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tv   Election 2017  BBC News  June 9, 2017 7:00am-10:00am BST

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the news and here is louise minchin. hello, good morning. theresa may's decision to calla snap election has backfired decision to call a snap election has backfired as the uk wakes up to a hung parliament. the conservatives have lost the ridge or debugger remained the biggest party, labour has done better than expected and jeremy corbyn has called for theresa may to resign. the prime minister says the country needs stability. the night saw alex salmond and nick clegg lose their seats, our political correspondent tom baker and's report contains flash photography. she called this election early. a political gamble — the hope that she would transform the tories‘ fragile advantage in parliament with a huge win. but the smiles of the campaign trail have vanished. forecasts suggest the conservatives may end up even worse off, without even a majority. if, as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats, and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on us to ensure we have that period of stability,
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and that is what we will do. and you can see what the labour leader makes of these results so far. a man whose campaign confounded many expectations. beaming smiles, with labour on course for a far better night than many thought. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well, the mandate she's got is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support, and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go, actually. in battersea, labour have ousted a government minister on a swing of 10%. there have been labour gains elsewhere. taking peter borough, and at the kent in hastings...
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the home secretary amber rudd only just scraped home. it's notjust the tories suffering. in sheffield, the lib dem's former leader nick clegg has lost his seat. i, of course, have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight, and i suspect many people will encounter after tonight, which is in politics you live by the sword and you die by the sword. the night began with a projection — the exit poll. we forecast the conservatives as the largest party, but short of an overall majority. labour would be up 30 seats. the snp have lost big names on a disappointing night, compared with their scottish landslide two years ago. their deputy leader angus robertson was ousted by the conservatives and their former leader alex salmond
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lost his seat too. now one of theresa may's own mps is laying the blame on her. i think she's in a very difficult place. she's a remarkable and a very talented woman, and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions, but she now has to consider her position. the festival of democracy has been on full show, as have the upsets. theresa may arrived at party hq knowing there are those who say that should bring the end of the road for her premiership. she has ended up wea k her premiership. she has ended up weak and with fewer mps and calls for her to go. tom bateman, bbc news. in northern ireland both the sdlp and the ulster unionist party lost their seats. it was a successful night for the largest parties. the democratic unionist party won ten seats and sinn fein won seven seats but will continue to abstain from sitting in parliament. the result could see the dup play a key role in any potential
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coalition negotiations with the conservative party. in wales, the labour party had a strong night taking back a number of seats from the conservatives. the results represent a blow to the tory party who had hoped to make gains in pro—brexit areas. plaid cymru won four seats and the liberal democrats lost their only welsh mp. meanwhile ukip have failed to win any seats in parliament. their share of the vote collapsed across britain and their leader paul nuttall came third in boston and skegness. the green party remain unchanged with one seat. the party co—leader caroline lucas, who held brighton pavilion, said the greens will never support a tory government. the greens are forecast to win 2% of the vote. as the financial markets across europe open this morning, traders are bracing themselves for a volatile day. overnight sterling suffered one of its biggest falls since january,
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sinking at one point to a low of almost 2% against the dollar and the euro after the initial exit poll. let's take a look at this morning's weather with matt taylor. a brighter day across the uk with more sunshine but there will be showers so do not leave all without your umbrella. showers working eastwards into central and eastern england for the late morning and afternoon, some could be thundery. golden turning brighter into the afternoon although stay employed ian the north and east. tonight, rain from the west spreading across the country and into saturday a wet start of the weekend across many western areas. time now to cross over to huw edwards. good morning from the bbc election
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centre. that has been a long and very eventful night. it is going to bea very eventful night. it is going to be a long and very eventful day because nothing has timed out how people expected, even until that very late hour of 955 pm last night. let me show you the state of play. the screen on the houses of parliament tells us that theresa may has lost the majority that she went into the selection with. we are looking at a hung parliament. 326 as the finishing line, the magic number you need to be in a majority in the house of commons, but the
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conservatives will not be there. it is likely that if they combine with the unionist in northern ireland they can get past the finishing line, but we are nowhere near that yet. we have a few results still to come. i am going to introduce my guests. there is quite a lot for us to talk about today. lord or donald the former cabinet secretary is with us. the former cabinet secretary is with us. you will be able to shed some light on the kind of turn while going on in number 10 thinking about the kind of permutations ahead. my colleague from bbc westminster will be giving other analysis upbringing is up—to—date. andrew marr is with us as is up—to—date. andrew marr is with us as well. we are going to richmond park first. the returning officer for richmond park to clout that the numberof for richmond park to clout that the number of votes is as follows...
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goldsmith, conservative, 28,000 588. anthony edmund, 426. sarah jane conservative, 28,000 588. anthony edmund, 426. sarahjane all me, liberal democrats... the total number of ballot papers
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rejected was 131. because vaults we re rejected was 131. because vaults were governed for more than one candidate, 19. because of being unmarked, 112. turnout was 79.3%. i declare that zach goldsmith is duly elected as member of parliament for the richmond park constituency. majority of just 45 the richmond park constituency. majority ofjust 45 on a very high turnout of 79% in richmond park. sarah 0lney pipped at the post. thank you. i want to thank the
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returning officer for organising what was a very difficult process and all the counters, many of whom are still here today. they will be delighted to know that is the end of accounting for the team being. also the police locally and nationally for ensuring that the election has been safe and effective and smooth, we are very grateful. if i talk about my team i want to pay tribute to my fellow candidates, particularly sarah 0lney, my predecessor, and fellow candidate peter who is not here today but it has been a pleasure meeting him and kate and i wish them the best. i cannot not find my own campaign team, the border have given up five weeks night and day simply from the
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goodness of their heart, working their fingers goodness of their heart, working theirfingers to the goodness of their heart, working their fingers to the bone to deliver this result. this is their result and the fact that is such a narrow margin insurers... means effectively this... iam margin insurers... means effectively this... i am so grateful to all of you. more than anything i am grateful to my constituents for having put their trust me again. i will never let them down. we have the most special community in the world than representing the community is an unimaginable incalculable or something i am so excited about doing over the next five years and we have challenges but opportunities and i look forward to with all of you to make sure we ta ke to with all of you to make sure we take advantage of those opportunities. zach goldsmith returned of the conservative mp for richmond park and sarah 0lney, the loser, a few words from her. four to
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five vaults were in it. she won the by—election a few months ago. we have the conservatives on a forecast of 318, eight short of what is needed. theresa may has lost the majority that she went into this election with against lots of the expectations so the day will be focusing on what kind of government we are looking at and whether theresa may will be heading that government. your thoughts? the second most important question is whether theresa may stays as prime minister. she has been meeting cabinet colleagues this morning at the advisers she has the duty to stay to hold the government together at least for the time being. you cannot go into a tory party
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leadership contest right before you start the brexit negotiation, which leads me to the single most important question which is what happens to the brexit talks? without in effect a prime minister with authority to deliver the kind of compromises, that is what she wanted, a bigger majority, she has to govern with almost certainly the dup from northern ireland, and arlene foster takes a very different view of things like immigration control, the single market, hard borders, and senior members of the conservative government do not believe it will be possible to deliver the kind of brexit deal they had been planning to do in these new circumstances because they have a caller should but that caller should contains remain as and the dup taking a different view and
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hard—core brexit on the other side. out of that deliver a clear negotiating position? we will probably go through a period of slow moving negotiation and possibly no deal and certainly not either be ha rd deal and certainly not either be hard or soft brexit that we are thinking people —— that people think could emerge out of this. your successoi’, could emerge out of this. your successor, the cabinet secretary, looking at the results, there is enormous uncertainty around it. what is going on? i am pleased because from the lessons of 2010 at the coalition we have always prepared for all possible outcomes so they will have gone through this one and the numbers we have got are particularly difficult, it is clear what it looks like, minority government, a situation where might
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the prime minister has to stay as prime ministerfor now. prime minister for now. short term it is very important we have a prime minister. those negotiations on brexit will be nonexistent. the reason we have to think about this is, think of it from the other point of view. it takes two sides to negotiate. the eu are going to ask who they are negotiating with. is this prime minister going to be around? this prime minister going to be around ? what this prime minister going to be around? what is their position? i do not think there is a position. what the eu is very good that is lots of process and no substance for quite some time. there will be viewers thinking article 50 has been triggered and there is a strict timetable. there is a limit to how much you can delay or fight. exactly, so while there will be nothing happening for a while, we eventually get to the point where
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that two year deadline, which can only be extended if the 27 unanimously agreed to extend it, sta rts unanimously agreed to extend it, starts to bite, and that is a very asymmetric process. that is really good for the 27 because they will fit allows with, if there is no deal, you are out, that is bad for hours, so this is not good news for brexit. one of the ironies about the election campaign as it was supposed to be the brexit election. she wanted to have the bigger mandate for those negotiations but until the la st for those negotiations but until the last few days we had very little about brexit and very little about the shape of the brexit negotiation that theresa may wanted to take the country towards. yes, coming out of the single market, perhaps coming out of the customs union. the 27 would not know exactly what was on the table and theresa may will have
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to rethink on all sorts of levels. if she stays, which she will have to certainly for the short term, what is she going to do within her team? there will be those who say you need to listen to us more carefully, maybe philip hammond, who died were rumours she was going to be shovel out of the cabinet, —— there were rumours. that is unlikely to happen i'iow. rumours. that is unlikely to happen now. there is going to be a big impression on me negotiation. the most important single cabinet minister is david davis. jeremy corbyn has just emerged. this is in north london where healers and his constituency in islington. good morning, everybody, thank you. he is
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weaving and looking it is fair to say pleased. lots of labour people acting as if they have won the election but they have lost. jeremy corbyn undercook the triumphalist bit and people like that, he comes across humble, surprised. that is pa rt across humble, surprised. that is part of the demeanour that has played so well in this election campaign. the most important minister at the moment is david davis because he has the brexit minister is the one who understands exactly how far the preparations have got, where the crunch on difficult issues are. from now on it is going to be a really difficult ca rd is going to be a really difficult card business of party management in the house of commons while trying to run these negotiations. in means that every time the eu comes to british sides and says we can bring you this for that we have to ask if
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the conservative party will wear it. i have been covering elections since 1983 and if there was one predictable goal headline it is conservative party at war over europe. it has been the case all the way through and it is still the case. i will come to the seats we need to focus on. but on the logistics of this morning, theresa may, if she agrees to stay on as prime minister, you seem to be suggesting that will be will the world within government, to have a prime minister in charge, will there bea prime minister in charge, will there be a visit to the palace? will all of the stuff we normally see happen? it is not certain one way or the other but it would be... if i were cabinet secretary i would be advising the prime minister to go to the palace and explain to the queen the palace and explain to the queen the situation and explain how she was going to manage at least the next few days and the run—up to the queen's speech and whether she was going to try to go to the hows and
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the key in our political system is who has the confidence of the house of commons and who can get the queen's speech through. i think she would be very well advised to go to the palace and explain tactics. on the palace and explain tactics. on the planning, if they are looking up some kind of agreement, not evil or more collagen, but some kind of agreement work with the ulster unionists would be senior civil servants be part of trying to fit out some sort of informal deal or not? that is up to... when we did the coalition we facilitated conservatives than lib dems coming together but in the end they decided together but in the end they decided to have those meetings with the civil servants there. would you not expect somebody inside downing street will be with the dup manifesto going through it?|j
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street will be with the dup manifesto going through it? i am fairly certain it will already have done that because you know dup is crucial. we have been there before. the text for the coalitions was the cabinet manual and people will be going back and watching the house because this has meant 70s. they will be dusting it down. the story of the night is the conservatives underperformed rather dramatically but labour made some rather dramatic gains. seeing those pictures ofjeremy corbyn a few moments ago i was reminded of one of the things we learned from the us presidential election which is sometimes you have to follow the noise. all of the noise on that campaign was with donald trump. i am not making comparisons other than to see when you look at how the campaigns were working the noise, the buyers, was definitely with jeremy working the noise, the buyers, was definitely withjeremy corbyn and if you have woken up and wondering what
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has gone on i can show you. some of that noise has translated into real and extraordinary seat gains. the first is canterbury. it has been conservatives since world war i. julian brazier has been the setting mp since 1987. they had a majority of nearly 10,000. labour has gained this from conservatives on a majority of 187, an extraordinary thing for them to take. 104 on their target list. this should ring bells from 1997, michael portillo losing his seat. i am not trying any comparisons between 1997 and now or between tony blair and jeremy corbyn except to say that enfield south is back on the radar again. it was safe conservative and goes labour often
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in landslide votes. it had the conservative majority and is goal david burrows is being replaced. stroud, just pipped to the post. but thirsty, an area of london that is gentrifying with posh housing coming through. it should have been an easy tory poll but labour has outperformed itself. labour gains that see, this key marginal from the conservatives. people remember it as the place where david cameron launched his manifesto when it looked to be more marginal than this time. hamilton west has been taken. starting to see some interesting swings, 9% towards labour. gordon brown's old seat, and other again
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from the snp. nearly 10%. glasgow north east, snp gain from laboured in 2015, the biggest swing of the election, 39%, labour has overturned that this time round. 13% swing back to labour, an astonishing night in england and scotland with these sorts of seats changing hands. a big story in scotland and we will be picking that up in the next few minutes. andrew neil is on the green. it isa green. it is a glorious day in the heart of westminster, the son has been shining. we are cross the road from the palace of westminster. i have john redwood, veteran backbencher of the tory party, philip lee, minister
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in the ministry ofjustice. what went wrong? people looked at what jeremy corbyn was the end and said we would like more spent on public services and students love the idea of not having to pay student fees although it was not clear how the country was going to afford that. we got this interesting answer, the country said they wanted a conservative government. they did not. we will have a bare majority in the house of commons. the british people did not afford mike for a conservative government. at the edges people would like more spent on public services. pretty disastrous decision to have a working majority, call mike goal an election and lose that majority. working majority, call mike goal an election and lose that majoritylj was very supportive of theresa may calling the election. she had a
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mandate to do the brexit deal. she did not get it. she has not got it. nobody has won this election. it is clear we have the number of seats to form a government and we will form their specs government probably in combination with the dup i am guessing what we should not continue as we have been doing. the idea we should not change our approach for the back of this approach is ludicrous. what would you change? there is a very tight team. a deeply broader base. it is difficult to interpret the result but i was in a seat which the conservative vote in 2015 voted remain and the response i was getting on the doorstep from very large numbers of unhappy conservatives remain voters and in addition lots of young people in
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groups turning up at polling stations and the labour vote has almost doubled. i cannot honestly say we should continue along the same have but i can say that theresa may should remain prime minister. for how long? i am not going to put a time on it. there is a difference between the number of seats the conservative party have won as opposed to the labour party. she is below the water line. no. you lose your majority. by what standard cannot be a wise decision? this has not been a good result for us. you do not call an collection to get this result. why did you get this outcome? there is an aspect of the youth vote because i saw it on the ground. in part i suspect that is to do with the tuition fees policy of the labour party. you only have to
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look at the result in battersea, reading east, which voted strongly to remain, if you want to look at the result that indicates what went wrong, look at rob wilson's result. theresa may said she needed a mandate for the brexit negotiations and she has not got one where does that leave? i do not accept that because i do not think this is about remain and leaves, it is about attitudes to public services. if it was about having a different approach to brexit they would have voted lib dem in droves. people went out and voted massively either for conservatives or labour and were both running on the same proposition that you accept the referendum and
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you leave the symbol market but you wa nt you leave the symbol market but you want the best possible free—trade access. because of the combined conservative than labour vote there isa conservative than labour vote there is a strong national mandate to get on with delivering what the public voted for iran to have the best possible... let us not rewrite history. let us remind ourselves with election was called because theresa may wanted a brexit mandate is going to the negotiations because of that she lost her majority. where is the mandate? i am explaining that she wanted to get an overall majority. i would have liked to get a bigger overall majority but the brexit mandate lies in the fact that the main party that went around the country asking for a second vote we re country asking for a second vote were defeated and people voted for the two parties who is said to accept the brexit verdict and do the
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best possible deal and remember we are not leaving europe, we arejust leaving the eu. in scotland they very clearly rejected a second referendum on independence. you did better in scotland than in england, thatis better in scotland than in england, that is a sign of how badly the campaign went. this is the disastrous personal result for theresa may. she began this campaign very popular. the moment people got to know her and see hard they did not read her anymore. hard job must be on the line. no. it has been a tough campaign. the result is not what we would have wanted but she secured 42% of the vote. it is 2001 since we got a party that secured that level. the country has decided that level. the country has decided that theresa may should be prime minister and notjeremy corbyn. the country has not decided, the
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country is not sure. i think you could conclude that one side got more votes than the other there the prime minister should stay put. i don't share the analysis thatjohn has regards to brexit. i don't think this issue is whether we brexit or not, that referendum has taken place andi not, that referendum has taken place and i don't want to have that debate again, it's about the type of exit, that clarity is not there, the position —— the labour party on brexit is different to ours, everybody is different. to sit here and claim that i know what the british people want from the brexit is paton nonsense so i'm not going to assert that but do i think the result indicates that theresa may remains prime minister? most certainly i do but i do recognise that in view of this result we can't just maintain the same approach,
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something must change otherwise what was the result all about? she will only remain prime minister if she can put together some sort of coalition, if she can do some sort of deal with the dup and hope that sinn fein won't... a coalition of chaos under the conservatives?m sounds like she will have enough votes to govern without having any formal gaulish and with anyone. she will have to have arrangements in place. why? 0therwise she will be a minority government. it wasn't soundly she will be a minority government, are in mind the sinn fein mps never come to parliament, she will properly remain as prime minister, she has considerably more seats than the labour party. we will have to leave it there, it's going to bea have to leave it there, it's going to be a busy day, the conservative party trying to come to grips with the result they never expected. let's go back to queue edwards at
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the election centre. andrew, thank you and thank you to your guests. while andrew was talking to his guests, the latest word from downing street, jo coburn, what is it... we have heard from laura kuenssberg says the prime minister has no intention of resigning, working on forming a government... we can probably show you that tweet and it is official in that sense, we can explore what is underneath that statement but that is from downing street. but is the latest. we will discuss that with andy and gus injust latest. we will discuss that with andy and gus in just a latest. we will discuss that with andy and gus injust a moment. let's have a quick update of the news. good morning. theresa may's decision to call a snap election has back fired as the uk wakes up to a hung parliament. some pollsters had predicted at the
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start of the campaign that mrs may would win a landslide. the conservatives have lost their majority. they will head back to westminster as the largest party but with 12 fewer mps than before the election. speaking as she was re—elected to her seat in maidenhead, the prime minister said the country needed stability. as we look ahead and we wait to see what the final results will be i know that as i say, the country needs a period of stability and whatever the results are, the conservative party will ensure that we fulfil our duty in ensuring that stability so that we can all, as one country, go forward together. labour have done better than expected gaining around 30 seats. the party now have 261 seats overall. in islington north the leader jeremy corbyn held his seat with more than forty—thousand votes. after his result was called, he said theresa may should resign. if there is a message from my‘s
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results it is this... the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well the mandate she has got us lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go, actually and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country. one major political figure to lose his seat was nick clegg. the former liberal democrat leader and deputy prime minister lost his sheffield hallam seat to labour. elsewhere the lib dems made gains, former minsters vince cable and jo swinson have both taken back the seats they lost in 2015. the party's leader, tim farron held onto his seat of westmorland and lonsdale. the scottish national party has endured a series of shock defeats, including the loss of its former first minister alex salmond and deputy leader, angus robertson. they both lost their seats
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amid a scottish conservative surge. the party's best performance in scotland since 1983. first minister, nicola sturgeon, said that the losses were a blow to her and the snp indicating she had some reflecting to do on key issues including independence. in northern ireland both the sdlp and the ulster unionist party lost their seats. it was a successful night for the largest parties. the democratic unionist party won 10 seats and sinn fein won seven seats but will continue to abstain from sitting in parliament. the result could see the dup play a key role in any potential coalition negotiations with the conservative party. in wales, the labour party had a strong night taking back a number of seats from the conservatives. the results represent a blow to the tory party who had hoped to make gains in pro—brexit areas. plaid cymru won four seats
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and the liberal democrats lost their only welsh mp. meanwhile ukip have failed to win any seats in parliament. their share of the vote collapsed across britain and their leader paul nuttall came third in boston and skegness. traders in the city of london are bracing themselves for a volatile day, the pound facing one of its biggest falls, down almost 2% against the dollar. the stock market is due to open at 8am this morning, jurors expected to rise and the eu budget commissioner said a hung parliament could delay brexit talks which are scheduled to start in just ten days' time. we note in this two is back in downing street. theresa may is now back in downing street. the prime minister travelled
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from her berkshire constituency to conservative central office in the early hours. she's said to have met with advisors for an hour there before returning to number 10 through a rear entrance. in the last few months —— minutes, the bbc‘s political editor told us that downing street has said the prime minister has no intention of resigning. time now to hand back to huw edwards, for more reaction and analysis. good morning once again. it's coming up good morning once again. it's coming up to 7:40am, let me tell you what we are intending to do in the next 20 minutes, we will have the latest from downing street, we will be talking about the future of theresa may, joining me in the studio gus 0'donnell the former cabinet secretary, jo coburn is with me and the bbc‘s and marr. we will be picking up on those trends that we need to focus on, thinking about the
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shape of the government might be and we will be thinking about further theresa may will continue to be at the head of that, we will be talking about the future of the brexit process , about the future of the brexit process, the eu hinting this morning that brexit talks could be delayed. some very big things for us to be considering but let's think about how we got here and the kind of nature of the swing that produced this, to put it mildly, unexpected results. let's join this, to put it mildly, unexpected results. let'sjoinjeremy this, to put it mildly, unexpected results. let's join jeremy vine. come into the elizabeth tyler, through the face of big then and some tinkling of glass and i am here in front of the swingometer. you know how this works, if the parties stay as they were last time the swing is zero and no seats change hands. these are all the seats affected, the red dots are labour seats, the blue conservatives. let's see what the swing was on average across the uk. and the conservatives
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and labour, a swing into conservative territory of about 2%. if it was applied uniformly, in other words, the same swing in every seat, these seats would go read from blue. labour would take those seats but swing is not ever really applied uniformly, let's watch what actually happened and you see labour had performed swing by actually going beyond the hand of the swingometer and taking some of the conservative seats that you might think they had no right to take, actually, right at the top, almost off the swingometer, that. is canterbury with the 10,000 majority, 8% there, that is battersea and portsmouth south, and to those as well. partly the labour vote surging in remain areas, young people voting for the first time coming out for labour. the swing actually was not representative of labour's performance in some seats
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they needed to win and they took them off the conservative party by turbo—charging and did well at the rubble is a great offset for the conservative party and it was in scotland. let's look at the swing in scotla nd scotland. let's look at the swing in scotland and see what has happened to the snp in particular. snp seats on the side. 0nly to the snp in particular. snp seats on the side. only one conservative seatin on the side. only one conservative seat in scotland, pretty marginal, any move, swing against the snp sta rts any move, swing against the snp starts to swing those yellow seats blue. what was the swing in scotland? blue. what was the swing in scotland ? it's remarkable, blue. what was the swing in scotland? it's remarkable, let's look, conservative smp swing, against the snp, of nearly 15%, if that was applied uniformly in every seat, all of these seats would go blue from yellow, that doesn't happen but the reasons i explained, the actual result is... let's look, 12 gains not 15, partly because the snp vote was weakened in some seats by the conservatives and labour took
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the seat, the snp hanging on in some seats but 12 seats for the conservatives in scotland plus the one they already had, quite remarkable. let's look at the blocks, they show the story of what happened in scotland, you wouldn't call this a collapse of the snp vote, because there are stuck in the people voting snp but you don't often see a plumber or a precipitous fall of 13% and that is a triumph for ruth davidson, the conservatives scottish leader that offsets to some degree the disaster were mrs may in the rest of the country. she called an election mrs may and it has not gone to plan but in scotland the surprise has been on the conservative side, you can see with the blocks, snp down 13%, conservatives up 14, modest rises for labour and the liberal democrats but those rises have been well targeted and have won them seats. the swingometer tells a story of a little bit of uplift for the conservatives in scotland. jeremy,
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thank you. i said earlier the story in scotland is one that tells a very different story to the one in england and certainly in parts of england, andy, your take on that. ruth davidson, mentioned there, good election for her, had she decided to fight and election for her, had she decided to fightand win election for her, had she decided to fight and win a seat on the westminster parliament this morning she would be crucial, pivotalfigure in the tory negotiations. discussing what is happening next, she has been very poor ten to theresa may, in close touch with number ten of the way through but unlike theresa may has been a big net vote winner in scotland, big, personal triumph has been a big net vote winner in scotland, big, personaltriumph but let's not forget the labour party, eve ryo ne let's not forget the labour party, everyone was writing them off in scotla nd everyone was writing them off in scotland before the selection, gestede, finished, overforever not at all, it has come back in a big way. the snp has lost ten of directions, to the liberal democrats in the highland areas and i think this is all about momentum. makes it much less likely we will see another
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scottish independence referendum any time soon and that is big news for the whole country. your thoughts on the whole country. your thoughts on the position of nicola sturgeon? there will be sniping but i think she remains overwhelmingly the most powerful person inside the snp particularly since alex salmond lost a seat alongside angus robertson and others. people will argue perhaps she should not have emphasised the second independence referendum which people in scotland did not overwhelmingly want but i think she is in overwhelmingly want but i think she isina overwhelmingly want but i think she is in a strong position and will remain leader of the snp and scotland's first minister for some time to come. let's talk about wells, the conservative performance in wales was not as robust as some people predicted and in fact, labour's performance in wales for some “— labour's performance in wales for some —— better than some people predicted. let's go to cardiff, we can talk to carwynjones, first minister. your take on the events of
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the night? we outperformed our own expectations, we were told the tories would make gains in wells, they lost seats, 28 seats, the biggest party and we can say it's welsh labour that speaks for wales and we hope our mandate is respected. when you are in government you have a record to defend and we source gain more seats in wales. to what extent was the performance dependent on the leadership thatjeremy corbyn provided? that was a strong element but of course, jeremy was energetic, went around the uk, addressing meetings and talking to people. here in wales we ran our campaign, i did the leaders debate, the welsh conservatives could not put up the same person for more than one of those debates, we knew we had a mountain to climb in a few weeks ago, we saw the first ball is, we worked hard on that and today we have a result that's better than we
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expected. we also had a manifesto that appealed to people, a welshman ma nifesto that appealed to people, a welshman manifesto particularly, people were attracted to. i think it's fair to say first minister, in the past you've not been let's say enthusiastic about the leadership of jeremy corbyn budget knowledge today he has fought a superb campaign, i think was the word. yes, i think that's very fair. look at the campaign from theresa may, i listened to john campaign from theresa may, i listened tojohn redwood, it's the arrogance, this entitlement to be in government, she started off this campaign, buta government, she started off this campaign, but a campaign around government, she started off this campaign, buta campaign around her, a25 campaign, buta campaign around her, a 25 point lead and ending up with the two point lead. someone builds a campaign around themselves in that campaign around themselves in that campaign falters so badly as we've seen with the conservative campaign, it's difficult to see how they can carry on in the future. first minister, good of you tojoin us. ca rwyn minister, good of you tojoin us. carwyn jones there minister, good of you tojoin us. carwynjones there in cardiff. let's put all of this into context of what
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is coming up, gus 0'donnell still with us. just wondering this morning while we were talking about laura kuenssberg earlier, giving us the latest word from downing street, the prime minister has no intention of resigning, working to form a government based on being the largest party in seats and votes. would we assume too much in thinking that the prime minister's personal instinct would be to walk away from this but there will be enormous pressure as you are suggesting earlierfor her to pressure as you are suggesting earlier for her to stay. i think, given what you've just heard, this was such a personal campaign and use of david cameron did after the brexit referendum. you know, his instinct was just to go within hours and he did it and instinct was just to go within hours and he did itand i think instinct was just to go within hours and he did it and i think part of her instinct would have been the same but it is her duty and i think she's realised this, it is a duty to stay because if she didn't, we would have no prime minister and that would be complete chaos. it's important that she stays, we see through the next period and the
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conservative party needs to sort out where it wants to go. just wondering where it wants to go. just wondering where it wants to go. just wondering where it wants to go, particularly in terms of brexit. if it's true as we are hearing that the european union is suggesting today that the process could be lengthened in some way or adjusted in some way what does that tell us? it tells us from their side, they say, what is your position? who has the power? it is a bit like theresa may would not want to google to speak to francois hollande. similarly in germany, a big election coming up and it looks like angela merkel will win but actually, the really big stuff happens post the german election. i think we can manage a process for we have a lot of talks, we will talk about process and money and some big issues but we won't come to any decisions and that... doesn't mean you have to push the final date back as if you push back the final date
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you get into this final mess of what are we going to do about the european parliament elections which come up in the spring of 2019. i don't think anyone wants to have those. nick clegg has said it's impossible to overestimate the extent to which the uk is seen as a drifting androgynous country by the re st of drifting androgynous country by the rest of the european countries. drifting androgynous country by the rest of the european countrieslj think rest of the european countries.” think that will be the prevailing wind. we may be able to show you a tweet from chris hope from the telegraph who said a short while ago that an official within the eu says the brexit talks could be delayed and that is going to, whether or not thatis and that is going to, whether or not that is true, it's the fact that it has been discussed and they view as my esteemed colleagues here have said, theresa may as a bit of a lame duck and if they think she is a lame duck and if they think she is a lame duck they don't know who to talk to and who to trust. very many people will be asking, is this mean we do not have to brexit after all and we could reverse the entire thing? this election could be seen as the end to
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the moral majority of the referendum but there is no political leader in britain with the kind of commons authority to hit the stop ten on brexit and that for the most unlikely, i would think. we will double through this process but in a more disorganised and possibly more chaotic and less good for us kind of way. in a way that maybe is more open to compromise on some of the noise as we have heard so far from parts of the conservative party. compromise over the single market, the soft order, possibly even over control of immigration if we have anything to do with it and they will and we will see the tory party going towards itself, the hard and soft dregs of tears, going to work day after day, week after week... ruth davidson will come into play. on the dup side, that issue of the border,
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togetherness two are due, she wasn't advocating any sort of hard border but the dup will want to press hard to guarantee that freedom of movement. it will be green in an exciting way or exciting in a grim way. yes, whichever way... another element of surprise, let me bring you up to date with what's going on in the royal borough of kensington and chelsea, they have sent the tellers home because they are too tired, far too close between labour and the conservatives, you might get the result late this afternoon, it might even be tomorrow. andrew, we have to pinch yourself. tonight has been full of extraordinary, unpredicted events but i never heard that, tellers being sent home because they are too tired. quite a few examples over the night of seats for it has been on a knife edge and in places you wouldn't always expect it to be. the most recent one in
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richmond park, zach smith won with 40 or so votes but that has been pleaded across the country, the two parties dominated, labour and the tories, look at their vote we haven't seen butchers like that for years, decades, in terms of the conservatives and that is why you are seeing conservatives and labour in many ways... we have another result in and this is a narrow majority, from sin dies, came in in the past few minutes, the conservatives holding onto sind is, derek thomas for the tories on just over 22,000 votes but look at andrew george from the liberal democrats, majority of 312 on a majority... such a high turnout... and look at the share of the vote, tells you a story, 43% each. to look at the change from last time, we see that the tories are up five, the lib dems
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up the tories are up five, the lib dems up nine. the lib dem is were looking to take back seats in the south—west but the problem for them was running a very anti brexit campaign was difficult in some areas. here is an example for it they didn't when bob they did come quite close. the other thing perhaps we haven't talked about as austerities and how much of this, was that the economy, stupid? of course we are talking about brexit because those negations —— negotiation stored in 11 days but there will be many people out there saying it is about bread and butter issues, public which saying it is about bread and butter issues, public - which is issues, public services which is where jeremy issues, public services which is where jere imagination and many caught the imagination and many people will have ordered along those lines. andrew earlier was underlining the importance of what has happened in scotland in terms of the changes overnight so emily can bring us up to date by underlying —— lining what went on. let me start with the scoreboard, this gives you a sense of what happened overnight, the snp retaining 35 but making net
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losses of 21, the conservatives have gained 12 seats, some of those on gigantic swings, they are on 13, the labour party seven making gains of six, and the lib dem peer mac, their best item scotland, adding on three but this is interesting, the share of the vote. you might have heard in the middle of the night nicola sturgeon, on and said she still felt the snp were the winning party, and that they had done better than all the other parties put together. if you start to add up the scores of the anti independence parties you can see they will be in the majority, they will have a far larger share of the vote and that 37% the snp sets up each tends to suggest there has been some kind of concerted vote against another scottish referendum. let me go into some of those extraordinary gains and losses. this one was a
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conservative gain from the snp and this is where the big beast of the snp alex salmond lost a seat. the conservatives on the majority of 2600 and this is a tremendous swing, 20%. last time round we saw swings but i'd shone any other british election in history, nearly 40%, not quite as big this time but pretty hefty nonetheless. the same sort of thing in bury for we saw angus robertson, the leader of the snp at westminster losing his seat and dumbarton east has been a game for the lib dems, jo swinson mp, the business minister, she has taken us from the snp. edinburgh west, tricky one, michelle thompson, suspended from the snp over allegations of mortgage fraud leaving christine jardine to pick up this seat quite well for the lib dems. coatbridge has been regained, rutherglen...
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before we handbag to you, fife north—east regained by the snp with a slim majority of two votes. a majority of two, jo coburn pointing out that is quite remarkable. but let's look at these images rom central london, this wasjeremy corbyn arriving at labour headquarters a short while ago and the real sense, although they have not won the election, it is there much a personal victory for his campaign. well, it is. as you say, they haven't won, they are many seats short of being the largest party but remember what the expectations were. remember what the predictions for and actually even within the labour party itself there we re within the labour party itself there were many labour mps who became candidates in this election who felt jeremy corbyn with me and his leadership would mean they lose seats and that hasn't happened. actually i think we can show you a
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tweet from my colleague vicki young. labour insiders saying this is a victory for him. he's not going anywhere, any tolkien might be unseated as leader of the labour party has been put aside. —— any talk he might be unseated. he has a vulture 40% he is secure. talk he might be unseated. he has a vulture 4096 he is secure. beat in the amount tony blair got in 2005 winning, it shows you, a reflection of the fact we have moved back to two party politics and with the squeezing of the other parties, it means coalition is off the cards because last time, in 2010, the lib dems were quite big, you could offer them things like secretary of state to the cabinet, deputy prime
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minister but this time it is not there because they are too small, thatis there because they are too small, that is why we are in minority government territory. just picking up government territory. just picking up of what jo coburn government territory. just picking up of whatjo coburn said, reminding us up of whatjo coburn said, reminding usa up of whatjo coburn said, reminding us a sturdy was a big aspect of this, a conservative mp being masticated by andrew neil outside westminster, talking about we have to rethink things but the early indication is, look at the dup manifesto which we are not great experts in, it is against the triple lock, it wants to keep the triple lock, it wants to keep the triple lock on pensions, and is the kind of example of bread and butter politics which may change as the result of this election. we are joined by joss we re this election. we are joined by joss were on, the newly elected mp for dunbartonshire. wasn't bread and butter issues? north of the border the biggest issue on the doorstep was indyref2, there was a lot of anger at the snp trying to force this on the scottish population again less than two years. we had a
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very divisive independence referendum, the wounds of that have not healed, still families and friends who aren't even necessarily talking to each other as the result of some of the difficulties and division that were uncovered during that time. there was an appetite in scotla nd that time. there was an appetite in scotland not to go through that again and in different seats people looked for the best way to make sure they did not have the snp and also there was something about how uncomfortable it was 56 out of 59 seats being held by one party, plurality of views is much more... there was a strong feeling from people but they did not necessarily wa nt to people but they did not necessarily want to have the snp everywhere and obviously in places like east dunbartonshire, the lib dems picking up dunbartonshire, the lib dems picking upa dunbartonshire, the lib dems picking up a seat, edinburgh west and caithness, so close in north east fife, punter lies in the close after several recounts but three strong gains to the lib dems which is
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really good progress for us coming out of this election. look at the westminster picture, nick clegg, the former leader saying there is no way forward in terms of them and that doesn't involve a great love turmoil, what's your thoughts?” think he's right. his voice will be missed in the house of commons as somebody with a huge amount of wisdom and experience particularly as the brexit negotiations get properly under way. but yes, there is no doubt there will be a lot of turmoil, you have a conservative party or theresa may had been to ta ke party or theresa may had been to take your vote for granted and get a landslide, that has blown up on her face, she is now very much in her own party a diminished figure and not necessarily the credibility and authority she had before this election campaign of the disastrous images of her running away from actually debating the issues and so, you're going to have a government that i think us to listen much more
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to parliament that they think that's one thing that is positive to come out of this but there's no doubt it's typical quarter ahead was negotiating brexit is incredibly difficult for the government to do. all different elements to balance under very difficult situation within the house of commons in terms of getting votes passed. joel swinson, the new mp for dunbartonshire east for the lib dems. the snp lost 21 seats overnight, they are on 35 seats. down from that strong performance to mag yea rs down from that strong performance to mag years ago. andrew neill as one of the guests from the snp. sterling is down 2% this morning. markets do not like uncertainty. theresa may trying to put together a new government. we will see how that
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goes. it was a bad night for theresa may and for nicola sturgeon. i have the member of the scottish parliament with me. you lost 21 seats in scotland, a 15% swing against you, why? that is from a base of the historic result of 95% of the seats won. you lost 21 seats. nobody expected us to win 56 seats again. did you expect to lose 21? i am not going to gloss over it. we have lost some very good politicians. in scotland we won the election, 35 seats, a majority. you nor in politics the direction of travel is everything and your direction of travel is down. 21 seats you lost to the conservatives, labour, many of your people said
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scottish labour was finished, you lost to the lib dems, to everybody. that is coming from a very high water mark in 2015. plenty for us to reflect on. the most pressing issues trying to form a government in that place and we have said we will begin conversations with the labour party and other progressives like the greens and like. you do not have the mps to do that. after the gamble david cameron took on brexit, the gamble air has taken, the conservatives should do the decent thing and step aside because they have no mandate for a hard brexit and allow the progressives to form and allow the progressives to form an alliance and the forward with the european union. you would not have an overall majority. it is not clear
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lead but they will have an overall majority. the dup at the conservatives are to short. the demand for the second referendum to bring a dependence on to the agenda again has gone down like a stone with the scottish voters, they do not want it. not every take the labour results. in the west of scotla nd labour results. in the west of scotland there is no doubt that has come about because of thejeremy corbyn search, not because of a decline in support for independence. there can be no doubt it said black independence. you are in retreat. independence is not read the gondola anymore for a year. we are in a third historic term. we havejust won the election in scotland. if thatis won the election in scotland. if that is on the decline so be it but we are still a very powerful...
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losing 21 seats, if that is not the retreat, what is? it is disappointing. it is a terrible result. the most pressing issue is forming a government. nicola sturgeon said that education was her top priority and only 3% of the scottish voters believed her, they thought independence was. is it not time for the snp to get on with running scotland better and forget about a second referendum quote? about a second referendum” running scotland better and forget about a second referendum i work record speaks for itself? the most pressing issue is brexit negotiations starting a matter of days. we have to get a government formed. we will speak to other progressives about that. it is time the prime minister did the decent thing and stepped aside and allowed us thing and stepped aside and allowed us to do that. we shall see.
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we are going to catch up with the news. after the news we will be discussing more about the brexit process coming up and talking about labour'sjohn process coming up and talking about labour's john mcdonnell who process coming up and talking about labour'sjohn mcdonnell who has been seeing that he wants labour to put itself forward to serve the country and form a minority government. we will be discussing whether that is possible at this stage given the make—up of the numbers. good morning. the bbc understands that theresa may has no intention of resigning as prime minister after the general election ends with a hung parliament. the conservatives have lost their majority, but remain the biggest party. labour has done better than expected and jeremy corbyn has called for theresa may to resign. 0ur political correspondent tom bateman's report contains flash photography. she called this election early. a political gamble — the hope that she would transform the tories' fragile advantage
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in parliament with a huge win. but the smiles of the campaign trail have vanished. the conservatives are set to end up even worse off with a hung parliament. if, as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats, and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on us to ensure we have that period of stability, and that is what we will do. and you can see what the labour leader makes of these results so far. a man whose campaign confounded many expectations. beaming smiles, with labour on course for a far better night than many thought. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well, the mandate she's got is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support, and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go, actually. in battersea, labour
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have ousted a government minister on a swing of 10%. there have been labour gains elsewhere. taking peterborough, by more than 12%. the home secretary amber rudd only just scraped home. it's notjust the tories suffering. in sheffield, the lib dem's former leader nick clegg has lost his seat. i, of course, have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight, and i suspect many people will encounter after tonight, which is in politics you live by the sword and you die by the sword. the night began with a projection — the exit poll. we forecast the conservatives as the largest party,
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but short of an overall majority. labour would be up 30 seats. the snp have lost big names on a disappointing night, compared with their scottish landslide two years ago. their deputy leader angus robertson was ousted by the conservatives and their former leader alex salmond lost his seat too. now one of theresa may's own mps is laying the blame on her. i think she's in a very difficult place. she's a remarkable and a very talented woman, and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions, but she now has to consider her position. the festival of democracy has been on full show, as have the upsets. may be in clear second place but jeremy corbyn's allies say they want to form a second government. theresa may has made it known she has no intention of standing down and is
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working on forming a government. she wa nted working on forming a government. she wanted a strong, stable and triumphant return here ahead of brexit talks and inventory. weekend with fewer mps and questions her future. in northern ireland both the sdlp and the ulster unionist party lost their seats. it was a successful night for the largest parties. the democratic unionist party won ten seats and sinn fein won seven seats but will continue to abstain from sitting in parliament. the result could see the dup demand significant concessions in return for propping up a theresa may administration. in wales, the labour party had a strong night taking back a number of seats from the conservatives. the results represent a blow to the tory party who had hoped to make gains in pro—brexit areas. plaid cymru won four seats and the liberal democrats lost their only welsh mp. meanwhile ukip have failed to win any seats in parliament. their share of the vote collapsed across britain and their leader paul nuttall came third
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in boston and skegness. the green party remain unchanged with one seat. the party co—leader caroline lucas, who held brighton pavilion, said the greens will never support a tory government. the greens are forecast to win 2% of the vote. let's take a look at this morning's weather with matt taylor. 0verall sunnier compared to yesterday but not completely dry. the rain will ease and we have some showers in western england and wales. they will push into central and eastern parts of england with the occasional run rumble of thunder. feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. tonight, early showers feeding and rain spreading. rain
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spreading across scotland. saturday rain on and off through the day. turning drier in scotland later. bright breezy in northern ireland. driest in the midlands, east anglia, the south—east, quite warm in the sunshine. sunday, the south east corner stays largely dry with sunny spells but further north than with the scuttling of shoulders, feeling cooler. temperatures mid to high teens. time now to hand back to huw edwards. good morning from the bbc election centre. if you are just catching up, the result of the 2017 general election is that we are looking at a
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hung parliament. these are the figures with just four results to come. the conservatives are the largest party and it has certainly turned out rather differently to what lots of the opinion polls were suggesting and to what people were expecting in terms of the analysis and the commentary beforehand. it has been a night of dramatic and unexpected results. four results still to come, three in cornwall and one in kensington. they are still counting. they decided to take a break counting. they decided to take a brea k after counting. they decided to take a break after a long night. john mcdonnell said that labour want to put themselves forward as the minority government. we will discuss of that is possible. the eu commissioner says that the brexit talks might not know start as planned on the 19th ofjune because they are looking at the kind of uncertainty that theresa may was
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seeing she did not want, which was why she called the election. andrew marr and joel cockburn are with me and professor peter hennessy. we are going to talk about the permutations of these figures but to help us with that lead others talk to jeremy. 0ne that lead others talk to jeremy. one of the things this result will do because it is so tight as it will put a lot of focus on the house of commons. we are in the virtual house of commons. looking at the numbers... we have the parties arranged as we think the final result will be. there are three or four results to come. we know that you have to get 326 mps for an overall majority. i am going to die to build the overall majority bearing in mind no one party can do
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it. -- bearing in mind no one party can do it. —— to try to. the conservatives need to add to that total and get it up need to add to that total and get it up to 326 and the obvious place to go with the dup. they have ten mps. if we put them in... that is pretty simple maths. the politics is not simple maths. the politics is not simple because the dup will want something for being in there and helping the conservatives but it will get through the queen's speech, whether you call it a coalition are working arrangement does not matter. the problem for theresa may is she has not done it on her own. they can get past 326 by enlisting the dup. this is how the benches with luck. not what anyone expected. the conservatives are here with mps and the line that gives you the overall
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majority is there, the dup help them through the line with the extra ten. 0n the opposition benches, the single biggest opposition party, libra, then the snp, much diminished in the house of commons, the lib dems doing a bit better than last time. that is how it would work. these are the benches to focus on. there is a way of the conservatives getting to the hundred and 26 but it is pretty humiliating for the prime minister to even think about this. that is the context. as we look ahead to the start of the biggest challenge any government has faced in this country for decades, the brexit process, the uncertainty is pretty cute. i am going to talk to our europe editorfor a pretty cute. i am going to talk to our europe editor for a sense of what they are thinking looking at the outcome of the election. what they are thinking looking at the outcome of the electionm what they are thinking looking at the outcome of the election. it can be summed up in the words of the french prime minister this morning
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who said we are surprised but brexit is not called into question. should the negotiations start be delayed, it was set for the 19th ofjune, but that is very soon, that was expected by the commission and that is what theresa may wanted at the time, this is thrown into the air, but this is auk is thrown into the air, but this is a uk decision. the generalfeeling in the eu is that they are feeling strong and stable. the 27 member states are united about the brexit process. emmanuel macron and angela merkel is looking strong. they look to the uk and see a political mess. as to whether this leads to a hard brexit or soft brexit brussels says this is a uk decision and say they are ready, they have had almost 12 months to prepare for brexit the good students to begin, they want
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them to begin and they remind the uk that the clock is ticking and the uk only has until march 2019 to finish the brexit process never mind talk ofa the brexit process never mind talk of a future trade relationship. peter hennessy, thoughts? even if the negotiations start a week on monday as planned the timetable is immensely tight to engineer the biggest political shift in our country since we dispose of the british empire, which in many ways is easier to do. getting out of the eu, and doing 46 years, 19,000 statutes and statutory instruments that have to be unscrambled, 560 treaties involving 160 countries, it is going to take longer than two yea rs. is going to take longer than two years. it is going to be very difficult. the question might arise, is article 50 revocable? can you stop it? jaunty has always said you
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could, it could be revoked, because it isa could, it could be revoked, because it is a process, not punishment. this extraordinary election has grown particles into the air including these procedural questions. there is no precedent. there is no equivalent of the cabinet manual for these negotiations so it is quite extraordinary. it must be hell for the negotiators in brussels. they have been ready for the traps to open a week on monday and there's a chance they not be. andy? this is an incredibly complicated negotiation. the brexit department is in better shape and they have been preparing for this but the issue they have is any deals they do depend upon a majority in the house of commons and looks as if that majority might not be available and therefore every time they are trying to do a
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compromise deal, every time they are offered something, they are going to have to think about the balance of power on the tory benches in the house of commons which is a nightmare. that will be the test. if theresa may is dealing as prime minister she is going to be looking over her shoulder one way to those who want to go with a hard brexit but of labour organises itself along with those many remain mps who may be looking for what we recall softer ex—an—mac she is going to have a very difficult time. people see and there is more of a majority for a softer brexit and it is up to the opposition to" organise themselves. arlene foster has given an interview suggesting that theresa may may be ina very suggesting that theresa may may be in a very difficult position. could the dup demand the head of the prime minister is part of the deal? seems extraordinary. yes, but anything is
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possible because we are in uncharted territory. there was a tweet seeing theissue territory. there was a tweet seeing the issue of europe has pretty much made every prime minister for the tories fall over. it is the curse of british politics. in the bigger picture, referenda does not sit well with our normal system of representative democracy and this election has been about bringing it into the orbit of representative democracy and it has produced this extraordinary results. it destabilises us and one of the reasons is that in 1850 when we were first approached the british system cannot cope and it is the great record of political careers. it is an absolute nightmare whether you are men or leave. nigel farage is with andrew neil.
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the former leader of ukip is with me. theresa may called an election to get a mandate for her kind of brexit. she did not get it. are you worried the kind of brexit you want may not be delivered? very. despite there being 318 tory mps, the dup having ten seats and supporting brexit, david davis, who of all the people in the cabinet i would've thought was closest to my position, he said this morning at 2:30am that perhaps leaving the single market and the customs union with have to be reconsidered and what's tory central office have concluded is that campaigning for hard brexit has cost them votes. i think that is wrong. this is about personality. she failed the test. she did not look like a leader injeremy corbyn was having a ball, engaging people,
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getting them to vote back. even david davies is considering putting the single market back on the table and the whole brexit process has seriously been damaged by this election. about half a mile down the road theresa may is attempting to put together a government to cope with the new circumstances, some reports she has been in touch with the dup. to get their support in northern ireland. can she pull it off? maybe she can put together a government but can she pull off the brexit process? she was asked four times do you believe in brexit and four times she could not answer the question. you cannot go to brussels and negotiate something as important as this unless you believe in and your heart. i am told she is going to stay. i think of brexit is going to stay. i think of brexit is going to be a success you have to have somebody who believes the net
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leading the government. you'd think she should go? absolutely. she has weakened the uk's position with these negotiations. if the very idea of brexit is back on the negotiating table again, if you are worried it may not happen or at least not as you would like it, here is your party, ukip, nowhere in this debate, no mps, less than 2% of the walk, out, over, done, toast. ukip yesterday seem to be a relevance of the process given that the tories we re the process given that the tories were fighting on brexit injeremy corbyn said that labour would stop the free movement of people. if we do not get the brexit the people voted for ukip could be more releva nt tha n voted for ukip could be more relevant than ever. you would come back from a very low base. you only got a little bit more of the vote
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than the greens. yes, but do not underestimate the fluidity of the voters. if the brexit voters get betrayed their votes will move. your parties and shoes stepped down as leader has been nothing short of a shambles. that shambles has come to its logical conclusion in how the people voted yesterday. it has not been well run or very professional. equally the tide was going on a different direction in this general election. it needs to be deformed unchanged but if we finish up inside the single market then you get will bea the single market then you get will be a party that is by getting millions of votes. if the country needs you get in your view more than everfor needs you get in your view more than ever for the reasons you have given, does not mean you get needs you than ever? i did not involve myself in this election campaign. if my worst
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fears are confirmed we do not get the kind of brexit that the people voted for i will have no choice but to involve myself again with filtering campaigning. you would come back as leader?” filtering campaigning. you would come back as leader? i am not seeing that but i would come back full time campaigning. that sounds of the few would come back as leader.” campaigning. that sounds of the few would come back as leader. i would not think about reading ukip unless there were fundamental reforms and you could actually lead. that is the former ukip leader. what happened to the current ukip leader?m former ukip leader. what happened to the current ukip leader? if nigel farage represents hard brexit and ukip is representing that idea of ha rd ukip is representing that idea of hard brexit what has happened to the man who represents you get or who wa nted man who represents you get or who wanted to in this parliament? paul nuttall, the leader, stood to be an mp in boston and skegness and you can see what has happened. the ukip
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share of the vote is down 26%. this may be an individual one but we know from looking at this that paul nuttall was not the choice of voters. does that suggest there is less of an appetite for ukip's idea or ideal of hard brexit? some of the other places we have seen that drop in the ukip vote. when douglas karr as well resign his seat of clacton he said ukipjob done. when you look at this year and you see how the vote has been split between labour and conservatives as if ukip voters are not sure which party to go back to the message is clear, in all of these, ukip is seeking a bigger hit, down 17%, 16%, 11%, voters are looking to another party to enact whatever kind of brexit they thought
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they voted for. thank you. i said earlierjohn mcdonnell was the mp would like to put themselves forward asa would like to put themselves forward as a minority government. that is something i want to discuss. also keen dunkers with the former conservative leader seeing a short while ago that a conservative leadership contest would be a catastrophe and plans the uk into crisis. can we nail this one on labour? could labour be in a position with endless configurations to form some kind of minority government? how would that work? theresa may as prime minister, even if she had lost this badly, could still carry on and go to the house and tried to get a queen's speech through and lose, as she would in those circumstances, and then she goes to the queen and says i cannot do it. i suspect this time she has
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the votes to do it so the situation will not arise. labour does not get a chance in those circumstances as long as she wins the vote in the house. that is the key. on the issue of the conservative leadership, that is the adjoining point, your thoughts or even duncan smith, who had a pretty torrid time and self? if the conservative party could move ina if the conservative party could move in a mature disciplined and brisk fashion to a new agreed leader that would be one thing but they cannot. it would be a fight. boris will not be able to restrain himself. he will be able to restrain himself. he will be leaping in and people will lead than against them and brexit will be back up for the fight and it will be bloody and long and catastrophic for the country. we have been waiting for some reaction from conservative mps and there has not been all that
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much so far. it makes me feel that leading brexit campaigners do not wa nt leading brexit campaigners do not want a leadership election, they wa nt to want a leadership election, they want to assure rupp theresa may and her position, however we can, because they are worried and they will have made a calculation the best way to keep brexit on track in their mind is to keep our in place and shore up her support. if there was to be a leadership election brexit would look at brisk in the way he would like to see it. anything from borisjohnson so far? no, i haven't seen anything. philip hammond? david davis? nothing from david davis, these are a key people, they will be waiting, keeping their powder dry, there will be conversations going on at large at higher levels in the conservative
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party to see strategically what can be done. if you want some sense of what an extraordinary event this general election has been, horace johnson is saying nothing! and that in itself is unusual since the last interview, he was told to sit bit! the time is 8:31am, time for a break and we will catch up with a news update. good morning. the bbc understands that theresa may has no intention of resigning as prime minister after the general election results in a hung parliament. some pollsters had predicted at the start of the campaign that mrs may would win a landslide for the conservatives, they will head back to westminster with 319 seats, seven fewer than would give them an overall majority. speaking as she was re—elected to her seat in maidenhead, the prime minister said the country needed stability. as we look ahead and we wait to see
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what the final results will be i know that as i say, the country needs a period of stability and whatever the results are, the conservative party will ensure that we fulfil our duty in ensuring that stability so that we can all, as one country, go forward together. labour have done better than expected gaining around 30 seats. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell says the party are offering themselves as a minority government. they now have 261 seats overall. in islington north the leader jeremy corbyn held his seat with more than forty—thousand votes. after his result was called, he said theresa may should step down. if there is a message from tinai's result it is this, the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well the mandate she's got is lost
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conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. i would have thought that's enough to go, actually and make way for the government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country. one major political figure to lose his seat was nick clegg. the former liberal democrat leader and deputy prime minister lost his sheffield hallam seat to labour. elsewhere the lib dems made gains, former minsters vince cable and jo swinson have both taken back the seats they lost in 2015. the party's leader, tim farron held onto his seat of westmorland and lonsdale. the scottish national party has endured a series of shock defeats, including the loss of its former first minister alex salmond and deputy leader, angus robertson. they both lost their seats amid a scottish conservative surge. the party's best performance in scotland since 1983. first minister, nicola sturgeon, said that the losses were a blow to her and the snp indicating she had some reflecting to do on key issues including independence.
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in northern ireland both the sdlp and the ulster unionist party lost their seats. it was a successful night for the largest parties. the democratic unionist party won 10 seats and sinn fein won seven seats but will continue to abstain from sitting in parliament. the result could see the dup demand significant concessions in return for propping up a theresa may administration. in wales, the labour party had a strong night taking back a number of seats from the conservatives. the results represent a blow to the tory party who had hoped to make gains in pro—brexit areas. plaid cymru won four seats and the liberal democrats lost their only welsh mp. meanwhile ukip have failed to win any seats in parliament. their share of the vote collapsed across britain and their leader paul nuttall came third in boston and skegness. traders in the city of london are bracing
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themselves for a volatile day following the election result. the pound has suffered one of its biggest falls since january, trading down by almost 2% against the dollar. the stock market opened half an hour ago with shares in the uk's top 100 companies rising more than expected. this morning the eu's budget commissioner said a hung parliament could delay brexit talks which are scheduled to start in 10 days time. theresa may is now back in downing street. the prime minister travelled from her berkshire constituency to conservative central office in the early hours. she's said to have met with advisors for an hour there before returning to number 10. and in the last half an hour jeremy corbyn has arrived at labour party headquarters. he was greeted byjubilant campaign workers and advisors. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has said that they have no intention of forming a coalition. time now to hand back to huw edwards. yes, good morning once again. as
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we've just heard, the yes, good morning once again. as we'vejust heard, the prime minister act in downing street, contemplating the results of an extremely difficult night of the conservatives, emerging from this 2017 election campaign with no majority at all in the house of commons. and having to contemplate building some kind of arrangement with the unionists in northern ireland in order to get a majority in the commons. we are looking at a hung parliament and it is a very uncertain situation we are looking at not just uncertain situation we are looking at notjust in terms of westminster but in terms of the very, very critical brexit dogs that are meant to be starting in about ten days' time. let's go straight to downing street and laura kuenssberg our political editor is there. what do you have for us? what a morning. we
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understand that theresa may is holed up understand that theresa may is holed up inside, trying to do a deal with the dup, having had her hopes so fundamentally dashed, her political gamble going so badly wrong for the conservatives but in the last half hour or so i've been speaking to a couple of senior conservatives, a senior member of the cabinet has told me she wolf day, she will not change her mind and although when you say her political authority is so shot, it's drained away, the argument for this is her constitutional ability, her prerogative to hang on and try to form a government but notjust bad, they are talking about imagining the alternative, imagine if the conservative party this morning, normally so ruthless, ends up with a leadership challenge, it's almost inevitable those leaders, one of the rivals would want to call an election, said they needed their own
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mandate and then we are back at the general election and i think one thing everyone in the tory party can agree on this morning is that is something none of them want. another senior conservative who has talked directly to theresa may told me she is resolute in the fact that she is not going anywhere. there is a bit ofa not going anywhere. there is a bit of a sense of tories starting to rally round but a bit of a spanner in the works, in the last few minutes the leader of the dup who would be vital for theresa minutes the leader of the dup who would be vitalfor theresa may's survival has suggested in an interview with bbc radio ulster that it would be difficult for her to survive under the dup do not play ball the calculus inside number ten this morning is that if completely changes and the most we can say in terms of concluding anything this morning, i can conclude that it feels very fluid! extremely fluid, laura, are you expecting to see the prime minister, for her to make a statement, what do you think the morning will bring? it would be
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unprecedented if we do not, let's put it that way. the normal routine of these things is that win or lose, prime ministers emerge from the doors once the result is settled they have a sweeping victory walk up downing street together with their family or their spouse or whatever. so much about the selection has been unusual and unprecedented that perhaps we will not but i have to say the optics of theresa may staying inside number ten and not coming out this morning would be extraordinary and would not look very good. but also, traditionally in this kind of circumstances the chairman of the 1922 committee, the group that represents tory backbenchers, they will traditionally have sons of conversation with the party leader before they conclude what to do in the chairman of the 1922 committee right now, my sense is from sources close to him that she to try to stay on but it may well be until a conversation takes place we will not
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see anything from the prime minister and as such, all we've had is guidance from tory sources that she is absolutely planning to stay on, we haven't had anything official in any way, shape orform. we haven't had anything official in any way, shape or form. laura, berrer weathers because i think in just a moment we will get a statement from jeremy corbyn, i think he's about to speak, i think we can go to it now. it's clear the conservatives are going to try and form a minority of and perhaps with the dup? are you going to try and block their every move or are you prepared to offer any kind of compromise? what we were elected to do is put form a programme about ending austerity in britain, is about supporting our national health service and social care service, is about proper funding of the education service and is about improving the lives of people in this country through protection of
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the triple lock on pensions for example. you sound like a man who is preparing to try and form the next government, is that what you expect to do? we are ready to serve this country, that is what we fought this election for and this is the programme we put forward in the election. you said no deal is, no pacts, is that also the case? we are offering to put forward the programme on which we fought the election, we have done no deals and no pacts with anybody, we are there as the labour party with our points of view, everyone knows what they are and everyone can see the huge increase in our support because of the way we conduct of the election and the comprehensive nature of the programme we put forward. do you envisage that you will be able to form a minority government or are we heading as many people predict for another general election? well parliament must meet and parliament will then have to take a decision on what happens when a government puts
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forward the queen's speech, we will put forward our point of view, we are of course, ready to serve. do you think in all this uncertainty, the brexit negotiation should be delayed? they are supposed to be happening in11 delayed? they are supposed to be happening in 11 days' time. they are going to have to go ahead, because article 50... government and offers in11 article 50... government and offers in 11 days' time will have to conduct the brexit negotiations. 0ur position is for a cure, we wanted jobs first brexit, therefore the most important thing is the trade deal with europe and i would have thought perhaps a good gesture from parliament would be to vote now to agree that all eu nationals can remain in britain. do you think they can be sons would delay to article 50 any delay whatsoever in the negotiations? that not completely in britain's hands, that has to be taken by the other parties in negotiations, we are ready to undertake the gutsy asians on the half of this country to protectjobs and have a sensible tariff free trade arrangement with europe. do
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you think theresa may should resign? is it so last night at my own election count, she fought the election count, she fought the election on the basis that it was her campaign, it was her decision to call the election, it was her name out there and she was saying she was doing it to bring about strong and sta ble doing it to bring about strong and stable government. well this morning it doesn't look like a stroll government, a stable government, it doesn't look like a government that has any programme whatsoever.m doesn't look like a government that has any programme whatsoever. if you can't put forward a stable government either, maybe you should resign? we've just been elected to parliament only a few hours ago and my party has had a huge increase in its vote, you —— we gained seats all over the country in every region of this country and in scotland and wales. i think everyone in the labour party and everyone who supported the labour party yesterday, young people, old people, eve ryo ne yesterday, young people, old people, everyone in between, i think they should be very proud of what we achieved. just to be clear, are you say you either victor, you should be forming the next government? we put
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forward our policies, strong and hopeful policies and they have gained an amazing response and traction. i think it's pretty clear who won this election. you are and you should be forming the next government? we are ready to serve the people who have given their trust to us. jeremy corbyn, thank you very much. the labour leader jeremy corbyn saying daebritz ready to serve and also saying the brexit talks will have to go ahead as planned on the timetable as set out under article 50. —— jeremy corbyn seen labour is ready to serve. john mcdonnell, welcome. labour has lost three elections in a row, ford does that leave your party? disappointed we are not forming a majority government but looking back on the last six weeks or so, six weeks ago we were 21, 22 points behind in the polls and i was
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predicting it would narrow and no one believed me at the time. i think the achievement of this campaign has been tremendous. did even you think it would go as well for labour?” knew the polls would narrow and i knew the polls would narrow and i knew we would pick up additional seats, we have been on the ground to ring round and listening. 0ur activists for feeding back messages of confidence so we thought yes, we are not a majority government and i am disappointed but we have laid the foundations for the potential of a minority government and then eventually a majority government. you and i have been around long enough to remember 1974, there were two general elections, the first one produced a hung parliament although it did produce a change of government to and we are yet to see that will happen. what are the chancesin that will happen. what are the chances in your view of a second election this year or early next year? the interesting thing about the first election and 74, which we both remember, ted heath went to the country with one question which was
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who governs the country and people said the question is about living standards and all that and that is exactly what happened this time. i was amazed that theresa may used that tactic i was amazed she called the election, i knew she was using short—term party advantage but is it that could easily disappear and that is exactly what happened. the instability we now have is not from the labour party or other parties, it's the conservative party itself. if we can form a minority government i think we could have a stable government, we would be able to produce a policy programme, a queen's speech based on the ma nifesto queen's speech based on the manifesto that i think would command a majority of support in parliament, not through deals or coalition but policy by policy. let me just say that would prevent another election because i think people have had enough of elections. it's an interesting prospect you put in, we know mrs may as we speak is trying to put together a government, perhaps do a deal with the dup. are you also, labour, speaking to the
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other parties, the snp, the greens... no. no we are not looking for a coalition or dealers, we will set out the policy programme based on the queen's speech and we expect able to vote for it. the problem we haveis able to vote for it. the problem we have is that i don't think the conservative party particularly under theresa may is a stable coalition in itself, i think that will fall apart. we have already seen this morning tory mps calling upon theresa may to go, saying her position is untenable. borisjohnson and david davis on the movers, i don't think they can form an alternative government, —— form a minority government. i think the best opportunity that we've got the government that would be stable in the interests of the the reason theresa may was rejected, i believe, was because she could party advantage before country and that was so blatant people rejected it.”
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ta ke was so blatant people rejected it.” take your point that a mrs may government could be unstable for the reasons you have given but fight would a minority labour government with no deals you say with any of the other left wing parties, why could that be any more stable? because we would be able to shape policy programme based on our ma nifesto policy programme based on our manifesto on a set of popular policies with large numbers of mps who would support them. we certainly wouldn't want to be seen to be voting against. would you take your ma nifesto voting against. would you take your manifesto and reconfigure that for a queen's speech, designed in such a way that would get the broadest support? that's what we were going to do anyway, that's what we were going to do anyway. said out a timetable of limitation. for example, we put forward the abolition of tuition fees, and extreme you popular policy the country... and extremely expensive. but we costed it and we can afford it, with a fair taxation system, we can. ido it, with a fair taxation system, we can. i do any mp to vote against it,
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i don't think they could, it would be extremely unpopular and on that basis we will be able to get our policies through. this is fascinating and we move into uncharted teresa talked to me about how you see this working out. mrs may succeeds for a file putting together a government of sorts but it turns out to be unstable and you would be there, expect...” it turns out to be unstable and you would be there, expect... i hope she doesn't do that. the queen could ask you orjeremy corbyn to form a government? i hope it isn't like that and i hope she realises today very quickly she cannot continue. i think the conservative party needs to recognise that cannot be entered government wages at the moment, it is an spare —— innocent unstable, divided form. if the snp who still have 35 mps, the biggest hardy from scotland, if you said to do and they have said they are up in general terms for a progressive government,
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helping to keep that in power but we wa nt helping to keep that in power but we want a second independence referendum, would you give that? there will be no deals, no coalitions, we have put forward the policy. if the snp want to vote for someone, it is up to them. politics is you and i know it is about deals, you cannot run a minority government without deals. that is the sort of politics that people have just rejected. jeremy's slogan when he stood at labour, —— as leader, straight talking, honest politics. this is what i believe in, i want to implement, its what i am going to do. by definition you would be a government forming a government for the party that lost the election, the party that lost the election, the tories haven't won it but you have lasted. that's the dilemma that eve ryo ne have lasted. that's the dilemma that everyone has, no one has once of who is best raised to former government? we believe the labour party can do that. give us the chance. how long
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you think it's going to take before you think it's going to take before you can see this happening? i'm hoping the situation is clarified within days otherwise we are in an impossible situation with negotiations on brexit coming. i think the responsibility is on theresa may to stand down and for the conservative party to go away and sort itself out and that the labour government take place. one final point, if, in your view, what mrs may is trying to do will lead to u nsta ble mrs may is trying to do will lead to unstable government, that leads to any kind of government that will be u nsta ble any kind of government that will be unstable and the alternative is a minority labour government is doing no deals, i would suggest you as u nsta ble no deals, i would suggest you as unstable as well and that we will be having a second election quite soon. i believe with sufficient political skill a minority garment would be able to provide stable government but it would be a better government as well. it's been based upon policies that were popular in parliament and in the country. we
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shall see, clearly many days to go, john mcdonnell, thank you. andrew, thank you. i think it's her to see beaver concentrating on every word in that and around the table, asking ourselves whetherjohn mcdonnell‘s theory that it would be possible for labour to form some sort of minority administration, with policies appealing across the house? very hard to see, politics is about two things at the same time, authority and power or numbers. you can see the jeremy authority and power or numbers. you can see thejeremy corbyn interview, they feel momentum is with them, they feel momentum is with them, they have a big, new moral authority which they are revelling in but none of that means an awful lot in policy terms unless they have the numbers in the house of commons. john mcdonnell will sing the popular policy on tuition fees, let's steer people to vote that dumb but that comes with a price tag. how many conservative mps do you think are going to vote in favour of labour tax cuts? tax rises. tax rises. it's
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an engaging pogba john mcpoland who's going to produce his alternative green speech were nevertheless, he doesn't and labour doesn't have the numbers and it's overwhelmingly likely that we will come out of this process with the theresa may as prime minister, leaning unsteadily and unhappily on the dup. gus o'donnell? i can't see any circumstances, it seems to me fa ntasyland, if theresa any circumstances, it seems to me fantasyland, if theresa may cannot get her deal and cannot get a queen's speech through then we could go to labour doing it but they don't have the numbers, it is a bull as that. for the conservatives and the dup vote against that queen's speech we don't get to any individual votes on tuition fees are anything, it's a nonstarter and in those circumstances i'm afraid we are back into second elections. that is why i think we will probably go with the first part which is the conservative minority and i'm not surprised both
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at the dup is saying, this is classic because seeding strategy, they are holding out for as much as they are holding out for as much as they can get. jo coburn? labour are sounding bullish, of course they would, to some extent this is their opportunity to do so but i agree with the guys, it's about numbers. you have to have the numbers to actually former a majority and looking at them now, they are not there and it's interesting john mcdonnell keeps saying we made no deals before the selection, remember ed miliband suffered as a result of the indication that he would do a deal or join the indication that he would do a deal orjoin forces with the snp, so labour were clear to put that to one side. they are still saying no deals, doing it on a policy by policy basis, i'm not sure it would necessarily lead to what he calls a sta ble necessarily lead to what he calls a stable government, any more stable than perhaps the one we were currently get, so they are going to
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press this issue, it's really all they can say at this point, she should go and obviously everything comes into play but at the moment that doesn't look like it's going to happen. more reports coming in from conservative sources, theresa may is likely to stay on as we've been reporting and that laura was telling us reporting and that laura was telling us because she doesn't want to allow brussels to delay brexit talks, that's the latest we have. let's rejoinjeremy. that's the latest we have. let's rejoin jeremy. let's see how labour has made this advance against the conservatives, one or two things we should point out that is quite interesting. the labour battle ground on the board, the most marginal constituency they were targeting is gower, held by the conservatives, 27 votes... these are very marginal seats that laboured don't hold that they had their eyes on because they were close to getting them last time. let's see the actual results now that we know them. you can see what's happening,
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as you'd expect, the most marginal seats labour has gone through like a knife through butter, actually they get stopped at morley and 0utwood, the old seat of ed balls. there still is conservative, labour gain a couple more, then it's patchy. gradually the conservatives hold onto more by the end. let's look through some more boards. the tory or the party majority increased, they become seats that are harder to win, we have northampton north and so on, stroud... let's see what happened in this election. looking at the results, you can see how the conservatives are hanging on war effectively from the seats. the conservatives escaping labour's clutches. east lothian, the scottish
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situation slightly different, beneficiaries of the severe downturn in the s&p boat but let's keep going through the sport, it will tell us something very interesting. we are looking at seats that labour were targeting, by the time we get to the third board we were the seats that majorities, high peak with a 4800 majority, cleethorpes down here with an 8000 majority, these are the seats coming out of the last election, the results and then, have a look, many of them don't change, redding east went to labour, so did warwick and portsmouth south. but you can see on this board, as the majority is increased, as you would expect, the conservatives hanging onto the seats they are defending. 0ne onto the seats they are defending. one more board, right into seats that labour would never really have expected to get, many of them snp seats and we see the results, let's look. actually they have only caught
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the scottish ones but in addition, a scanned array. they overturned the majority and the question we are asking is how is it that labour has advanced in a perfectly logical way through some of the seats but then others felt much more easily and the conservatives have won most of them? what was it worth the seats that they were made your bill is disappointing. let's break this down. these are the seats that were on the labour target list and which they gained a starting on the most marginal. gower. we will highlight the seats that would agree main and this is the clue to it. look here. there is nothing to write home about, they simply took the seats with the smallest majorities as you would expect but as we go down the board, the seats get harder and harderfor labour to board, the seats get harder and
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harder for labour to win, usually the tory majority increases but what we find is that labour only gain or the constituencies voted for remain. remain constituencies somehow turbo—charged the labour vote, isn't that interesting? and look at the seats labour lost, even starker, these ones they lost, derbyshire north, hillsborough south, copeland, stoke—on—trent... those were seats up stoke—on—trent... those were seats upfor stoke—on—trent... those were seats up for brexit seats. they were not comparable to treat for labour, it's a bit of analysis they are on the labour vote but let's sum it all. we can go to the big pie chart that brea ks can go to the big pie chart that breaks down the seats in the house of commons. you see the dotted line at 12 o'clock which the conservatives have fallen just short of. jeremy, thank you. plenty to talk about and believe me as we go on in the next couple of hours, more than enough for us to be thinking
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about in terms of the future shape of the government. now, if you're watching in the regions of england and bbc one you will get 30 minutes of news specifically on the results for your area, if you're watching in scotland, wales, northern ireland or the bbc news channel you are staying with us and believe me we will be exploring all of these things, who knows we may even get a senior conservative to come along and give us conservative to come along and give usa conservative to come along and give us a response conservative to come along and give us a response to what is going along. we would like that but in the meantime a pause for the news and weather. and we will be joined by joanna gosling. good morning. the bbc understands that theresa may has no intention of resigning as prime minister after the general election results in a hung parliament. mrs may would win a landslide for the conservatives, they will head back to westminster with 319 seats, seven fewer than would give them
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an overall majority. 0ur political correspondent tom baker and reports. she called the election early, hoping she would transform the tory fragile... but the smiles on the campaign trail have vanished. but the conservatives set to end up even worse off. if as the indications have shown and this is correct that conservative and has won the most seats and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on is to ensure we have a period of stability and that is exactly what we will do. and you can see what the labour leader makes of these results so far. a man whose campaign confounded many expectations. beaming smiles, with labour on course for a far better night than many thought. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate.
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well, the mandate she's got is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support, and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go, actually. in battersea, labour have ousted a government minister on a swing of 10%. there have been labour gains elsewhere. they increased their majority in cambridge by 12,000, and they took peterborough from the conservatives, boosting their share of the vote by more than 12%. just look what the mood was like during the count in hastings. the home secretary amber rudd only just scraped home in hastings by 346 votes. it's notjust the tories suffering. in sheffield, the lib dem's former leader nick clegg has lost his seat. i, of course, have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight, and i suspect many people will encounter after tonight, which is in politics,
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you live by the sword and you die by the sword. the night began with a projection — the exit poll. this morning, with nearly all the results and, the conservatives are the largest party but short of an overall majority. labour would be up 30 seats. the snp have lost big names on a disappointing night, compared with their scottish landslide two years ago. their deputy leader angus robertson was ousted by the conservatives and their former leader alex salmond lost his seat too. now one of theresa may's own mps is laying the blame on her. i think she's in a very difficult place. she's a remarkable and a very talented woman, and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions, but she now has to consider her position. 0hh, jeremy corbyn! jeremy corbyn's vocal support is growing. labour may be in a clear second, but his allies say they want to form a minority government.
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are you stepping down, mrs may? she didn't answer that question. she wa nted didn't answer that question. she wanted a strong, stable and triumphant return here ahead of brexit talks, she has ended up weakened with fewer mps and questions over her future. the dup in northern ireland could play a pivotal role in westminster and have already said they will make the influence felt. the dup took ten seats, up by two, sinn fein 17 but will continue to abstain and sitting in parliament, both the sdlp and the ulster unionist party lost their seats. labour had a strong night in wales reclaiming a number of seats from the conservatives, the results we re from the conservatives, the results were a blow to the tories who had hoped to make gains in progressive areas. plaid cymru one four seats,
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up areas. plaid cymru one four seats, up one and the liberal democrats lost their only welsh mp. ukip failed to win any seats in parliament, the share of the vote collapsed across britain and the leader upon the poll came third in boston and skegness. the greens kept their one mp caroline lucas, the co—leader of the party. the overall forger was done in selecting the trend away from the smaller parties towards the big two, labour and the tories. let's return to the bbc election special. good morning once again from the bbc‘s election centre. if you are just joining bbc‘s election centre. if you are justjoining us, you're waking up to the news that there is to be a hung parliament. there is not going to be a majority government of any colour, certainly not conservative, given some of the predictions we were used to in recent weeks. this is where we are with three seats to declare. 647 m, are with three seats to declare. 647 in, and the prediction is that the
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conservatives will be on 316, ten short of a majority in the house of commons. labour on 261 and we are looking at 29 seats gained for labour and the loss of 12 seats for the conservatives. not where most people thought we would be this morning. it is an unexpected result which creates all kinds of uncertainty, not just in which creates all kinds of uncertainty, notjust in terms of the colour of a government or who will be prime minister, because there are questions about theresa may's future, but in terms of the challenges this government has two tackle, the brexit challenge specifically presenting all kinds of problems. to explain a little bit more about the results before i bring my guests in once again, let's join evan davis. i want to take you to the results behind the headline. labour on to the results behind the headline. labourona to the results behind the headline. labour on a 55% share of the vote. the conservatives of 33% in london.
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why do i point that out? they have had an incredibly good night in london and there is one seat which remains unresolved. it remains unresolved because we understand the cou nters unresolved because we understand the counters have gone home believing it was too close to call. this seat is kensington. kensington is forecast as too close to call. this has never gone labour. it would be an extraordinary result if this were to go labourandi extraordinary result if this were to go labour and i am extraordinary result if this were to go labourand i am not saying extraordinary result if this were to go labour and i am not saying that it well but what i can show you is three seats that border kensington which are all showing extraordinary swings to labour. in westminster, a labour seat, the swing has been 11%, and in these two seats, trueblue tory, chelsea and the city of london, containing knightsbridge and the city, a 10% swing to labour and a 9.3% swing. kensington only requires an 11% swing for labour to ta ke requires an 11% swing for labour to take it. if kensington goes red,
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jeremy corbyn has achieved something that tony blair never did, because that tony blair never did, because that seat has never been labour.” am just thinking at the moment, we are getting a lot more reaction coming in, especially in the context of the eu because this is a crucial context. the latest from the leader of the dominant conservative group on the european parliament, he is saying that the clock is ticking for brexit. and i think there is going to be some pressure on the timetable. we have also heard from guy verhofstadt, a leading negotiator within the parliament, for the liberal bloc with in the european parliament, and he has said that this has been an own goal for david cameron and theresa may, and it makes it much more located. michel barnier is all ready to go, leading the negotiations in the eu, as soon as this is over to start the
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brexit negotiations and i have heard that that date that we have been hearing about was not cast in stone. the aim was to pick up on those brexit negotiations within ten days but it is a movable feast. let me say a little bit more about the leader of the conservative group in the european parliament. the uk needs a government soon, he says. the date for the beginning of the negotiations are unclear. and he goes onto say that the is united but the uk is split. prime minister may has brought chaos to her country instead. very significantly, martin schulz, the stp leader in germany, italy important politician in these negotiations, has congratulated jeremy corbyn on his performance and has agreed to meet with him, saying that this is the end to the british plan for hard brexit. more
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importantly, das bildt in germany is saying, is the exit coming? for that to happen, you need a politician with the votes in the house of commons to hit the hold button and i do not see that that could possibly be the case. but it does look as though there are the numbers for a different type of brexit to the one being talked about. if the pressure is going to come within the european parliament, and manfred weberfrom the conservative bloc in the european parliament, is saying that actually know the way is open for negotiation, theresa may will be under pressure to rethink what the lines will be because she will need the support of the house of commons. and what will the senior team are in the cabinet secretary be thinking at this stage? they will be thinking that this was always going to be a difficult process. trying to get these detailed negotiations done in two years as article 50 requires, it
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will only be done in the term of an augmentation after the deal has been done. that has become harder because at the moment, the civil servants will be sitting there saying, what is our negotiation position. we now wa nt is our negotiation position. we now want the eu 27 position is, but as our position changed? we were reporting somebody within the eu saying that the situation is more flexible but weber is saying that the timetable is more uncertain. we need to very quickly start putting together issues about what we're going to learn from this election. does it mean soccer brexit? does it mean we stick with the simple goal —— of the single market? mean we stick with the simple goal -- of the single market? it does, but there are some key issues like the fate of the eu nationals. as we
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know, during the election campaign labour wanted that to be unilaterally done by the british government. and obviously that was now going to be part of negotiations and so will that change? the divorce bill that michel barnier has been discussing, it is over these things that have already been put out there. we know that the government under theresa may said before that they would not pay anything like 100 billion euros, which was one of the figures put out there. what happens to that now? will that be sorted first, as the eu would like, or will it become part of the negotiation? she is in a weaker position than before. i want to bring in one thing now. it is an important statement thatjohn swinney of the snp has made this morning about the future of scotland. really important. john swinney is an important figure in the snp in scotland. after alex salmond losing his seat, second only to nicola sturgeon. he said this
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morning that the issue of the second independence referendum explains a lot about why the snp did so badly in so many seats. he said that after this they have to take time and care, and they have to acknowledge that the question of a second referendum was a significant motivator of votes against the snp in the selection and we have to be attentive to that point. that is very close to a senior member of the snp saying that they are giving up on the second independence referendum. a year ago after the eu referendum, were reporting the fact that david cameron came straight out and resigned. 0ne that david cameron came straight out and resigned. one of his closest advisers in number ten at that time was sir craig 0liver advisers in number ten at that time was sir craig oliver and he is with andrew. he is indeed. a big cheese in david cameron's downing street. if you we re cameron's downing street. if you were still in theirjob, what would you be advising mrs may to do today? i think she needs to take real soundings from the conservative party and find out how much support
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she actually has. the indications are that the conservative party is saying that we need another leadership election like they need a hole in the head. that does not mean to say she is out of the woods, because the pressure over the coming days will be intense, but i think she will probably see herself through today. but however you spell it, is it not the harsh reality that mrs may is a lame duck prime minister now? i think it is extraordinarily difficult for her to form a government with the legislative programme that is meaningful in any way. the reality is that any government at the moment is that any government at the moment is going to have to do difficult things. look at what survives the conservative manifesto, like getting rid of school lunches. if you have a majority of two or three, that is going to be voted down instantaneously in the house of commons and anything difficult is going to constantly, against that. you are facing the prospect of a government limping on for a few months and maybe another election. lots of instability. and she would be dependent for a majority, if
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that, on the dup in northern ireland. arlene foster has said this morning that it might be quite hard for mrs may to survive. exactly. but if she did manage to do a deal with the dup, she has her own backbenchers with their own issues, their own wants and needs and concerns. look at somebody like nicky morgan, and people likejohn redwood, who you interviewed earlier today. the gulf between these groups of people is enormous and when you have complex legislation that is also quite difficult, you face the possibility of being voted down by your own party, never mind doing a deal with the dup. and you know tory backbenchers, the only thing that really succeeds in the tory party is success. and lots of tories will now regard theresa may as a failure.” think that is true. they will feel that they were taken into an election believing that on the back of her name they were going to get an increased majority and she did not deliver that. that is the
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problem. a big problem. but perhaps an even bigger problem is do we really wa nt an even bigger problem is do we really want to be having a leadership election now, at a time when the labour party might think it is out of the rams a possibility, but when they might be thinking they could form a government. that would suggest that the conservatives are between a rock and a hard place, they have a lame—duck leader and no stomach for another election. they are in a very bad position, and after the weekend we will have a sense, after people have spoken to each other, and then we will have a sense of what is going on and what is going to happen. at the moment they don't feel like they have the stomach for the fight, but you will have people agitating, saying you could deliver this, we could go into brexit negotiations but we are not stronger. it is made worse, because this is entirely self—inflicted. worse, because this is entirely self-inflicted. the decision was
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taken by theresa may, and to be fair, she was worried about the house of lords because it wasn't in the manifesto what they were planning to do with brexit. people in the house of lords were saying they could play around with this, and she felt she needed a mandate, to be there that is the case, but she was also tempted by the fact that people were saying, you have 4 million ukip votes which are up for grabs, we can have a massive majority, this is a chance to put the labour party to the sword and all of that came to nothing. why was the campaign such a shambles?‘ number of reasons that you have been going through, one i would like to add, i would like to know what data they were working with because it sounds to me like some of the very punchy tweets that were coming out from the strategists, saying, you have got it totally wrong, let's see what happens on the night, but we saw that, and it appears the data they were working from was not that accurate. interesting. we were told,
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ignore the polls, they have not got it right. and the ground water shows that the tories are doing really well —— the ground war. and they we re well —— the ground war. and they were going to take a number of labour seats in the midlands and the north, based on the data you were talking about, but that is not accurate. it appears that was the case. the ground war in 2015 were successful and it was based on very targeted campaigning and it appears that the conservative party were going for seats they could never possibly realistically get and were putting resources in those seats and possibly leaving themselves bear elsewhere. she called this election because she wanted a mandate for brexit, that was the ostensible purpose. and also because she thought she could win and win big. she doesn't have a mandate for brexit now. she put the manifesto in
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the tory manifesto and the people have not voted for it. she is in -- an extraordinary and difficult position. she has even fewer votes and when she takes this back to the british parliament, can she be sure to get this voted through question at this will make the negotiations very tough —— voted through?“ at this will make the negotiations very tough -- voted through? if we we re very tough -- voted through? if we were to return late october, early november, will theresa may still be prime minister? it is too soon to tell, but it looks very difficult for her. this is a very volatile time in politics and many people make predictions and they are wrong, but it does look tough at the moment. this is one prediction we can agree, it is not exactly strong and stable. having got this result, the conservative party will not be happy that that was the campaign slogan. laughter thanks forjoining us. we can go
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back to the bbc election centre. thank you very much, craig 0liver, master of understatement. talking to andrew at the palace of westminster, we have more news on the european union. some conflicting signals about the way they are reading this result. michel barnier, the chief negotiator for these brexit talks, he's the man in charge of the process , he's the man in charge of the process, what has been saying? he says brexit negotiations should start when the uk is ready. in other words they don't think the uk is ready right now. after the election result last night. timetable and eu positions are clear. they are ready and waiting and he says let's put our minds together on striking a deal. he feels there is no point starting the negotiations until he
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is sure that he is dealing with the right person and also the right offer they are going to put on the table. as we were discussing, manfred weber from the european people's party group, he said, don't forget the clock is ticking. they have already started. the pressure for one side of the eu is already on theresa may and on the other side they are saying they only want to talk to the person who is in charge and knows what they are doing. michel barnier is not unfriendly, common—sense. michel barnier is not unfriendly, common-sense. he is probably the best bet in the negotiation for britain, he'sa best bet in the negotiation for britain, he's a bit grand and he would like to negotiate with very senior ministers only, but he is not difficult for theresa may and indeed they have a very crucial personal connection. they are both very friendly with bernard cazeneuve, the former french prime minister. and so thatis former french prime minister. and so that is a back channel between michel barnier and theresa may. the richard fly has returned to the
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studio, that is why i'm stumbling. —— wretched studio, that is why i'm stumbling. — — wretched fly. studio, that is why i'm stumbling. -- wretched fly. he likes you, andrew. no flies on me! some thoughts on the michel barnier contribution? he is a brilliant negotiator, formidable opponent against us, and what he is saying is basically, i'm only going to talk when you know what you are talking about, but at the same time we are not moving the two—year deadline so we are squeezing the time and you guys have got to get your act together, that is basically what it is about. the bow group are now calling for a conservative leadership election. that changes the temperature. it does. brexit of course is the important negotiation ahead. looking at domestic policy, how easy is it going to be to push through with the manifesto if theresa may is staying on as the
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prime minister and having to guide through cuts for example question not she had already struggled with some of own backbenches in terms of for tax credits and national insurance contributions and that will be difficult for her now in the house of commons and also in the house of commons and also in the house of commons and also in the house of lords for the wii —— the house of lords for the wii —— the house of lords the house of lords is the same as it was, it has a built in majority against the conservatives. basically it will be very difficult, and what the house of lords will do, they won't exceed their remit that they can throw things back to the house of commons to think again. every time you do that means another vote and if you are running a minority government the last thing you want is a votes in the house of commons, because you only need a few rebels and it falls, so only need a few rebels and it falls, so getting difficult choices, like cuts, throw, that is very hard. ——
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through. great moment to be a tory backbencher. yes, they will have a lot of power. we heard from john mcdonnell, saying theresa may should resign. he is saying that theresa may has the weekend, if that, to form a government, otherwise labour will try to form a coalition. they are going to keep pushing hard, labour. a quick final word because you need to go. it has been great having your expertise by the way. if you were in number ten this morning, would your expectation be that the prime minister will make a statement at some point? yes, she has got to. she should go and see the queen at some point and say, this is the strategy, this is what we are going to do. i completely accept that she needs a bit of time and the dup are tricky, so she needs to get together
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what she's going to come out and say and how she is going take this forward. the clock is ticking and she needs to get on with it. thanks very much. we were talking about how the labour performance had panned out. we can go down to cardiff and speak to 0wen smith, who challenged jeremy corbyn for the leadership. what are your thoughts on the labour performance? i'm delighted. we have reta ken performance? i'm delighted. we have retaken so performance? i'm delighted. we have reta ken so many performance? i'm delighted. we have retaken so many fantastic colleagues and we have 30 new colleagues and we have a 40% share of the vote it is a very good night for labour. we haven't won but this is a very good performance and jeremy corbyn needs to be congratulated. what will the labour people make of the fact that you ran a campaign because you thought he was a dead loss as leader? i was clearly wrong in feeling that he would not be able to do this well and he has proved me wrong and lots of people wrong. i ta ke wrong and lots of people wrong. i take my hat off to him. what is the
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secret of his success? it is down to the policy proposals? him as a leader? it is both, ithink, and i don't know what he has got, but if we could bottle it and drink it, we would all be doing very well. the ma nifesto would all be doing very well. the manifesto was incredibly popular, people clearly warmed to the radical ideas that were proposed in the ma nifesto ideas that were proposed in the manifesto and they want an end to austerity and a government that invests in public services and we we re invests in public services and we were hearing that on the doorstep. some people have not voted at all, and they were voting labour yesterday. not just junk people, and they were voting labour yesterday. notjustjunk people, it was people who were inspired by the policies and it has to be said by jeremy corbyn —— notjust young people. andrew moore says it is carrot juice people. andrew moore says it is carrotjuice in his bottle. —— andrew marr. where do i get this? at the allotment. moving on, john
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donnell has said that labour is standing by to form a minority government bottom gus 0'donnell has said the numbers don't add up. the only viable option is the conservatives with help from the dup. theresa may has made a catastrophic mistake, but notjust for the tory party, for the country, because in some respects she was right, we do need stability at the point of the brexit negotiations but she has left us with a less stable situation. the labour party must stand by ready to form the government right now, if the tories fail to cut a deal and i hope that we get a stable government and i hope that the labour party is able to form the government because i think that manifesto we stood on last i would transform our country andi last i would transform our country and i hope we get the option to put that into practice. the eu chief
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negotiator michel barnier has said they are ready to talk when the uk is ready to talk, reflecting the fa ct is ready to talk, reflecting the fact there is uncertainty, what are your thoughts on how rigid that process should be? it should not be rigid, there should be flexibility, but what he has said this morning is a statement of fact. they can't negotiate until they know who the government of the country is and who they are negotiating with and that is why she needs to get on with it, and john mcdonnell is right to say she needs to move quickly. she will wa nt she needs to move quickly. she will want a few hours to reflect but i do think it is incumbent on her as the prime minister who called this election. she didn't need to. she had a majority and she didn't really need to go to the country because of brexit. she went to the country out of political opportunism because she she thought she could crush the labour party but she has been undone. and she has left us in a less sta ble undone. and she has left us in a less stable set of circumstances.
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giving your complements aboutjeremy corbyn and the labour party campaign, if you are asked to serve in his team, what visual answer?” would serve any labour government at any point, and jeremy has many people who have worked very well alongside him in this campaign. andrew gwynne and others were fantastic and i'm sure there are other people who he will be talking to and! other people who he will be talking to and i wish you well. very modest answer. laughter thanks forjoining us. 0wen smith the labour mp. thanks forjoining us. 0wen smith the labourmp. a thanks forjoining us. 0wen smith the labour mp. a final word before we go to the news, on where we stand this morning in terms of theresa may's options. i'm talking the next few hours. she is the vicars daughter and she has a sense of duty and she knows she has made a big political mistake. she took ownership of that, it was her campaign, her mistake, and therefore
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she has a duty to hold together the government and pick up the pieces in the short term. she would love to go off and running through wheat fields again. if she wasn't leading the conservative party, but she can't do that. the tory party is not in a fit state to have another leadership election so soon and the country would be plunged into another period of uncertainty at a crucial moment in the brexit negotiations so i think duty calls and she will stay. we will pause for a moment. viewers are joining we will pause for a moment. viewers arejoining us from around the uk. . gus o'donnell is. that is leaving us. it good morning. you havejust joined us at the bbc election centre. if you have missed this morning's nears, you have been heavily asleep, let me tell you that
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theresa may is to pry minister this morning but she does not have a majority in this new parliament. it is to be a hung parliament and the prospect at the moment seems to be that mrs may is staying in power with the help of the dup. that is not confirmed, by the way, that is just the way that the figures are stacking up. and we're nowhere near the kind of solid, impressive majority that so many commentators and some of the votes had been suggesting for the conservatives, right up until that exit poll came at last night. let me go straight to is one important part of the story because the result in scotland showing heavy losses for the snp with games for the conservatives and labour. lorna gordon is there. the snp in scotland won more seats than any other party by a large
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margin but really i think it is fair to say that this was not a good result for them. some of the big beasts of the snp are gone. alex salmond gone, angus robertson gone, the snp map of scotland in 2015 were scotla nd the snp map of scotland in 2015 were scotland was pretty much painted snp yellow is now a patchwork quilt. we have had some comments in the last couple of hours from john swinney acknowledging that the result might show that the second independence referendum, that suggestion of a second referendum was a significant motivator of votes in this election and that the snp had to be attentive to that. the last 21 seats. we have heard from politicians and pundits but what about voters? with me, four voters who have braved the rain here in edinburgh this morning to come out and have a chat. david mcilroy, selma, kim harding and lindsey
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gibbons. the giverjoining us. selma, what do you make of this results ? selma, what do you make of this results? i voted for the snp but we have to remember that from 2010 until the moment, scotland has one dominant party but the uk now appears to have a very wounded tory party, propped up by the dup. that does not stand strong and stable to me. it certainly does not look like a good lead—in to brexit. what will happen to policies throughout the uk? the drop for the snp, what went wrong? i think that was a readjustment after the 2015 election. and the big elephant in the room that nobody wants to talk about is 2014. we had 22 going to 45, which came about through a grassroots movement that transcended class and area. that is what is going to revitalise scotland. you voted conservative, martin, what
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happened that went right for the conservatives here in scotland?” think ruth davidson is the clue to what went on in scotland. she is a fantastic leader and the conservative team did a fantastic job of getting the boat out. i am sure they are very happy. what is the policy that the tories were campaigning on? it was comparatively -- it campaigning on? it was comparatively —— it was mostly about the union and anti—indy ref two. —— it was mostly about the union and anti-indy ref two. what are the tories stand for? i don't know. ruth davidson is my msp and i have never managed to get her to say anything about policy. i have asked to say repeatedly what her views on certain things are, not from an attacking position but to find out what she stands for. i have no idea what she stands for. i have no idea what she stands for. i have no idea what she stands for. the snp leadership seems to be acknowledging that a significant part of this vote, they will be returning to westminster, is
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down to the fact that this was a vote against a second independence referendum. but what we should be voting on his policies. we are having a general election about which way we want to run the country, not another referendum. and did you vote for? i voted for iain murray, my labour mp, primarily because he is an excellent constituency mp and i think he would bea constituency mp and i think he would be a great support. i am delighted that so many labour mps got in this time, and also because i feel strongly that i want to send a message that i do not want another referendum. but it is curious. you seem to be voting for a constituency mpfor seem to be voting for a constituency mp for constituency reasons but there has been a surge in the labour vote. it seems to be down tojeremy corbyn but your mp is not a great fan ofjeremy corbyn, is he?” corbyn but your mp is not a great fan ofjeremy corbyn, is he? i don't know that it is necessarilyjeremy
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corbyn. i took the view that the people who voted snp, having usually been a labour supporter, have now got rather cheesed off with the snp and what they have been banging on about, and have gone back to what they originally supported and believed in. i don't know that is supported. in view of the fact that every time kezia dugdale and jeremy corbyn got together, they had a disagreement, kezia dugdale cannot keep the scottish labour party together. the stirling constituency labour party said voted tory. barney crockett up in aberdeen, he has broken away from the labour party the labour party in scotland cannot control labour. the whole party is crumbling and that is what has allowed the conservative party to come back into scotland. for labour to be telling labour voters to vote tactically, to vote for the tories, is unbelievable in scotland. and it will not continue. david, as a
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conservative voter, do you think that indyref2 is dead and buried? you can never that indyref2 is dead and buried? you can never say that indyref2 is dead and buried? you can never say that. i think the snp will come back with some story that would indicate that indyref2 is still on the table. my position is that the tories will go back and say, look, the snp is wounded in scotland, so let's put the indyref2 thing to bed for ever. and they will have an indyref2 and then lose it. who will lose it, the tories will visit? yes, because the tories consistently lose. every time you call one of these referenda, you lose it. the tories consistently lose it. the tories consistently lose scotland! who can say? what is the chinese curse, you live in interesting times? we live in interesting times? we live in interesting times. never a truer word was said. we live in confusing and very interesting times. not least here in scotland. thank you very much, lorna gordon.
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and thank you to your guests. so when are we? sick hundred and 48 results are coming and we have just two to go. 0ne results are coming and we have just two to go. one of those is cornwall north will we are expecting the conservatives to hold on. that would give them 308. the forecast is 319, including the forecast for kensington. but they have taken a break there because it is so tight. and the word from kensington before they took a break a short time ago was that labour were just ahead. so the conservatives could well end up not on 319 but on 318. so that is the picture with just two results to come in. of course we are certainly now looking at a hung parliament and a word from david miliband, the former labour minister. he has tweeted saying wow, so good labour stronger. so good brutal brexit rejected, so good the next generation realise the stakes and
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spoke up. david miliband of course wa nted spoke up. david miliband of course wanted to be labour leader and was beaten by his brother ed miliband who lost the election in 2015. there he is from his position in new york saying that he thinks a brutal brexit has been rejected. and saying thatis brexit has been rejected. and saying that is down to the younger generation because of course when the polls were looking and projecting the result, it looked as if the younger generation was going to come out in big numbers for jeremy corbyn but the fear was they might not actually come out and vote. i was mentioning kensington. let's look at these pictures because it tells you something about the state of exhaustion in kensington after a very long night. we do sympathise, it is a weary look. is it that i'm already? this is the tea m it that i'm already? this is the team in kensington, where basically a short time ago they were all told, look, you have had a hard night and there is still no result, take a
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break and come back later. we may not get a result from kensington later today. it may even be tomorrow. let's go to emily for more detail. i have just tomorrow. let's go to emily for more detail. i havejust been hearing tomorrow. let's go to emily for more detail. i have just been hearing off records that there are 35 votes in it. they have done a couple of recurrence already which might explain those looks of exhaustion on the faces, and labour has been ahead in one of those recounts. if there arejust 35 in one of those recounts. if there are just 35 votes in it, in one of those recounts. if there arejust 35 votes in it, you can see why they might have just paused for a moment to make sure they are not missing things, seeing double, dropping things on the floor and they have decided to suspend it. it is incredibly tight and the reason for that is that the sitting mp, the mpfor for that is that the sitting mp, the mp for the conservatives, was a brexiteer in a very remain part of london. we often talk in terms of swings and maths and majorities but it all comes down to personalities and it is peoplejuggle careers
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it all comes down to personalities and it is people juggle careers that we have been watching again on a night like that it —— like tonight. the drama of the night, one of those is sheffield hallam. 0ne the drama of the night, one of those is sheffield hallam. one of the most poignant images, seeing nick clegg was his seat. he said he had never shirked from fighting political battles. he took his party to the front line, in the national interest, with the conservatives after 2010. he lost out on a pretty tight race and he is no longer an mp. the lib dems losing out. in westmorland and lonsdale, we were watching closely. tim farron held on but he has slashed his majority. it used to be 9000 and you can see he is now sitting on less than 1000. in gordon, another big beast, perhaps the biggest in the snp, alex salmond has lost out to the conservatives. will he be having a word with nicola sturgeon about the kind of campaign that the snp have run? in hastings,
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we we re that the snp have run? in hastings, we were watching this one with a lot of trepidation for amber rudd. we thought she might lose out. she held on, but the labour party will be incredibly disappointed to miss this. that would have been a big beast to take, the home secretary, the sitting home secretary. 0ne beast to take, the home secretary, the sitting home secretary. one more to bring you, ipswich. now this is suffolk and we do not expect any bread in a part of the world like this. but ben gummer, who not only was one of the cabinet office ministers but actually was responsible for some of the ma nifesto responsible for some of the manifesto writing and the policies in it, lost his seat to sandy martin. 0ne in it, lost his seat to sandy martin. one person who has had an excellent night, the big green beast, caroline lucas has nearly doubled her majority in the only seat that they hold. thank you, emily. emily with the latest on the personalities. we have been talking about the permutations for government and of course we have been talking about theresa may
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having to unite with the dup. in belfast, chris, your thoughts on the likely barometers? what will be conversation be between theresa may and the dup? the dup have found themselves in a position that they have never been in before, as potential kingmakers in a hung parliament. perhaps understandably they are not giving away too much publicly as to what the price of their support might be. but if you look at what they have said in the past about this, and their manifesto this time around, you might get some clues. in 2015, when everyone expected a hung parliament that did not actually happen, the dup spoke often of what they would do, what their attitude would be if they found themselves in a position of influence. 0n found themselves in a position of influence. on that occasion they said they would not want to take ministerial positions but they would rather support a government in a supply arrangement. but this time they have not specified whether they
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would ask for seats around a cabinet table or whether they would accept a confidence and supply move. as regards policies, they may ask for financial assistance for northern ireland for the likes of infrastructure projects. but if you look at the manifesto, some of the economic losses, on the broader issues they say they would want a triple lock on pensions to be retained, to cut vat for the tourism businesses, to have the personal tax allowa nce to businesses, to have the personal tax allowance to be increased. you may well get some discussion around broader policy issues, notjust matters that affect northern ireland solely. a big one will be brexit. the dup passionately supported brexit until the rise of ukip. they we re brexit until the rise of ukip. they were probably the most eurosceptic party in the uk. they were against membership of the european common market. they pushed for some kind of flexibility for northern ireland, a stronger voice around the brexit negotiating table. but particularly when it comes to that all—important
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issue here of border control between northern ireland and the republic, they have said as theresa may has set herself, that they want crossing the border to remain as seamless and frictionless as possible. so you can expect that to be high up on their wish list. clearly a strong night for sinn fein and the dup, but remarkable to think, women go back 30 years, the sdlp, with nothing —— when we go back 30 years. yes, the dup and sinn fein have taken their dominance to a whole new level, we did not think they would wipe out the sdlp but thatis they would wipe out the sdlp but that is what has unfolded overnight. dup gaining a couple of seats and sinn fein gaining three seats. the independent unionist is the only other party, so this is a disastrous
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night for the sdlp, having no seats left at westminster and there will be no irish nationalist representation on the benches of the westminster because sinn fein do not ta ke westminster because sinn fein do not take their seats. now, westminster because sinn fein do not take theirseats. now, once westminster because sinn fein do not take their seats. now, once again, they are reduced to no mps and the last time they won a couple of seats back after going without mps for five years, and now their tally amounts to zero once more. chris, thanks. 0ur correspondent in belfast with the latest on the picture in northern ireland which is a very important part of the government jigsaw. the former deputy speaker nigel evans now joins jigsaw. the former deputy speaker nigel evans nowjoins us. how are you? a very unexpected story in some ways, what do you make of it? totally baffled, normally when you win 43% of the national vote, that
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is what you expect, that is what tony blair got when he had 44%, a landslide, but that did not happen for us. why? the campaign was going swimmingly until we launched our ma nifesto. swimmingly until we launched our manifesto. and then on the horizon, in the distance, as our line was heading towards this landslide victory, which we never really believed we thought we would get a big majority, but nothing like 150 but we managed to steer the ship straight towards the iceberg called social care and the triple lock and the winter weather payments and quite frankly that is what people wa nted quite frankly that is what people wanted to talk about. and for several days week derailed our own campaign and we hijacked our successful campaign and we were not talking about the labour party any more and what their policies were, we we re more and what their policies were, we were talking about our social ca re we were talking about our social care policies and trying to justify them and then we had to clarify them. the whole thing went downhill from there. who takes responsibility? i want to know who
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was responsible for putting that in the manifesto. quite frankly, there has got to be... i know you want to know whether i'm supporting theresa may, and the answer is yes. 43% of the vote, we did very well in scotla nd the vote, we did very well in scotland and we were making some games, but the fact is, we had a range of seats that we should have been winning, we couldn't win lancaster and fleetwood, we could not even windy city of chester, and soa not even windy city of chester, and so a load of our candidates that should have been winning were absolutely slain on the cross of our own manifesto —— we could not even win the city of chester. questions have got to be asked about the governance and the style of governance and the style of governance and the style of governance and we cannot continue this way. had the bear traps been shown to some of the older and wiser cabinet members before the manifesto had been announced, surely it would
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not even have featured in the ma nifesto, not even have featured in the manifesto, it has cost us the general election. he would have do acknowledge that theresa may is the authority behind the manifesto and really there has been talk about the way that she runs things with a very tight—knit team, the point you are making about not canvassing opinion more widely. is it possible for her to retain authority going into such a very challenging period? not least with the brexit talks in ten days' time. i believe so. this will be talked about in the 1922 committee, i'm one of thejoint talked about in the 1922 committee, i'm one of the joint secretaries on that committee. theresa may, i'm certain, will want to explain how there is going to be a change in the way that we are going to do things. had some of the cabinet ministers seen that policy beforehand, surely that would never have featured in our manifesto at all. never have i seen a very our manifesto at all. never have i
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seen a very successful campaign until that point being hijacked by ourselves, we hijacked our own campaign. and then it was a disaster from then on in. so if any colleague of yours asks for the prime minister to stand down, you will say they are wrong? i will be supporting her, yes, supporting theresa may to come toa yes, supporting theresa may to come to a coalition deal with the dup. in 11 days' time we're going to be starting brexit discussions and theresa may did manage to get 43% of the vote and in normal times that would have been a very good majority, but the fact is, in many seats, it was polarised, the lib dems were hammered in many seats, in southport where they had held that say, they ended third and the conservatives gained that seat. 43% was a very strong conservatives gained that seat. 43% was a very strong percentage, but the labour party were able to talk
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about the things they were offering including tuition fees and people turned out that don't normally turn out. and they've managed to get 41% of the vote and they've managed to cling onto many of those seats that otherwise would have gone the way of conservatives, even in my own seat. my conservatives, even in my own seat. my vote was almost 32,000, the biggest ever, but also the labour party vote went to just over 18000 and that is the biggest it has ever been. the liberal democrat vote was crushed and so was the green party vote, and ukip were crushed all over the place. 0ne vote, and ukip were crushed all over the place. one would normally expect that the ukip vote would mostly come to the conservative party, but that simply didn't happen. i heard people saying, i voted simply didn't happen. i heard people saying, ivoted ukip simply didn't happen. i heard people saying, i voted ukip and i was going to vote conservative, but the fact is now, i have seen your manifesto, what you are going to do to my winter weather payments, i'm not coming with you. that has costed us
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a lot of seats. nigel evans, thanks. we can talk to another prominent conservative, the former cabinet minister nicky morgan. what do you think of the position this morning? clearly it was stunning, a big shock to everyone, you can see that on the faces throughout the night and this is not the result that any of us wanted. when the prime minister called the election in april. it has been a tough seven weeks, and the first thing i want to say, i feel for colleagues who have lost their seats because it is hard enough to bea seats because it is hard enough to be a candidate and think you are going to win, but to be someone who has been an mp and then not to be an mp this morning is a two mendis shock and we are all feeling very much for them. —— shock and we are all feeling very much forthem. —— is shock and we are all feeling very much for them. —— is a tremendous shock. the thought about potential threats to the position of theresa
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may, which we discussed with nigel eva ns. may, which we discussed with nigel evans. how do you think she can carry on in terms of her for it? evans. how do you think she can carry on in terms of herfor it? her authority has been badly damaged by this result? this is the result that she absolutely did not want and that none of us wanted and that will make life difficult. i think she should carry on and she is entitled as the prime minister to see if she is able to form a government and there has been talk... you were talking about the dup and a potential coalition with them, and it is right that she does. people want there to be some. . . does. people want there to be some... clarity about leadership, we have the brexit negotiations starting in 11 days' time and there isa starting in 11 days' time and there is a cabinet in place we have the brexit secretary david davis who can start those talks, and that should happen. there will be a discussion within the conservative party, clearly, about the campaign. can you
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tell viewers that following this campaign and indeed the events that happened before the campaign, that you have confidence in theresa may's leadership this morning?” you have confidence in theresa may's leadership this morning? i think theresa may is absolutely a competent and more than capable prime minister and leader of the party but clearly there has been mis—judgement in the way we started off, thinking there would be a significant win for the conservative party and that hasn't happened and we need to understand why. but there is having a government prepared to negotiate brexit which is what most people now want and there is what is going to happen in the conservative party which is for us to deal with and i'm not sure that is a great wider interest to the electorate. nicky morgan, the former conservatives cabinet minister. we are surprised because the polls before the exit poll on the whole set the conservatives would win big.
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two years ago when i was a pollster, we got it badly wrong and we said it would be a hung parliament and it wasn't, but this time the polls have gone the other way. they overstated the conservatives lead. two pollsters can hold up their heads high, the first is one of the newer companies which has been saying consistently for the last ten days that it was a very tight race. their figures pointed to a hung parliament. and my old company yougov, they collected data every week, 7000 a day, and they then produced very bravely a look at each constituency and they were widely mocked. they said amber rudd might be in trouble in hastings and she was in trouble. they were mocked when they said labour mike windt canterbury, and it did. —— might win. so my old company, nothing to
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do with me now, but they did something very brave, and they got it right. the times newspaper had those polls but they kept saying this is a very brave and surprising poll and they put them further and further to one side. it is interesting. you mentioned the times and andrew neil has a guest from the press with him. we do indeed. it has started to rain here. maybe tory tea rs. started to rain here. maybe tory tears. plenty of weeping and gnashing of teeth, but we have two loyal members of her majesty's press. kevin maguire of the daily mirrorand press. kevin maguire of the daily mirror and james from the spectator magazine. theresa may has malfunctioned, the how long can she survived as prime minister? that is
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a very good question, the cabinet we re a very good question, the cabinet were debating this in the early hours of last night, and some people thought she has got to carry on in the national in with the brexit negotiations so close —— the national interest. i think she will carry on for a short period of time. the tory party want to get back into office, they don't want another election in the autumn. they worry about the momentum, which is with labour and another election would be even worse. that happened in 1974 when harold wilson won for labour, but badly, and then he had a small overall majority in october.” but badly, and then he had a small overall majority in october. i think she would do a deal with the dup and then she will govern for a period of time. all the authority she had has gone now. even those people in the cabinet who say they want her to stay are talking about how the style has got to change and there needs to be collective decision—making, and
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so this will be a difficult and different premiership from the one she had before. she has never changed, why would she change now? she made a virtue of that, but that has backfired badly for the we remember when she said she had no intention of having a general election is not that long ago, and now she has said she has no intention of resigning, but we take this with a pinch of salt. she will never fight another election. the tories will not let that happen. they are very ruthless and that is why they have been in power for most of the past century and at some stage they will push her out. she has gone from someone who had a magic spell, broken completely, her for it is shot to pieces. —— her authority. by seeking to consummate the marriage she has made it worse. philip hammond is not a more
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charismatic politician than theresa may. amber rudd... he is still chancellor? he is probably laughing now. what about david davis questioner is getting a lot of blame —— what about david davis? questioner is getting a lot of blame -- what about david davis? he is getting blame because he said that she should go for this early election. there is a brexit backlash was borisjohnson has a £350 million problem. amber rudd has enhanced reputation, and she has a wafer thin majority in hastings and there is a question of whether you can be prime minister when the majority in your own constituency is so small. ruth davidson has, with her reputation enhanced but she's not even an mp —— has come out. john mcdonnell has said labourare in
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has come out. john mcdonnell has said labour are in stand—by to form a minority government but no deals with the snp and the lib dems. that is not how a minority government works. there would be backroom deals, of course, it means no formal coalition as we saw between the conservatives and the liberal democrats. you could not do it otherwise. it would be very difficult to organise and the arithmetic is against you. the finishing line is 322 because the seven sinn fein mps have abstained. it will be 318, 319, they will do the deal with the dup who will extra ct a the deal with the dup who will extract a huge price for this coalition of chaos, which will be created. they will want the border with the republic of ireland which rules out a very hard exit. labour is waiting in the wings, hoping

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