different takes on the kind of country this is and what they wanted to be. and the very ——
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and are very different leaders who wa nt to and are very different leaders who want to proceed you to let them take us want to proceed you to let them take us there. theresa may seemed unassailable. not now. we have set out in our manifesto the challenges that we face is the country. and how we asa that we face is the country. and how we as a government would deliver on them. how we would ensure that we we re them. how we would ensure that we were addressing the challenges. but isn't it the case that you did not have to call the selection, and you asking people to trust you for five yea rs asking people to trust you for five years after a campaign where, it seems you have said as little as possible? watto said to the bridge people is to be open with about the challenges this country faces. but also about the opportunities that we have in this country. and i think thatis have in this country. and i think that is the absolute right thing to do. back where it all began. a welcome for the political hero of north london, denied. anti— nuclear weapons, fixed in decades old principles. jeremy corbyn has
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changed politics dynamics, even if tomorrow, he comes up short. turnout tomorrow, he comes up short. turnout tomorrow, not tonight, is what really matters. this contest is not a decision on one—day, but a choice which changes lives for years. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. in addition to labour and the conservatives, there are other parties contesting the election. the lib dems will be trained to increase their 90s that they currently hold. tim farron has promised extra money for schools and hospitals if they win power. so how do things stand? earlier, i spoke to gary 0'donoghue and asked him what the latest polls suggest. -- nine seats. it is very substantial. some polls put the conservatives with a 5—point lead. some have a 12 point lead. there is not a lot of confidence, i would have to say, in polls at the moment. britain is still, in a
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sense, still rocking from the referendum result, last year, which was not predicted by the pollsters. so there is a lot of caution about polls, here. there is a lot of feeling that, perhaps, people and not necessarily tiny pollsters is atley what they are planning to do. they are plain cards pretty close to their chest. we have a huge number of voters with a large number of variety and variation. tomorrow will bea variety and variation. tomorrow will be a gamble. the politicians might feel they know what is going on in the country, but they will still be biting their fingernails and walking up biting their fingernails and walking up and down and doing all that kind of nervous stuff before the actual boat start getting counted for good at 10pm on thursday evening. of course, today, the final hours of campaigning for all the little party, here. and i wasjust watching jeremy corbyn at short time ago on east asia north london, losing his voice, slightly. that is probably
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indicative of what all of the party leaders are feeling on this home straight. yes, i figured interesting. there is a slightly traditional element. this is an election that is taking place in 2017, but there has been a lot of big open—air and indoor campaign rallies byjeremy corbyn, lest by theresa may, though she has done a few. jeremy corbyn has been talking to big crowd. and that is what happens. it takes a toll. he has done three orfour of happens. it takes a toll. he has done three or four of those events today. so he is feeling the pace of it. but is interesting, because he is saying that this time around, he believes that the labour party has that the mainstream centre ground of british politics. and there is interesting thing here in britain at the moment, which is that after a long time, 20 odd years, of what you would call manager of politics, which is people really not disagreeing, the party is not really disagreeing, the party is not really disagreeing, on how the economy should be run, or the particular
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aims, here or there, should be run, or the particular aims, here orthere, now should be run, or the particular aims, here or there, now you have a real difference. that was gary 0'donoghue, speaking earlier with babita sharma. you're watching newsday on the bbc, live from london in singapore. still to come: will bigger be better? the queen and her husband began their royal progress to westminster. the moment of crowning, in accordance with the order of service, by a signal given by the great guns of the tower. tanks and troops are patrolling the streets of central peking after the bloody operation to crush student—led protests, and the violence has continued, the army firing on civilians throughout the following day and night. 0ver there you can see its mighty tail — the only sign left, almost, that an aircraft had been here. uefa imposes an indefinite ban on english clubs playing in europe. today is the 20th anniversary
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of the release of the beatles' album sgt pepper's lonely hearts club band, a record described as the album of the century. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm rico hizon in singapore. i'm babita sharma in london. thanks forjoining us. our top stories: former fbi director, james comey, has said donald trump asked him to drop an investigation into a top white house official‘s links with russia. the countdown to the british election. the two main candidates make their final push to the public ahead of thursday's vote.
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left—wing revolutionary, masaaki 0saka, has been arrested and charged for murdering a police officer during tokyo street protests more than 45 years ago. japanese media say no other suspected criminal has spent longer evading arrest. that story is one of the most read on bbc.com across asia. let's take a look at some front pages from around the world. as we've been hearing, it's election day in the uk. the metro's calling it the battle for britain and is urging all its readers to go out and vote. the philippine daily inquirer leads on the conflict in marawi. the paper has this picture of militants, who it says are among those fighting the army in the south of the country. it believes their knowledge of the local terrain is making it increasingly difficult for government forces to retake the city.
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the china daily puts president xijinping on its front page. he's in kazakhstan for a security summit. but it's this picture that really caught our eye. it's a student getting a supportive hug from a teacher before taking the national college exam. 0ver nine million students are taking the test this year, and if you're one of them, we wish you the very best of luck. now, what stories are sparking discussions on—line? a lawyer in singapore is suing the head teacher of a prestigious school for taking away his child's phone. the secondary school has banned students from using phones during school hours. the lawyer is now claiming damages arguing the school has infringed personal property rights. for the past 16 years,
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the shanghai cooperation organisation has had six full members. but all that's set to change. the political and security group was founded in 2001 by russia, china, and the former central asian soviet republics of kaza khsta n, kyrgyzsta n, tajikistan, and uzbekistan. now, india and pakistan are set tojoin at a summit in the capital of kaza khsta n, asta na. its estimated the group will encompass half the world's population. so, will the expansion of the shanghai cooperation 0rganisation increase its influence? i'm joined by amitendu palit from the institute of south asian studies at the national university of singapore. it is great to have you with us. india and pakistan bothjoining. how significant is this? firstly, india and pakistan don't normally do things together. that is a good and positive development. this will be a
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regional bloc with probably the largest population in the world. . was it a smart and strategic move for russia and china to bring in the indians and pakistanis? yes. they will not settle the india— pakistan dispute with this forum alone. both of the countries want to contribute into the region. i think for both of them, they have respective interests themselves. for india, for example, and pakistan for an extent it may be and pakistan for an extent it may be an opportunity to keep the other at bay and maintain the leverage. yes, competing in this particular platform. china will surely push for
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their one belt, one road initiative which india is not part of the pillar that will be an interesting subject. coming on the back of the one belt forum only a month ago and which was endorsed by russia, india has been the only country which is the home and the opposing it. it has legislative reasons to do so. —— vehemently. we are increasingly seeing how they respond. how do you think they will respond? india has already made its position clear when it comes to the one belt, one road in that there is a segment of it thatis in that there is a segment of it that is important to india. india will not back off from the position it has already taken, insisting at the same time it is a pro—activity
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country. india, china, russia, pakistan. donald trump wavering on nato and ripping up the paris climate accord. how important will this bloc be going forward?|j climate accord. how important will this bloc be going forward? i think it will take time to work out its agenda. i don't think until now the shanghai cooperation 0rganisation has converged properly. it will take time. each country has its own respective agenda. they are inspiring to play bigger roles in the world. but the bigger powers don't usually converge easily because they have bilateral dynamics individually. it will take time to work out a cohesive agenda. more importantly, the group will be left wondering as to what the us is up to next. so that is going to be a major
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point of surprise. and now the question of iran in the discussions. they could be at loggerheads as they move on. thank you, sir, for your insights. some breaking news coming to us from scotla nd some breaking news coming to us from scotland yard. the detectives investigating the london bridge terror attack have made three more arrests. two of the men were held on suspicion of preparation for terrorist attacks. eight people lost their lives in the attack on saturday which has been claimed by islamic state. the latest, three more arrests have taken place in the investigation. more on that to come. fossils discovered in north africa have cast new light on how modern humans evolved. they reveal that homo sapiens existed 100,000 years earlier than previously thought. and they were present all across africa, notjust the east, which was previously thought to be the cradle of humanity.
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as pallab ghosh reports, the fossil discovery could rewrite the text books of human evolution. this is the face of one of the very first of our kind. and more casts of bone fragments of the earliest known homo sapiens. the discovery of these fossils were presented at a news conference in paris. they have com pletely conference in paris. they have completely changed the theory of how modern humans evolved. the common wisdom that there is probably some kind of beginning human in sub saharan africa a million years ago, what our works have shown is that we have to push back in time much further the age of the origin of our species. human remains in it the obr, species. human remains in it the 0br, kenya, and tanzania, suggested that east africa was a cradle from which the species emerged 200,000 yea rs which the species emerged 200,000 years ago. the discovery of 300,000
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years ago. the discovery of 300,000 year old human remains in morocco show humans began to emerge much earlier. and not just show humans began to emerge much earlier. and notjust there, stone tools found across the continent suggest homo sapiens were all over africa at the time. this is a scale of the earliest known human of our species. and this is a modern human. —— skull. you can see the faces are practically the same aside from the slightly pronounced brow region. another difference. the earliest human has a slightly smaller brain. scans of the skull published in nature show that we did not emerge rapidly, but over hundreds of thousands of years. it took longer to make homo sapiens in evolution returns than we thought. it was complex. different parts of africa
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probably evolved differently. some evolved in southern africa, some in east africa. there was no single place where homo sapiens is became asked. the search by kaka -- became us. asked. the search by kaka -- became us. the search is on to find perhaps even older remains. the past of humanity has now been rewritten. palla b humanity has now been rewritten. pallab ghosh, bbc news. stay with us. and before we go, in just a few hours, britons will vote in country's general election. i'll be reporting from newcastle for the bbc. every five years the city is a contender for being first to announce a result. here they are during the brexit referendum running the ballot boxes to the election centre for counting. you can watch the special general election programme on bbc newsjust before 21:00 gmt. stay with us. hello. most of us had sunshine
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through the day today. it will be cloudy. the cloud is thick enough to bring rain for some of us. the relatively clear whether working out of the north sea replaced by the lump of cloud. the low spinning around their sending south—westerlies across the uk. the cloud will be big enough for us to get wet weather. the wettest of it is in wales in north—west england. low cloud and mist and fog. a mild start to the day. 13—111. cooler in the north of scotland. at least some morning sunshine. gusty to start the day across wales and south—west england. they will come in at a0 miles an hour. the same in east anglia and east england. the occasional spit of rain is possible. that working in across england.
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misty in the pennines. it will get across northern ireland first thing in the morning. edging across scotland. the north will stay dry with early morning sunshine. going on through the rest of the day, uncertainty about the northward spread of the rain. it could get further north, threatening scotland into the afternoon. returned to northern ireland later in the day. some showers in wales and south—west england and moving into the midlands. south—east england, trying to get bright late in the day. thursday night, showers pushing across the uk. the weather port turn lighter. still coming in from the south—west to pick another mild start for friday. a better kind of day on friday. fewer showers. more in the way of sunshine. limited to scotla nd in the way of sunshine. limited to scotland with the showers in the afternoon. with sunshine and lighter winds, it will feel warmer. 19 in
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belfast. 22 in london. pleasant in the light winds. showers continuing to affect parts of scotland. the weekend. rain lurking behind it. that is tying in with another area of low pressure bringing wet and fairly windy weather to start the weekend across many areas of the uk. brace ourselves for a soggy start to the weekend. not all of it is bad news. the rain will disappear. it will be a dry day. highs of 23 in london. and that is the forecast of your weather. this is bbc world news. the top story. a former fbi director says donald trump pressured him to drop an enquiry into links with russia. james comey issued a statement ahead ofa james comey issued a statement ahead of a senate hearing saying the president demanded this loyalty and asked him to lay off investigating the former national security adviser michael flynn. a big search
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operation is continuing for a burmese plane with more than 120 people on board. most of the passengers were soldiers and their families. this most of the passengers were soldiers and theirfamilies. this is trending on our website. fossils found in morocco suggest humans evolved 100,000 years earlier than previously thought. it suggests humans evolved across all of africa rather than the east of the continent. more to come. i will be back in half an hour. now it is hardtalk.
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