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tv   Election 2017  BBC News  June 9, 2017 7:00pm-9:01pm BST

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it's seven o'clock and we're at westminster, where theresa may is putting together a new minority government, after a disastrous night for the conservatives in the general election. the election that was never meant to happen resulted in a dramatic reversal for the conservatives, who won only 318 seats asjeremy corbyn‘s labour made gains. mrs may has apologised to her colleagues who've lost their seats, and now the party is having to depend on support of the democratic unionists to govern. in the days and weeks ahead, it is the union that will be to the forefront of our minds, the union is oui’ forefront of our minds, the union is ourguiding star. key posts in the cabinet are announced, with no change at the top. borisjohnson remains foreign secretary, amber rudd home secretary, and philip hammond stays as chancellor. it was a great turnout for labour, who won 40% of the popular vote, and jeremy corbyn insisted
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he could lead a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time. the party that has lost in this election is the conservative party. and on the losing side were the liberal democrats, the snp who lost a third of their seats and ukip, whose leader paul nuttall resigned. the election was called to strengthen the prime minister's hand over brexit, so where does this leave the negotiations now? we'll bring you more on that and all the latest from downing street on this most unexpected of election results. it's seven o'clock.
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welcome to westminster, where theresa may is constructing a government, despite losing her commons majority after the snap election she called just seven weeks ago. the outcome — a hung parliament — is now slowly sinking in. the conservatives do remain the largest party, but they'll need the help of northern ireland's democratic unionist party, to sustain a government. labour exceeded expectations, gaining seats in scotland, england and wales, while it was a night of setbacks for the scottish national party. so let's recap on the results of an election, that theresa may, didn't have to call, but has now left the country with a hung parliament. with all but one seat declared — kensington in west london — the conservatives have 318, eight short of a majority. labour has 261, the snp 35, with the liberal democrats on 12, and the dup ten. so labour ended up winning an extra 29 seats, and far
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from increasing their majority as many predicted, the conservatives actually lost 12. the snp shed 21. in the end the conservatives had a vote share of 42.44%, with labour at a0%. both parties increasing their slice of the ballots cast. ukip‘s support however collapsed, falling by 10%. our first report is from our political editor, laura kuenssberg on the results. this report does contain flash photography. is this strong and stable, prime minister? she who dares doesn't always win. the most votes, the most seats, but under this stinging glare, no iron gates nor police protection can shield theresa may from the accusation she looks a political loser. the trappings of power, the visit to the palace,
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help from northern irish mps mean she can gather enough support to stay on. but having believed herself to be on the brink of a sizeable majority, going backwards seems like defeat. i have just been to see her majesty the queen and i will now form a government. a government that can provide certainty and to lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. this government will guide the country through the crucial brexit talks that begin in just ten days. not a single mention of the result. what the country needs more than ever is certainty and having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability
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to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. this will allow us to come together as a country and channel our energies towards a successful brexit deal that works for everyone in this country, securing a new partnership with the eu which guarantees our long—term prosperity. that's what people voted for last june. that's what we will deliver. now, let's get to work. so theresa may walks back into number ten still prime minister but damaged, diminished, a smallerfigure. thank you very much! jeremy corbyn is not the victor. labour lost as badly as they did in 2010. but he looks it. behind by more than 60 seats, but so much further on than anyone had expected. many young voters' dreams,
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the tories‘ nightmare. incredible result for the labour party because people voted for hope. young people and old people all came together yesterday. very high turnout, huge increase in the labour vote and they did it because they want to see things done differently and they want hope in their lives. coffee for tory staffers this morning instead of celebratory champagne. the loss of so many seats burst their balloons. are you stepping down, mrs may? traditional election rules showed few clues to theresa may's retreat. boris, does your party need a new leader? should it be you? by morning, words in the wind of ministers who might think of their own manoeuvres. because what was surprise at the start... and what we're saying is the conservatives are the largest party. note that they don't have an overall majority at this stage. ..gradually, seat after seat,
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was glorious shock for labour. loss after loss for the conservatives. no obvious pattern or geography to start with. but a hung parliament. # we'll keep the red flag flying here...# with no overall winner becoming clear. we cannot see any way at all that the conservatives can get to the 326 mark and we think it's pretty clear that there is going to be a hung parliament. was he grabbing a victory of sorts? well, over the sceptics in his party... politics isn't going back into the box where it was before. what had seemed her unassailable lead at the startjust melted away. personal as well as political loss
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written all over her face. as we ran this campaign, we set out to consider the issues that are the key priorities for the british people. the tories care about winning. it wasn't long for the first call for her to go. she's a very talented woman and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions, but she now has to obviously consider her position. but no others publiclyjoined. discipline perhaps? or some cheerfrom tories‘ big wins in scotland, a separate campaign fought with 13 seats won, levels of support not seen for years. the tories and labour in scotland dragged the snp down from their high point. the bubble pricked even for alex salmond. other parties took heavy fire. the lib dems adding seats but losing their biggest household name, perhaps loved and loathed.
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nuttall, paul andrew, ukip. .. and in reverse, another ukip leader took his leave. no party though can govern alone. meet the ten strong democratic unionist party, northern irish mps who will prop theresa may up. the prime minister has spoken with me this morning and we will enter discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation. 0thers, though, calling for her to go. we will work with others if it is at all possible to keep the tories out of government. she put her party before her country, she has been found out. she should be ashamed. it's an act the westminster circus did not expect. i think labour mps have been shocked by how well we've done. and lot of them will recognise jeremy's here and will take us into the next election and they will start to work with him. i think we've witnessed a political earthquake and i am going to be the first or second or third person
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to say that jeremy has had a character explosion. you must accept, though, that a hung parliament makes the government less stable, less strong. i accept this isn't the result we wanted. it's not a great result. i'm not here sugar—coating this view. i'm telling you that of the options once the people have decided at the ballot box, this is the clear one that gives the country certainty. but only later this afternoon did the prime minister acknowledged that anything had gone wrong. i had wanted to achieve a larger majority, but that was not the result that we secured and i'm sorry for all those candidates and hard—working party workers who weren't successful. she won more votes, more seats, she keeps this address, but her gamble failed. the electorate can damn with faint praise. the cabinet reshuffle is already under way and our correspondent
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ben wright is at downing street with the latest. then, all the top post staying the same. no real surprise there. not a surprise considering what happened last night. there had been speculation during the campaign that philip hammond, the chancellor, might be in trouble. he barely had any role in this campaign, kept out of sight and it was thought, had theresa may been returned a thumping majority, she might have wanted to have a switch in the treasury. the fa ct have a switch in the treasury. the fact she has reappointed all the key people to theirjob straightaway is a sign of her weakness. philip hammond stays where he is, boris johnson stays in the foreign office, michael fallon stays in defence, amber rudd in the whole office, the big jobs are staying where they are. it is continuity. there will have to bea it is continuity. there will have to be a reshuffle in the lower ranks because eight ministers lost their seats last night so there will have
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to be changes made. but this was a reshuffle that changes pretty much nothing and as i said, demonstrates that she does not have the political capital to do anything dramatic at the moment. when are we likely to get any further announcement on appointments? the expectation is over the weekend, clive. it would be today, we don't think. theresa may hasjust left number ten out the back. not sure where she has gone, but she didn't go through the front gate and so she didn't see the relatively... well, large protest at the bottom of the downing street on white hole with cha nts downing street on white hole with chants of "vote jeromy downing street on white hole with chants of "votejeromy keogan" wafting up here. there is a buzz among the jeromy keogan wafting up here. there is a buzz among thejeromy keogan supports tonight. thank you. annita mcveigh is at stormont. the dup are underfire
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the dup are under fire for the breakdown of power—sharing in stormont. they are now power brokers uncork the walk. that's right,. uncork the walk. that's right, . the uncork the walk. that's right,. the dup, despite those controversies recording their best ever election results this morning, or this afternoon, when they held a news conference at a hotel near here, they looked incredibly confident. they were feeling that the ball was very much in their court. they did not give as much detail about what they were going to be asking for it, if any at all, and i think over the next couple of days, that is what they will be doing when they sit together in discussions. the dup will think about what exactly it wants to ask theresa may for, what will be the price for supporting her? we know that theresa may, when she went to see the queen at buckingham palace earlier today, said that she was going to form a minority government.
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on the understanding of the previously good working relationship of the democratic unionist party. but i understand that when she had a phone call with arlene foster, the dup reader, earlier that nothing substantive had been discussed at that point. it is interesting that basically theresa may was working on the premise of the previous relationship with the dup rather than anything that had been discussed in detail today. presumably, those discussions are going to get much more detailed over the next 48 hours or so. they do have a history of cooperation. there is no question about that. but the dup, they are socially conservative, anti—abortion, do not believe in gay marriage and so on. do we have any idea marriage and so on. do we have any id ea exa ctly marriage and so on. do we have any idea exactly how they are going to work together potentially in the future? well, we know that it won't be, we
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understand it won't be any sort of formal coalition as we saw when the conservatives and liberal democrats shared power with david cameron and nick clegg, of course. but it would be possibly a issue by issue arrangement with the conservatives seeking the support of the democratic unionist party issue by issue. in terms of what the dup would be the king in return for that support, certainly one thing they would be looking for would—be increased investment into northern ireland. they would also be, of course, making their voice very clear in terms of brexit negotiations. they do not want a ha rd negotiations. they do not want a hard border. they have used the term frictionless borderjust like theresa may has done, but they are not keen on a customs union. we do not keen on a customs union. we do not know exactly what any alternative arrangement they would wa nt to alternative arrangement they would want to the customs union would look like, so there would be a lot of detail to be worked out on brexit and, of course, theresa may would
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have the balancing act of keeping the dup happy while keeping the members of her party happy and then the other big question around this is how compatible can be discussions that the dup havret theresa may at any arrangement they come to be with any arrangement they come to be with any discussions the dup have to have here at stormont about the turn of the power—sharing assembly. the 29th ofjune is the date the northern ireland secretary has given to the parties here to try to come to an agreement by, that they will get things up and running again, for example nominating a first and deputy first minister. that is another tricky balancing act that needs to be considered in all of this. thank you for that. let's chew over all this now with matt zarb—cousin, a former spokesperson forjeremy corbyn, and katie perrier
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who is former director of communications for theresa may. i will start with you, katie. it must have been incredibly difficult for theresa may to come out and attempt to show some strength and fortitude given that she brought all this on herself. she does actually have quite good in strength and resilience. she has this kind of commitment to public servers that goes all the way back to being a local councillor in her early 20s so idid find local councillor in her early 20s so i did find someone when i worked in number ten who had that strength and quality about her. she will wear this on her shoulders. she will feel responsibility but she will feel the need to carry the country forward in this difficult time. a couple of comparisons have been made with hillary clinton in the sense that on the public stage, in an arena, a bit stiff, wooden, robotic but on a one—to—one level, very personable and charming. but i wonder, is that theresa may behind—the—scenes? issue someone theresa may behind—the—scenes? issue
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someone who is much more relaxed than she exhibits which is in front of the camera? theresa may is actually very witty. you wouldn't think that when you see her in front of the camera, but she can joke brilliant day. i have been in meetings when she has had us all in stitches. you don't see that in public. ruth davidson, the tory scottish leader, she is a laugh a minute. why doesn't it come out? because she is shy and she does not love doing media. on the one hand, it is quite refreshing. i sell it to journalists, she doesn't demand the limelight, she does not want to be the front page of the paper and all over the news all the time. she raises when she wants to speak and then goes back again instead of being in the spotlight all the time. but she can occasionally looked uncomfortable as a result. matt, anyone with a certain amount of grey hairs andi anyone with a certain amount of grey hairs and i am one of those has probably been to eightjeremy corbyn rally in the last couple of years and it was interesting seeing him on
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the stump in this election. he looked as if he was on a campaign rally from ten years ago, 15 years ago, he seemed so natural and so up for it in a way that theresa may just couldn't exhibit.|j for it in a way that theresa may just couldn't exhibit. i think jeremy corbyn has this quite unique ability in politics to draw massive crowds wherever he goes. i think the optics of that were quite important in this campaign because for the la st two in this campaign because for the last two years, he has been very much stigmatised by the press and i think it was important to legitimise support for him. these kinds of rallies, anyone who was there when he was on stage at wirral live with the libertines, people were chanting his name. it is rare to have that in modern politics. he energised young people and we saw that in the increased turnout. he didn't look out of place with the libertines, interesting! this is the third election labour have lost. yes, it was a huge turnout, but the party is
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still way away from winning. we have lost seats, we have lost votes and seats since there's 97. and yesterday, we gained... a higher share of the vote then we have had since 1997. we had the biggest swing to any political party since 1945. and obviously, we are going in the right direction and i think the whole labour party can see that the jeremy corbyn project is something they can get behind and it is very important that we break from the past and break from that failed economic consensus and we offer an alternative to people and i think thatis alternative to people and i think that is something people can buy into. all right, 0k. matt, katie, good to see you. thank you for your reflections on an interesting night in british politics. one of several shocks last night, came in kent, where canterbury elected a labour mp for the first time since the constituency was formed at the end of the first world war. the sitting tory mp sirjulian brazier held the seat for the last 30 years.
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our correspondentjune kelly has been speaking to young voters there. well, there is a big student population in canterbury. three universities in this city and we are at the university of kent with some students. first of all, can i ask you how you voted and why?|j students. first of all, can i ask you how you voted and why? i voted labour are mainly because i think with jeremy corbyn labour are mainly because i think withjeremy corbyn i felt labour are mainly because i think with jeremy corbyn i felt that labour are mainly because i think withjeremy corbyn i felt that he was a more genuine politician. you hear all of the young people say that they will not bother voting because all the people are the same but i felt this time we had a genuine chance of change, so i felt i wanted to grab hold of that rather than just have another politician who follows the status quo, essentially. what about you? i voted labour as well. why? i find jeremy corbyn more trustworthy than theresa may. i think he cares for people and generally for me, i think economic leaves its me better. even though he
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and his party are still in opposition. it has taken a while, obviously, for the country to gain labour's crossed again because a few years ago it wasn't so great under their control and we have had a tory leadership now but the vote has prove n leadership now but the vote has proven that a lots more people don't trust them any more and so i feel that labour the right way to go but if we have a transition period where we have a lot of the major parties making decisions then that mighte lot of students we thought spoke to today faulted labour. how did you vote ? today faulted labour. how did you vote? i voted labour. today faulted labour. how did you vote? ivoted labour. i've looked today faulted labour. how did you vote? i voted labour. i've looked at the local mps. i looked at his voting history and did not agree with a lot of the things that our old mp had voted for. you voted against gay marriage and stuff like that but i really did not agree with andl that but i really did not agree with and i think rosa duffy seems to be
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more of a positive local mp. she seems to be very supportive of students and we see that is good for us as students and we see that is good for us as students. on that point about stu d e nts us as students. on that point about students was the tuition fees. was that a big point for you? jeremy corbyn were saying he would get rid of tuition fees. yes, i think pretty much all students... no student must have huge debt over them for the re st of have huge debt over them for the rest of their life, until they can pay it off but for a lot of people, it is an extremely long time. and it was free tuition until very recently. relatively recently in the 19905 recently. relatively recently in the 1990s when it was £3000 and it has gone up and up and up and i don't know how, you know, realistic it is to make tuition fees free now but i think it is a positive step in the right direction. what were the big issues for you? i am running out of money! yeah, like, ifind him very trustworthy. i voted labour as well, surprise, surprise! ifind him very
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trustworthy, i like the fact that he is one of the mps in parliament that has had the lowest expenses claims. epic that is what is being a politician is about. it is about serving the people that are going to be in your country in the future and not having several houses? maybe that's a sweeping statement and it's very, i guess, that's a sweeping statement and it's very, iguess, basic that's a sweeping statement and it's very, i guess, basic student statement to make from my limited perspective, but from where i am standing, i feel like he perspective, but from where i am standing, ifeel like he is the person who will look after our generation, will look after working class and lower middle—class families like mine and ifeel like he is in touch with the majority of the country. ben, what about you? what were the big issues with you? mainly brexit and tuition fees, to be honest. what about brexit specifically? specifically the fact that, to be honest, i didn't believe
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the whole match that no deal was better than a bad deal because no deal is a bad deal. and she kept on asking for people to give her a much larger majority. i took the view that if she gets a much larger majority than most of them will be brexit ears, especially looking at the candidate she put forward. so there we have a range of views from there we have a range of views from the university of kent. bacteria. —— back to you. so, theresa may's convinced she can form a government, with help from "friends and allies" the dup. my colleague christian fraser looks at the workings of hung parliaments, and how the conservatives might now govern. we don't have as much experience with hung parliaments in the uk as they do on the continent, but we have had one as recently as 2010. you will recall that after five frantic days of negotiation, david cameron went into coalition with nick clegg's liberal democrats — a government that lasted the full five—year term. it's unlikely we're going to get
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a coalition this time. but the conservatives can still govern, and here's why. 326 is the magic number. it's an absolute majority, it's just over half of the constituencies in the uk. the conservatives are eight short. in fact, the number is usually a bit less than this because sinn fein don't take their seats and the speaker doesn't vote. nonetheless, the conservatives can have a go at it because they have the most seats in parliament. and that's what theresa may's doing right now. she's taking initiative. she went off to see the queen just after lunchtime today because she thinks she can form a government. what she has to ensure is that by the time they come to the queen's speech, there's a majority of mps in parliament that will support her platform. or to put it another way, she has to ensure there is a majority of mps that aren't going to vote against it. so let's take a look at the numbers. what i'm going to do as i'm going to build a left—leaning alliance. not a coalition, but parties on the left that might supportjeremy corbyn.
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there is 261 for labour. we put in the snp, the liberal democrats. let's put in plaid cymru, and also the one green mp. and you'll see that they're short of the magic number, and actually shorter than the conservatives' number on 313. so they're five short of where the conservatives are. but then look what happens to the conservatives if you put the dup with them. the biggest party in the northern ireland assembly, ten seats, and they're over that magic number. so they have potentially 328 mp5. what kind of relationship with this be with the dup? well, there are three options, potentially. a formal coalition, or they could have a much more informal relationship where they vote on a vote—by—vote basis. or they could have what we call "confidence and supply", whereby the dup agree to vote with the government on key issues like a budget, or a vote that might bring down the government, in return for a price. the one thing to say, though, is that these two parties do have
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long—standing connections, and the dup has voted with the conservatives many times before. a couple of important dates for you before we finish. this one — june 13th. that is when the new parliament meets. after that through the week new mps will be sworn in. this is the date by which theresa may has to be confident that she's got that majority of mps — a week on monday, june 19th. incidentally, what happens if after that point, after the queen's speech, there is a leadership contest, or theresa may decides to stand aside? well, the conservatives would still remain in power while any leadership contest follows. christian fraser reporting there. theresa may says she'll lead a minority government despite the general election ending in a hung parliament. christian fraser has just been
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looking at all the details concerning that. so, let's recap on the results of the election that was never meant to happen. with all but one seat declared, kensington in west london, the conservatives have 318 seats — 8 short of a majority. labour has 261, and the snp 35, with the liberal democrats 12 and the dup10. labour gained 29 seats and, far from increasing their majority, as many predicted, the conservatives actually lost 12 seats. the snp shed 21. the conservatives took 42.4% of the votes cast. labour ended up on 40%. so both parties increased their share of the electorate. but ukip's support collapsed, by 10%. speaking outside no 10, theresa may said she intended to form a government with northern ireland's democratic unionist party, to provide "certa i nty" and deliver brexit. us? alan will be back on bbc. get! early next year. there will be a lot of on telly next year. if you can wait that long. having secured the largest number
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of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commending a majority in the house of commons. the fallout from last night's election is slowly beginning to emerge. let's take a look at the latest developments tonight. theresa may has apologised to conservatives who lost their seats, insisting she won't resign and herfocus remains on forming a government ahead of brexit talks beginning in ten days. tonight, she's released details of her cabinet with the top five posts staying unchanged, including the chancellor philip hammond, foreign secretary boris johnson and home secretary amber rudd. she only just held onto her seat by 346 votes. mrs may now needs the support of northern ireland's democratic unionists, who have 10 seats at westminster. their leader, arlene foster, says she'll begin talks with the prime minister. but there's speculation about what the dup might demand in exchange for its support. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn
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has exceeded all expectations, gaining 29 seats and winning 40% of the vote. that's the biggest increase in the share of the vote by a labour leader since clement attlee in 1945. jeremy corbyn says labour is ready to form a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time. the party that has lost in this election is the conservative party. the liberal democrats now have 12 seats — up four on their total in 2015. but their former leader, nick clegg, lost his seat in sheffield hallam. it was a bad night for nicola sturgeon and the governing scottish national party which lost 21 mp5, including the seat held by the former leader, alex salmond. the conservatives gained 12 seats — their best result in scotland since 1983.
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the leader of the uk independence party, paul nuttall, is standing down with immediate effect. ukip failed to win any seats in parliament, and its share of the vote collapsed. finally, a surge in the youth vote may have proved crucial tojeremy corbyn's gains last night. young voter turnout has been estimated at 72%. overall turnout was 69%, the biggest since 1997. remember there's still one seat yet to declare in london, where a third count in the borough of kensington and chelsea has been taking place. our bbc london political editor, tim donovan, is there. are we any closer to finding out who's won the seat? well, someone said a short time ago that we might get a result. or rather the outcome of the third recount! by about 8:30.
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they resumed proceedings here shortly after 6pm, after a ten hour hiatus where staff had been allowed to go home and get some sleep. they stopped at around seven o'clock this morning after a second recount produced some discrepancies in the bundles and paperwork. the returning officer took the view that rather than start this again when things we re than start this again when things were beginning to get frazzled, and it was so close, we are told, he paused it. you can see now that this is what's going on. they're having their third go. we uphold maybe 8:30, but no guarantee that that is the end. the conservatives indicate so far that they have been challenging these counts. we heard from labour sources the first time round that labour might have been around ahead by around 50 votes, thenit around ahead by around 50 votes, then it came down to 30. we were know the details of the second recount, but you can see what we're dealing with. we are dealing with ha ndfuls dealing with. we are dealing with handfuls of votes. people are
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optimistic that this time, or the next time, we may finally get an outcome. and it's worth saying how important or what the big deal this would be for labour, notjust in london but in the country. kensington hasn't been in present form in the labour's hands since 1974. there are parts of this borough, everyone assumes that kensington are part of, like michael portillo and malcolm rifkind who represented the predecessor. but it deduced to include parts of regents park in north london. nevertheless, it is an absolute prize for labour and would be the icing on the cake forjeremy corbyn in london at least. it really does some of the story of the night, what is going on where you are. what are the local factors that have given labour such a massive boost in an area that most people would think of as incredibly
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rich and affluent? very hard to get away from brexit. rumours about labour winning the race, or potentially winning this, came through during one of the early cou nts through during one of the early counts of the evening in battersea, which was extraordinary in itself. there is a young population in battersea as well. we mp there before, jane ellison, a treasury minister, knew there would be a real challenge. because she was the tory mp in the highest remain voting area. certainly in london, and i think actually in the country. so she knew she would face a challenge but she had a majority of something like 7000 swept away. she lost by 4000 and we knew something was moving there. it happened in a couple of other seats as well. the former northern ireland secretary, theresa villiers, she survived by 320 votes. she is an arch brexiteer the representing an area which had
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supported remain, or gone we remain way in the referendum. in south—west london it didn'tjust benefit labour, it benefited the liberal democrats because they came back. ed davey and vince cable came back in kingston and twickenham. we will checkin kingston and twickenham. we will check in with you in the next couple of hours and hopefully there will be a result. many thanks, tim donovan there in kensington. theresa may has said she believes the conservatives are the party to lead britain into the brexit negotiations, despite losses in the general election.0ur correspondent fiona trott has been to stockton—on—tees, in country durham, to gauge reaction. theresa may, i think she's just a fool. i mean, she went into the election trying to endorse her policies, and it's just, unravelled. i think she won't be there long. about europe, what are you worried about? when you have a democratic vote from the people, that mandate should be carried on regardless of what your position is as a politician. they're there to serve. they serve the mandate. in the mandate was leave. are you worried that this brexit isn't going to happen? yes, lam.
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i'm worried that we're just going to open our gates to everybody. obviously, it's two weeks until they start discussions for leaving brexit, which is a bit scary. who did you vote for in the general election? i voted labour. that's a tricky old thing, because voting for labour means you have weakened theresa may's position. yeah, but from my point of view, jeremy corbyn is better for the younger generation. we need that going forward. i voted to come out. hopefully it was the right way to go, and that's what will happen. but if it isn't, all you can do is vote, isn't it, and see what happens then. did you vote labour in this election? yes. but that has weakened theresa may's hand, of course. so for you voting labour was more important than leaving europe? well, yes. charity begins at home, and that is why i voted for the party that would help the people. and that's when i voted labour. i think she will pull through. i think she'll do all right.
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i think she's a strong woman, and i believe in her. with me is sir simon fraser, former head of the foreign office, and baroness kramer, the liberal democrat peer. i was at the ones with canned last night, an area that is 75% remain. and one would have thought perfect territory for the liberal democrats to make some grains. the activists there told me last night they decided to focus further afield, richmond, kingston, twickenham. and it seemed like a strange tactic. because in the end labour actually did pretty well versed kill yellow the reality for us is we are a small party. we don't have anything like the resources of the other parties. and resources are required when you're going to run a proper general election campaign. so we have national candidates, but we have
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today much more selective. people wa nt to today much more selective. people want to give us large donations, i will tell you right now we will be able to expand the number of seats into which we can put that kind of effort. but for us, we hadn't expected an election to come so quickly. we knew we were rebuilding after a tough experience in 2015. and if the election had been called for 2020, you would have seen many more seats up in that position where they were able to go out there and ta ke they were able to go out there and take on for winning the seat. but still, 48% of this country didn't vote for brexit. they wanted to stay in the european union. we know that there are lots of people out there who are very angry about the possibility of a hard brexit, of leaving the single market, and the customs union, and so on. and the liberal democrats really hitched their wagon to courting those people. and it just their wagon to courting those people. and itjust did not take off. in fact a lot of those people
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went to labour. why? if we hadn't had... first of all, it's a matter of principle that is core to our way of principle that is core to our way of thinking. we would want to remain. but with theresa may's decision to leave the single market and leave the customs union, i think we are the only people who have been fighting the battles, certainly in parliament. and in many of the debates and conversations, you could say in many ways that perhaps labour owes us say in many ways that perhaps labour owes us because say in many ways that perhaps labour owes us because we say in many ways that perhaps labour owes us because we exposed the fact by the work that we did that theresa may was taking 48% of people for granted, essentially ignoring them, and telling them that theirjob was to be silent or she would deliver whatever she chose. so we have to make those arguments. but we also get squeezed. because of our current voting system, people might look and say, i don't want that person in. then there very quickly persuaded that the only thing they can do is wait for the other major party, rather than building around a player like ourselves. so we have to do
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things step—by—step. just the reality of being a small party, making great use of the wonderful resources we have and fantastic candidates. that's the reality of why we have to grow. we increased our number of seats, we are pleased with that. the next election we go into, we will increase again, and we will rebuild. very quickly, is tim farron safe? tim farron is definitely safe. good to see you, thank you forjoining us. as we've heard, the gains made by labour across the country may in part have been driven by an increased turnout of younger voters. there's been a greater swing to labour in seats with a higher population of 18— to 24—year—olds. steph mcgovern has been getting reaction from voters in york. she began by asking a labour supporter why he was happy with the result. i think part of it, on the one hand, is the huge levels of youth turnout that's been reported. i mean, i've seen figures like 72%, which if that's the result, that's brilliant. but on the other hand, i think it was that the conservatives thought that they could take
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the ukip vote for granted, and it didn't seem to reflect that way because they were antiestablishment and, at the end of the day, they couldn't endorse theresa may. i know we were talking earlier that it's notjust about student loans and tuition fees, is it? no way, no. a lot of people i know that our young and have voted are necessarily students. we're not unanimously students, not everyone goes to university. i've got a lot of friends in work who are young as well. and it's a similar thing — they've taken an interest and they've not been spoon—fed things any more. they're looking themselves, and going out, finding out manifestos, making their own opinions. i saw a sky thing that had... oh, one of our rivals! is that what you're telling me?! it was like a 36% swing to the conservatives in over 55s. but a 36% swing to labour in 18—30—year—olds. i think it was 30—year—olds.
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so i think that is where the main differences. but obviously because of the turnout, it managed to make a difference this time. yeah, and that has made a big difference. and i know that we've got a conservative voter, ross, and lance, you voted for the liberal democrats. so, what are your thoughts on the result? i said before, i think the lib dems have done well and have more women. i think is it one third of the seats now, of the 12 seats, women, which is a very good thing. jo swinton has been an absolutely amazing mp beforehand, and a minister. and she's back, which is a good thing. norman lamb is back. no, he held his seat. and he's been doing absolutely amazing stuff when it comes to mental health and making sure that mental health and physical health are on parity when it comes to treatment. and obviously nick clegg. he was gone. were you gutted about that? yeah. ross, for you, a conservative voter? it was a disappointing national results, but locally
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a lot of constituencies, we have had a massive increase in the conservative vote. in don valley, for example, my constituency, there is a 16.4% increase in votes there. 19,000 more votes going to the conservatives. in an area where people have taken for granted the idea that it is just a labour constituency. now it is very winnable in the next election for the conservative party, if we play our cards right. the next election, that could be any time soon, couldn't it! october! hopefully not, i need a rest. i think we all need a rest! but what do you think of this tie—up potentially with the dup? the tie—up with the dup, i'm not overly optimistic about. ijust hope we can forge a strong government that produces the brexit that people did vote for, and keeps the economy stable, reinforces enthusiasm from businesses in the uk economy. and i'm reallyjust hoping that we don't get into any economic problems as a result of that. so it's fair to say that despite your political differences you are all agreed that it's good news that more young people voting?
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all: absolutely. that's a good note to end it on. that's it from us here in york. with me is sebastian payne from the financial times, sam coates from the times, and kate mccann from the daily telegraph. corbyn managed to go over all of your publications using young people and using the internet. jeremy
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corbyn had a great campaign. i think that there's no doubting that they a really good job at reaching around, using new ways of communication, galvanising young voters and using the kind of people that perhaps wished they had voted in the european referendum but didn't, and saw brexit and got upset, and decided that this time they were going to engage with democracy in a much more active way. i don't think that newspapers dictate how people vote, the readers of the times, we don't tell people what to do, and you wouldn't expect us to do that. but there's no doubting that even though he didn't emerge as prime minister, one of the winners of the election was jeremy corbyn minister, one of the winners of the election wasjeremy corbyn and the way that he campaigned, surprising everybody, including the times. kates, one of the losers, clearly, is theresa may. a lot of the mainstream press were rooting for her, pushing for her. but there were
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frailties that within the campaign and within herself but simply couldn't get her over the line. and there was criticism, to. throughout there was criticism, to. throughout the campaign people were saying theresa may isn't answering enough questions, she isn't talking about her personality in. there were a series of interviews where people we re series of interviews where people were frustrated that she didn't reveal anything about herself or her style of government. there was criticism about her wooden delivery as teachers and that she repeatedly said strong and stable throughout the campaign. i don't think she avoided criticism in our newspaper and in others, but what i would say isjeremy corbyn and in others, but what i would say is jeremy corbyn made and in others, but what i would say isjeremy corbyn made use of things like video, twitter, much better than the conservatives it. the conservatives have done millimole —— have done really well harnessing of facebook. jeremy corbyn has made use of twitter. he got artist, they have concept, rallies. there was a sense of excitement around his campaign
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andl of excitement around his campaign and i think theresa may's campaign didn't have that momentum. and some of those videos put up by the labour campaign, millions and millions of hits, really quite incredible. is the hard brexit finished, dead, in the hard brexit finished, dead, in the water, over? a lot of people seem the water, over? a lot of people seem excited by that prospect. but don't forget the vast majority of people in this country voted for the conservative and labour party, both of whose manifesto said they wanted to end the free movement of people. a lot of the new mps arriving in parliament might not feel but when way. and crucially there is new lines between the conservatives and dup from northern ireland to bring into question. the dup is very concerned about the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland, and they want to keep britain in the customs union. if that does happen then things might slow down a bit. mps describe it to me as slow down a bit. mps describe it to measa slow down a bit. mps describe it to me as a hard brexit was a train going off the tracks very quickly.
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today we might have found the brake pedal. sam, working with the dup, socially conservative, the conservative party, they would say they've moved on and on a lot of those issues, gay marriage, abortion, and so on. how do you think this relationship is going to work? this is a relationship of convenience. i think they're going to be clear discomforts and the conservative party it. you only have to look at ruth davidson shortly after theresa may announced that the conservative party would be tying up with the dup in order to get those votes to ensure a majority in the house of commons, but only by a little bit. now she is tweeting about a lecture she had given in belfast about gay marriage. i think you can take that as a sign that she is uncomfortable with the stance taken. but there is a broader thing. theresa may has a tiny majority, even with the dup. this is not a
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sustainable proposition. theresa may stood on the steps of downing street today and said, i am offering certainty. she is not, this will not work. this will collapse at some point because she has to put through the commons some of the most complicated legislation that we have ever seen complicated legislation that we have ever seen in order to push the brexit. i think that's impossible. she is essentially on death row as a prime minister and the conservative party doesn't have the energy after a general election to change their leader. but it will come soon. kate, will she survive, and when will she go quiz is difficult to answer because the conservative party doesn't have the appetite to change its leader. jeremy corbyn has won molly votes than anybody thought he would. —— has won more votes. a lot of people think you could do quite well out of a second election. the people who voted for him the first time want to see him deliver his manifesto. more people might vote for him the second time. talking about his manifesto, the queen's speech, june 19, that has got to
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change, hasn't it? it's got to be adapted given the disavowal of advice are many voters last night? the conservative manifesto, that is. isa the conservative manifesto, that is. is a conservative government that will be formed and crucially we have heard from theresa may that the key posts in her cabinet of chancellor, home secretary and foreign secretary are not going to change. they will very much be the same people. there might be tweaks, not least because as some are saying might be tweaks, not least because as some are saying you have all of the dup rating for this, who will be wanting something for support this government. whether it is money for an apple in northern ireland, or a hyperlink to belfast, it is all going to be in the queen's speech. —— foran going to be in the queen's speech. —— for an airport in northern ireland. there are a few things for theresa may to be thinking about. going back to the point about when the premise i go, ithink look going back to the point about when the premise i go, i think look to where we are in the autumn. for the foreseeable future, people want calm
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and stability. nobody wants to re move and stability. nobody wants to remove a prime minister at this stage. but tory mps tonight are saying that has got to be a management change. it has to change the way she runs operation. that could win term by the time she gets to the autumn she might not to be able to continue going. good to see you three. forjoining us. tonight voters are coming to terms with the new political landscape. there will be far reaching consequences and across the uk millions of people are asking what it all means for them. our correspondentjon kay has been gauging the mood among voters travelling from dumfries all the way to stroud — here's his report. breakfast time at a truck stop in the scottish borders. news report: theresa may might have to move house... and news is sinking in. it'sjust completely upside down, isn't it? conservatives stacking up seats here, but losing their majority in westminster. he scoffs you look gobsmacked! chaos. that's what we didn't really need. absolutely unbelievable.
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at the till, lee thinks theresa may should blame herself. she's focused too much and brexit, really. she's been trying to drive that down people's throats, and it's not really worked out for her. but in the kitchen, anne thinks a tory—led coalition could be a good thing right now. the best way to go, to get views from both sides. we head south, across the border, to find out why so many people who voted for brexit last year voted labour this time. crewe, in cheshire. i was quite shocked, to be honest. new mum gemma told me the tories just haven't connected with her. they don't really come to places like this and the the real live people. i feel they live in a bit of a bubble. news report: theresa may will meet the queen in the next half an hour... crew has switched from the tory to labour, and market trader punchal said the conservatives should have stuck to the issues he cares about. what were you interested in, what do you want to hear about? health, schooling, education.
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you know? prospects for my kids. i've got two boys, and i don't know where they're going to get a job or anything like that. theresa has shot herself in the foot, actually. because a lot of pensioners have been very unhappy. i've been a staunch supporter of her, but i'm very disappointed. did you vote for her? yes, idid. we carry on down through the midlands. labour has also won constituencies that voted to remain in the eu. like stroud, in rural gloucestershire. this is now one of jeremy corbyn's seats. i think they were resting on their laurels. on the village green we meet pippa, a tory voter. but she says labour worked harder to tempt younger voters. they really touched on what affected people, knocked on the doors and said it. whereas i don't think the conservatives put enough into that. he felt like somebody you can actually believe in. thatjim told me he was simply more impressed withjeremy corbyn than by theresa may.
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i wouldn't trust her as far as i could throw her. i really wouldn't. but you'd trust him, corbyn? i think so, yeah. i'd certainly give him a chance. so, hundreds of miles today, politics in flux, but life rolling on. i'm pleased to say with me is that eric pickles, former secretary of state for communities and local government. good to see you. nice to be her. a number of people are describing theresa may as a lame—duck prime minister. dead prime minister walking. a prime minister who haven't got much time left in office. what are your views on that? utter nonsense. our system operates on the basis of can you get an
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actual parliament, can you get a vote through parliament. she's managed to secure a government that can do that. anybody can be prime minister when times are good. it's how you come out of adversity, and i've got complete confidence that a reasonable come out of this is longer. but this was a self—inflicted wound. she didn't have to call an election. her judgment in making it so presidential and focused around her, relying seemingly, if we are to believe the press, an influential advisers, and not having the kind of cabinet responsibility and input into the manifesto that a lot of people might have expected. and her own personal style and dealing with the voters not turning up to the debate. you say it's utter nonsense that she's a lame—duck prime minister, but she's brought all of this on herself. where is the confidence that she had? never despaired democracy. we asked the people a question. they voted. we didn't come up with a question. they
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voted for more conservatives are voted for more conservatives are voted in record numbers for conservatives. we have a big gap between ourselves and the labour party. so at that point it's the ball to move on, will form a government, and start the process of being in government. she called this election in order to get a stronger hand she felt she needed. the suggestion now is that a hard brexit is off the table. do you believe that there should now be more of a consensual approach, perhaps with some of the other parties, about how to deal with one of the great questions of our time, leaving the european union? i have been on record to say whether she had a majority of 90, 120, 640, that we should always stretch beyond our comfort them. we should always stretch to other parties. but i don't recognise the idea of hard or soft brexit. i think we test that we
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have got to have is can we leave the european union without causing damage either to ourselves, or sue our partners. and i think that is perfectly possible. -- or to our partners. should she leave out the liberal democrats or labour?|j partners. should she leave out the liberal democrats or labour? i think she has made offers in terms of involving people in talks, of regularly informing the house. and given that we are now in a position of first chair of parliament, i think there is every incentive for others to come along and to help. very interesting indeed. it's good to see you, thanks forjoining us. much more from westminster in a few minutes, but now time to look at the weather. a mixed bag for this weekend with warm sunshine and rain are never too far away. braid is pushing its way in through the south—west through the rest of tonight, up towards
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south—west england, wales and northern ireland. lows of 8—9 celsius. warm for many parts of the uk with all that cloud. here is where the rain is on saturday. it clears northern ireland and we will get sunshine with wetter weather pushing into scotland. rain gets stuck across northern england and pushes into the south—west. cool under the rain but cheering up in south—west scotland and northern ireland with sunshine and warmer temperatures. the rain is as overnight, but we see a band of rain pushing towards the south—east of the uk. we could see rain developing on that, too. elsewhere, a fresher feel with sunshine, but plenty of showers in the northwest. it's eight o'clock and we're at westminster, where theresa may is putting together a new minority
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government, after a disastrous night for the conservatives in the general election. i have just been to see her majesty the queen and i will now form a government. a government that can provide certainty and to lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. the election that was never meant to happen resulted in a dramatic reversal for the conservatives to one over the 318 seats asjeremy corbyn's labour made games. —— made games. mrs may has apologised to her colleagues who've lost their seats, and now the party will have to depend on the support of the democratic unionists to govern. in the days and weeks ahead, it is the union that will be to the forefront of our minds, the union is our guiding star. key posts in the cabinet are announced, with no change at the top.
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borisjohnson remains foreign secretary, amber rudd home secretary, and philip hammond stays as chancellor. it was a great turnout for labour, who won 40% of the popular vote, and jeremy corbyn insisted he could lead a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time. the party that has lost in this election is the conservative party. and on the losing side were the liberal democrats, the snp, who lost a third of their seats, and ukip, whose leader paul nuttall resigned. the election was called to strengthen the prime minister's hand over brexit — so where does this leave the negotiations now? we'll bring you more on that and all the latest from downing street on this most unexpected of election results. it's 8 o'clock, welcome
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to westminster, where theresa may is constructing a government, despite losing her commons majority, after the snap election she called just seven weeks ago. the outcome, a hung parliament, is now slowly sinking in. the conservatives do remain the largest party, but they'll need the help of northern ireland's democratic unionist party, to sustain a government. labour exceeded expectations, gaining seats in scotland, england and wales, while it was a night of setbacks for the scottish national party. so let's recap on the results of an election, that theresa may, didn't have to call, but has now left the country with a hung parliament. with all but one seat declared— kensington in west london, the conservatives have 318, eight short of a majority. labour has 261, the snp 35,
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with the liberal democrats on 12, and the dup ten. so labour ended up winning an extra 29 seats, and far from increasing their majority as many predicted, the conservatives actually lost 12. the snp shed 21. in the end the conservatives had a vote share of 42.44%, with labour at 40%. both parties increasing their slice of the ballots cast, ukip's support however collapsed, falling by 10%. our first report is from our political editor, laura kuenssberg on the results, this report does contain flash photography. is this strong and stable, prime minister? she who dares doesn't always win. the most votes, the most seats, but under this stinging glare, no iron gates nor police protection can shield theresa may from the accusation she looks a political loser. the trappings of power,
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the visit to the palace, help from northern irish mps mean she can gather enough support to stay on. but having believed herself to be on the brink of a sizeable majority, going backwards seems like defeat. i have just been to see her majesty the queen and i will now form a government. a government that can provide certainty and to lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. this government will guide the country through the crucial brexit talks that begin in just ten days. not a single mention of the result. what the country needs more than ever is certainty and having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative
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and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. this will allow us to come together as a country and channel our energies towards a successful brexit deal that works for everyone in this country, securing a new partnership with the eu which guarantees our long—term prosperity. that's what people voted for last june. that's what we will deliver. now, let's get to work. so theresa may walks back into number ten still prime minister but damaged, diminished, a smallerfigure. thank you very much! jeremy corbyn is not the victor. labour lost as badly as they did in 2010. but he looks it. behind by more than 60 seats, but so much further on
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than anyone had expected. many young voters' dreams, the tories‘ nightmare. incredible result for the labour party because people voted for hope. young people and old people all came together yesterday. very high turnout, huge increase in the labour vote and they did it because they want to see things done differently and they want hope in their lives. coffee for tory staffers this morning instead of celebratory champagne. the loss of so many seats burst their balloons. are you stepping down, mrs may? traditional election rules showed few clues to theresa may's retreat. boris, does your party need a new leader? should it be you? by morning, words in the wind of ministers who might think of their own manoeuvres. because what was surprise at the start... and what we're saying is the conservatives
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are the largest party. note that they don't have an overall majority at this stage. ..gradually, seat after seat, was glorious shock for labour. loss after loss for the conservatives. no obvious pattern or geography to start with. but a hung parliament. # we'll keep the red flag flying here...# with no overall winner becoming clear. we cannot see any way at all that the conservatives can get to the 326 mark and we think it's pretty clear that there is going to be a hung parliament. was he grabbing a victory of sorts? well, over the sceptics in his party... politics isn't going back into the box where it was before.
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what had seemed her unassailable lead at the startjust melted away. personal as well as political loss written all over her face. as we ran this campaign, we set out to consider the issues that are the key priorities for the british people. the tories care about winning. it wasn't long for the first call for her to go. she's a very talented woman and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions, but she now has to obviously consider her position. but no others publiclyjoined. discipline perhaps? or some cheerfrom tories‘ big wins in scotland, a separate campaign fought with 13 seats won, levels of support not seen for years. the tories and labour in scotland dragged the snp down from their high point. the bubble pricked even for alex salmond. other parties took heavy fire. the lib dems adding seats but losing
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their biggest household name, perhaps loved and loathed. nuttall, paul andrew, ukip. .. and in reverse, another ukip leader took his leave. no party though can govern alone. meet the ten strong democratic unionist party, northern irish mps who will prop theresa may up. the prime minister has spoken with me this morning and we will enter discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation. others, though, calling for her to go. we will work with others if it is at all possible to keep the tories out of government. she put her party before her country, she has been found out. she should be ashamed. it's an act the westminster circus did not expect. i think labour mps have been shocked by how well we've done. and lot of them will recognise jeremy's here and will take us into the next election and they will start to work with him.
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i think we've witnessed a political earthquake and i am going to be the first or second or third person to say that jeremy has had a character explosion. you must accept, though, that a hung parliament makes the government less stable, less strong. i accept this isn't the result we wanted. it's not a great result. i'm not here sugar—coating this view. i'm telling you that of the options once the people have decided at the ballot box, this is the clear one that gives the country certainty. but only late this afternoon did the prime minister acknowledge that anything had gone wrong. i had wanted to achieve a larger majority, but that was not the result that we secured and i'm sorry for all those candidates and hard—working party workers who weren't successful. she won more votes, more seats, she keeps this address, but her gamble failed. the electorate can damn with faint praise. the cabinet reshuffle is under way
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and our correspondent ben wright is at downing street with the latest. we will talk about the shock of last night a little later, but some appointments have been made. theresa may anxious to get on with the government again, as it were. yes. quick to show that she is still the leader of a government, despite this immense act of political self harm she has committed. she has reaffirmed the key characters of the government are going to stay in place. that is perhaps a sign of her weakness, a thought that perhaps philip hammond might leave. he will stay at the treasury, boris johnson will stay at the foreign office, all the big secretary of state ‘s stay where they were. there will be some lower ministerial reshuffling that
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happens over the next couple of days because she lost eight ministers, there are places to fail. on the whole, this is a continuation of government that we had before. we note that the pollsters out there are having their own inquests into how they were so out of kilter with what the result actually was, but the parties themselves have their own pollsters. they must been shocked. were blindsided the rest of us. shocked. were blindsided the rest of us. labour's private polling was saying this could be an 83 style catastrophe. the tories were thinking they would look at and hefty increase. i sent last week with theresa may stirring around key constituencies, this week, all labour held. i was rally in bradford south that the tories haven't won in
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100 years. one of those seas that the tories thought would just fall to them as they turned yorkshire, the midlands, bits of wales blue. that was their expectation and going around on that bus and on the plane, there was no sense that they thought privately this was going off the rails. the way that tour bus carved its way through labour seats was indicative of their con na confidence. now we're being told that there was a bit of a shambolic operation going on. complacency, not well—run, sniping and criticism of people around theresa may. theresa may herself, she put herself front and centre of this campaign and it became patently obvious as the weeks passed that she didn't have the political skills to pull off that starring role. thank you. annita mcveigh is at stormont, for us tonight.
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the dup, they are suspected to be formulating a price. what kind of a price they are putting forward for their loyalty to this minority government of theresa may. absolutely. the dup, they made it very clear at a news conference that they wanted to work on a deal that would be good for northern ireland first and foremost. arlene foster also saying that they want to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation. she talked about the principle of the union being the dup's guiding star in the days ahead in any negotiations. i think they will be considering as a party what they wa nt considering as a party what they want to ask for, how far they might push on any deal, what their
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priority areas will be, what are the things they want most, what might they be prepared to let go. i think they be prepared to let go. i think they want to get something out of this, but they will also want to be pragmatic. that is the position we are in. how quickly these talks happen, how quickly they can come to fruition, we do not know, needless to say theresa may and her people are pushing for confirmation of an arrangement between the dup and the conservatives as quickly as possible. not a formal coalition as we saw with the conservatives and the liberal democrats, but some sort of arrangement with the dup backing perhaps on an issue by issue basis. it may be slightly more formalised than that. we wait to see the exact shape of it. where does all this leave power—sharing and the executive in the building behind you? the executive in the building behind you ? the british executive in the building behind you? the british government in westminster is supposed to be a
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dispassionate honest broker in bringing the two sides together, the unionists and nationalist side. the fa ct unionists and nationalist side. the fact that the british government now has two rely on the dup and the unionists to stay in power, how difficult it is it going to be to foster the kind of relationship with sinn fein that would make power—sharing work? sinn fein that would make power-sharing work? a great question. another big issue to come out of all of this. real concerns in some quarters that theresa may's decision to try and form this deal with the dup could damage efforts to get the northern ireland assembly back up and running. you will remember power—sharing collapsed backin remember power—sharing collapsed back in march and whether those two things are compatible is a really big question. if the northern ireland secretary for example is to be seen as an independent broker in any discussions between the various
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parties, how will those other parties, how will those other parties beyond the dup feel if they know that the northern ireland secretary it in an arrangement with the conservative party. how can the northern ireland secretary be seen as an independent broker? sinn fein, there part, they had a strong election, the strongest showing ever. they don't take their seats in westminster, seven seats. strongest ever showing for dup with ten mps. sinn fein want to be back here on monday to start discussions to start getting power—sharing working again. a deadline on the 29th ofjune said by the secretary of state james brokenshire to make some progress on this for the parties to nominate a first minister and deputy first ministerand make a first minister and deputy first minister and make a definite step towards getting power—sharing back again, whether that will be damaged,
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delayed by the discussions going on between the dup and the conservatives, we don't know at the moment. lots of people seem to think that those two things are not compatible. we will leave it there. thank you very much. when the prime minister called the election, she had a majority, but it was a slim one, and firmly believed a bigger mandate, would strengthen her hand, in the brexit negotiations. but what a risk to take, a throw of the dice that failed, spectacularly. in the end, she lost 12 seats and with it, her parliamentary majority disappeared. our deputy political editor john pienaar looks at how theresa may's gamble failed. who expected to hear or tell this tale today? the story of a leader and her party that felt unstoppable, at times seemed lost. then ended up mocked by enemies, and seen by the rest as having gone from strong and stable to weak and wobbly. theresa may, top of her party, but no longer in charge. there had been a turning point.
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it was awful. the campaign was going swimmingly well until we launched our own manifesto, and did the triple assault on our core vote — the elderly. mrs may never looked like stumbling at the start. it was all about her, britain's most trusted leader — most of all by older voters. we will deliver for britain. but a new social care policy left thousands, including natural conservative supporters, fearing their family homes might go to pay care bills after they had gone. that forced a u—turn — a u—turn she unconvincingly tried to deny. nothing has changed. nothing has changed! we are offering a long—term solution for the sustainability of social care for the future. but no one really believed it. are you embarrassed by this u—turn, prime minister? tory poll ratings suffered.
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furious tories blamed her advisers, and theresa may's way of relying on them, fiona hill and nick timoney, who is said to have come up with the vote—loser of a plan. will he last? through the campaign, tv and radio appearances were dominated by a handful of trusted administers. one in particular, who was sent to debate when her boss said no. theresa may may not be here, but i hope to make a good fist of it. today, the focus is on tories who want more of a role, and a more powerful cabinet as a whole. life is not going to be easy in future. would a bit more cabinet discussion help? there have been a lot of complaints, a lot of feeling that things have been decided by a small group of people, ministers have not been consulted. i think the prime minister would be wise to pay attention to this
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feeling that ministers need to be included in all decisions. you know, any decision that affects their department, it is absurd they are not consulted. theresa may's credit with voters seemed to fade the longer the campaign went on. once, when she was defending tory spending plans. in the labour party manifesto, we know the figures don't add up. what is important... what about your own figures? let the prime minister answer. two terrorist attacks made this an election like no other. mrs may claimed to be the leader to keep them safe, but was challenged time and again about police cuts. austerity was costing them support. jeremy corbyn tapped into the feeling of anti—austerity in the country, and i picked that up on the doorstep. people were tiring of austerity and wanted something different. it is too late for theresa may to correct the failures
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of her campaign, but there is time to pay the price as she plans a parliamentary programme, knowing that any thing that upsets mps risks a humiliating defeat. she had hoped to win freedom on brexit but the danger now is that her hands may be tied. the prime minister's big gamble failed. today, she has spoken of five more years in office but when you are under this kind of pressure, time can fly quickly between one crisis and the next. labour are celebrating a better than expected election, confounding the gloomy predictions at the start of the campaign and gaining 29 seats. labour leaderjeremy corbyn called it an ‘incredible result‘. our correspondent vicki young looks at where and how those labour gains were achieved. # 0h, jeremy corbyn! it wasn't victory, but to jeremy corbyn and his most ardent fans, it felt almost as sweet. many had written him off.
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instead, he delivered labour's largest increase in the share of the vote since the war. his team say he offered voters hope, a positive vision. they want — jeremy's slogan when he stood as leader — straight—talking, honest politics. that's what they want, they want someone to come forward and say, this is what i believe in, this is what i want to implement and this is what i'm going to do. and they support that type of politics. it was exactly what these huge, enthusiastic crowds wanted. all over the country, mr corbyn took his message. our manifesto offers something very, very different. he promised higher pay, more free childcare, to scrap tuition fees, paid for by higher taxes on corporations and the wealthy. and when the results rolled in, it seemed that younger voters were behind the labour surge. the university city of canterbury, a seat which had been held by the conservatives for 100 years, now labour. some think their success stemmed from videos on social media, which had tens of millions
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of views and shares. i think a lot of young people, as well, don't necessarily read all the newspapers that were kind of doing their smear campaign againstjeremy corbyn, so i think people underestimated actually how effective sharing stories and photographs, how effective that was going to be. i pay the university fees, and for people it is just so refreshing to see somebody stick to his word. what do you think about his image and the campaign he ran? i think he did well. i mean, he did turn up to all the debates and stuff. theresa may didn't. ijust think that people are quite interested in his kind of antiestablishment rhetoric and how he has kind of always sat on the backbenches and just been fighting for small people, for the little man, for 35 years. insiders here at labour hq say this result was absolutely a victory forjeremy corbyn. they say he enthused voters, especially the young, by offering clear, popular policies.
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the question now is whether labour mps will finally accept his leadership. last year, mr corbyn was challenged for the top job. today, his former rival was eating humble pie. well, i was clearly wrong in feeling that jeremy wouldn't be able to do this well, and i think he has proved me wrong and lots of people wrong, and i take my hat off. i don't know whatjeremy‘s got, but if we could bottle it and drink it, we'd all be doing very well. others praise mr corbyn's performance but point out that power is still some way off. we can win over former conservative voters, but we need to understand why, despite the fact that they often identify with our values, they didn't vote for us this time. and so, that's not a negative process, it's a positive process, building on the leap forward that we had at this general election. labour has now lost three general elections in a row. we are just walking down the street to our home now. thank you, everybody, so much for coming. but the infighting of the past two years is forgotten, for now. vicki young, bbc news, westminster.
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with me is the labour mp, seema malhotra. good to see you. thanks forjoining s. extended your majority of 16,000 last night. you did throw well, the party did very well. thank you did very well. it shows a growing confidence in labour and a way in whichjeremy has confidence in labour and a way in which jeremy has conducted confidence in labour and a way in whichjeremy has conducted the campaign has! whichjeremy has conducted the campaign has i think it ceded expectations on all counts, it has shown him at his very best. in contrast to theresa may who ran a poor campaign and took voters to granted from the very beginning. it has also rebalanced the debate about brexit, we have seen absolutely the end of theresa may's hard brexit as a result of yesterday's results. also, a refocusing on the big issues that have made a difference in the campaign, older people's care, housing, prospects for younger
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people, our policing. those were the issues people were talking about when they went to cast their vote. you are still in opposition, it would seem theresa may is trying to form a minority government. you are ina form a minority government. you are in a position in the last two years of opposition led byjeremy corbyn, many would suggest including those in his party, haven't been the greatest. how can you build on the success of last night over the length of this parliament, whether it is until the end of the year or over the next five years. that is pretty straightforward. what you have seen in the election campaign as the labour party pulled together and work together. ultimately, we all want a labour government. we fundamentally believe that this country will be far better off for our prosperity, our socialjustice, for equality, if we are run by a labour government. i believe that there will be a way that we can come together with a shift in british
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politics, it is right to describe this as an earthquake in terms of what has happened, where we refocus on the national debate, how we can have a brexit that works in the interests of people's prosperity and our economy. how we make sure that people feel much more positive. there has been much more division and much more uncertainty in the last year particularly and i do think that there is a different mood for a different kind of politics and i think that point of a politics of hope is a strong one that resonated. the bottom line is that you did as badly as gordon brown in 2010. your seat count, 261, well behind the conservatives. you lost. jeremy corbyn, everyone would agree, or most people would agree, ran a fantastic campaign. he is a very good campaign. how is he and i go
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back to this session about the last two years, about leading a parliamentary party, holding the government's feature to the fire? how can he do that any convincing way that will be enough of a platform for the next election? going into this new parliament, it is going to be different. the dynamics of the parliament are going to be different and theresa may is fundamentally weakened. this is probably the worst political own goal in british political history and there is one that i remember to be anywhere near close to this mistake that theresa may has made. that has put greater instability in our politics and our government. i do think that there is a sense of responsibility that we all have as members of parliament. it is one that the labour party feels very strongly. you may look at the results in one way, but if you think about it from the point of view of
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us about it from the point of view of us being up 29 seats, it being two yea rs us being up 29 seats, it being two years and is the last general election, we have had a great instability and earthquake in between with the brexit referendum. a country is divided. we have got a strong sense that the issues that people are facing, it is the labour party that has won the argument in four weeks. it has won the argument where in the last two weeks, i have noticed a change in people's attitudes towards people on the doorsteps. there is a lot for people to be heartened by and proud of. a lot for the country to feel hopeful for. if there was any point where this government failed, i have no doubt that we would find a way to form a government and do so successfully. thank you forjoining us. we can talk to the former conservative mp for strood, neil carmichael, who lost to labour's david drew byjust under 700 votes. he was the mp since
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2010 and was chair of the commons education select committee. how are you feeling? i am very disappointed, i wanted to win, i was effective at probing the issues on education and thinking about new ideas and so on so thinking about new ideas and so on so obviously i regret losing the seat. what went wrong? several things, the campaign itself was wrong. we didn't have a positive vision for where we were taking the country, i do not think people felt there was any direction of travel that they could ally themselves with. i think that some of the policy areas themselves were lacking in thinking and testing, social care is the obvious one but there were others. thirdly, the focus on the heart brexit meant we were effectively disengaging from some
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people who understood we were leaving the eu but wanted to do so ina much leaving the eu but wanted to do so in a much more constructive way, leaving friendships in place. theresa may says she will soldier on with the dup hopefully propping up her minority government. is that the right thing to do or should she stand—down? right thing to do or should she stand-down? given that i was supposed to be negotiating with the eu within ten days, to have the leadership election thrust upon us after the already chaotic outcome of the general election would basically be the final icing on the cake which is basically a disaster area so we need some continuity. she has been effectively entrusted with the responsibility of forming a government and that is what she is undertaking and i think the best thing for her to do is to get on with the job and proceed in a way in which we can negotiate with the
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european union in a constructive and well argued manner. do you believe that a heart brexit, what some people are calling a heart brexit, is off the table? i don't think i heart brexit is necessarily what we want. we will see where we go. this isa want. we will see where we go. this is a negotiation with others so others might have something to say themselves but the outcome for europe and the uk, it ought to be characterised by good relationships between ourselves and former partners and good opportunities for trade so we can effectively continue to build an economy by trading with each other and elsewhere and thirdly, a good way of making sure there is supply chains that operate effectively, including the movement of people. many thanks for that.
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neil carmichael, who lost her seat by just neil carmichael, who lost her seat byjust 700 neil carmichael, who lost her seat by just 700 votes. neil carmichael, who lost her seat byjust 700 votes. thank neil carmichael, who lost her seat by just 700 votes. thank you. theresa may says she'll lead a minority government, despite the general election ending in a hung parliament. so let's recap on the results of the election that was never meant to happen. with all but one seat declared, kensington, in west london, the conservatives have 318 seats, eight short of a majority. labour has 261, and the snp 35, with the liberal democrats 12 and the dup ten.labour gained 29 seats and far from increasing their majority as many predicted, the conservatives actually lost 12 seats. the snp shed 21. the conservatives took 42.4% of the votes cast, labour ended up on 40%. so both parties increased their share of the electorate. but ukip's support collapsed, by 10%. well, speaking outside number 10, theresa may said she intended to form a government with northern ireland's democratic unionist party, to provide "certainty" and deliver
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brexit. having secured the largest number of votes a nd having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist to as the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding majority in the house of commons. the fallout from last night's election, is slowly beginning to emerge. let's take a look at the latest developments tonight. and theresa may has apologised to conservatives who lost their seats, insisting she won't resign, and her focus remains on forming a government, ahead of brexit talks beginning in ten just ten days. tonight, she's released details of her cabinet, with the top five posts staying unchanged, including the chancellor philip hammond, foreign secretary boris johnson and home secretary amber rudd, who onlyjust held onto her seat by 346 votes. mrs may now needs the support of northern ireland's democratic unionists, who have ten seats at westminster. their leader, arlene foster, says she'll begin talks
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with the prime minister, but there's speculation about what the dup might demand in exchange for its support. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has exceeded all expectations — gaining 29 seats and winning 40% of the vote. that is the biggest increase in the share of the vote by a labour leader since clement attlee in 1945. jeremy corbyn says labour is ready to form a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can do put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time. the party who has lost in this election is the conservative party. the liberal democrats now have 12 seats — up four on their total in 2015. but their former leader, nick clegg, lost his seat in sheffield hallam. it was a bad night for nicola sturgeon and the governing scottish national party, which lost 21 mp5, including the seat held by the former leader,
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alex salmond. the conservatives gained 12 seats, their best result in scotland since 1983. the leader of the uk independence party, paul nuttall, is standing down with immediate effect. ukip failed to win any seats in parliament, and its share of the vote collapsed. finally, a surge in the youth vote may have proved crucial tojeremy corbyn's gains last night. young voter turnout has been estimated at 72% — overall turnout was 69%, the biggest since 1997. in scotland it was a bad night for the snp — the party lost a third of its seats. they've ended up with 35 seats, the tories have 13, labour seven and the lib dems four. the snp losses claimed some high profile scalps. the party's former leader and scottish first minister, alex salmond, lost his seat to the tories as did the party's leader at westminster, angus robertson. while it was a disastrous night
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for theresa may south of the border, the conservatives had their best showing in scotland for decades. tories believe their anti—independence message hit home. our political correspondent glenn campbell has the story of a tory revival in scotland. they haven't had cause for celebration like this in a uk general election in scotland for a generation. scottish conservative and unionist, 24,000... the tories have found their winning form again after years in the wilderness. the scottish secretary has won a westminster seat four times, but now he has got 12 colleagues for company. 37,718. without wins in scotland, theresa may would have found it far harder to have formed a government. in a sense, the government were rescued by scotland. they might not be able to have
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formed a government even with the dup, had it not been for ruth davidson in scotland. in no uk general election since 1983 when margaret thatcher won 21 seats, have the scottish tories done better. the party went down to ten in 1987, picking up one more and john major in 1992 and then as tony blair's new labour swept to power in 1997, wipe—out. every tory mp was turfed out, from those of cabinet rank to this, then scottish office minister. i think undoubtedly we had become toxic for a variety of reasons. i don't need to go over it, mrs thatcher, the poll tax, all myths my opinion. nevertheless, they got into the scottish psyche that we were somehow anti—scottish. we were on the wrong side of the constitutional argument. we held out against
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the scottish parliament. now, ironically, we are on the right side of the constitutional argument, and we are leading the constitution debate here in scotland. in 2001, the scottish tories picked up just one scottish seat and they did no better in the election after election after election. until last night, winning 13 seats from moray to angus in the north—east, through perthshire south and stirling in the heart of scotland. renfrewshire and glasgow and in the four seats across the southern border. the conservatives are back in business in scotland, a force to be reckoned with. andy said that we now have our eyes on aspiring to be a government is not fanciful, it is not the stuff of dreams, it is actually not very realistic aspiration. already the
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main operation at holyrood and the second party in local government, these results mean the tories have overta ken these results mean the tories have overtaken scottish labour at westminster also. one of the main deciding factors in yesterday's general election was the high turnout of young voters. early reports suggest that a record number of 18 to 24—year—olds voted. i'm joined by two of them — stephen cannon, who is 23 and voted conservative and fiona sullivan who is 18 and voted labour. i'm also joined by matt morley, who ran a highly successful online campaign to help young people decide how to vote. we have quite a few people behind us who have decided to join us, hopefully our viewers can hear you. if we start with labour, what was the attraction? jeremy corbyn was the attraction? jeremy corbyn was the only one providing real policies for young people and that showed in the youth vote turnout. theresa may made the mistake of not doing so.
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the fact is, you have to keep doing it. and that is the key? how does the labour party and the other parties build on the momentum of so many young people coming out? they need to start putting policies are out because people were getting excited about free tuition, people we re excited about free tuition, people were telling their friends and talking to their parents, their pa rents talking to their parents, their parents have a vested interest in their kids. it was a great idea by labour to cater to the young people and jeremy corbyn should take the credit. that is part of the issue for the conservatives. theyjust do not seem to be able to reach out to younger people? there are a lot of younger people? there are a lot of younger people? there are a lot of younger people involved in the conservative party, if you look around at the campaigners and activists, a lot of it is run by young people but jeremy activists, a lot of it is run by young people butjeremy corbyn activists, a lot of it is run by young people but jeremy corbyn was offering an all—you—can—eat buffet paid for by someone else and theresa may was offering a nutritious sports drink that was hard to sell but it is good for the future. was that the
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thing for you, fiona? a bribe? that is what they want us to think and nobody has done this before, nobody has promised such big things that appeal to the majority. people were going to find this acceptable, labour cost of their policies and the conservatives did not. matt, you helped establish a registration drive for younger people. i surprised by how well it took off? to ta ke surprised by how well it took off? to take that their points, the fact that we know young people vote when they feel it will make a difference, if there is a real choice at the election is if the parties are quite central and ideology is similar, they don't think that will do a huge amount. 2.5 million people used the website we built and the majority of them were young people and the majority were in swing states, sheffield hallam, bristol west, etc. these people wanted choice, to say,
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lam here these people wanted choice, to say, i am here and i want to know what my options are on the table. let me explore beyond that. they were not particularly ideologically driven to begin with, young people typically vote more left generally but even those who are not aged 18—24 said this year, i am not party loyal, brexit has changed a lot of this. as isaid, how brexit has changed a lot of this. as i said, how did the parties —— how do the parties build on this? i said, how did the parties —— how do the parties build on this7m begins with the electoral registration, the last campaign. turn up, it was called, some of the biggest brands that young people know like facebook, delivery and buber, they made that seem like it was part of their life and once you activated them and got the message to them, they looked at the party politics beyond that so ourjob was to say, this is important and this is why and how you make that
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decision is up to you but it isjust fingers away from what matters to you. were you saying to friends, this is really important? you have to vote and exercise your democratic right? yes. that was a thing with my friends, everybody had such a vested interest and it was spreading, social media was blazing with posts about voting, regardless of party. i think a lot of this was to do with social media. stephen, the conservatives were just not as good at that, where they? we got carried away because fundamentally the labour party did not win the election, theresa may has helped deliver a vote that is larger than tony blair's and margaret thatcher's and in any other election that would give hera and in any other election that would give her a strong majority. 1688
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votes and the tories would have had a strong majority right now. fundamentally, theresa may did get the vote out. she called the election to provide stability. she has not done that. we still have this same strong, stable leader. she has caused the hung parliament and more uncertainty. we have had a numberof more uncertainty. we have had a number of uncorrectable elections but this still has delivered a conservative government. minority. with a larger vote. relying on dup support. matt, this must be heartening! this is what you want to hear, a political discussion among young voters who have decided to turn out? we want to see the fact that people know there is choice in an election, at the end of the day, any person in this country and particularly young people, what
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confuses them is party loyalty. just because everybody else has voted for something, why should i? people want to see the full spectrum of options, they listened to the arguments and debates but the will make a choice that reflects their own views and in this case it appears from the numbers that they have turned up en masse and have voted more to the left of centre. the problem there is actually, young people have the choice is taken away from them because they have been lied to, rather than being given the truth, we have a difficult future ahead and we have a difficult future ahead and we need to make tough decisions, they have been promised the world with no way of paying for it.|j they have been promised the world with no way of paying for it. i will have to cut in! it is great to have all of you. democracy in action. you voted, we have ourfriends behind us who are showing their democratic right to protest as well! thank you. the nottinghamshire constituency of mansfield had its own oscars
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moment last night, after a slip of the tongue led to the wrong name being declared the winner. many of those living there would forgive it being an easy mistake to make, it's the first time the tories have been successful there, taking the seat from labour. and atjust 27 years old, the new mp wasn't even born when the losing candidate won the seat for the first time. our correspondent rob sissons reports on how the change happened. joseph alan meale has duly been elected. that oscars moment. they read out the wrong result. but, then again, mansfield has always been labour. sir alan meale has been voted in time and time again since 1987. not last night. mansfield has gone conservative? crikey! i am a socialist at heart but it sticks in your craw to vote conservative. and margaret, a retired nhs cleaner, hadn't voted tory before, either. i think it's better the devil we know and i think we should give theresa may a chance. i don't think she's had a chance yet. i'm a lifelong labour supporter and i can't believe that mansfield has gone to conservative
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after all these years. i can't believe it. i can't. because it's a miners' town, i'm surprised. last night's winner, ben bradley, is 27 and reckons he'll be the second youngest mp in parliament. he believes brexit won it. mansfield is changing, the demographics are changing. ijust think people have been crying out for a change, to be honest. defeated for labour, sir alan meale, predicts the party will win the seat back. anybody who gets a job like that is in for one term, however long that term may be. and i suspect we'll have another one very, very soon. in mansfield, many people say it feels like a new political era. with me is a backlash from the institute for government and we will talk about minority governments and how theresa may might get things working. firstly, the majority with the dup, good to see you, by the
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way, is just two? the dup, good to see you, by the way, isjust two? yes, maybe a little bit more. when you take out sinn fein. her position in the house of commons is nowhere near where she would have wanted it to be and where most people expected it to be throughout the campaign and she is going to have to govern in a different way, i think. minority government isn't a very common outcome of westminster elections but it is not without precedent and certainly, you can look at other countries where minority government ‘s have been able to work very effectively. canada, new zealand, australia, ireland has done that and other places also but they have to learn to govern in a slightly different way and that is going to be the challenge for theresa may and your team. crucially, they have to agree on a budget, supply and if there are any suggestions over a
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vote of no confidence, then they have to have a majority in order to defeat that so those are the two key issues? confidence and supply? exactly right. it'll be interesting to see over the next few days what count of cooperation arrangement the conservatives and the dup country. all we know at the moment is they have agreed that the dup will not putjeremy corbyn in downing street and that will enable theresa may to remain as prime minister but it might be that we see something more formalised emerging over the next few days, possibly a sort of published cooperation and confidence and supply agreement in which, for example, dup might commit to back the government on those crucial votes were the survival of the government is at stake, in exchange for that is an interesting question.
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for some concessions that are to their interests. they are still working on that. jeremy corbyn says he would be willing to lead a minority government but if you add up minority government but if you add upa minority government but if you add up a progressive alliance on the left, snp, the green party and so on, it doesn't get to the required number, does it? no, i cannot see that working, frankly. even if you add up labour, snp, lib dems and a handful of others and the one green mp, they still have fewer than the conservatives have on their realm so i cannot see how that would work. the conservatives, as you said, i just a few seats short of a majority and they will have two be ready to compromise and probably theresa may will not get everything from her ma nifesto will not get everything from her manifesto through parliament, she might have to economise on aspects of brexit strategy. notjust because
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of brexit strategy. notjust because of the need to get the dup onside but she does not necessarily have all of backbenchers behind as well. i think the way the numbers stack up, there isn't any other realistic alternative other than a conservative led administration. do you see, given the state of flux that british politics is in, and this might be too political question for you, can you see theresa may surviving long enough to get through any count of agenda?” surviving long enough to get through any count of agenda? i think crystal ball gazing, we have shown we are terribly bad at that! she is obviously significantly weakened by this campaign, there are no two weighs about that. two months ago she was this goliath on the political scene, and she has had a bad campaign. jeremy corbyn came
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into his own, the conservatives made a few unforced errors, there is a lot of her own backbenchers blaming herfor the decision to lot of her own backbenchers blaming her for the decision to hold an election in the first place, from what was seen as mistakes in the ma nifesto. what was seen as mistakes in the manifesto. she is in a much weaker position and there will be some people who have even come out today from the conservative backbenchers who will potentially be looking for an opportunity to push out. i think she probably will have an opportunity to make it work but she will have to look over her shoulder. good to see you. thank you. we are expecting the kensington result, they have had three recounts so far. and we are expecting that in the next couple of hours. it is a handful of next couple of hours. it is a ha ndful of votes, next couple of hours. it is a handful of votes, really, separating the conservative and labour
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candidates. we will bring you that. now now we leave you with some of the sights and sounds of the last 24 hours and the conservative election gamble that backfired. they are still the largest party but with far fewer seats and are now and what we are saying is the conservatives are the largest party, note they don't have an overall majority at this stage. unless the exit poll is incredibly wrong, the prime minister has failed to achieve her principal objective. the worst possible outcome would be a hung parliament. cheering. politics has changed, and politics isn't going back. cheering. you live by the sword and you die by the sword. i am standing down today as the leader of ukip with immediate effect. cheering. are you resigning, prime minister? are you stepping down, mrs may?
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morning, all! i will now form a government. a government that can provide certainty and lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. we will enter discussions with the conservatives. now, let's get to work. some of the main voices from an incredible election campaign. time for a look at the weather and darren bett has all of the details. we are seeing a change in the weather, cloud has been thickening from the west all day and we have shunted
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away all of those showers from earlier but this is a thickening cloud beginning to bring some rain that has arrived in the south—west. not much, we also have rain across wales, pushing into northern ireland and the wetter weather eases towards scotla nd and the wetter weather eases towards scotland and north—west england. the lowest temperatures with clearer skies in the north—east but for most, with the cloud, quite a warm light. you will see the rain getting stuck in the same place across northern england, wales, moving into the south—west and the rain moves into scotland but leaves in the afternoon added quickly brightens up in northern ireland. the best sunshine across east anglia and warm and sunny day, quite humid and strife through the midlands until the evening. into sunday, a band of cloud is moving away from the midlands towards east anglia and the south—east and may bring some rain. away from here, it will brighten with sunshine and also
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showers and another blustery day on sunday with the bulk of the showers across scotland and northern ireland. still rather humid in the south—east. we are at westminster where theresa may is putting together a new minority government after a disastrous night for the conservatives at the general election. it's nine o'clock and we're at westminster, where theresa may is putting together a new minority government, after a disastrous night for the conservatives in the general election. i have just been to see her majesty the queen and i will now form a government. a government that can provide certainty and to lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. the election that was never meant to happen resulted in a dramatic reversal for the conservatives to one over the 318 seats asjeremy corbyn's labour made gains. mrs may has apologised to her colleagues who've lost their seats, and now the party will have to depend on the support of
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the democratic unionists to govern. in the days and weeks ahead, it is the union that will be to the
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