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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 8, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. millions will vote in the general election today, as security is increased at some polling stations after the terror attacks in london and manchester. voting will start in an hour to elect 650 mps to parliament in westminster, with the first results expected at around midnight. good morning. it's thursday the 8th ofjune. also this morning: all eyes on the white house as the fbi director sacked by donald trump prepares to give his side of the story. new figures show that 80% of toddlers in england did not visit an nhs dentist in the last year. after 75,000 passengers were stranded when ba's it systems went down, doubts are now being raised about the company's explanation for what happened. i'll have the details shortly. in sport, andy murray says
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he didn't play great tennis, but he beat kei nishikori to reach the semi—finals of the french open for the fourth year in a row. from colgate lasagne to green ketchup, we'll look at the ill—conceived products that have been consigned to the first ever museum of failure. and matt is in rochester with the weather. a bit ofa a bit of a fail as well. in morning. we are failing to know our wildflowers. i am we are failing to know our wildflowers. iam in we are failing to know our wildflowers. i am in kent to find out more. what we do know is there is rain this week. i will have all the details coming up. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. in just one hour, polling stations will open for millions of people to cast their vote in the general election. police forces say there'll be increased security in some areas following the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. the first election results are expected at around midnight.
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gary 0'donoghue reports. election day 2017, just two years after the last one and three years earlier than we were expecting. 68 different parties are vying for your votes this time around, with a total field of more than 3,300 candidates. we'll elect mps from 650 constituencies across the uk, 533 in england, a0 in wales, 59 in scotland, and 18 in northern ireland. around 47 million people are eligible to vote, and we'll be casting our ballots at 41,000 polling stations on the length and breadth of the land, as well as by post. the party leader with the most mps will be invited by the queen to form a government. mps are due back here next tuesday. so, after seven weeks of campaigning, the time has come to choose their will and by those
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green benches across the road. 11 days from now, the queen will arrive here in a scaled—down ceremony, wearing a hat, not a crown, driven in a car, not a royal coach, to present the new government's plan to the next parliamentary session. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, westminster. you can watch all the results coming in throughout the night on the election 2017 special will be with david dimbleby. that's on bbc one from 9.55pm tonight. three more people have been arrested in connection with the london bridge terror attack last weekend. yesterday, police arrested two men at the same address in ilford, east london, on terrorism and drugs charges. a 29—year—old man from the same area was taken into custody on suspicion of the preparation of terrorist acts. the former fbi director sacked by donald trump will give evidence to a senate committee today. james comey claims the us president tried to influence his investigation into links between members of the trump team and russia. 0ur north america correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan, reports. oh, and there's james.
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more famous than me. there was a time when president trump had nothing but praise forjames comey, but a firm grip in january turned into a firing in may. the president sacked the fbi director, reportedly calling him a nutjob and more. he's a showboat, he's a grandstander. the fbi has been in turmoil. you know that, i know that, everybody knows that. most people know the president's version of events. now, james comey will go public before the senate. 0n the eve of his appearance, he gave this. he said the president isn't being investigated by the fbi as part of the russian enquiry, confirming statements made by mr trump in the past. butjames comey did say over a private dinner injanuary he was asked by the president for his unwavering support. the white house has denied this.
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but how far did the president expect this loyalty to go? mr comey says he was asked to drop the investigation into ties between the former national security adviser michael flynn and the russians. there is no suggestion the president asked for an end to the wider russian inquiry butjames comey says mr trump told him there was a cloud over him.. it's not just congress which is looking into the trump campaign's ties to russia. there was also an ongoing fbi investigation. in the saga of washington politics, james comey‘s testimony is a must—see moment but it's just one act in what is becoming a long and drawn—out political drama. bbc news, washington. the vast majority of children under the age of three did not see an nhs dentist last year. many parents do not know
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when young children should have their first checkup, they report. we would like to see drug safety testing facilities at concerts were people can take any drug to a facility to see what it is and how strong that substance is so they can make an informed decision over whether they should take that to minimise harm. president trump has contacted the emir of qatar offering help to resolve a worsening diplomatic crisis between the country and its gulf neighbours. qatar has been cut off since monday amid accusations the country supports terrorist groups.
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many flights in and out of the country are suspended and there are fears that food supplies will run out. the united arab emirates warned anyone sympathising with qatar could face up to 15 years in prison. the wreckage of a military plane that went missing with around 120 people on board has been found in the sea off southern myanmar. the aircraft was travelling to yangon when it lost contact yesterday afternoon. it was carrying 122 soldiers, family members and crew. myanmar‘s army chief confirmed that several bodies had been found. same—sex couples in the uk could be allowed to get married in anglican churches for the first time. today, the scottish episcopal church will vote on whether to change its definition of marriage. a positive vote would mean that same—sex couples from all over the uk can marry in anglican churches in scotland. 0ur correspondent, michael buchanan, reports. at the centre of what we celebrate here today is the love between these
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two men. a day marriage in an anglican church. this was in the us. later today, this could become legal in scotland. the scottish episcopal church, the anglican church in scotland, will vote this afternoon on whether to allow gay weddings. this man is strongly in favour. so many people know young couples who wa nt to many people know young couples who want to be married in church and stand up in front of their friends and in front of god. gay marriage has split anglicans. the churches of england and wales do not allow it. but if the vote in edinburgh is passed today, it could allow those in the uk to be married in scotland to the fury of anglican traditionalists. it is according to the bible who runs the church. the bible says the church is the supreme authority run byjesus christ. when
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something like this happens, it is not about the sex, it is about the authority of the bible that matters. this is one of the defining divisions among anglicans. today's vote could bring a new future a step closer. michael buchanan, bbc news, edinburgh. for the first time ever, more electricity in the uk has been generated by renewables and nuclear power, rather than by a combination of coal and gas. the national grid says that at lunchtime yesterday, more than half of the country's electricity supply came from sources like solar and wind power. you might remember this as we talked about it yesterday. a diamond ring bought at a car boot sale for £10 has been sold for more than £650,000 at auction in london. the ring did not go under the hammer physically, but it went under the
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hammer. the 26 carat cushion—shaped diamond was expected to fetch £350,000, but went for almost double that yesterday. the owner bought the ring in the 1980's and was unaware of its real value and had worn it every day for 30 years! can you imagine that? walking around like this! it only cost a tenner. at least they got the money in the end. do you know who bought it? no. it wouldn't surprise me. do you know who bought it? no. it wouldn't surprise melj do you know who bought it? no. it wouldn't surprise me. i could wear it while gardening. good morning, everyone. what happens if you are at work and you get a little bit cross when something frustrates you? that never happened. andy murray got ci’oss never happened. andy murray got cross yesterday in paris. but he is
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through! andy murray is through to the semi—finals of the french open for the fourth year in a row. he came from a set down to beat kei nishikori in four, and tomorrow he faces the former champion stan wawrinka. after the defending champion, novak djokovic, was knocked out, the seven—time grand slam winner, john mcenroe, suggested he'd lost his desire. djokovic went out in straight sets to austria's dominic thiem. there are real question marks over him now. jamie vardy will miss england's world cup qualifier against scotland on saturday. he's pulled out of the squad with a minor injury he picked up in training. he won't play in next week's friendly with france either. chelsea striker, diego costa, claims manager, antonio conte, has told him that he's not part of his plans at the club. costa spoke to reporters after spain's draw with columbia last night, saying "they do not want me there." apparently, that message came through as a text. that is not ideal. the back pages. this is in
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the back page of tomorrow's mirror. a story mess. it is about van dyche. he wanted to go to liverpool as part of his next move, but liverpool have had to apologise to southampton for talking to him before talking to the club. that is not allowed. it is really basic! they had to apologise officially and released a statement that they will stop their interest in him. that is a disappointment for jurgen klopp, who had his eye on him for ages. and the rugby. they say they have to play better than yesterday if they want any hope in the matches coming up. they are calling it chaos rugby. they are using that phrase a lot. they say it will not work against the big teams.
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they have to be more clinical and more focused. and finally from me, i wa nt to more focused. and finally from me, i want to show you this. i don't know if you have done this in the north. a town, one near manchester city, this is nolito, he says he has to go back to spain, he says my daughter's face has changed colour. he looks like he thinks she has been living ina like he thinks she has been living in a cave. he is not used to the weather. what is wrong with that! i will defend manchester. it is wonderful. but, yeah, it does rain a little bit. if you are used to wonderful mediterranean sunshine, it might bea wonderful mediterranean sunshine, it might be a little bit much. he says
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it rainsa might be a little bit much. he says it rains a lot. and it is pouring with rain this morning. it rains a lot. and it is pouring with rain this morninglj it rains a lot. and it is pouring with rain this morning. i have a weather—related story. it has gotten windy. that has been good for renewable energy. there we go. that is good for the environment and things. good morning, everyone. the guardian. this week's windy weather across europe has set new records for renewable power. the uk yesterday. winded anti—nuclear and solar power yesterday contributed more energy than coal! —— wind and nuclear and. it is interesting. sometimes it is too windy for the turbines, and you think, what, how does that work? and results for businesses coming out at the moment. the retailer owned by sir philip green had their results come out yesterday. they suffered worse than
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expected. 79% a slope in profits due to the closing of their home stores. and topshop uk's sales have fallen for the first time in nearly a decade. things are not going well there. we are not showing any front pages this morning, because of the rules about electoral coverage. in case anybody is not aware, to be com pletely anybody is not aware, to be completely neutral, we cannot tell you anything about what is on the front pages, because of the election rules. we can tell you this story about a monkey, though. why not? john passed this one to me. i think it pushed out your heartstrings. —— bald. but we cannot tell you how the monkey will be voting. it is smiling, actually smiling! he doesn't have a name yet. i think he
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will be voting for a cuddle. that is a lwa ys will be voting for a cuddle. that is always a good vote. it's 06:15 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. voters are going to the polls in the general election today. security has been increased at some polling stations after the terror attacks in london and manchester. the sacked fbi director, james comey, will testify today in an investigation into links between a former national security adviser and russia. matt's out at a nature reserve today surrounded by beautiful wild flowers to brighten up your morning. we said it was wet and wild outside this morning, but in some places it is all right. we have sent matt to a nature reserve, surrounded by beautiful wildflowers. hello, matt. good morning. a quick test for europe, while you are there. can you name this flower? —— test for you both. daisy. yes, daisies. big long daisies, close enough. it is an
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oxide daisy, and it is one of 50 flowers in this year's great british wildflower hunt, an initiative launched today by the plant life 0rganisation. that was launched on the back of a survey which says 70% of us want to know more about our wildflowers. less than half of 16— 23 —year—olds can identify the nation's favourite flower, the bluebell. we will have more from the gorgeous surroundings of branscombe park in kent throughout the morning. it is dry, we have some breaks in the cloud. it will be raining for many people across the uk this morning. looking at the forecast today, the overall story is that it is fairly cloudy across the uk and it is mild. a chill in the air across scotland. rain falling from those clouds in some northern and western areas. here in the south—east and east anglia, we have a dry start, with some broken cloud
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and a bit of hazy sunshine coming through. temperatures in the midteens already. raining across the north midlands into northern england. heavy bursts west of the pennines, edging into southern parts of scotland. the far north of scotla nd of scotland. the far north of scotland starting with a frost and some sunshine here this morning, but cloud amounts are increasing. northern ireland, outbreaks of rain on and off through much of this morning. the rain is particularly persistent on the hills this morning. quite a breeze coming with it, but not as strong as recent days. that breezes coming from a general south to south—westerly direction. —— breezes. so a comparatively mild start for most of you away from scotland. rain will continue to affect northern ireland at times, pushing into central and southern scotland. it does mean that across england and wales, where we start with the wet weather, there will be some improvements. some sunshine at times, but a scattering of showers. some of those could be heavy and thundery later. temperatures into the low 20s in the
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sunshine, but most people will be in the mid—to high teens. coolest in the mid—to high teens. coolest in the north of scotland, temperatures around 11— 1a. tonight the rain pushes north into northern scotland, where it will sit for most of the night. heavy showers elsewhere, maybe the odd roll of thunder to ta ke maybe the odd roll of thunder to take this into the evening. showers becoming fewer in number into the morning. temperatures should hold up for the vast majority. certainly a mild light tonight in parts of northern scotland. taking us into tomorrow, friday will be a day where scotla nd tomorrow, friday will be a day where scotland has the heaviest rain. turning patchy through the day. the rest of the uk, sunshine and showers, mainly in the west to begin with, pushing into the east in the afternoon where they could become heavy with some hail and thunder. western areas finish the day dry and brighter, with some sunshine. high teens, may be low 20s for one or two. 0vernight and into saturday, and the rain is back again. quite widely across the uk in the morning on saturday. heaviest on the hills in the west. it will spread east
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through the day, and i think many will finish with some brightness, especially across western parts of the country. like today and tomorrow, temperatures, mid—to high teens, it will probably be more humid by saturday across the south—east corner. by sunday i think it should have cleared out and we'll have sunshine and some showers. that is how the forecast is looking. you too should start turning up on your wildflowers. i will be testing your morning. i like the idea of the rain going away, and i like matt amongst the flowers. skipping through the fields. yes, that is him with his oxeye daisies. we will write that down. exercising your democratic right is a simple enough exercise for many, but some people find voting independently, and in secret, difficult because of their disability. the royal national institute of blind people says that many people with sight loss still rely on others in order to cast their vote. as breakfast‘s tim muffett reports, there are some who say online voting in uk elections is long overdue. casting a vote in secret. a
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fundamental democratic right. but in oui’ fundamental democratic right. but in our mocked up polling station, aher is showing the problems the royal national institute of blind people says many blind people face. the numbers are in braille. there is a template with the candidates' name. tactile voting templates we introduced in 2001. by law, gk polling stations now have to provide them. but asher and others say that sometimes they do not work. that is 110w sometimes they do not work. that is now lined up. yes, unfortunately that a plate used a pollie stations is not fit for purpose. we still rely on some body to read out the names of the candidates and then you still have to trust them that they are telling you honestly weather boxes are. -- where the boxes. so you are reliant on somebody else
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guiding you through the process. yes, and to check you have put the mark in the right place. for some, problems can occur before polling dale. —— day. ismael has a learning disability and thinks registering to vote is to complicated. disability and thinks registering to vote is to complicatedlj disability and thinks registering to vote is to complicated. i feel it is difficult when voting, it i have to bring my form in and get my collea g u es bring my form in and get my colleagues at work to help me fill outperform, because the former is not accessible and it has a lot of jargon terms and lots of boxes to tick. in westminster, the rights of disabled voters are being discussed ata disabled voters are being discussed at a pre—election meeting. polling stations should be accessible to all. some say that is not always the case. if somebody has not made the necessary provision in advance, you are turning up and you are not getting in. you are getting -- guessing, sometimes, as to who you are voting for. what impact does it hires —— have if you are unable to cast your vote? i feel like i'm not pa rt cast your vote? i feel like i'm not part of society. the electoral
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commission oversees uk elections. not all polling stations will be able to be situated in ideal premises, but what we want to make sure is that local authorities can make the necessary adjustments so that they can be accessed by all. many say that the blind voting templates are not fit for purpose, that they do not work properly. what do you say to that? big improvements have been made to make sure they provide the right to contemplate so that they do fit the ballot paper, and how they will be used in practice so that the polling station staff are familiar with them. the commission wants any problems to be reported. we urge anybody who finds themselves in that position to contact the local authority immediately, so it can be put right. but the way that votes are cast is set in law, something that arik once changed. where brits democracy is campaigning for online voting. first—time voters born in 1991 have known nothing other than a world of facebook, smartphones, social media. with online voting, you wouldn't need assistance, you can use your
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own equipment in your own home. doesn't online voting leaders of open to potential hacking, potential security risks? people tend to look on online voting so you should have 100% security, but that doesn't exist anywhere, online or off—line. we do need online voting to make the democratic process more accessible and inclusive. a radical rethink of the way we vote. some believe it is long overdue. humans walked the earth more than 100,000 years earlier than was previously believed. this is according to new research in the journal nature. the fossilised remains of five people which were found in north africa are thought to be more than 300,000 years old, prompting a major rethink in how and where homo sapiens evolved. 0ur science correspondent explains. the face of one of the very first of oui’ the face of one of the very first of our kind. bone fragments of the very
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first homo sapiens. the discovery of these fossils were presented at a news c0 nfe re nce these fossils were presented at a news conference in paris. they have com pletely news conference in paris. they have completely changed the theory of how modern humans evolved. the common wisdom that there is probably some sort of garden of eden in sub saharan africa, 200,000 years ago, with human similar to us emerging rather rapidly. but what the works in djebili have shown is that we have to push back in time much further. the age of origin of our species. human remains in ethiopian, kenya and tanzania suggested that east africa was the cradle from which our species first emerged. that was 200,000 years ago. but the discovery of 300,000 —year—old human fossils in morocco suggests that modern humans began to emerge much earlier. and not just modern humans began to emerge much earlier. and notjust there. stone tools found across the continent suggest that homo sapiens were all
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over africa at the time. this is a scale of the earliest known human of oui’ scale of the earliest known human of our species, and this is a modern human. you can see that their faces are practically the same, apart from the slightly pronounced brow ridge. there is another difference. the earliest human has a slightly smaller brain. scans of the scale published in the journal nature suggest that our brains and other features evolved gradually, over hundreds of thousands of years. rather than our species emerging rapidly as a finished article. rather than our species emerging rapidly as a finished articlem took longer to make, sapiens in evolutionary terms, in genetic terms come in behavioural terms. and probably the process was complex. different parts of africa were probably involved. at times morocco could have been important and at other times it may have been east africa all southern africa. there was no single place where, sapiens became us. -- homo sapiens. the
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search is now wants the fossil species in africa who be even older. —— fossil specimens. the history of human it is being rewritten. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollands. bbc london has learnt that more children than ever across the capital are being admitted to hospital for self harm. almost 1,900 young people were taken in last year for cutting their body, overdosing on pills or burning themselves. it's a 10% rise on the year before. but experts say this is only the tip of the iceberg and that the real figure is much higher. that is really about 25 cent of all actual incidents of self harm. —— 2596. actual incidents of self harm. —— 25%. so if you think that there are thousands of more that do not go to
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amd. also, it is well understood that about 50% of young people who self harm do it secretly. a couple who want to take their sick baby son to the united states for treatment are taking their case to the supreme court this afternoon. they're hoping to overturn a high courtjudgement that ruled in favour of turning off his life support. connie yates and chris gard want 9—month—old charlie gard, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, to undergo a therapy trial. great 0rmond street — who are caring for the child — say the therapy won't help and his life support should end. it's emerged traffic wardens have put tickets on cars which were left abandoned inside a police cordon during the london terror attack. penalty charge notices were issued to a number of vehicles left near borough market, where several people were stabbed on saturday. transport for london said the fines "should never have been issued" and apologised for the "insensitive mistake." let's have a look at the travel situation now. good news on the london underground. all lines are running a good service. on the roads, northbound
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traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approaches already queueing. northbound traffic on the a406 north circular is queueing from barking towards the north flyover. at london bridge, southwark street remains closed between borough high street and southwark bridge road, with various closures affecting access to borough market. let's get access to borough market. let's get a check on the weather. good morning. not as much sunshine today as yesterday. a cloudy day, all in all. most of us should stay dry and the winds are a touch lighter than they were yesterday as well. a rather cloud is start, then. it isa well. a rather cloud is start, then. it is a mild start, though. 12— 14 at the moment. plenty of cloud around this morning. a bit of brightness. that will start to peep through more into the afternoon. the small chance of drizzle around this morning, maybe one or two showers later in the day. most of us try. —— dry. south—westerly winds still quite brisk, but lighter than yesterday. 0vernight tonight, the
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chance of 12 showers in places but most of us try and another mild start to the morning. —— dry. tomorrow there will be more sunshine around, and a greater chance of one 01’ around, and a greater chance of one or two showers, most of us still staying dry, the wind becoming lighter and the temperatures higher as well, 21 or 22 celsius on friday. it will feel quite warm and mighty over the course of the weekend. we are likely to see some outbreaks of rain and a strengthening of wind on saturday. try and brighter by the time get to sunday. —— dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to breakfast. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. nhs dental check—ups for children are free, but new research suggests 80% of toddlers didn't have their teeth checked in the last year. we'll find out when a baby should
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first visit the dentist. lauren child, the creator of the charlie and lola books, joins us just after 7:30 to talk about her new role as the children's laureate, and how she plans to get more boys and girls reading. i hope she inspires more children with her books and happy feelings. the singer, glen campbell, was diagnosed with alzheimer's disease six years ago, and now, the performer has returned to the recording studio one final time. his daughter, ashley, joins us to talk about his bittersweet farewell album just after nine. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. it's half an hour until polling stations will open for millions of people to cast their vote in the general election. police forces say there'll be increased security in some areas following the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. the first election results
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are expected at around midnight. we can talk now to our political correspondent, alicia mccarthy. there is a lot we cannot say this morning, isn't there, because of the election rules. what can you tell us? yes. there are 650 seat up for grabs today in constituencies up and down the country. if you think this campaign has been going on for a long time, it is worth pointing out it is 50 days since mps voted to have this election. polling booths close at ten o'clock tonight. because it is polling day, there is a lot we cannot say. we cannot talk about party policies to date. here are some fun facts. there are 3500 candidates standing in this
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election, 900 of which are women. that is fewer than last time but a larger proportion. we are expecting the exit poll at ten o'clock tonight. the first result is due before 11. traditionally, that is one of the sunderland sits. we will get the first results just before midnightand get the first results just before midnight and should have a good idea before this time tomorrow. you can watch all the results coming in throughout the night. the election 2017 special will be with david dimbleby. that's on bbc one from 9.55pm tonight. three more people have been arrested in connection with the london bridge terror attack last weekend. yesterday police arrested two men at the same address in ilford, east london, on terrorism and drugs charges. a 29—year—old man from the same area was taken into custody on suspicion of the preparation of terrorist acts. the former fbi director sacked by donald trump will give evidence to a senate committee today.
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james comey claims the us president tried to influence his investigation into links between members of the trump team and russia. the white house denies the allegations. the vast majority of children under the age of three didn't see an nhs dentist in england last year. dental surgeons have expressed concern that many parents don't know when young children should have their first check—up. music festivals should provide drug testing facilities to help reduce unnecessary deaths this summer, that's according to the royal society for public health. reading and leeds festivals and a number of other live music events are aiming to introduce the scheme later this year. critics have condoned the scheme, saying that it normalises drug taking. we would like to see drug safety testing facilities whereby people at night clubs and festivals where people can take any drug
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to a facility to see what it is and how strong that substance is so they can make an informed decision over whether and how they should take that to minimise harm. the anglican church in scotland could be the first in the uk to allow same—sex marriages. a vote by the scottish episcopal church this afternoon will determine if their definition of marriage should be altered to afford gay couples the same rights to marry. the move is opposed by some traditional anglicans. how about this for a way to dry your hair? a daring 88—year—old has set a new record as the uk's oldest female wing—walker. that is the way to do it! betty bromage, who lives in a retirement home in cheltenham, took to the skies strapped to the wings of a vintage biplane. the former nurse beat the record she set last year, flying at 200 feet and travelling at up to 130 miles per hour. betty said afterwards it was a "bit
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windy" and a "bit wobbly," but she had thoroughly enjoyed it. she would definitely feel the wind in her hairthen! go, betty! she cannot dry her hair at all because of her helmet! i'll have to think of something else! sally is he now. —— here. that is how i got to work this morning. andy murray. he got frustrated, but he usedit murray. he got frustrated, but he used it to his advantage in a positive way. andy murray is through to the french open semi—finals for the fourth year in a row. he had to fight for his place, though, after going a set down to kei nishikori. murray came back to win in four sets. he said he didn't feel he'd played great tennis but it was a huge step in the right direction.
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he takes on the 2015 champion, stan wawrinka, tomorrow. he has been playing very well and has not dropped a set. yeah, he has obviously played extremely well the last few years. he is confident. so, it is going to be very, very tough, but, you know, you can learn some things from last year, and i am sure he will as well. the defending champion, novak djokovic, is out. he was beaten in straight sets by one of the sport's emerging talents, austria's dominic thiem, losing the third set to love. it was a big shock. that's the first time that's happened to djokovic in a grand slam for 12 years. thiem faces the nine—time winner, rafael nadal, next. there was a cracking match in the women's quarter—finals, where the third seed simona halep came back from match point down against russia's elina svitolina to book her place in the last four. jamie vardy has pulled out of the england squad and will miss saturday's world cup qualifier with scotland and the friendly with france next week.
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he has what's been described as a "minor injury" and has left the squad as a precaution. gareth southgate's side travel to hampden park top of their qualifying group. chelsea striker, diego costa, claims manager, antonio conte, has told him in a text message that he's not part of his plans at the club. costa spoke to reporters after spain's draw with columbia last night, saying "i am a chelsea player but they do not want me there." and liverpool have apologised to southampton over "any misunderstanding" and say they're no longer interested in signing defender, virgil van dijk. that is someone they have been closely monitoring for some time. pakistan have kept alive their hopes of reaching the semi finals of the champions trophy with a rain—affected win over south africa. in a must—win game, they restricted south africa to just 219 from their 50 overs, well below what would be considered a competitive total. pakistan were comfortably ahead of the run rate when the rain started to fall in birmingham.
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it leaves both teams with one win a piece. great britain's squad for next month's world para—athletics championships at the london stadium has been announced. as expected, places for paralympic champions jonnie peacock and hannah cockroft among other big medal hopes. every time i get to represent written is a massive honour. we get to where the kit and this is what you train for. you compete around the world and that local events. but coming back to london, that is what it is all about. you come back to the home crowd and want to show what you have been working for.|j the home crowd and want to show what you have been working for. i look at this may be more than rio. i get to go back to where it all began. st ratfo rd. go back to where it all began. stratford. rubbish amazing when
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—— british fans are always amazing in that stadium! i'm looking forward to it. defending champion, chris froome, lost time to some of his rivals on the fourth stage of the criterium du dauphine. he had been expected to challenge for the stage win on the 23—kilometre time trial, but could only manage eighth fastest. former teammate, ritchie porte, was fastest although the result has lifted froome up to sixth in the overall standings. 0n opening day of the women's tour in britai, poland's katarzyna niewiadom took the stage win into kettering. they'll take a 90 mile loop around stoke on trent and staffordshire today. great britain missed the chance to reduce team new zealand's lead in the america's cup semi—final, after heavy winds prevented sailing in bermuda. trailing 3—1 in the series, wind speeds of more than 24 knots meant all four of the days races were pushed back. they will now look to draw level in the best of nine series when racing commences again today. do you remember those amazing pictures of the boat capsizing? do you remember those amazing pictures of the boat capsizing ?m can get really windy in bermuda. the
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weather is so bad there! it is not what i expected. i thought it would be beautiful. they want the wind, but not quite as much. and we thought it was windy over here. youngsters should have regular dental check ups, starting from when their first teeth appear, that's usually around six months of age. yet figures released today suggest 80% of children in england under the age of two didn't visit an nhs dentist within the last 12 months. widespread confusion about when a baby should first have a check up is part of the problem according to dentists. professor nigel hunt, dean of the faculty of dental surgery at the royal college of surgeons, joins us now. thank you very much for talking to us on thank you very much for talking to us on breakfast this morning. good morning. it is a pleasure. good morning. it is a pleasure. good morning. what is there so much confusion about when a child should pay his or her first visit to the dentist? we are getting mixed m essa 9 es dentist? we are getting mixed messages and misunderstandings from
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the public and parents as well as indeed some healthcare professionals. i think what we are trying to do here is to bring this out into the open so we can have a coherent plan. and we need to make it absolutely clear that every child should be having a dental check by the age of one. and this really is not only to let the dentist have a look at the child, but also to get the child used to being seen in a friendly and hopefully welcoming and child friendly environment. umm, the problem at the moment, though, if children are in a visiting the dentist, it is the result of tooth decay because they are not visiting. yes. figures for children under the age of four needing to go to hospitalfor age of four needing to go to hospital for dental extractions, in fa ct, hospital for dental extractions, in fact, multiple dental extractions, is over 9000 a year. this is really because many are going to the
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dentist too late and tooth decay has increased to such a rapid extent that the only solution to the problem is to have the teeth extracted. if we can get to the children early and make sure that pa rents children early and make sure that parents realise that dentistry for children is free, then we can make sure that they get the early checkups and they can get the correct advice to adopt a much more preventive attitude and make sure all of the decay is actually avoided. how do you get them to go to the dentist? with programmes like this. we need a concerted effort involving several stakeholders, notjust us, but with the nhs and health services and other associations. we are getting widespread coverage to make sure we are getting a consistent
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message that prevention is far better than a cure. professor nigel hunt at the royal college of surgeons. can i have a check? they look perfect. i meant can i have a look perfect. i meant can i have a look at yours? when did you last go? white a while ago, but i am just over two years old. —— white a while ago, but i am just over two years old. -- quite. many people leave it until they have a problem. and now for the weather. he has lovely deep. lovely gnashers. of you you have the corn cockle and also some poppies. a field full of
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them, bursting into life since we have been here. we are talking wildflowers. plans life organisation has discovered that we'd do not know enough about our british wildflowers. —— plant life 0rganisation. today they have launched the great british wildflower hunt. you can take part as well, there is a whole series of fa ct as well, there is a whole series of fact sheets online, you can keep score and see how many you see, and learn more about the amazing planets like we have in the uk. as you can see, here at ransom farm in kent, it isa see, here at ransom farm in kent, it is a stunning morning. —— ranscombe farm. grey skies here, i think it will be grave most people today. the coolest conditions are across northern scotland today. down here in the south—east first of all, we have the cloud breaking up in times to let a bit of sunshine through, a bit of a breeze, and temperatures in
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the mid— teens. a dry morning commute. heavy rain in the northern midlands, particularly west of the pennines. that will continue for a few hours yet. much of scotland sta rts few hours yet. much of scotland starts dry, sunniest in the north, temperatures already on the rise here. northern ireland will be dodging rain all day long, i'm afraid to say. that rain will be on and off. wettest conditions will be in the south—east of northern ireland and across western parts of england and wales. rain across wales in the hills in particular, rather persistent to take us through the beginning of the morning. through the day that breezes coming from a south to south—easterly direction, pushing further north and turning wetter across scotland. rain on and off in northern ireland. if you're starting off with the rain across western parts of england and wales things should write and up into the afternoon. there will be some showers around, some of which could be heavy, maybe thundery. drives of all, parts of east anglia, the south—east and the of scotland. cooler in scotland, around 11— 14.
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most of all —— most of you will have rain and then temperatures in the high teens. tonight will stay on the mild side. the rain in scotland will linger. not as cold here as it was last night by any means. some showers elsewhere across the western half of the uk. many of you will have clear skies at times through the night to take us into friday morning, and it should be a mild start friday as well. looking at the details for friday, well, northern scotland, a grey and damp day. rain in the morning tending lighter and patchy. elsewhere across the country, sunshine and showers. showers in the west initially, pushing east as weather could become heavy. thundery in the afternoon. 0n friday, you finish dry and brighter. temperatures much as they are today, mid—to high teens may be low 20s in some places. 0vernight into saturday night, the rain is back. a soggy start, particularly across the hills and the western coasts. hopefully
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most will see something drier and writer. —— writer. there could be some heavy bursts of rain on saturday as well. breezy at times, as it will be over the next few days, but the rain not as strong as it has been before and the rain not quite as heavy as it was to take us into yesterday morning. that is how you weather is looking. there are still questions about that british airways computer crash wished that so many people delayed the weekend before last. steph has more. a massive drama for british airways when this happened, and all the passengers. they are still feeling the repercussions for this. we were originally told it was human error that caused the computer meltdown at british airways, with the boss willie walsh saying an engineer cut the data centre's power, and messed up the reboot. but now former it workers at ba have said it would have been very difficult for a single person to do this. on top of this ba has been criticied
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for the way it communicated the problems with passengers when things went wrong. so how does this all impact the ba brand? gary davies is a brand reputation specialist at manchester business school. what did you think of the way that british airways handled this?” what did you think of the way that british airways handled this? i can emphasise. they are caught between giving us a complete picture of exactly how it went wrong, and protecting their reputation. in one sense, we haven't yet got the truth from them, and that is the most damaging thing, because all of our work and reputation management suggests the worst thing you can do at this moment in time is to be seen to be not telling the truth and the whole truth. how much can that impact its reputation, then? whole truth. how much can that impact its reputation, themm whole truth. how much can that impact its reputation, then? it can be very damaging. we have 35,000 customers disadvantaged by what happened. we not too sure yet about what kind of compensation they will be getting and we are not too sure
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about the forward bookings that will impact on their bottom line over the next six months. this problem isn't going to go away in a week or so. next six months. this problem isn't going to go away in a week or som is such a massive business. 0nce lots of customers think, well, it was a one—off, i am sure they have sorted it out now? absolutely, if it can be passed off as being an accident, human error, and particular somebody else's error, if it isa particular somebody else's error, if it is a contractor and has nothing to do with ba. that would be the perfect solution. the share price hasn't done much so far. you can imagine the key investors, willie walsh trying to keep them happy at the moment, waiting and watching to see what will happen to forward bookings. because he is the darling of the city at the moment. if you invested in ba four years ago you would have quadrupled your investment. the share price is staying back on a yield of about 3.2%, which is not bad at this moment in time. the problem is, what comes next? if you are the boss of ba, what would you have done
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differently? i probably wouldn't have used an autocue to make my apology. if i was to say to you, i am very sorry, steph, i can't remember a thing this morning about radicchio ways, if i read that from a piece of paper, you think that was weird. —— about british airways. but ifi weird. —— about british airways. but if i say it and i mean it and weird. —— about british airways. but if i say itand i mean itand i can —— and you can look at my eyes and think, this guy is telling the truth, that comes across more powerfully. we must learn to manage better when things go wrong. to do it better in the far east. —— they do it better. they know that the name of the game, ultimately, is to be forgiven by the public and be forgiven by your customers. that sounds alien to our managers of moment. they want this more analytical approach, rather than pushing all the problems away from them approach. at the end of the day we are all human beings. if somebody makes a mistake and apologises, and we think they are not going to do it again, we think they have learnt their lessons, we will forgive them. that is really interesting, gary.
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thank you. later in the programme will be talking about the compensation side of things, because still lots of passengers, as gary was saying, have not had any compensation organised yet. more on that later. staying with that idea of going wrong... failing is traditionally something we tend to keep to ourselves. but in the swedish city of helsinborg, they do things differently. they celebrate things that most of us would sweep under the carpet. it's home to the museum of failure, a treasure trove of products filled with one flop after another. it aims to show that failing can just sometimes lead to success. 0ur correspondent richard galpin has been taking a look at some of the botched innovations. the trump boardgame. i'm back, you are fired. it is a very lousy version of monopoly. this plastic b i cycle, version of monopoly. this plastic bicycle, everlasting because it never rusts. it wobbles as you bite. this double drummond street, you can play on the up stroke and the down stroke. —— drumstick. play on the up stroke and the down stroke. -- drumstick. the doors of
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the world's first museum of failure are being opened here in the swedish city of housing board. it is the brainchild of this man, samuel west. he isa brainchild of this man, samuel west. he is a psychologist on a mission to show people here and around the world that failure should be celebrated, beaches it is part of the process leading to successful innovation. —— because. even the dj here is using equipment which was originally a failure, because it was too complicated to use. and amongst those studying the weird and wonderful things on display here, there seems to be genuine enthusiasm about the whole concept.” there seems to be genuine enthusiasm about the whole concept. i love it. i think it is fantastic. the focus on failure, which we normally try to hide under the carpet, to actually expose the failures is the only way to true innovation, i think is fantastic. before the opening party i was given an exclusive tour of this unique museum by its director, samuel west. there are obviously a
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lot of exhibits here, about 17 total? 70 different products and services. do you recognise that? google glass. at that failure because they didn't take privacy issues seriously enough. another food innovation over here. mcdonald's. $300 million, a luxury burger that didn't work out. what success have you had in persuading companies to review their failures and hand over their exhibits to you? zero! the companies refuse to collaborate. they don't want anything to do with the museum of failure, because it might tarnish the brand. what was that make you think? it's just the brand. what was that make you think? it'sjust really drives home the point of how sensitive an issue failure is, and to what an extent we are willing to go to hide it. as for my favourite exhibit here, that was easy. incredibly, this was marketed
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asa easy. incredibly, this was marketed as a beauty mask. as you can see inside, there is a whole load of electrodes with gel on them, and if you put them on your face, electrodes with gel on them, and if you put them on yourface, you get electric shocks which apparently make you more beautiful, but i can tell you, it is very unpleasant. the hope is that with the opening of this museum, failure will be seen in a very different light. i want to know the actually switched that mask on. he looked terrified. what would you put in the museum of failures? what kind of from your life would you like to save for the future as a reminder? did she love be betamax? 0r future as a reminder? did she love be betamax? or were you a fan of the green catchup? there must be somebody out there. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. we had green catchup on the putty
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van, didn't we? tempt —— three mac. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollands. bbc london has learnt that more children than ever scotla nd scotland yard says this morning's raids were carried out in your and waltham forest. the men arrested we re waltham forest. the men arrested were suspected of commission, of terrorism offences. bbc london has learnt that more children than ever across the capital are being admitted to hospital for self harm. almost 1,900 young people were taken in last year for cutting their body, overdosing on pills or burning themselves. it's a 10% rise on the year before. but experts say this is only the tip of the iceberg and that the real figure is much higher. that is really about 25 cent of all actual incidents of self harm.
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-- 25%. so if you think that there are thousands of more that do not go to a&e. also, it is well understood that about 50% of young people who self harm do it secretly. a couple who want to take their sick baby son to the united states for treatment are taking their case to the supreme court this afternoon. they're hoping to overturn a high courtjudgement that ruled in favour of turning off his life support. connie yates and chris gard want 9—month—old charlie gard, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, to undergo a therapy trial. great 0rmond street — who are caring for the child — say the therapy won't help and his life support should end. it is still good news if you are using the tube this morning. all lines are running a good service. northbound traffic on the a406 north circular is queueing from barking towards the north flyover. anticlockwise delays on the m25 wohling an accident on the approach
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tojunction wohling an accident on the approach to junction 31 from wohling an accident on the approach tojunction 31 from west wohling an accident on the approach to junction 31 from west thurrock. hughes back through the dartford tunnel. at london bridge, southwark street remains closed between borough high street and southwark bridge road, with various closures affecting access to borough market. let's get a check on the weather. good morning. not as much sunshine today as yesterday. a cloudy day, all in all. most of us should stay dry and the winds are a touch lighter than they were yesterday as well. a rather cloud is start, then. it is a mild start, though. 12— 14 at the moment. plenty of cloud around this morning. a bit of brightness. that will start to peep through more into the afternoon. the small chance of drizzle around this morning, maybe one or two showers later in the day. most of us dry. south—westerly winds still quite brisk, but lighter than yesterday. 0vernight tonight, the chance of 12 showers in places but most of us try and another mild start to the morning. —— dry. tomorrow there will be more sunshine around, and a greater chance of one or two showers, most of us still staying dry, the wind becoming lighter and the temperatures higher as well, 21 or 22 celsius on friday. it will feel quite warm and mighty
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over the course of the weekend. we are likely to see some outbreaks of rain and a strengthening of wind on saturday. drier and brighter by the time we get to sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello. this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. the polls have just opened in the general election with increased security in some areas after the attacks in london and manchester. millions of people are expected to turn out to vote, with the first results expected around midnight. hello. all eyes on the white house
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as the fbi director sacked by donald trump prepares to give his side of the story. new figures show that 80% of toddlers in england did not visit an nhs dentist in the last year. after 75,000 passengers were stranded when ba's it systems went down, doubts are now being raised about the company's explanation for what happened. i'll have the details shortly. in sport, andy murray says he didn't play great tennis, but he beat kei nishikori to reach the semi—finals of the french open for the fourth year in a row. her charlie and lola books are loved all over the world. we'll be joined by the newly crowned children's laureate, lauren child. and matt is in rochester with the weather. hello. good morning. apparently we don't know enough about british wildflowers. i am on a farm to find
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out more about that. what we do know about is rain this week. more to come. i will have your forecast details coming up. thank you, matt. good morning. first, our main story. polling stations across the uk have opened for millions of people to cast their vote in the general election. police forces say there'll be increased security in some areas following the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. the first election results are expected at around midnight. gary 0'donoghue reports. election day 2017, just two years after the last one, and three years earlier than we were expecting. 68 different parties are vying for your votes this time around, with a total field of more than 3,300 candidates. we'll elect mps from 650 constituencies across the uk, 533 in england, 40 in wales, 59 in scotland, and 18 in northern ireland. around 47 million people are eligible to vote, and we'll be casting our ballots at 41,000 polling stations on the length and breadth
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of the land, as well as by post. the party leader with the most mps will be invited by the queen to form a government, with mps due back here next tuesday. so, after seven weeks of campaigning, the time has come to choose their will and by those green benches across the road. 11 days from now, the queen will arrive here in a scaled—down ceremony, wearing a hat, not a crown, driven in a car, not a royal coach, to present the new government's plan to the next parliamentary session. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, westminster. there is just one other thing we can tell you this morning. you can watch all the results coming in throughout the night on the election 2017 special will be with david dimbleby. that's on bbc one from 9.55pm tonight. the times newspaper has cctv footage
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of what appears to be the london terrorist is co—ordinating the attack. —— terrorists. it is believed to be the first footage of them. the newspaper claims it shows them. the newspaper claims it shows them outside of a gem where one of them outside of a gem where one of the attackers worked. and now in america, we have this news. the former fbi director sacked by donald trump will give evidence to a senate committee today. james comey claims the us president tried to influence his investigation into links between members of the trump team and russia. 0ur north america correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan, reports. oh, and there's james. he's become more famous than me. there was a time when president trump had nothing but praise forjames comey, but a firm grip in january turned into a firing in may. the president sacked the fbi director, reportedly calling him a nutjob and more. he's a showboat, he's a grandstander. the fbi has been in turmoil. you know that, i know that, everybody knows that. most people know the president's
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version of events. now, james comey will go public before the senate with his. 0n the eve of his appearance before the senate, james comey released a written statement. he said the president isn't being investigated by the fbi as part of the russian enquiry, confirming statements made by mr trump in the past. mr comey says he was asked to drop the investigation into ties between the former national security adviser michael flynn and the russians. he said mr trump told him this. there is no suggestion the president asked for an end to the wider russian inquiry butjames comey says mr trump told him there was a cloud over him.. it's not just congress which is looking into the trump campaign's ties to russia. there was also an ongoing fbi investigation. in the saga of washington politics, james comey‘s testimony is a must—see moment but it's just
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one act in what is becoming a long and drawn—out political drama. bbc news, washington. the vast majority of children under the age of three did not see an nhs dentist last year. many parents do not know when young children should have their first checkup, they report. medical advice recommends a child should start central checkups when they develop their first tooth. yet this analysis of all nhs trusts in england has shown a worrying lack of take—up. in the year to march, 20% alone of one— 2—year—olds went, meaning 80% did not. 60% mist a
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central checkup in that period. the faculty is blaming a widespread misunderstanding of when children should have their first checkup at which, according to guidelines, is around six months. in 2016, 9000 children in england aged between one and four had teeth extracted in hospitals, often under general anaesthetic. most of this is under general tooth decay, which the government insists is 90% preve nta ble. government insists is 90% preventable. it says in a system where it is free for teenagers or the younger, there is no excuse. bbc news. music festivals should provide drug testing facilities to help reduce unnecessary deaths this summer, that's according to the royal society for public health. reading and leeds festivals and a number of other live music events are aiming to introduce the scheme later this year. critics have condemned the scheme, saying that it normalises drug—taking.
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we would like to see drug safety testing facilities at concerts were people can take any drug to a facility to see what it is and how strong that substance is so they can make an informed decision over whether they should take that to minimise harm. president trump has contacted the emir of qatar offering help to resolve a worsening diplomatic crisis between the country and its gulf neighbours. qatar has been cut off since monday amid accusations the country supports terrorist groups. the united arab emirates warned sympathisers with qatar could face up to 15 years in prison. let's speak to our diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, who is in doha for us this morning. same—sex couples in the uk could be allowed to get married in anglican churches for the first time. today, the scottish episcopal church will vote on whether to change its definition of marriage. a positive vote would mean that same—sex couples from all over the uk can marry in anglican churches in scotland.
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0ur correspondent, michael buchanan, reports. at the centre of what we celebrate here today is the love between these two men. a gay marriage in an anglican church. this one was in the united states. but later today, this scene could become legal in scotland. the episcopal church, the anglican church in scotland, will vote this afternoon on whether to allow gay weddings. this man is strongly in favour. so many people now know young gay couples who want to be married in church and stand up in front of their friends and in front of god and declare their love for one another. gay marriage has split anglicans. the churches of england and wales do not allow it. but if the vote in edinburgh is passed today, it would allow those in the uk to be married in scotland to the fury of anglican traditionalists.
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it is the authority of the bible who runs the church. the bible is the supreme authority run byjesus christ. when something like this happens, it is not about the sex element, it is about the authority of the bible that matters. this is one of the defining divisions among anglicans. supporters say acceptance is inevitable over time. today's vote could bring that future a step closer. michael buchanan, bbc news, edinburgh. the wreckage of a military plane that went missing with around 120 people on board has been found in the sea off southern myanmar. the aircraft was travelling to yangon when it lost contact yesterday afternoon. it was carrying 122 soldiers, family members and crew. myanmar‘s army chief confirmed that several bodies had been found. you might remember this as we talked
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about it yesterday. a diamond ring bought at a car boot sale for £10 has been sold for more than £650,000 at auction in london. the 26 carat cushion—shaped diamond was expected to fetch £350,000, but went for almost double that yesterday. the owner bought the ring in the 1980's and was unaware of its real value and had worn it every day for 30 years! they just wore theyjust wore it like an everyday piece of jewellery. theyjust wore it like an everyday piece ofjewellery. i got theyjust wore it like an everyday piece of jewellery. i got you a present! i thought you never would! i didn't. and now we go back to american politics. it seems like
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there is never a dull day. but today is likely to be particularly dramatic. the former fbi chief, james comey, who was sacked by donald trump last month, will tell a senate committee that the president tried to influence his investigations into possible links between russia and members of the trump team. before we hear more about today's hearing, let's look back at the story so far. injanuary, the two men met for a private dinner, and president trump reportedly asked mr comey for his loyalty. in february, the president is alleged to have asked mr comey to "back off" his investigation into michael flynn. a former member of the trump team sacked for lying about his links to moscow. in march, mr comey confirmed that his bureau was investigating possible russian interference in the 2016 election, including any links between the trump campaign team and the russian government. in early may, president trump sacked mr comey without warning. and ten days later, mr comey agreed to give his version of events to the senate intelligence committee. that almost brings us to the day. ——
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today. last night, in another surprise twist, james comey released his statement in advance of the hearing. graham lanktree can tell us more about this. he's the us politics reporter for newsweek. good morning. good morning. good morning. we tried to explain very carefully what is going on. there are very many twists and tangents. why did james, give this testimony last night? they give them beforehand sometimes. that can happen for confirmation hearings. sometimes it is to put on the record and clarify a sequence of events they will talk about. what was surprising in this statement? did we learn anything new? we definitely did. confirmation of the new york
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times story talking about how donald trump asked james comey to see this way clear to ending an investigation into michael flynn. —— his. james comey said in his statement he felt the president had asked him to drop the president had asked him to drop the investigation. now, if that is true, it could be an obstruction of justice, which is a crime. but what the ramifications of that are is unclear right now. when james comey gives evidence later, donald trump will be live tweeting his response, which is extraordinary. what should the response there? what will we learn? in the comments of donald trump? no, what are the key things we wa nt trump? no, what are the key things we want to learn from james comey?
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what he has said he will talk about, how comfortable he felt in the position is the president put him in. he had several conversations with him. he was called in march and april with donald trump saying there isa april with donald trump saying there is a cloud over me, referring to the russian investigation, seemingly indicating that he wanted that cloud to be removed. and he asked james comey to go on the record to say it donald trump was not under investigation. donald trump made that statement in his letter when he fired him saying that he was not under investigation. james comey actually wanted to go public with that because it contained the investigation in the future. if comey is giving evidence, and the president, comey may say something
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against the president, may make an implication that could put the president, the legality of his behaviour in question, with the president tweaking at the same time, how does that work? how is that allowed ? —— tweeting how does that work? how is that allowed? —— tweeting at the same time. well, contrary to legal advice, people close to president trump had said he is going to be tweeting, and he wants to push back against this. this undermines the system, doesn't it? it is almost like having a court in public, when you have got a process. it is contrary to legal advice. what the president does is his decision. in other cases he has got legal advice not to tweet, and with respect to his travel ban, he has been tweeting about it all week. people say that is undermining the government's case in the supreme court. as a political reporter who watches american
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politics and shenanigans, can you believe... i mean, it is extraordinary, isn't it? who would have thought that we would be in this situation with these characters and all of this playing out. it is like a real—life house of cards.” think the past four months have been com pletely think the past four months have been completely unbelievable. it is more like a reality tv presidency. what would be the consequences of this if it did come out and it was proven that president trump acted unlawfully. well, there are implications from impeachment. it is a crime, if he obstructed justice. but whether or not congress goes ahead... there are seven steps to impeachment, and that involves the department ofjustice launching an investigation, the house taking that investigation, the house taking that investigation under consideration, then watching impeachment proceedings —— launching impeachment proceedings, having then vote on it, thenit proceedings, having then vote on it, then it goes to the senate, then the senatejudiciary then it goes to the senate, then the senate judiciary committee then it goes to the senate, then the senatejudiciary committee runs a
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whole court case... i think what you are saying is that we are going to be talking about this for some time. really. graham, thank you. just so you know, that testimony begins at 3pm uk time. match is at a nature reserve today, not just talking about the weather but also talking about beautiful wildflowers to brighten up your morning. we have been testing each other. those are definitely puppies. you are very smart. yes, those are poppies. the common p°ppy, yes, those are poppies. the common imppy. in yes, those are poppies. the common poppy, in fact. yes, those are poppies. the common poppy, infact. good morning. did you know that the word poppy, as well is at a cup and even dandelion, have all disappeared from the oxford junior dictionary? —— buttercup. not commonly used by children any more. the organisation planned licensed to change that. in a recent survey they found 70% of us want to know more about the uk's wildflowers. today they launched the great british
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wildflower hunt. you can download little fa ct wildflower hunt. you can download little fact sheets and there is a game where you can spot various wildflowers in the fields of the uk. iam in wildflowers in the fields of the uk. iamina wildflowers in the fields of the uk. i am in a lovely field this morning, lots of common poppies around me. we will be looking at more throughout the day. they have been steadily opening up as daylight breaks. it is a bit grey, but dry here. not the same everywhere. if we look at the forecast of today, i think the overriding story from most people will be that it is cloudy, grey but reasonably mild. here we have sunshine after what has been a frosty start for one or two. in the south—east corner, dry here, as was in anglia. if you cloud breaks are possible. should have a dry commute. heavy bursts of rain in the north—east of england, and west of the pennines. much of scotland gets through the morning rush—hour dry. northern ireland, rain on and off this morning. heaviest in the east of northern ireland, but we will see some rain in western areas later on.
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across wales and south—west england, a similarly damp start to thursday morning. rain heavy and most persistent over the hills. a breeze blowing across the uk today, coming from a south and south—westerly direction, keeping the temperatures up. it is wishing the cloud further north, so if you start dry in scotla nd north, so if you start dry in scotland and central and southern areas, it will be tony winds are through the day. rain on and off in northern ireland. 0ptimistically, it will be drier and brighter in the afternoon, maybe a students is of sunshine, but also heavy showers developing. you could even see the odd rumble of thunder. east anglia and southeast asia dry. highs this afternoon around 2122 degrees. into tonight, the rain in scotland will push around —— linger around and push around —— linger around and push into the north. here it will be a much, much milder nights then we had. further south, a fuzhou was scattered around, mainly across western areas. —— few showers.
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temperatures should hold up for most, with breezes in place. into friday, a damp start across northern scotland. the rain easing off but turning patchy through the day. elsewhere, sunshine and showers starting in the west. they push east through the afternoon. by this stage some of those could be heavy and thundery with hail, but western areas to drier and brighter. temperatures in the mid—to high teens, maybe the low 20s. finishing the day with cloud increasing in the west, rain overnight to take this into the start of saturday. heavy rain at times in the west on saturday. we will see some rain in the east, and it should turn bright in the afternoon across east anglia and the south—east, and increasingly muqqy and the south—east, and increasingly muggy here as well. still some rain in the forecast and a bit of sunshine as well, all helping our wildflowers grow. in the last few minutes the airline flybe has announced they made a loss
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this financial year. steph has been looking through the figures. what is happening? we aren't surprised. they put out a profit warning in march, saying they were going to make a loss this year compared to last year. now we have the official statistics. it is a loss of £6.7 million and that compares to a profit the previous financial year of five one £5 million. and a lot of it is to do with it problems they have had, it write—downs. £4.8 million, that is a big chunk of it. also, the airline industry is tough. there is lots of competition. this is one of the biggest domestic fliers in the uk. they do very well from some of the key routes, manchester, southampton, belfast, those sorts of routes. but there's quite a few unprofitable routes they run as well. they are talking about reducing their fleet size over the next few years. they have been on this turnaround plan for the last three years and we are just coming towards the end of that. lots of
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these costs they are having to write down, they are saying that they are hoping and expecting things will get better for them. but that mill —— will mean reducing the fleet size. they are talking about technology as well, building a better and more resilient it platform, which is interesting given everything that has gone on with british airways. they say they will move a lot of focus without. constant change, isn't it? you have to keep up with the times in aviation. so, election day — and exercising your democratic right is a simple enough exercise for many, but some people find voting independently, and in secret, difficult because of their disability. the royal national institute of blind people says that many people with sight loss still rely on others in order to cast their vote. as breakfast‘s tim muffett reports, there are some who say online voting in uk elections is long overdue. casting a vote in secret.
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a fundamental democratic right. but in our mocked up polling station, asha is showing the problems the royal national institute of blind people says many blind people face. the numbers are in braille. there is a template with the candidates' name. tactile voting templates we introduced in 2001. by law, uk polling stations now have to provide them. but asha and others say that sometimes they do not work. that is now lined up. yes, unfortunately the template used by polling stations is not fit for purpose. we still rely on somebody to read out the names of the candidates and then you still have to trust them that they are telling you honestly where the boxes are. so you are reliant on somebody else guiding you through the process? yes, and to check you have put the mark in the right place. for some, problems can occur before polling day.
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ismael has a learning disability and thinks registering to vote is too complicated. i feel it is difficult when voting, i have to bring my form in and get my colleagues at work to help me fill out the form, because the former is not accessible and it has a lot ofjargon terms and lots of boxes to tick. in westminster, the rights of disabled voters are being discussed at a pre—election meeting. polling stations should be accessible to all. some say that is not always the case. if somebody has not made the necessary provision in advance, you are turning up and you are not getting in. you are guessing, sometimes, as to who you are voting for. what impact does it have if you are unable to cast your vote? i feel like i'm not part of society. the electoral commission oversees uk elections. not all polling stations will be able to be situated in ideal premises, but what we want to make sure is that local authorities can make the necessary adjustments
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so that they can be accessed by all. many say that the blind voting templates are not fit for purpose, that they do not work properly. what do you say to that? big improvements have been made to make sure they provide the right kind of template so that they do fit the ballot paper, and how they will be used in practice so that the polling station staff are familiar with them. the commission wants any problems to be reported. we urge anybody who finds themselves in that position to contact the local authority immediately, so it can be put right. but the way that votes are cast is set in law, something that areeq choudary wants changed. webroots democracy is campaigning for online voting. first—time voters born in 1991 have known nothing other than a world of facebook, smartphones, social media. with online voting, you wouldn't need assistance, you can use your own equipment in your own home. doesn't online voting leave us open to potential hacking, potential security risks? people tend to look on online voting as you should have 100% security, but that doesn't exist anywhere,
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online or off—line. we do need online voting to make the democratic process more accessible and inclusive. a radical rethink of the way we vote. some believe it is long overdue. polling stations are now open. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. three men have been arrested in terror raids, not connected to the london bridge attack. scotland yard says the raids were carried out in new and waltham forest. the men were arrested on suspicion of preparation and instigation of terrorist offences. a 10% rise on the year before in
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children's self harming is alarming experts. they say the real figure children's self harming is alarming experts. they say the realfigure is probably much higher. about 2596 of all actual incidence of self harm, if you think, it is thousands more that do not go to amd, and it is also well understood that about 50% of young people that self harm actually do not seek relief. —— go to a&e. a actually do not seek relief. —— go to me. a new form of littering is plaguing some of london's beauty spots. it involves some dog owners leaving the bags they are meant to ta ke leaving the bags they are meant to take away hanging off trees. keep britain tidy calls it a disgusting development which needs to stop. looking at the cube, we have a good service on all lines apart from london 0verground, service on all lines apart from london 0verg round, with service on all lines apart from london 0verground, with no service between sid and crystal palace. heathrow express and heathrow connect services are suspended
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between heathrow terminals one, two, three and four because of a track fault. passengers are advised to use the piccadilly line and local buses. 0n the roads, the a406 is closed northbound following a fuel spillage. that takes us to check of the weather. good morning. not as much sunshine today as yesterday. a cloudy day, all in all. most of us should stay dry and the winds are a touch lighter than they were yesterday as well. a rather cloud is start, then. it is a mild start, though. 12— 14 at the moment. plenty of cloud around this morning. a bit of brightness. that will start to peep through more into the afternoon. the small chance of drizzle around this morning, maybe one or two showers later in the day. most of us try.
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—— dry. south—westerly winds still quite brisk, but lighter than yesterday. 0vernight tonight, the chance of 12 showers in places but most of us try and another mild start to the morning. —— dry. tomorrow there will be more sunshine around, and a greater chance of one or two showers, most of us still staying dry, the wind becoming lighter and the temperatures higher as well, 21 or 22 celsius on friday. it will feel quite warm and mighty over the course of the weekend. we are likely to see some outbreaks of rain and a strengthening of wind on saturday. try and brighter by the time get to sunday. —— dry. that is it from us. we are back in half an hour. the latest designer website. see you soon. hello. this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. in the last half an hour, polling stations have opened across the uk for millions of people to cast their vote in the general election.
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police forces say there'll be increased security in some areas following the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. let's speak to our political correspondent alicia mccarthy, who is in westminster for us this morning. tell us what you can say. good morning. finally the big day is here. if it feels like it has been a long time, it has been 50 days since mps long time, it has been 50 days since m ps voted long time, it has been 50 days since mps voted to hold the election. as you were saying, polling stations have opened and will not close until 10pm tonight. because it is polling day, we cannot talk about party policies today. i can give you some fa cts . policies today. i can give you some facts. there are 650 constituencies up facts. there are 650 constituencies upforgrabs. facts. there are 650 constituencies up for grabs. there is a total of 3301 candidates representing 68 parties. of those candidates, 986
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are women, which is less than last time, buta higher are women, which is less than last time, but a higher proportion. the polls close at 10pm. the exit poll comes a little bit after that. the first result is expected to bid after 11. and we should know what actually happened by this time tomorrow morning. perfect. and one other important factor for you to know that we can tell you. you can watch all the results coming in throughout the night. the election 2017 special will be with david dimbleby. that's on bbc one from 9.55pm tonight. the times newspaper has released cctv footage of what appears to show the london bridge terrorists in the days before the attack. it's believed to be the first time the three men have been placed together before saturday's attack in which eight people were killed. the newspaper claims these pictures show the men outside the gym where one of the attackers worked. three more men were detained in east london late last night. the former fbi director sacked by donald trump will give evidence
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to a senate committee today. james comey claims the us president tried to influence his investigation into links between members of the trump team and russia. the white house denies the allegations. the vast majority of children under the age of three didn't see an nhs dentist in england last year. dental surgeons have expressed concern that many parents don't know when young children should have their first check—up. music festivals should provide drug testing facilities to help reduce unnecessary deaths this summer, that's according to the royal society for public health. reading and leeds festivals and a number of other live music events are aiming to introduce the scheme later this year. critics have condoned the scheme, saying that it normalises drug taking. president trump has contacted the emir of qatar offering
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help to resolve a worsening diplomatic crisis between the country and its gulf neighbours. qatar has been cut off since monday amid accusations the country supports terrorist groups. the united arab emirates warned sympathisers with qatar could face up to 15 years in prison. a daring 88—year—old has set a new record as the uk's oldest female wing—walker. betty bromage, who lives in a retirement home in cheltenham, took to the skies strapped to the wings of a vintage biplane. the former nurse beat the record she set last year, flying at 200 feet and travelling at up to 130 miles per hour. betty said afterwards it was a "bit windy" and a "bit wobbly," but she had thoroughly enjoyed it. i wonder whether she will try and break a record next year. hands in
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the air! well done, betty! fabulous, isn't she? and now we are going to talk about moods and how you channel angen talk about moods and how you channel anger. as we know, john is an angry man. do you ever get angry?” anger. as we know, john is an angry man. do you ever get angry? i can... i would pay to see that. andy murray can getangry i would pay to see that. andy murray can get angry on the tennis court. but he has properly grown up in front of us. when he gets angry and frustrated now, he channels it into his game. and we saw the yesterday. andy murray is through to the french open semi—finals for the fourth year in a row. he had to fight for his place, though, after going a set down to kei nishikori.
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murray came back to win in four sets. he said he didn't feel he'd played great tennis but it was a huge step in the right direction. he takes on the 2015 champion, stan wawrinka, tomorrow. he has been playing very well and has not dropped a set. yeah, he has obviously played extremely well the last few years. he is confident. so, it is going to be very, very tough, but, you know, you can learn some things from last year, and i am sure he will as well. the defending champion, novak djokovic, is out. he was beaten in straight sets by one of the sport's emerging talents, austria's dominic thiem, losing the third set to love. that's the first time that's happened to djokovic in a grand slam for 12 years. thiem faces the nine—time winner, rafael nadal, next. there was a cracking match in the women's quarter—finals, where the third seed, simona halep, came back from match—point down against russia's elina svitolina to book her place in the last four. jamie vardy has pulled out of the england squad and will miss saturday's world cup qualifier with scotland and the friendly with france next week.
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if you were wondering about sir ben ainslie's progress in the america's cup, well, there hasn't been any. jamie vardy has pulled out of the england squad and will miss saturday's world cup qualifier with scotland and the friendly with france next week. he has what's been described as a "minor injury" and has left the squad as a precaution. gareth southgate's side travel to hampden park top of their qualifying group. chelsea striker, diego costa, claims manager, antonio conte, has told him in a text message that he's not part of his plans at the club. costa spoke to reporters after spain's draw with columbia last night, saying "i am a chelsea player but they do not want me there." and liverpool have apologised to southampton over "any misunderstanding" and say they're no
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longer interested in signing defender, virgil van dijk. that is someone they have been closely monitoring for some time. pakistan have kept alive their hopes of reaching the semi finals of the champions trophy with a rain—affected win over south africa. in a must—win game, they restricted south africa to just 219 from their 50 overs, well below what would be considered a competitive total. pakistan were comfortably ahead of the run rate when the rain started to fall in birmingham. it leaves both teams with one win a piece. great britain's squad for next month's world para—athletics championships at the london stadium has been announced. there are ten! as expected, places for paralympic champions jonnie peacock and hannah cockroft among other big medal hopes. every time i get to represent britain is a massive honour. we get to wear the kit and this is what you train for. you compete around the world and at local events. but coming back to london, that is what it is all about. you come back to the home crowd and want to show what you have been working for. i look at this maybe more than rio. i get to go back to where it all began. st ratfo rd.
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british fans are always amazing in that stadium! i'm looking forward to it. it is unbelievable. if you were wondering about sir ben ainslie's progress in the america's cup, well, there hasn't been any. the day's racing was called off due to heavy winds in bermuda. great britain were hoping to reduce new zealand's 3—1 lead, but the delay really helps the kiwis, giving them more time to repair their damaged boat after they capsized on tuesday. it has been quite disappointing, hasn't it? do you know what, when you listen to ben ainslie speaking, he isa
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you listen to ben ainslie speaking, he is a winner, but also a realist. he is talking about how things may not work out for them this time, but he has one goal, to get this cup. whether that happens now or in the future, it will happen for him.. com plete future, it will happen for him.. complete change of tack. what do you make of the advice that you should let your children be bored as a mum? it isa let your children be bored as a mum? it is a good idea but it is difficult. there are so many things to distract them these days. you have to start when they are really little and don't get in their face too much. let them be. i remember doing that. you would get given a cardboard box and you had to use your imagination is. why was i asking that? lauren child has been named as the new children's laureate. the author and illustrator says she'll not only be encouraging children to read more, she'll also be asking parents to let their children become bored. lauren, who created the charlie and lola books, thinks boredom leads to creativity.
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our friends at newsround asked some children what they thought of her appointment. iamafan of i am a fan of her work. i think it has been a really good experience. i think that she is going to be a really good laureate.” think that she is going to be a really good laureate. i want to write long stories and make people do what she is doing, and not do something else. i hope she achieves inspiring work helping children with her books and happy feelings. congratulations. they are big fans. that is what matters most, though they approve of this appointment! that is really nice, if they are pleased. it is good. what do you
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hope to achieve? you are following an impressive list. quentin blake. jacqueline wilson. yeah, no, it is amazing, especially with quentin blake. when i started writing and illustrating, quentin blake was the first ever laureate. he was one of the people that really inspired me to be one. i saw him drawing live, and so it made it real. that is what children need to remember. you are real people. it is a job you could end up doing. you straddle both worlds in terms of illustration and writing as well. which do you push more in terms of creativity? arson, if you say go read a book, you want them to go and take in the words not them to go and take in the words not the drawings. —— 0ften. them to go and take in the words not the drawings. -- often. we are a bit
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funny about drawing, as if it is less important than word. we were all born literate. children can read expressions from the minute they are born. pictures are wonderful way of conveying information. you only need to look at all of the gadgets now and iphones and things. they are all symbols and things that children can read. we are visual beings, so i think it is important. your greatest hit, of course, charlie and lola. i cannot imagine their story without your pictures. we are seeing the television version there as well. it is that marrying of illustrations and story. when it works, it really works. yeah. you are trying to talk to more than one age group, always, when you are writing a picture book, because so many... you know, you will have different age groups.
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young children, older children, and adults. you have to go for the adults. you have to go for the adults as well so i always try and include something for them. when we introduced you, we were talking about boredom. children need to be bored. two, it is the moments when they are just talking to each other and having flashes of inspiration. why is it matter so much, if parents are watching right now, to let kid be sometimes? they are the most creative beings. we are born like that and are very good at finding things to do and connecting ideas. and when you are not being directed too much, that is when you can come up too much, that is when you can come up with something brilliant. any scientist will tell you that because they are very creative people. does that apply to you to? do you have to be bored to be at your creative best? yes. you don't no what to do and you would wriggle out of a job
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if you possibly could. sometimes if idid not if you possibly could. sometimes if i did not have a deadline i would do anything else. it is that moment of looking out the window and letting your mind just float and then sometimes you will see something thatis sometimes you will see something that is just an amazingly funny thing. and then that is an idea. how important is it? children's laureates talk about the importance for boys and girls, really, to reach different books at different ages. how important is it as an illustrator that children see someone illustrator that children see someone in a book that looks like them? i am talking about diversity? it is essential. how can you feel pa rt it is essential. how can you feel part of a community if you are not represented on television, in film, in books? do you feel a responsibility to push that?” certainly do as me, and i don't know what the answer is on a wider scale,
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andi what the answer is on a wider scale, and i would love hollywood to think and i would love hollywood to think a bit more about girls leading films. not everybody has to be white in films. we see that a lot. these same with books. i wrote a picture book with black children on the cover, only black children in it, because it was not an issue, it was just about to children talking. —— two children. so why not? not everything has to be an issue, you just want children to see themselves ina just want children to see themselves in a book. lauren, congratulations. children's laureate, that must protect big smile on your face. enjoy it. thank you forjoining us. matt is going to bring us the weather from one of england's largest nature reserves for wildflowers. he has been brushing up on here is flowery knowledge. ——
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hears. good morning. that yellow flower is a chibok. —— charlock. it grows amongst the puppies here at ranscombe amongst the puppies here at ra nscombe farm amongst the puppies here at ranscombe farm in kent. in a recent survey by planned life, 70% of people were found to know —— found to wa nt people were found to know —— found to want to know more about flowers here in the uk. with that in mind, planned life have today launched the great british wildflower hunt, a chance to get to know the nation's wildflowers that little bit better. —— plant life. let's get on with the forecasts. it is dry here in kent and it will be dry for some of you, but the overall ‘s tory is cloudy and mild. —— overall story. we have the driest conditions across east
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anglia, the south—east and northern scotla nd anglia, the south—east and northern scotland at the moment. rakes in the cloud here in the south—east and east anglia. —— breaks. it will be cloudy and rainy west of the pennines and in the north—west midlands as well. northern scotland started with frost this morning but isa dry started with frost this morning but is a dry and reasonably bright day ahead. most places avoiding the rain. the heaviest of the rain will be to the east. a thoroughly wet start across much of wales at the moment. the overnight rain in the south—west of england is starting to these off a little bit. that is because that area of rain is working north under the south to south—westerly winds that we have this morning. it is going to turn wet across central and southern scotla nd wet across central and southern scotland through the day. rain on and off the northern ireland. across parts of northern england western england and wales, after a bit of a wet start, we will see things turning drier and brighter. still a fuzhou was to come, some of them could be heavy and thundery in the
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afternoon. —— few showers to come. east anglia and the north—east avoiding most of today's showers. staying dry for the bulk of the day. if you get some sunshine this afternoon it could hit 21 or 22. tonight, that rain in scotland will start to become more confined to northern areas of scotland. with that in mind, not as cold as last night here. temperature staying in two double figures for some. double figures for most of us overnight. a bit of a breeze. 0ccasional showers, mainly in the west. clear skies as well to go with it. into friday, a different state, largely across—the—board. different state, largely across—the—boa rd. —— a different state, largely across—the—board. —— a different day. at rates of rain heaviest in the morning in northern scotland, easing in the afternoon. the rest of the country, dry times, a scattering of showers pushing east in the afternoon and becoming heavy and thundery. western areas becoming drier and brighter, temperatures much like today. through the night and into saturday, heaviest across
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western areas. particularly in the hills. we may have some rain in east anglia, the south—east and northern scotla nd anglia, the south—east and northern scotland at times. here we will see some brightness come through. in the south—east corner it could turn quite humid late in the day. that is how it is looking. more through the morning. there are still lots of questions about wyatt british airways' computer system crashed and caused delays for lots of people two weeks ago. steph is looking into it. there are still lots of people getting into touch with us and saying they have not had any money back and do not know what to do. we were originally told it was human error that caused the computer meltdown at british airways, with the boss willie walsh saying an engineer cut the data centre's power, and messed up the reboot. but now former it workers at ba have said it would have been very difficult for a single person to do this. on top of this, ba has been criticised for the way it communicated the problems with passengers when things went wrong. so what should you do if you were caught up in this? helen dewdney runs a consumer expert
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site known as the complaining cow. she's here with me. there are two things here. there is the compensation side of it but there is also the expenses that people have incurred because they couldn't get that flight. what can they do? if they were flying in the eu they can go for the delayed flight eu they can go for the delayed flight compensation under eu regulations, that is if they have been delayed more than three hours. the amount depends on the length of the flight, what it is long haul, mittal or shorthaul, and how long they were delayed. the other question is whether they were entitled to accommodation and travel to and from that accommodation, and food and refreshments for the time they were delayed. is it easy to get this back? one gentleman who has beenin this back? one gentleman who has been in touch with me, gary, his 80—year—old mother was stuck at a rome airport, which was obviously scary for the family. he has contacted british airways and all he got was an automated email response. is that fair at this point? well, i
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do not think ba have done everything they could do to make it easy to people. it is a form for this and a form for that and they have changed things on their site a lot. people do not have to do that. people can write and say that they were delayed for this length of time, that this was the time of their flight, this was the time of their flight, this was when it eventually arrived, here are the receipts from a connotation, please refund me. —— accommodation. ba told me yesterday they were responding to all claims and aims to responding to all claims and aims to respond within 14 days. that is a lot of passengers to get through here, as well. yes. they have said they have put more staff on to deal with it, but i don't know how many. interesting in may that point about writing a letter. in gary's mum's case, an 80—year—old woman might not have online access, and lots of other people don't as well. you do not have to do the process they set out. yes, you canjust right. if you're happy with their response, you're happy with their response, you can go to cedr, the centre of effective dispute resolution, which
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is an ombudsman. they will look at your case for you if you're not happy with ba's response. and in terms of money back, what can you expect to get? it depends on your flight expect to get? it depends on your flight and the delay. it could be between 250 euros and 600 euros for the delay, but the accommodation, it is just whatever is reasonable. that is just whatever is reasonable. that is the guidelines, whatever is reasonable. what is the division of reasonable? it is a thing for ba. it should be relative, reasonably cheap accommodation, but of course on those lives people were not able to book the cheapest accommodation because they were so many thousands of people. so in that case i think it is still reasonable that he had to go somewhere more expensive because all the other places were full. so you might have to show evidence you tried to get other places, but i think the authorities will seed in the passengers' favour because it was so difficult. great advice, thank you. and thank you for all the messages you have sent in.
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keep them coming as this gets resolved. that is it from me now. just to be clear, helen calls herself a complaining cow, you didn't call her that? that's right. no, i would didn't call her that? that's right. no, iwould never didn't call her that? that's right. no, i would never insult anybody. failing is something we normally keep to ourselves. but in the swedish city of helsinborg they celebrate it. it's home to the museum of failure, a treasure—trove of products that have flopped. it aims to show that failing can just sometimes lead to success. 0ur correspondent richard galpin has been taking a look at some of the botched innovations. the trump boardgame. "i'm back, you're fired." it's a very lousy version of monopoly. this plastic bicycle, everlasting because it never rusts. it wobbles as you bike. this double drumstick, you can play on the up stroke and the down stroke. the doors of the world's first museum of failure are being opened here in the swedish
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city of helsinbjorg. it is the brainchild of this man, samuel west. he is a psychologist on a mission to show people here and around the world that failure should be celebrated, because it is part of the process leading to successful innovation. even the dj here is using equipment which was originally a failure, because it was too complicated to use. and amongst those studying the weird and wonderful things on display here, there seems to be genuine enthusiasm about the whole concept. i love it. i think it is fantastic. the focus on failure, which we normally try to hide under the carpet, to actually expose the failures is the only way to true innovation, i think is fantastic. before the opening party i was given an exclusive tour of this unique museum by its director, samuel west.
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there are obviously a lot of exhibits here, about 70 in total? 70 different products and services. do you recognise that? google glass. a failure because they didn't take privacy issues seriously enough. another food innovation over here. mcdonald's. $300 million invested on a luxury burger that didn't work out. what success have you had in persuading companies to review their failures and hand over their exhibits to you? zero! the companies refuse to collaborate. they don't want anything to do with the museum of failure, because it might tarnish the brand. what does that make you think? itjust really drives home the point of how sensitive an issue failure is, and to what an extent we are willing to go to hide it. as for my favourite exhibit here, that was easy. incredibly, this was marketed as a beauty mask. as you can see inside, there is a whole load of electrodes
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with gel on them, and if you put them on yourface, you get electric shocks which apparently make you more beautiful, but i can tell you, it is very unpleasant. the hope is that with the opening of this museum, failure will be seen in a very different light. enjoy yourfailures. enjoy your failures. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollands. three men have been arrested on suspicion of terror offences in east london following a series of raids overnight that are not connected to the london bridge attack. scotland yard says the raids were carried out in newham
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and waltham forest. the men arrested are suspected of commission, preparation and instigation of terrorism offences. bbc london has learnt that more children than ever across the capital are being admitted to hospital for self harm. almost 1,900 young people were taken in last year for cutting their body, overdosing on pills or burning themselves. it's a 10% rise on the year before. but experts say this is only the tip of the iceberg and that the real figure is much higher. that is really about 25% of all actual incidents of self harm. so if you think that there are thousands of more that do not go to a&e. also, it is well understood that about 50% of young people who self harm do it secretly. there's a new form of littering plaguing some of london's beauty spots. it involves some dog owners leaving the bags they're meant to take away hanging off trees. keep britain tidy says it's a disgusting development which needs to stop.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. heathrow express and connect services are suspended tween the four terminals at heathrow. that is because of a track fault. hostages are invited to use the picadilly line. —— passages are invited to use. anticlockwise delays on the m25 following an accident on the approach to junction 31 from following an accident on the approach tojunction 31 from west direct. queues back through the da rtford direct. queues back through the dartford tunnel or the way to junction 3. that takes us to the weather. good morning. not as much sunshine today as yesterday. a cloudy day, all in all.
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most of us should stay dry and the winds are a touch lighter than they were yesterday as well. a rather cloud is start, then. it is a mild start, though. 12— 14 at the moment. plenty of cloud around this morning. a bit of brightness. that will start to peep through more into the afternoon. the small chance of drizzle around this morning, maybe one or two showers later in the day. most of us dry. south—westerly winds still quite brisk, but lighter than yesterday. 0vernight tonight, the chance of 12 showers in places but most of us dry and another mild start to the morning. tomorrow there will be more sunshine around, and a greater chance of one or two showers, most of us still staying dry, the wind becoming lighter and the temperatures higher as well, 21 or 22 celsius on friday. it will feel quite warm and mighty over the course of the weekend. we are likely to see some outbreaks of rain and a strengthening of wind on saturday. dry and brighter by the time get to sunday. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello. this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. the polls have opened in the general election, with increased security in some areas after the attacks in london and manchester. millions of people are expected to turn out to vote for 650 mps. the first results are expected around midnight. good morning. it's thursday the 8th ofjune. also this morning: testing times for donald trump as the fbi director sacked by the president prepares to give his side of the story. here, new figures show that 80% of toddlers in england did not visit an nhs dentist in the last year. good morning.
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in the last hour the airline flybe has announced they made a loss of over £6 million this financial year. i'll have more on why. in sport, andy murray says he didn't play great tennis. but he beat kei nishikori to reach the semifinals of the french open for the fourth year in a row. diagnosed with alzheimer's six years ago, the country star glen campbell has returned to the recording studio for one last time. his daughter ashley will tell us why. and matt is in rochester with the weather. the morning. the well do you know your wild flowers here? we don't know them well enough in britain, apparently, and some are disappearing from a children's dictionary. more details in the next hour, and something we know a lot about in the forecast, the rain! we will see you in a minute. he is
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quite camouflaged among the flowers. let's bring you up to date. polling stations across the uk opened an hour ago so millions of people can go and cast their vote in the general election. police forces say there is increased security in some areas following the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. the first election results are expected at around midnight. gary 0'donoghue reports. election day 2017, just two years after the last one, and three years earlier than we were expecting. 68 different parties are vying for your votes this time around, with a total field of more than 3,300 candidates. we'll elect mps from 650 constituencies across the uk, 533 in england, 40 in wales, 59 in scotland, and 18 in northern ireland. around 47 million people are eligible to vote, and we'll be casting our ballots at 41,000 polling stations the length and breadth of the land, as well as by post.
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the party leader with the most mps will be invited by the queen to form a government, with mps due back here next tuesday. so, after seven weeks of campaigning, the time has come to choose who will end up on those green benches across the road. 11 days from now, the queen will arrive here in a scaled—down ceremony, wearing a hat, not a crown, driven in a car, not a royal coach, to present the new government's plan to the next parliamentary session. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, westminster. and you can watch all the results coming in throughout the night. the election 2017 special will be with david dimbleby. that's on bbc one from 9.55pm tonight. the times newspaper has released cctv footage of what appears to show the london bridge terrorists in the days before the attack. it's believed to be the first time the three men have been placed together before saturday's attack in which eight people were killed. the newspaper claims these pictures
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show the men outside the gym where one of the attackers worked. three more men were detained in east london late last night. the former fbi director sacked by donald trump will give evidence to a senate committee today. james comey claims the us president tried to influence his investigation into links between members of the trump team and russia. 0ur north america correspondent rajini vaidya nathan reports. oh, and there's james. he's become more famous than me. there was a time when president trump had nothing but praise forjames comey, but a firm grip injanuary turned into a firing in may. the president sacked the fbi director, reportedly calling him a nutjob and more. he's a showboat, he's a grandstander. the fbi has been in turmoil. you know that, i know that, everybody knows that. most people know the president's version of events. nowjames comey will go public before the senate with his.
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0n the eve of his appearance before the senate, james comey released a written statement. he said the president isn't being investigated by the fbi as part of the russia inquiry. but how far did the president expect his loyalty to go? mystica amy says he was asked to drop the investigation into ties between between former national security adviser michael flynn and the russians. he said mr trump told him this. russian inquiry butjames comey says mr trump told him there was a cloud over him.. it's not just congress
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which is looking into the trump campaign's ties to russia. there was also an ongoing fbi investigation. in the saga of washington politics, james comey‘s testimony is a must—see moment but it's just one act in what is becoming a long and drawn—out political drama. bbc news, washington. president trump has contacted the emir of qatar offering help to resolve a worsening diplomatic crisis between the country and its gulf neighbours. qatar has been cut off since monday amid accusations the country supports terrorist groups. many flights in and out of the country are suspended and there are fears that food supplies will run out. the united arab emirates warned sympathisers with qatar could face up to 15 years in prison. music festivals should provide drug testing facilities to help reduce unnecessary deaths this summer, that's according to the royal society for public health. reading and leeds festivals and a number of other live music events are aiming to introduce the scheme later this year. critics have condemned the scheme, saying that it normalises drug taking we would like to see drug safety
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testing facilities at concerts were people can take any drug to a facility to see what it is and how strong that substance is so they can make an informed decision over whether they should take that to minimise harm. we will debate that shortly. the vast majority of children under the age of three haven't visited an nhs dentist in england in the last year. dental surgeons have expressed concern that many parents don't know when young children should have their first check—up. nick quraishi reports. medical advice recommends a child should start dental checkups when they developed their first tooth. but this analysis of all nhs trusts in england has found a worrying lack of take—up. in the year to march, just 20% of one to two—year—old saw
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a dentist, 80% didn't. 60% aged one to four missed out on a dental checkup in that period. the faculty blames a widespread misunderstanding about when children should have their first checkup, which according to guidelines is around six months. we are getting mixed messages and misunderstandings from the public and parents as well as indeed with some health care professionals. and i think really what we are trying to do here is bring this out into the open so that we can have a coherent plan, and to make it absolutely clear that every child should be having a dental check by the age of one. in the year to 2016, well over 9000 children in england aged one to four had teeth extracted in hospitals, often under general anaesthetic. most of this is down to tooth decay, which the faculty insist is 90% preventable. it says
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ina insist is 90% preventable. it says in a system where dental checkups are free for all under 18 is, there is no excuse for the findings. the airline flybe has announced they made a loss of over £6 million last year. steph's here with more. good morning. we were expecting it, it is fairto good morning. we were expecting it, it is fair to say, they put out a profit warning in march saying that they have had a tough time, and a lot of it is to do with the it system they have been upgrading, so they have had to write down something like £4.8 million because of that, so that has cost them a lot of that, so that has cost them a lot of money, and that is a big chunk of this £6.7 million loss they have reported today. also they have been overambitious in terms of increasing capacity, so they are europe's independent regional airline, the biggest number of domestic flights in the uk, and they have been hit ha rd by in the uk, and they have been hit hard by the fact that they have been increasing their capacity at a time when customer demand has been
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falling, so that has pushed up their costs. what they are saying now is they will look to reduce their fleet and concentrate on those lines which are the profitable ones. so their main hubs being manchester, birmingham, southampton, belfast, and they want concentrate on getting the right times of flights and delivery capacity rather than increasing the number of flights they have overall. what is interesting about all of this is they talk about it quite clearly, and given what happened with british airways, it is not surprising they are wanting to say that they want their it systems to be resilient, more money going into that, so we can expect future results to take that into account. thank you very much. same—sex couples in the uk could be allowed to get married in anglican churches for the first time. today, the scottish episcopal church will vote on whether to change its definition of marriage. a positive vote would mean that same—sex couples from all over the uk can marry in anglican churches in scotland. 0ur correspondent
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michael buchanan reports. at the centre of what we celebrate here today is the love between these two men. a gay marriage in an anglican church. this one was in the united states. but later today, this scene could become legal in scotland. the episcopal church, the anglican church in scotland, will vote this afternoon on whether to allow gay weddings. this man is strongly in favour. so many people now know gay couples who want to be married in church and stand up in front of their friends and in front of god and declare their love for one another. gay marriage has split anglicans. the churches in england and wales do not allow it. but if the vote in edinburgh is passed today, it would allow those in the uk to be married in scotland, to the fury of anglican traditionalists. it is the authority of the bible who runs the church. the bible is the supreme authority run byjesus christ.
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when something like this happens, it is not about the sex element, it is about the authority of the bible that matters. this is one of the defining divisions among anglicans. supporters say acceptance is inevitable over time. today's vote could bring that future a step closer. michael buchanan, bbc news, edinburgh. the wreckage of a military plane that went missing with around 120 people on board has been found in the sea off southern myanmar. the aircraft was travelling to yan—gon when it lost contact yesterday afternoon. it was carrying 122 soldiers, family members and crew. the burmese army says it has now recovered ten bodies from the andaman sea. it is 13 minutes past eight. sally
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will bring us up to date on the sport soon. but we are going to talk about a bit of botany. matt's out at a nature reserve today surrounded by beautiful wild flowers to brighten up your morning. jon, even we know that one. it is a daisy, right? well done, it is one of five, and poppies here in the heart of kent. this is run and managed by an organisation which is trying to promote our connection with the nation's wildflowers, and today they are launching the great britain wildflower hunt, and you can get involved by going to the website, downloading fact sheets and searching your own wildflowers. you can choose whether to go to the countryside or town, and get to know a little bit more about our wild flowers across the country, which
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are starting to become less and less known by the younger generation. many words such as poppy, cowslip, co rnflowe r, cornflower, a re cornflower, are starting to disappearfrom cornflower, are starting to disappear from the dictionary. but let's talk about the forecast. it is a rainy morning uk wide, but the sunshine in northern scotland. a little chilly through much of the day, brakes and the cloud possible, but rain across the northwest midlands and raining heavily across northern england, particularly the pennines, into southern scotland. northern scotland has the brightest weather of all with blue skies for some of you. northern ireland, rain on and off. a thoroughly wet start for many, particularly around the hills. the overnight rain easing off
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in devon and cornwall, but they will have showers later in the day. some of you do start the day dry, east anglia might get away with a dry day by and large, the same as well with northern scotland. in northern ireland, the rain will be on and off, but fun northern england, western england and wales, the rain will gradually peter added improved, but we will still have showers into the afternoon and some could be heavy and thundery, and temperatures generally in the high teens, sunspots could hit 20 celsius with some hazy sunshine across the south—east corner. into tonight, a different sort of night in scotland, more cloud, outbreaks of rain in the north, and it won't be as cold as recent nights. elsewhere, clear skies and a few showers here and there, particularly across the western half of the country, temperatures not falling away too much. a mild start to your friday
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morning, scotland has a cloudy start, particularly in the north. elsewhere across the country, we will see some sunshine at times, showers mainly across western areas in the morning, the east in the afternoon, where they could become heavy and thundery. temperatures much like today's values. we do finish today with the cloud increasing in the west. takes us into the start of the weekend, saturday looking rather wet, particularly along the hills. the further south and east you are, you may see some morning rain, but there isa may see some morning rain, but there is a chance you could see afternoon sunshine, and it will feel quite humid, but elsewhere, temperatures as they have been in the last couple of days. we will be finding out more about these wildflowers in the next half an hour, but now back to the studio. there is an idea proving controversial for some this morning. it is one that says music festivals
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should provide testing facilities to help reduce drug—related deaths this summer. help reduce drug—related deaths this summer. it is being backed by the royal society for public health. 0ne scheme that analyses the purity of illegal substances is already being trialled at two festivals, but critics and some of you are asking if it normalises, makes it acceptable, drug—taking? we'rejoined now by fiona measham, the co—founder of the drug—testing charity, the loop, and from barrow in furness, debbie pay, whose son christian died after taking a lethal mix of drugs at a festival in 2015. thank you very much forjoining us, debbie. it is good to have you with us. could you tell us and our viewers what happened to your son, christian? hello, good morning. yes, he went to kendall calling, as eve ryo ne he went to kendall calling, as everyone knows, and basically they all decided, a group of them decided to try out what they thought was es.
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mdma, and what they bought was not mdma, and what they bought was not mdma, it was a lethal mix. he took it, and he ended up falling very, very ill. he did, yes, yes. his friend noticed he was having breathing difficulties and called for help, yes. and what we are saying today and what we are discussing today is about how it has been suggested that some festivals could test drugs before they are being taken. do you think this would have been something that christian and his friends would have considered doing?” and his friends would have considered doing? i do, yes, yes. no pa rent considered doing? i do, yes, yes. no parent in the world will ever think that there child will take drugs, that there child will take drugs, that if they do, they would like to think that they would be sensible enough to have them tested first, yes, definitely. we will come back to you in a moment, debbie. let's
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speak to professor fiona measham from durham university. how would this work, in a practical sense, you are ata this work, in a practical sense, you are at a festival, and, what come you take your drugs to a counter, and they are looked at under a microscope? yes, basically, people bring a small sample of a substance of concern, a pill or a small amount of concern, a pill or a small amount of powder, they put it in a plastic bag, posted into an amnesty bin, they get a unique identity number, comeback of an hour later and in the course about half an hour we have conducted a barrage of four different types of analytical processes, and then we give them the result is part of a brief intervention package by a trained substance misuse practitioner. and you say either this is ok to take or not ok? we never say that drugs are 0k to take. my charity, the loop, we don't endorse drug use, this is a pragmatic harm reduction in response to the reality that some people will ta ke to the reality that some people will take drugs. we are examining the
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purity of tells, and we have increasing drug—related deaths in the uk so that is the main concern. unfortunately, 57 people died from ecstasy in 2015 so it is about identifying it. you might not be saying explicitly, but if you hand back a pale and say we can't find any contaminant in it, we're not making any judgment, aren't any contaminant in it, we're not making anyjudgment, aren't you implicitly saying this is ok to take and you are encouraging people to break the law, that is what your critics would say? we don't hand back any substances, we just get one small boats to test, and we are saying that the probability of what is in that particular substance, can't generalise about other drug circulating on site. to give you an example of what we have identified la st example of what we have identified last year in our pilots, we identified boruc acid, a pesticide, being mis—sold as cocaine, and concrete that had been made into ecstasy tablets, 100% concrete. also people ground up malaria tablets and we re people ground up malaria tablets and were selling them as cocaine. they
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are the sort of contaminants we can find on site. but if a drug has no contaminants, that doesn't make it safe, does it? absolutely not, high purity can be as much of a risk as low purity in relation to drugs. pa rt of low purity in relation to drugs. part of this is about informing people of the dangers of all drugs. and giving them various harm reduction advice information that relates to the specific substance they have had tested. debbie, you said perhaps this might have helped christian and his friends, when it came to the drugs that they took, which led to christian's death. the problem is, though, there is more education needed, more thanjust knowing that there aren't contaminants in the drug. surely, and what many people will be saying to us is surely children should be encouraged to just to us is surely children should be encouraged tojust a to us is surely children should be encouraged to just a way? absolutely. i do agree with you, definitely, definitely, but at the end of the day, all parents are out there to educate their children on drugs, on how lethal they are, how
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the mixes can be lethal, how they can kill them, how they can become addicted. but at the end of the day, teenagers and young adults will be drug and during the curious, they are going to do it. and if they are going to do it, do it safely, that is the way it is. debbie, thank you very much for talking to us this morning. and professor fiona measham, thank you. lots of you getting in touch, alan asking if it was aiding and abetting, you would say it is different from that. gle nys say it is different from that. glenys is saying we shouldn't condone drug—taking but this might bea condone drug—taking but this might be a practical alternative. the time is 23 minutes past eight. so, election day — and exercising your democratic right is a simple enough exercise for many, but some people find voting independently, and in secret, difficult because of their disability. the royal national institute of blind people says that many people with sight loss still rely on others in order to cast their vote. as breakfast‘s tim muffett reports, there are some who say online voting in uk elections is long overdue.
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casting a vote in secret. a fundamental democratic right. but in our mocked—up polling station, asha is showing me problems the royal national institute of blind people says many face. the numbers are in braille. there is a tactile template with the candidates' name. tactile voting templates we introduced in 2001. by law, uk polling stations now have to provide them. but asha and others say that sometimes they do not work. that is now lined up. yes, unfortunately the template used by polling stations is not fit for purpose. we still rely on somebody to read out the names of the candidates and then you still have to trust them that they are telling you honestly where the boxes are. so you are reliant on somebody else guiding you through the process? yes, and to check you have put the mark in the right place. for some, problems can
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occur before polling day. ismael has a learning disability, and thinks registering to vote is too complicated. i feel it is difficult when voting, i have to bring my form in and get my colleagues at work to help me fill out the form, because the form is not accessible and it has a lot ofjargon terms and lots of boxes to tick. in westminster, the rights of disabled voters are being discussed at a pre—election meeting. polling stations should be accessible to all. some say that is not always the case. if somebody has not made the necessary provision in advance, you are turning up and you are not getting in. you are guessing, sometimes, as to who you are voting for. what impact does it have if you are unable to cast your vote? i feel like i'm not part of society. the electoral commission oversees uk elections. not all polling stations will be
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able to be situated in ideal premises, but what we want to make sure is that local authorities can make the necessary adjustments, so that they can be accessed by all. many say that the blind voting templates are not fit for purpose, that they do not work properly. what do you say to that? big improvements have been made to make sure they provide the right tactile template so that they do fit the ballot paper, and how they will be used in practice so that the polling station staff are familiar with them. the commission wants any problems to be reported. we'd urge anybody who finds themselves in that position to contact the local authority immediately, so it can be put right. but the way that votes are cast is set in law, something that areeq choudary wants changed. webroots democracy is campaigning for online voting. asha has come to meet him. first—time voters born in 1991 have known nothing other than a world of facebook, smartphones, social media. with online voting, you wouldn't need assistance,
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you can use your own equipment in your own home. doesn't online voting leave us open to potential hacking, potential security risks? people tend to look at online voting as though you should have 100% security, but that doesn't exist anywhere, online or off—line. we do need online voting to make the democratic process more accessible and inclusive. a radical rethink of the way we vote. some believe it is long overdue. tim muffett, bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. the weather this week is
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being driven by areas of low pressure, and there is not one but two on the chart behind me. this is what we are seeing today, a spell of rain pushing its way across the country. it has been bringing heavy rain overnight across england and wales, now coming across north—west england into northern ireland, with fairly sharp showers following along behind, but some of us could stay largely drive. if you catch a shower, it will be on the sharp side, but will blow through quickly on the wind. there could well be some showers here and there across wales through the afternoon, fairly frequent across northern ireland which could see some local flooding. temperatures not reaching the far north until the end of the day. our rain across scotland still with us overnight, but it pulls away from everywhere else. there will be a few
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showers behind, but a lot of dry weather, showers getting a little more frequent across western areas by the end of the night, but it will bea mild by the end of the night, but it will be a mild night. for tomorrow, still some showers around, still the rain to clear, easing through the morning. if you can dodge the showers, there will be a lot of dry weather with some sunshine, and certainly the showers easing off through the afternoon. here is saturday's low, but don't write off the weekend just yet. there will be rainfora time the weekend just yet. there will be rain for a time on saturday, particularly across western areas of the uk, but not so much rain the further south and east you go. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. turning up the heat — qatar's credit rating is cut as the diplomatic crisis deepens. live from london, that's our top story on thursday the 8th ofjune. who will blink first in this
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dispute, and how damaging could it be for fatah—— dispute, and how damaging could it be for fatah-- qatar's economy and the region? also in the programme: countdown to comey. the former fbi director will offer testimony about trump and russia, but could it damage
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