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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 10, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin, live from westminster. a prime minister under pressure. just a day after clinging to power, theresa may faces a backlash from fellow tories. the conservative leader is forming a minority government with the support of the democratic unionist party, but there are questions from some of her own mps over how long she can remain in thejob. the deal with the dup is also under scrutiny. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, says she's raised concerns with the prime minister about the unionists‘ opposition to gay rights. labour has ended its election campaign on a high. jeremy corbyn‘s party took kensington from the conservatives for the first time in its history. this morning we'll be live at downing street with the latest. and we'll be hearing how people across the uk have been reacting to friday's result.
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yes, the butty van is here at the agricultural show in warwickshire and we have emptied out the brea kfast toybox, and we have emptied out the breakfast toybox, even the couch here, we will speak with locals to find out what they think has happened and what happens next. good morning, it's saturday 10th june. we're on college green in westminster for a special programme as we look at what happens next after the 2017 general election resulted in a hung parliament. also ahead: police reveal that the london bridge attackers had tried to get hold of a seven ton lorry, and that petrol—bombs were found in the van they did eventually hire. detectives are now appealing for information about the knives used in the attack.
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in sport: a proud moment for england's harry kane. the striker will captain his country in tonight's world cup qualifier against scotland in glasgow, while the scot‘s striker leigh griffiths has been passed fit to play. and philip avery has the weather. good morning. it is an ok start to the day in sussex but i am afraid not everywhere. i have all of the detail on the weather in a couple of minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the prime minister is facing pressure this morning as she moves to form a government with the help of the democratic unionist party. her failure to secure an outright majority has led to questions from some corners of the conservative party over whether she should remain in charge. emma vardey has this report on the fallout from the general election result. 16,000... a
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16,000. .. a valuable result in the uk's richest constituency. almost 2a hours after the polls closed it took a third recount in kensington to finally reveal labour had taken the seat from the tories for the first time ever byjust 20 votes. it means the conservatives and the campaign with 318 seats to labour's 262, labour are with 318 seats to labour's 262, labourare up 30. with 318 seats to labour's 262, labour are up 30. the snp on 35, the lib dems on 12, plaid cymru on four and the greens with one. now, theresa may is reaching out to the democratic unionist party in northern ireland for support. with the ten dup mps the conservatives will have a working majority in the house of commons. but there are early signs that for some this will
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be an uncomfortable alliance. the dup is anti abortion and northern ireland is the only part of the uk where same—sex marriage is not legal. scottish conservative leader ruth davidson last night sought assurances that any deal with the dup must not affect gay rights across the uk. meanwhile, concerns remain over whether the prime minister can hold on. one senior tory has told the bbc it she has to go. and this was the transport secretary chris grayling on the bbc‘s question time. secretary chris grayling on the bbc's question time. she needs to stay as prime minister for the future. what was once sold as a strong and stable now feels ever shaky. for the latest, let's speak to our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, who is at downing street this morning. theresa may is in number ten this
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morning. there was a lot of taking yesterday. that is right. this election hasn't delivered theresa may the bigger majority. it has left herfighting for may the bigger majority. it has left her fighting for her prime ministerial career. there are questions and lots of angry conservative mps about what many saw asa conservative mps about what many saw as a disastrous campaign, and that's why people are asking just how long theresa may can hang on at number ten. heidi allen has said she thinks theresa may has six months at best. privately other mps and a minister said they can't see her staying on. if she does stay on there are pressures on her already to change her style leadership. many say the party wa nts her style leadership. many say the party wants to be more involved in policy decisions and warning against presidential style of politics. ultimately her gamble to call the election in the first place may not just have cost her the conservative
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party the majority, it could have also cost her thejob party the majority, it could have also cost her the job at number ten. you rachid tell us what it means for the dup. there is a learning curve about the issues surrounding it. theresa may needs to get a deal done with the dup pronto. the agenda will be happening in a few days, one week on monday, so she needs to get the deal done before then. we imagine it will be more of a day by day thing rather than a formal coalition or a formal agreement. there have been questions about what the dup stands for. the conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson, who helped the party takes 13 seats, an increase of 12 seats, she is gay, she is due to marry herfemale partner shortly, and she has pressured theresa may and said that
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she thinks there are more important things than the party, including the country and rights for lesbian, gay and transsexual people. she has said she has had reassurance from theresa may that lgbt writes will not be changed when it comes to a deal with the dup who of course oppose same—sex marriage and they are the only part of the uk, well, northern ireland is the only part of the uk where there is — where same—sex marriage isn't legal. if she is to get the deal done it is going to be tricky. we will speak to you later in the programme. thank you. and we will speak with the former director of communications, katy perry, with the significance being she resigned when the snap election was called and she has a great deal of insight into theresa may and we will speak with her later on. and we should say at this point the programme will be dominated with the fallout from the general election and we will cover all of the things
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that you need to know. and what it means for you. one of the london bridge killers tried to hire a seven and a half—tonne truck on the morning of the attack. police have revealed khuram butt‘s payment failed to go through, so he hired a white van from b&q instead. with his fellow attackers, rachid redouane and youssef zaghba he ran down and killed three people on london bridge. eight people are now in custody. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. this was the weapon found still strapped to khuram butt‘s body last saturday night. he and his fellow attackers used three identical 12 inch pink knives made of ceramic to murderfive people. counterterrorism detectives want help on where the ernesto knives were bought. the men had already killed three other people on london bridge with a van hired from b&q. throughout the carnage, heroic members of the public tried to stop them. we have stories of people who came out armed with chairs, other items were thrown, bottles and anything they could get their hands on, with a view to stop the attackers coming into pubs or bars but more
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importantly to scare them and try to stop others being attacked. afterwards in the van police van 13 petrol—bombs made with lighter fluid and cloth cut from tracksuit bottoms as well as two blow torches. the day started with the ringleader, khuram butt, on police bail, trying to hire a 7.5 tonne truck. he didn't have enough money, so instead he hired the white van from b&q in romford, which the men picked up some time after 6:30pm. then leaving barking soon after 7:30pm, they set off for central london. at 9:58pm they arrived at london bridge, driving across it and then back again before ploughing into pedestrians on their third pass. by the time they crashed the van at 10:07pm they fatally wounded three people. they then used the knives to kill five more. at 10:16pm, they were shot dead by police. detectives now believe
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it was in a safe house, a flat above this row of shops in east london, that the men had prepared for their attack. daniel sandford, bbc news. 25 people have been arrested on suspicion of committing hate crimes since the london bridge terror attacks according to the metropolitan police. the number of officers on the streets has been increased to reassure communities who may feel worried as they gather in their places of worship. president donald trump says he is 100% willing to speak under oath about his conversations with the ex—fbi chief james comey. mr trump has denied having asked for mr comey‘s loyalty, or for an inquiry into a former white house aide to be dropped. mr comey says he was fired because of the investigation into links between the president's election team and russia. those are the other main stories. we
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are here focusing on the fallout from friday's result in the general election. let's take a look at how today's newspapers are reporting on the election fallout. there is so much discussion. the front of the times, —— times, theresa may stares into the abyss, and they are talking about the ulster unionists and we will speak withjohn tongue in a couple of moments. from hubris to humiliation, looking at the moment theresa may re—entered number ten yesterday. the front of the mail, tories turn on to reza. reshuffle mayhem. they say furious tory mps threatened to oust theresa may within six months after the disastrous election campaign. mae clings to power according to the i. the daily telegraph, may fights
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to remain prime minister on the front of the daily telegraph newspaper. and a couple of others as well — coalition of crackpots, that is the mirror. and the ft, the financial times weekend paper, this is the financial times and the headline isn't about the effect of it, it is that she is clinging to power as the new front opens in the brexit battle to start a week on monday. jon tonge is here to help us. he's a professor of politics at the university of liverpool and has written a history of the democratic unionist party. it is gonna come and helpful this morning. john is struggling with his voice. i am struggling after 24 hours of non—stop talking. voice. i am struggling after 24 hours of non-stop talking. before we get onto the dup, we've seen the front pages today, i want a thought on survivalfor front pages today, i want a thought on survival for theresa may. front pages today, i want a thought on survivalfor theresa may. that front pages today, i want a thought on survival for theresa may. that is the most pressing issue. can she survive? what is remarkable about
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cove rage survive? what is remarkable about coverage is the hostility to the idea that theresa may has shored up her position. there is a great deal of scepticism amongst pro— conservative newspapers over whether this deal will work and whether theresa may can remain in office. she is not assured of her position and it is notjust a case of the coalition of crackpots. you have the times, the telegraph, sceptical over whether this will work. times, the telegraph, sceptical over whether this will worklj times, the telegraph, sceptical over whether this will work. i am going to let you have a sip of water while we look at... theresa may hasn't done much since the result came through. there was a brief moment outside number ten and then the brief interview as well. let's hear what she had to say. what is important is that we bring government together, we form government together, we form government in the national interest at this critical time in our... for our country, because we face the challenge of the brexit negotiations. so it is important to have a government that can take the negotiations through. that is what i am doing, forming a government. i
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obviously wanted a different result last night and i am sorry for all of those colleagues who lost their seats who didn't deserve to lose and of course i will reflect on what happened. john, interesting to see the first speech in downing street and then this apology to tory mps. what do you think of the way that has been handled by theresa may? there is anger in the conservative party. people think, why was the election called? we people think, why was the election called ? we never people think, why was the election called? we never had a clear narrative in the campaign as to why it was called. it was on the ground, there was opposition to the brexit plans, but it looked like the labour party triggered the article 50. they did not oppose the triggering of brexit, so the election was seen as unnecessary, and conservative mps are angry that colleagues have lost jobs and won't return to westminster anytime soon. there is a question of the unnecessary election and the question of the poor campaign. i
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can't remember this campaign as poor as that from a conservative party in living memory. normally they are very efficient election fighters. go back to 2015 with the lisbon crosby campaign. it was a very poor campaign. it was a very poor campaign that said very little and they underestimated jeremy corbyn. we go forward in what is called a minority government and the dup, you know a lot about this party, are included in that. what will they be doing — are they propping up the conservative party, what will happen? it is not a formal coalition or happen? it is not a formal coalition ora happen? it is not a formal coalition or a formal pact. it is a supply in confidence. when it comes to parliamentary votes, the dup will back the the conservatives so the government can carry on but there will be a pricetag. theresa may and the conservatives need the dup far more than the dup near the conservatives. the dup are the unrivalled leaders in northern ireland and they, frankly, their
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needs are not anything like the needs are not anything like the needs of the conservative party. theresa may is friendless at when —— westminster other than the dup, theresa may is friendless at when —— westminster otherthan the dup, so it isa westminster otherthan the dup, so it is a pact of necessity. some of theissues it is a pact of necessity. some of the issues well illustrated by ruth davidson's comments. the conservative leader in scotland has picked up on some of the dup‘s positions on various issues. some people might find unpalatable and that has become an issue with gay rights, to do with abortion, same—sex marriages let's hear what she had to say. i spoke with the prime minister this morning and i told her there were a things are worried us, one thing is country and the other is gay and transgender rights. i asked for reassurance that if any deal was done with the dup, there would be no
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recession of lgbti writes. we tried to use it the influence that we have to use it the influence that we have to advance the rights of lgbti people in ireland. northern ireland is the only part of the uk were cannot have same—sex mess marriage. i want categoric assurance from the prime minister on that and i received it. yes, she received a sure answer is when it comes down to it, how comfortable with it for theresa may to be sharing a platform, either metaphorically or literally, with people who say that ruth davidson... they do not approve of her being married to her partner. is untenable situation? it is hugely uncomfortable. all the dup are bothered about is that there is no same—sex marriage in northern ireland for what they will not budge on that. their position will be that if we go back to direct rule over
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northern ireland which is a direct risk, then the dup are insistent that there must not be same—sex marriage in northern ireland. they'd blocked it five times. there has never been a single vup member who has supported same—sex marriage in an assembly vote. they have a veto in northern ireland. they were a fundamentalist protestant party as a vehicle for the church. 0nce fundamentalist protestant party as a vehicle for the church. once upon a time they ran campaigns saving people from sodomy. they have mellowed somewhat that they are not going to move on this issue, however. and it is not a question of applying a ban, it is about banning it in northern ireland. we will let you go and have a cup of tea. hopefully you can recover your voice a little bit. thank you very much. it is 18 minutes past six and this
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isa it is 18 minutes past six and this is a special breakfast programme. 0ur is a special breakfast programme. our main stories... theresa may presses on with forming a new government as she faces calls to step down and concerns over a deal with the democratic unionist party. and the final result of the 2017 election was announced late last night — it was a labour gain in kensington. louise and i are a little nervous. we have a canopy that it looks a little gloomy. philip? good morning to you all. that far down you will be fine, as was the case earlier this morning in east suffolk. however, and we are heading for a but, aren't we? there is rain in the forecast. there will be warm sunshine around. especially
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today thanks to this area of low pressure sweeping this cloud in from the atlantic. it is enough for rain already across many parts of the british isles, especially across parts of wales and into the north of england and southern parts of scotla nd england and southern parts of scotland full of it has been weak in northern ireland but thankfully that rain will move away from northern ireland. that means it willjust become more of a player across more of the west of england, through wales and, i'm afraid, once you have it in that particular neck of the woods you will keep it. it will also move through scotland. following behind, dry airthat move through scotland. following behind, dry air that the brightness, perhaps and it will be warm in the north—east. good c 27 degrees in northern ireland. there is a great sweep cloud and rain across the north and west of england and wales. the driest and finest of the weather down towards the south—east. if you are thinking about the cricket, well, that will be a neat call. the longer it goes on it will the —— of
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the light will become an issue and the light will become an issue and the rain eventually does have to come in and you will see that later on. the light may get you before that. as the rain comes further south and east it will fizzle somewhat sub i think we will have a mild night across the far south—east and, elsewhere, it is not cold one by any means at all because the brief is still coming in from the south—west. as i say, there is a lot of it. many above on the charts will sunday is going to be a mixture i would think for many of sunny spells and a lot of cloud. that frontal system struggling to get away. patchy at that stage and you will notice closest to the centre of the low we have many showers, perhaps ganging up at times across scotland and northern ireland, north and west of england and into wales as well. again, nota of england and into wales as well. again, not a particularly cold day, thanks to the influence of that south—westerly breeze. so the weekend, for the most part, it could be better for the weekend, for the most part, it could be betterfor the middle park of june but it could be a lot worse.
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who could have predicted it? a conservative lead has turned into a minority government. the warnings against a labour ‘coalition of chaos' have been replaced with accusations of a conservative ‘coalition with crackpots‘. so just what went wrong for the tories? we looked at the newspapers and all of them are critical of the reason may. —— theresa may. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin spent the day in bury north where council budgets have been slashed and voters swung from blue to red. what a mess to clear up. the morning after the night before. this business was set up after bin collections were cut here. bury lost half of its funding in 2010.|j collections were cut here. bury lost half of its funding in 2010. i am told that people have had enough. cut public services, cut social care and end pagers, cuts to education
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and end pagers, cuts to education andi and end pagers, cuts to education and i think people are looking for something more positive and knowing that it does not have to be that way. from pre-election headlines which read court being to core blimey. the labour voter here is stunned and chuffed. blimey. the labour voter here is stunned and chuffedlj blimey. the labour voter here is stunned and chuffed. i don't know what is going on in! are you in shock? yeah. this conservative voter is stunned and serious. theyjust thought they were going to wind and she couldn‘t be bothered. that was the end of the story. i think you can forget about brexit. brexit. the word they thought they would dominate all of the decisions made a day earlier. in the end, another word helped to turn this seat from blue to red. austerities. people have said enough is enough. economics is about humanity as well as balancing the books. there were
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other reasons as well. we went in search of pub with them. jeremy corbyn became the face of the people. he stepped up and was put in the limelight more than theresa may. in the bluebell inn, conservative had their own series. the cuts to the winter fuel allowance, the cut to the triple lock. if she had not said all about this car that she was going to do, she would have been fine. she shot herself in the foot, as far as fine. she shot herself in the foot, as faras i‘m fine. she shot herself in the foot, as far as i‘m concerned. fine. she shot herself in the foot, as far as i'm concerned. they saw political suicide narrowly avoided in westminster. back in bury north as the dust settled there was a murder mystery under way.|j as the dust settled there was a murder mystery under way. i hope so, i hope so. did you know that result was coming? i had hoped it wouldn‘t. this is a bellwether constituency. they have always followed the
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national trends. this time, they did not guess who did it. there was a 5% swing to read as theresa mayjust held on to power, and only with the help of the dup. what do you know of them? i do not know much. and the socially conservative views of the dup are not palatable to war political conservatives. that is horrifying. as a tory supporter, how do you feel about this?” horrifying. as a tory supporter, how do you feel about this? i can't. .. i can‘t. i can‘t countenance it. do you feel about this? i can't. .. i can't. i can't countenance it.|j hope the murder mystery might be easier to solve. the headline is a journey into wrecks that negotiations few would have imagined. theresa may says nothing will derail bomb. —— them. for the third time in just over two years, british voters found themselves waking up on friday to a result that few would have confidently forecast. this time, a hung parliament.
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but that is exactly what pollsters yougov predicted. joining us now isjoe twyman from yougov. we ta ke we take these polls with a pinch of salt but they narrowed. did you think this would happen? two weeks ago we released a simulation of seat estimates for how we thought things would break up and that would suggest a hung parliament was most likely. it is fair to say that that was not met with universal acclaim from pundits and politicians. but since then, that polling on the simulation has not really moved suggesting it was definitely distinct possibility. even then, i felt, looking at the end of my data, once the exit polls came in, i thought that seeking a majority may still have happened. if you look at the trends and what was detected, people are talking about young people are talking about young people in the change happened during the campaign. what evidence was there of that? what we saw from the start of the campaign was a
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contraction of the gap between conservative and labour. when it started, that was a 24 point gap which is enormous historically. it was almost inevitable that would get smaller. as time went on the conservatives never really were able to maintain any kind of long—lasting momentum. things like the kerfuffle over social care... it all affected their ability to carry things on. their figures their ability to carry things on. theirfigures dropped back their ability to carry things on. their figures dropped back and those labour ‘s research. joining that was the support for young people. not just the sopore, also the likelihood that they would actually turn out to vote stock that was the big difference. and your evidence is that they did turn out and vote? yes, that is correct. how much of this was down to personality and individual? there is a lot of evidence to show that it is so much about leaders these days because the average person on the street is not
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downloading a copy of each manifesto and reading it from cover to cover and reading it from cover to cover and making notes. instead they ask themselves broad questions. who do i trust? who was competent? who can deliver the promises they are making? and these questions are a nswered making? and these questions are answered now by the leaders. we call it heuristics. and so having someone, although theresa may begins by staying strong and stable a lot but then mistakes on things like social care. that starts to deflate that bubble. 0n the other hand, jeremy corbyn starts from a low base of being relatively unknown and im proves of being relatively unknown and improves as he goes along. we are where we are and theresa may is in downing street right now. you polling as we speak, aren‘t you, and to find out what? if people are happy with the result? what question are you asking, given that we have a result? essentially it is now asking whether people are happy with the
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circumstances that have arisen but also, crucially, the coalition with the dup will play an important part in our polling of the next few weeks and months because at the moment most people in mainland britain do not have much ip of the dup at all. there were not picked it was no ideological bedfellows. they were chosen because they have the numbers and were willing to say yes. more on them later. what was a word? heuristics? and you wait for the day. we will see a little later. back here at about five minutes to wait. 629 is the time and we are back with headlines in a few minutes. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. coming up before 7am, philip will have the weather. we are live in westminster this morning with all of the latest news.
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the prime minister is facing pressure from within her own party, as she moves to form a government with the help of the democratic unionists. theresa may‘s failure to secure an outright majority has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is at downing street for us this morning. the big question is where are we now? theresa may has emerged from the alashe not with the increased majority but instead facing questions about her premiership and no one can get away from the fact there are angry tory mps about what many called a disastrous election campaign. and that is why we have questions about just campaign. and that is why we have questions aboutjust how long theresa may can hang on here in downing street. we even heard from the conservative mp heidi allen who said she thinks the prime minister has six months at best left here in
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number ten and other mps have said privately, even one minister saying they don‘t see how she can stay on. evenif they don‘t see how she can stay on. even if she is able to stay on there are already pressures on her to change her leadership style, to widen her circle of advisers, and for the party to be more involved in policy decisions. and also, warnings about presidential styles of politics. so, yes, there are questions about that. ultimately this election was a political gamble many were surprised about and it is one that potentially has left are fighting for thejob. one that potentially has left are fighting for the job. in life and in politics we arejudged fighting for the job. in life and in politics we are judged by the company we keep. there are issues around the dup on him theresa may will be reliant. -- on whom. theresa may needs a deal with the dup to form the government. that needs to be done pretty quickly, around the next couple of days, before we have the queens speech setting up a
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government agenda. there are concerns about her relationship with the dup which for example opposes same—sex marriage in northern ireland, same—sex marriage is opposed, is not lawful, and ruth davidson, conservative leader of the scottish, the leader of the conservative party in scotland, is 93v conservative party in scotland, is gay and plans to marry her partner in the next few months. she has raised concerns with theresa may about that. thank you. senior sinn fein leaders say they‘re concerned that a deal between the dup and the conservatives could put the northern ireland peace process at risk. power sharing in stormont broke down in january and nationalists say they expect the british government to remain neutral in efforts to revive it. this current arrangement may prove reckless. we will wait and see and reflect on that. we have argued for some time in recent times the british government have been working with cahoots with the democratic unionist party to the disadvantage
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of the political process here. in fa ct of the political process here. in fact they called off the talks recently to re—establish our institutions and without that, the british public should actually have close scrutiny of the dup and what that party represents. later in the programme we‘ll be talking to theresa may‘s former director of communications katie perrior. we will look at how that affected the state politics across the uk in the next couple of minutes. and just on theissue next couple of minutes. and just on the issue of theresa may herself, questions about her character are merging. later in the programme we‘ll be talking to theresa may‘s former director of communications katie perrior. that‘s at 7:10am. she quit when the snap election was called. lots more coming up on the election. yes, and we will keep you up—to—date on the other news as well. two more people have been arrested in connection with the london bridge terror attacks. in total, eight people are now in custody. police investigating
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the killings have revealed that the three men who carried it out had wanted to hire a lorry but their payment was declined. petrol—bombs and blow torches were found in the van they did use. 25 people have been arrested on suspicion of committing hate crimes since the london bridge terror attacks according to the metropolitan police. the number of officers on the streets has been increased to reassure communities who may feel worried as they gather in their places of worship. president donald trump says he is 100% willing to speak under oath about his conversations with the ex—fbi chiefjames comey. mr trump has denied having asked for mr comey‘s loyalty or for an inquiry into a former white house aide to be dropped. mr comey says he was fired because of the investigation into links between the president‘s election team and russia. those are the main stories this morning. yes, we are going back with mike in
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the studio. what is going on in sport? it is a big day, actually. thank you. for england and scotland fans, they don‘t come much bigger than this, a world cup qualifier at hampden park with scotland badly needing a win, because they‘re six points behind leaders england. england will have a new captain, tottenham‘s harry kane, as his manager looks to rotate the skipper‘s armband match at hampden is not an easy start though. scotland are unbeaten at home in their last five matches. he has belief in himself and his ability. he has always had that. when he played in the under 21 c wasn‘t in the tottenham team. he was looking to break in. he had great self belief even then. he has really grown to be an outstanding player. the game is there to be enjoyed and
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the enthusiasm of the players and the enthusiasm of the players and the time they have put in, they are ready, they are ready for the game. physically and mentally, they are ready for the game. we have real assets in our team and real assets in ourteam as assets in our team and real assets in our team as a group and we have to use them. scotland and england are not the only home nations in action today. northern ireland travel to azerbaijan looking to cement second place in their group. andy murray said he‘d had "a good tournament, all things considered", after losing in the semi—finals of the french open. he was beaten in five sets to stan wawrinka, in a match which lasted over four—and—a—half hours. murray does leave paris in better shape than when he arrived, and he tried to take some positives from the defeat. iam not i am not happy right now, i am disappointed and frustrated and tired after a long, long couple of
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weeks, but i am proud i have put myself in a position when there was a lot of doubt coming into the event andi a lot of doubt coming into the event and i didn‘t feel great at the beginning of the tournament. i worked through it and i accepted the position i was in and i gave it a reasonable account for myself. stan wawrinka will play nine—time champion rafa nadal in sunday‘s final after he beat dominic thiem in straight sets. the spaniard has yet to drop a set at the championships this year. and there is still british interest at roland garros — alfie hewett is through to his first grand slam singles final. he takes on defending champion gustavo fernandez and he‘ll also play in the doubles final alongside world number one gordon reid. lions coach warren gatland has named what‘s probably his strongest side yet for this morning‘s match against canterbury crusaders. 0wen farrell starts at fly—half as gatland begins to hone in on his side for the first test.
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crusaders are the form team in super rugby, so the challenges are only getting tougherfor the lions. england cricket, looking to make it three out of three when they take on australia at edgbaston today. eoin morgan‘s team have qualified for the semifinals but australia have to win after the first two gains were washed out by rain. playing against australia or as has extra baggage regardless of how the teams are going and where they are at and we will probably consider the fortu nes at and we will probably consider the fortunes australia have had with the weather since they have come, it adds extra. they are a strong team and if they get on top they hammer things so it is up to us to produce some of our best cricket. bangladesh are through to the semifinals if england beat australia. they stunned new zealand, knocking them out with a five wicket win, thanks to a record partnership. lewis hamilton‘s mercedes
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was fastest in first practice for the canadian grand prix. he edged out his title rival, ferrari‘s sebastian vettel, who‘s now 25 points clear in the standings. but hamilton was beaten into second place in p2 by kimi raikkonen in the other ferrari. let‘s go back to charlie and louise at westminster. the programme is a little different this morning following events. we are at westminster and we are conscious people are talking about the westminster bubble. what we are trying to do is reflect on the politics, which is very much here, and of course we want to speak with as many people as possible in terms of the reaction to what has occurred. and you imagine how many conversations have gone on across the country. families i am urgent arguing and john mcguire is finding out what is going on and how people
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are feeling from the agricultural show in warwickshire and he has the bacon butty van with him. yeah, morning to you, louise and charlie. we are, as you say, at the agricultural show. i want to show you that bacon. it is the first time the butty van has been out in the election campaign without the bacon being burnt and i am sure we will ta ke being burnt and i am sure we will take care of it later. we will have a look around now, we are in warwickshire, pretty much in the heart of england, and they are getting the parade ring set up, all sorts of animals, the usual type of thing you would expect, and also the conversation as you say. yesterday i went to crewe with the butty van. it is one of the seats across the uk that went from tory to labour with a slim majority. i tend to agree with the labour policies on domestic policies but i think we needed a
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strong leadership in the negotiations in brexit and that is being denied. i am not sure what is being denied. i am not sure what is being told at all. she might be able to get a deal on brexit but i don't think that will outweigh the policies against what will happen. he is absolutely perfect. she was in a good position to call on the election. it was clever at the time. i don't think she ran a clever campaign. if she had, it would be something very different and people we re something very different and people were think at least everything will be planned out and we know what the next steps are. she will have a free hand in what she was doing and now she has to do with the others want as well. i think they could be in a little bit of a mess. at the end of the day we have to do... we have to deal with what we have got, the same with brexit. people who don't want to leave the eu, we have to get on with it and make the best of what we have got, and that is really yet.
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really interesting views in crewe. we have a collection of people to introduce you to this morning. firstly, amy bates, and ian 0‘donnell, businessmen, amy is a farmer. good morning. thank you for coming. what do you make of what has happened? it is a difficult situation that we didn‘t expect, so let‘s hope she can take us through brexit. the agricultural industry has been heavily invested in europe for the last generation or so. what does it make you think about brexit negotiations now over the next weeks, months, years? it has to keep going forward and we can get through it. i think there will be hard times to come. we can get through it and become a stronger nation and make british food for the british people and get people in touch with farming and get people in touch with farming and agriculture. part of what i do
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is educate children about where their food comes is educate children about where theirfood comes from, so is educate children about where their food comes from, so we is educate children about where theirfood comes from, so we need is educate children about where their food comes from, so we need to get back to that. as a small—business owner, and i know you area small—business owner, and i know you are a member of the federation of small businesses. you talk to other people in same position as you. the same question, what do people expect and what they think the outcome" the hope and expectation is that we would have a secure government who would have a secure government who would be able to move things forward. i don‘t think they mind who it was but a good majority government. the challenge is not knowing who has a strong mandate to move things forward. things will ta ke move things forward. things will take longer and business just move things forward. things will take longer and businessjust wants certainty because we have been waiting around for too long. listening to the prime minister in downing street, it was almost as if the last seven weeks was a speed bump, and it was business as normal. are you convinced? not really. everything will take longer. they don't have a majority. if they bring something into the house, it won't be quick and easy. they will have to
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doa be quick and easy. they will have to do a lot more negotiating to allow things to get through. that will just delay the process. thank you very much. i want to introduce you to doctor michael flynn. you have left us a croissant, thank you. as an academic, what have you made of the last 24 hours? i wonder if we can drawa the last 24 hours? i wonder if we can draw a precedent. people talk about 1974 with the minority government. is it the same today or is ita government. is it the same today or is it a different kettle of fish? the same but different. we have a minority government, we have a hung parliament, we need to use the historical experience to inform what we are doing. in that same way it is very different. if you look at the situation she faces with the arrangement with the dup, she is essentially at the mercy of any group of mps who have a coffee together and feel upset about something. believing it is strong
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and stable at this point, to return to your point with the others, the speech was a right angle to reality and she was behaving as if he had won the election which is not the case. it is hard to see where to go from here. i want to ask you about the brexit negotiations. if we think she is weakened by what happened yesterday, weekend in what way, in the eyes of those she will negotiate with, in terms of the commons, or the way that the public think of her and her strength or not in those negotiations in the days to come? the latter sense is the outline of where it matters, the way we perceive it, the british public. the europeans have been geared up for this for a year and they are ready to get on with it. that won‘t change the approach. for us, the fact she is living on a knife edge for as long as the government can survive means she is inevitably weaker. there is a need for legislation before parliament, in relation to
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negotiations, and she could fall at any point, which makes it weaker. thank you very much. lots more from us at the agricultural show later in the programme. i have been studying the bacon and you have literally done the best buy such a long way. could we have some, please? thank you so much. we will catch up with the weather right now. philip? many of you see cloud at the moment streaming in from the atlantic. this was the scene in devon. the weekend, not a write—off by any means at all. if you get rain don‘t worry it will not be with you all weekend. there will be warm sunshine around, breezy at times as well. there is a mass of cloud wrapped around an area of low pressure. throwing its way towards the british isles at the moment. some of you have already had a wet night supper was the case in northern ireland. we can see the
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rain tending work its way eastwards which must be good news eventually for scotland. i think the rain will push on through here and leave a better afternoon in prospect but once the rain sets in across some of these western areas, you will get it all day, especially in the cumbrian fels, perhaps down to the north and western parts of wales as well. some brightness after the rain and 22 is possible in the north—east of scotland. 19 or 20 in the central belt. in improving picture here after that wet night. there is a frontal system, no getting away from the fa ct system, no getting away from the fact that it sits there are a good pa rt fact that it sits there are a good part of the day, creeping towards the east which is good news for the cricket because even though the rain looks adjacent, i don‘t think you will see it until late in the day. light could be an issue in between all of that to keep a close eye on it. some people in the south—east could see 20 for 25. the front goes
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into the south—east overnight and ad has a weaker affair. a mild night across the piece. and were often running into sunday. low pressure quarter of the british isles. i survive there as well. still dangling front across east anglia and the south—east. the drip and drab of rain from those of you have planned for the morning you may need to factor in rain. plenty of blustery showers across scotland and into northern ireland as well. the best of the conditions probably from lincolnshire to the east midlands in central southern england. tonight, 22, the tops of the day. not bad at all. we are here in westminster discussing the fallout from the election. hopes for a second independent referendum in scotland we re independent referendum in scotland were struck a blow as high—profile members lost their seats. the conservative‘s performance in scotland was one of the few positives for tories. with us now are scottish musician and political campaigner pat kane and journalistjohn mckee.
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inevitably, some of the headlines have revolved around alex salmond being defeated as well as angus robertson losing his seat. the big picture, scottish politics has dramatically changed. picture, scottish politics has dramatically changedlj picture, scottish politics has dramatically changed. i think what has happened is... even bigger than those losses, big headline moments for them falling out and lacking momentum, the real casualty is the second independent referendum. nicola sturgeon has signalled that she will not pursue it. notjust high brexit now but nationalism throughout the uk in general has been a casualty, in my opinion, of this election. i know you are a musician so you have had along few nights what do you think? i am we
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did it go wrong? if you are left progressive person many things went right. the snp talk of the labour vote and added some of their policies onto it. the jeremy corbyn we nt policies onto it. the jeremy corbyn went a little bit further left than the snp so it is not surprising. and westminster is different now from scotland. let's be honest, it is a high benchmark to fall from, when you win 91% of the seats and the new drop to 56%, it is hard to criticise the snp for falling from a state of near perfection. if you translated the percentage of votes, they had 120 seat majority over here. it's not good for independence but the thing about the independence referendum is that it is contingent
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on how westminster delivers. it is quite unstable over there, let's be honest. momentum is one of the things, we all want to talk about politics and for so long the snp has had momentum. you mentioned that high mark in terms of extraordinary position that they were in. has everything changed ? position that they were in. has everything changed? is the momentum com pletely everything changed? is the momentum completely in a different direction? what is interesting and what the snp did by capturing that momentum is you see that sort of radical edge, especially among the use switch to be more radical terms. but if you look at 18 to 24 —year—olds in that segment in scotland they have switched now in large numbers, like the rest of the uk, from the snp to the rest of the uk, from the snp to the labour party. also, i think, what i will say is that you are right, pat, that the westminster election has a different dynamic. if you combine percentages, unionist parties across the board got 60% of
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the mode in terms of popular share. that is why it the constituencies backing away from it. we must mention ruth davison. she, whatever your views are, political views, she had quite a good night. however, what i would say is that there isn‘t element of anti— politics about the tory vote in scotland. there is a sense in which we have had enough and we do not want any more fights, and we do not want any more fights, and we do not want any more binary divisions. give us a rest. sol think... the mood in scotland is quite complex. on ruth davidson, what she has done is quite important, she has done very well and moved as far away as she could from theresa may. she had a separate ma nifesto from theresa may. she had a separate manifesto which it was against... she had... she said they do not want foxhunting and they do not want the fuel allowance cuts. she ran enough
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faraway and now she is firing shots at the dup alliance. she tweeted her speech at golf rap dumber belfast pride as a shot across the bow is. speech at golf rap dumber belfast pride as a shot across the bow islj pride as a shot across the bow is.” know we live in strange political times. apologies for the noise behind us. we are live in westminster this morning. as you can see... the ruth davidson issue, momentum and people stepping forward , momentum and people stepping forward, people stepping back. right now theresa may is on the back foot, there is no question about that. ruth davison, she is a conservative on the front foot? is there any possibility that somewhere along the line ruth davison could end up in a position other than the leader of the scottish conservative party? she is desperate to go on strictly come
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dancing. if there is one thing she can do to establish political head germany it would be that. she did tell us that once. —— he gammy. —— political hegemony. potentially she could but the thing about ruth davison is that she is not... some people would love her to just passing, graba people would love her to just passing, grab a seat and see what happens. she will not do that. she knows that would damage your reputation. she just knows that would damage your reputation. shejust won knows that would damage your reputation. she just won an election in scotland, she needs to do well here. but we should watch to see what you can do. a lot of that the tories won were historical tory votes that went to labour. it is ideological. she will head a limit. the country is to the left and if you showed a progressive votes... you think the tories have done the
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best they can do? i think it is the best they can do? i think it is the best they can do? i think it is the best they can do because the country is not... if you look at the balance a progressive parties in scotland it is not really a home to conservatism. she has done very well in targeting a get off my back, they give me peace. one last point question i know you are coming back... thank you very much indeed. time now 656. apologies for the noise us, it will be like that this morning. we are reviewing where we are after friday and let‘s have a look now. voters of britain delivered a hung parliament. we know of the consequences
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and what we‘re saying is the conservatives are the largest party. note they don‘t have an overall majority at this stage. unless the exit poll is incredibly wrong, the prime minister has failed to achieve her principal objective. the worst possible outcome would be a hung parliament. cheering politics has changed and politics isn't going back. you live by the sword and you die by the sword. i am standing down today as the leader of ukip with immediate effect. cheering reporter: are you stepping down, mrs may? 0h, jeremy corbyn! i will now form a government, a government that can provide certainty and lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. we will enter discussions with the conservatives. now let‘s get to work. it is always interesting when you
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put those images together and see what the story of the day is. we‘re here and you can see in westminster this morning we are discussing so much of the implications of what happened. we will speak to a conservative minister and will also speak to a new labour mp and of course. . . speak to a new labour mp and of course... i now semi— people were looking at the manifesto of the dup yesterday and the website collapsed. we will find out more about the dup as well. that is all coming up later on. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin, live from westminster. a prime minister under pressure. just a day after clinging to power, theresa may faces a backlash from fellow tories. the conservative leader is forming a minority government with the support of the democratic unionist party, but there are questions from some of her own mps over how long she can remain in thejob. the deal with the dup is also under
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scrutiny. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, says she has raised concerns with the prime minister about the unionists‘ opposition to gay rights. labour has ended its election campaign on a high. jeremy corbyn‘s party took kensington from the conservatives for the first time in its history. this morning we‘ll be live at downing street with the latest. and we‘ll be hearing how people across the uk have been reacting to friday‘s result. and we
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