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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 10, 2017 7:00am-8:00am BST

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just a day after clinging to power, theresa may faces a backlash from fellow tories. the conservative leader is forming a minority government with the support of the democratic unionist party, but there are questions from some of her own mps over how long she can remain in thejob. the deal with the dup is also under scrutiny. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, says she has raised concerns with the prime minister about the unionists‘ opposition to gay rights. labour has ended its election campaign on a high. jeremy corbyn‘s party took kensington from the conservatives for the first time in its history. this morning we‘ll be live at downing street with the latest. and we‘ll be hearing how people across the uk have been reacting to friday‘s result. and we are live at the kenilworth
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agricultural show in warwickshire, to hear what people are saying here this morning. the election really has been the nation‘s conversation. the butty van is here, the sofa is here, and we have lots of lovely guest to talk to. and chris the sheep isjoining us, isn‘t here, molly? —— isn‘t he. good morning. we are on college green in westminsterfor good morning. we are on college green in westminster for a very special edition of this this morning, looking at what happens next after the 2017 general election resulted in a hung parliament. also had this morning, police revealed the london bridge attackers had tried to get hold of a 7—tonne lorry, and that petrol—bombs were found in the van. detectives are now appealing for information about the knives used in the attack. in sport, a proud moment
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for england‘s harry kane. he‘ll captain his country in tonight‘s world cup qualifier, against scotland in glasgow, while the scots‘ striker leigh griffiths has been passed fit to play. and philip avery has the weather. hello, good morning. and 0k start to the day in sussex, but i‘m afraid it is not like that everywhere. i will have all the detail on the weekend‘s weather in just 80 minutes. have all the detail on the weekend‘s weather injust 80 minutes. —— eight few minutes. good morning. this is breakfast, live from college green in westminster. our top story this morning — the prime minister is facing pressure from within her own party, as she moves to form a government with the help of the democratic unionists. theresa may‘s failure to secure an outright majority has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. 0ur political correspondent emma vardy has this report on the fallout from the 2017 general election. 16,000...
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a valuable result in the uk‘s richest constituency. almost 2a hours after the polls closed it took a third recount in kensington to finally reveal labour had taken the seat from the tories for the first time ever byjust 20 votes. it means the conservatives end the campaign with 318 seats to labour‘s 262. labourare up 30. the snp on 35, the lib dems on 12, plaid cymru on four and the greens with one. now, theresa may is reaching out to the democratic unionist party in northern ireland for support. with the ten dup mps, the conservatives will have a working majority in the house of commons. but there are early signs that for some this will be an uncomfortable alliance. the dup is anti—abortion and northern ireland is the only part of the uk where same—sex marriage is not legal.
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scottish conservative leader ruth davidson last night sought assurances that any deal with the dup must not affect gay rights across the uk. meanwhile, concerns remain over whether the prime minister can hold on. 0ne senior tory has told the bbc she has to go. and this was the transport secretary chris grayling on the bbc‘s question time. she needs to stay as prime ministerfor the future. what was once sold as strong and stable now feels ever shaky. just around the road behind us, of course, is downing street. we can go to our political correspondent eleanor garnier. i imagine there are
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some tough conversations going on today for theresa may. what is your analysis this morning? good morning. i think theresa may has emerged from this election not without increased majority she wanted but instead fighting for her premiership. there is anger among many conservative mps at what many say was a disastrous campaign. that is why there are questions this morning about how long theresa may can hang on in downing street. we heard from heidi allen, a conservative mp, saying that she thinks theresa may has just six months to hold on here in downing street. 0ther mps and one minister have just downing street. 0ther mps and one minister havejust said downing street. 0ther mps and one minister have just said that they don‘t see how she can hang on. even if she does, there are already demands on her to change her leadership style, to increase that small advice circle that she has around her, to consult the party more on policy changes. and also a warning about a presidential style
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of objects. of course, between now and next week she needs to get a deal done with the dpp —— dup, and eyebrows have been raised about how difficult that could be, not least because some of the view is that the dup hold. i think ultimately this big political campbell theresa may took has not just big political campbell theresa may took has notjust cost the conservative majority, it could cost cost her herjob. eleanor garnier, thank you. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, has raised concerns about a deal with the democratic unionists. she‘s asked the prime minister for assurances that gay rights won‘t be eroded by the dup which opposes same sex marriage. catriona renton is in glasgow for us this morning. ruth davidson has made open, and about her concerns over the dup. take us through what she has said? absolutely. the scottish conservatives have become important players now, winning 13 seats at the
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election. they only had one last time, so that gain of 12 seats has made their voice very important, and pa rt made their voice very important, and part of the reason i think why theresa may has managed to stay in downing street. she did raise her concerns yesterday. she is clearly not entirely comfortable about an alliance with the dup. 0f not entirely comfortable about an alliance with the dup. of course, the dup are against gay marriage. ruth davidson is in a relationship with her female partner. ruth davidson is in a relationship with herfemale partner. she is due to get married to her. so she did raise her concerns with theresa may yesterday. she said there were other things that matter to her more than the party, one of them being lgbt i writes. —— lgbti. she said she received date categorical assurance that there would be no diversion of lgbti that there would be no diversion of lg bti rights that there would be no diversion of lgbti rights in britain, and that the prime minister would try to advance lg bti writes the prime minister would try to advance lgbti writes in northern ireland. she is also looking to use her increased influence over the brexit negotiations. i think she
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will seek to see she can get negotiations for britain to remain pa rt negotiations for britain to remain part of the single market, that is one of the things she suggested. she said it was important that there is an open brexit that allows for the greatest amount possible of free trade. so the political ‘s landscape has certainly changed here in scotland. —— political landscape. senior sinn fein leaders say they‘re concerned that a deal between the dup and the conservatives could put the northern ireland peace process at risk. power sharing in stormont broke down in january and nationalists say they expect the british government to remain neutral in efforts to revive it. this current arrangement may prove reckless. we will wait and see and reflect on that. we have argued for some time in recent times the british government have been working in cahoots with the democratic unionist party to the disadvantage of the political process here. in fact, they called off the talks recently to re—establish our institutions and, without that, the british public should actually have close scrutiny of the dup and what that party represents. and we will have more on the fallout
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from the election later on. right now, we have the rest of the news. it‘s been revealed that one of the london bridge killers tried to hire a 7.5—tonne truck on the morning of the attack. police say khuram butt‘s payment failed to go through, so he hired a white van from b80 that was eventually used instead. two more people have been arrested in connection with the attack. a total of eight people are now in custody. here‘s our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. this was the weapon found still strapped to khuram butt‘s body last saturday night. he and his fellow attackers used three identical 12 inch pink knives made of ceramic to murderfive people. counterterrorism detectives want help on where the ernesto knives were bought. the men had already killed three other people on london bridge with a van hired from b&q. throughout the carnage, heroic members of the public tried to stop them.
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we have stories of people who came out armed with chairs, other items were thrown, bottles and anything they could get their hands on, with a view to stop the attackers coming into pubs or bars but more importantly to scare them and try to stop others being attacked. afterwards in the van police van 13 petrol—bombs made with lighter fluid and cloth cut from tracksuit bottoms as well as two blow torches. the day started with the ringleader, khuram butt, on police bail, trying to hire a 7.5 tonne truck. he didn‘t have enough money, so instead he hired the white van from b80 in romford, which the men picked up some time after 6:30pm. then leaving barking soon after 7:30pm, they set off for central london. at 9:58pm they arrived at london bridge, driving across it and then back again before ploughing into pedestrians on their third pass. by the time they crashed the van at 10:07pm they fatally wounded three people.
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they then used the knives to kill five more. at 10:16pm, they were shot dead by police. detectives now believe it was in a safe house, a flat above this row of shops in east london, that the men had prepared for their attack. daniel sandford, bbc news. good morning. you are watching bbc brea kfast. good morning. you are watching bbc breakfast. we are live from westminster this morning, discussing the fallout of the latest election and what it might mean for all of us. and what it might mean for all of us. yes, maybe reflecting some of the conversations you had last night all over this this morning, about the situation we now find ourselves in. we are going to talk about campaigns now. their campaigns were like chalk and cheese. theresa may met small select groups of supporters whilejeremy corbyn addressed large rallies of fervent followers. and while some critics said the prime minister failed to shine in personal interviews, others claimed the labour leader blossomed in the limelight. before we speak to a pair of experts in this field, let‘s remind ourselves of some highs and lows from those two very
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different campaigns. i have just chaired a meeting with the cabinet, where we agreed that the cabinet, where we agreed that the government should call a general election to be held on the eighth of june. you're joking. not another one. i like your shoes, and then she looked at me and said, your shoes got me involved in politics. do you know who leaked your manifesto? no, we don't. strong and stable. strong and stable. strong and stable. you've called a general election for the good of the conservative party and it's going to backfire on you! would you allow north korea or some idiot ina would you allow north korea or some idiot in a run to master and then say, we'd better start talking? —— some idiot in iran to us. i'm
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jeremy... make sure you register to vote. what the country needs more than ever is certainty. and having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. so, those are some of the images you will remember. katie perrior is theresa may‘s former director of communications — she stood down on the day the election was announced — and matt zarb—cousin was a spokesman forjeremy corbyn until april. welcome to you both. i am sure you are very tired from an extraordinary few days. katie, what i want to ask
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you is, rather than going back in time, right now, theresa may would have us believe that nothing has changed. just looking at that speech on the podium, she has come back from meeting the queen, she stands in front of the press after what has been an extraordinary election, and would have us believe that it is business as usual? well, of course, charlie, everything has changed. i wrote in the times this morning that actually, that speech, she struck the wrong tone outside number ten. she should have come back and said, i hear you. what i have offered is not enough, i have taken that on board and listened. instead she delivered a speech claiming that it was business as usual, standing strong, saying we will deliver a strong, saying we will deliver a strong brexit. then she had to go to media interviews later in the day. why is that? why the chick at that time wrong? —— did she get that time wrong? i don't know why, acting she has been given poor advice. all the way through this campaign theresa
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may suffered from poor advice from her close circle of advisers. if you are going to run a presidential style election with a woman who doesn‘t like doing the media, ja ka rta doesn‘t like doing the media, jakarta void during debates. you have to go out there. tony blair crawled over broken glass in 2000 and want to get on the airwaves. she looked like it was slightly beneath her. that sets the tone. by by way of contrast, the man who lost was the one left smiling. yes, no one expected him to win seats and i think there was a lot of concern that he wasn't going to be able to win seats and win votes and what's happened is we have had the biggest swing to a political party since 1945. people looked at the rallies. they knew he was a good campaigner but they didn't think that would necessarily translate to votes and seats. the fact that he has been able to mobilise and many young people and in those seats where the young people voted the turnout has
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gone up 4% or 5% and those seats have swung around to labour. on a day—to—day basis, in the place around us here, trying to get something changed or presented properly, how has it changed? we have more mp5 now. our position in westminster is much stronger. i think his credibility within the party and with the public has increased considerably in the course of this general election campaign. i don't think that anything anyone predicted. let's talk about theresa may. like us, she will be up this morning having brett test. the conversations going around the are never—ending. —— having breakfast. what now for her? she said she was with the conservative government for the next five years. does she mean that will be her? what she means is the conservative government doesn‘t fa ncy the conservative government doesn‘t fancy being in opposition. people will be rallying around the pm today
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saying in the long—term maybe this is to option for now we have to get together. for how long? you never know. but the conservatives are a ruthless bunch and they go for each other quite carefully. i‘ve always said it is really bad to not have a strong opposition in the house of commons. if the conservatives don‘t have an enemy across the ventures we tend to turn on ourselves. —— ventures. in that very small group around her, we understand she has two key advisers. so three of them are deciding how things go. has this... do you think anything has changed in the way she will think this group ayes will she get rid of people, will she listened to people more? is the way she goes about this business so entrenched? more? is the way she goes about this business so entrenched ?|j more? is the way she goes about this business so entrenched? i think she will have to change that. when you look through the newspapers this morning, in every other paper there is coverage about how it is too
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tightly controlled. in the election campaign the presidential campaign was about her at the beginning and in the end she ruled out amber rudd, david davis. she has a lot of big hitters and she didn‘t use any of them. tell us what it's like. a lot of people listen and think she has two advisers. what do they do? what happens in a room? are they literally just saying, happens in a room? are they literallyjust saying, what happens in a room? are they literally just saying, what are we going to do? what's happening? they are terrible political leaders, but lillian street ciders. you need a few people who have been around the block. —— brilliant street ciders. what we‘ve seen through the ma nifesto what we‘ve seen through the manifesto preparation is they‘ve landed really badly on the doorstep and mps didn‘t even know what was going to go in it. so it is too tightly controlled at the top. and there was the leak of the manifesto. you think in some way that worked well forjeremy corbyn? absolutely. the conservatives wanted an election
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about brexit. if labour tried to its article 50 earlier on and i think they would have called the election then. but because the manifesto leaked, we then had a lot of intrigue and a lot of people finding out what was in it and a debate about policies and lots of issues. i think that really helped and got the election campaign going. whether it was intentional or not we don't know. but a quick look at the papers. it is really all about theresa may. many stairs into the a byss. theresa may. many stairs into the abyss. she has had her chips. —— may stares. you would think papers like the daily telegraph, which has been so supportive throughout, this thought process that is happening now, how close is it to the truth?|j process that is happening now, how close is it to the truth? i think they are quite spot on. they will all be sitting there, david davis, borisjohnson all be sitting there, david davis, boris johnson and all be sitting there, david davis, borisjohnson and theresa may thinking, where do we go next? the conservatives have to regroup and
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remember what they offered the country. theresa may talked about the things that mattered to people. why people were voting brexit and how they were feeling at home. that‘s why she is four points ahead. is there a plot right now to replace theresa may? this is the conservative party, there‘s probably a lwa ys conservative party, there‘s probably always a plot. i don't know. i think people get annoyed when... i am playing that role of sort of laughing about it, but this is our prime minister we are talking about andi prime minister we are talking about and i think sometimes in this westminster bubble we all try to fight out of it. this is the real deal. is there someone now trying to conjure a plan to be prime minister while we have a prime minister?” conjure a plan to be prime minister while we have a prime minister? i am sure they will be looking at the long—term, thinking, will this be the next five years with theresa may 01’ the next five years with theresa may oramiin the next five years with theresa may or am i in with a shot? there are big hitters in the cabinet to at the moment will be crowding around the prime minister, backing her, was we are ten days away from the start of
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brexit negotiation and that will be on their mind. in the long-term, probably. what is notable is their silence. i think the problem they haveis silence. i think the problem they have is that theresa may now looks like a defeated prime minister. she called the election because she wanted an increased mandate, she thought the election was a foregone conclusion, i think she took the public for granted. they didn't really give them a positive offer. and she got punished for that. now either... the longer she stays there the more it will help labour in terms of the increased to labour support, but if she goes out such a crucial time for the country that i don't think the public will ever forgive the conservative party. that‘s a very interesting point. thank you both very much indeed. time to get some sleep. thank you both so much. we are hoping it stays dry this morning. so far, so good. we have a tent, so we are safer now. how we can looking?
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good morning. isee how we can looking? good morning. i see that the bla nkets good morning. i see that the blankets have come out. i didn‘t think it was that cold! if you are waking up in the channel islands this morning you probably have some of the best weather on offer. glorious conditions. a very sensible choice shooting through the glass in lancashire. not looking very sparkly here forjean. you are not alone in lancashire. widely across northern england and western parts of england increasingly and wales, northern ireland you‘ve had your rain overnight. that‘s gradually creeping away and it will move into scotland during the course of the day. it is all tied in with weather fronts which will gradually push further north and gradually push further eastwards, out of the west of england and from wales. but it will ta ke england and from wales. but it will take an absolute age to see the front moving on. once the rain is gone i think things brighten up. we could have 22 degrees. the wind
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direction isjust could have 22 degrees. the wind direction is just right for you. could have 22 degrees. the wind direction isjust right for you. 22 degrees in northern ireland. still showers to come into the far west to finish the day. there the weather front. breezy, coming infrom finish the day. there the weather front. breezy, coming in from the south. 17— 19. in the sunshine for the south—east you keep that for much of the day. 24— 25 foot. edgbaston, a bit close for the cricket! cloudy throughout. the light could be an issue and then the rain moves on later today, hopefully. you might get a good day‘s played, but interrupted? that‘s a neat call. that eventually fizzles into the south—east of the british isles. a —— not a cold airstream, so not a cold night, near the low pressure into sunday it will be breezy and plenty of showers as well. that will be the wafer western scotland, northern ireland and eventually we will have their showers pushing into parts of the
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north—west of england, through western wales. the driest of the weather from yorkshire, western wales. the driest of the weatherfrom yorkshire, lincolnshire and into the midlands and central and into the midlands and central and southern england, towards the east with the cloud popping the weather front is still there. 21— 22 certainly, with the chance of a spot of rain. more on the website, see you later. thank you very much. good morning. we are live in westminster throughout the morning, discussing what everything means. we‘ve got the general election result, we know it‘s a hung parliament. what does that mean? we are trying to reflect some of the conversations you may be having at home, questions about how much damage has been done to theresa may by the election results. we are trying to give you more information about dup. we are learning fast about what that party represents and how crucial they are 110w represents and how crucial they are now to the conservatives and what lies ahead. what is unwarranted —— minority government really mean? what does it mean for you? we are trying to get
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to the bottom of that. the papers this morning, look at this. the mirror, the coalition of crackpots is the way they have written it up this morning. we know that theresa may was talking about a coalition of chaos, but the mirror have written it up like this. you can see more it up like this. you can see more of it up like this. you can see more of the headlines. the guardian, also the daily telegraph as well. who could have predicted it? at conservative leader turning into this government. accusations of a coalition of crackpots. what went wrong with the tories? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin spent the day in bury north where council budgets have been slashed and voters swung from blue to red. what a mess to clear up. the morning after the night before. this business was set up after bin collections were cut here. bury council has lost close to half of its funding since 2010. josh tells me people
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have had enough. cut public services, cut social care and nhs cuts social care, education and i think people are looking for something more positive and knowing that it does not have to be that way. there is a better way for people. from pre—election headlines which read ‘cor bin‘ to ‘cor blimey‘. dave, the labour voter, is stunned and chuffed. i don‘t know what is going on! you don‘t know? no! is this the look of shock? yeah. dave, the conservative voter, is stunned and furious. theyjust thought they were going to win and she couldn't be bothered. that was the end of the story. i think you can forget about brexit. brexit. the word they thought they would dominate all those decisions made the day earlier. in the end, another word helped to turn this seat from blue to red. austerity.
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and people have said enough is enough. economics is about humanity as well as balancing the books. there were other reasons as well. we went in search of pub wisdom to the red lion. jeremy corbyn became the face of the people. i think he stepped up and was put in the limelight more than herself... sorry. names, you know what i‘m saying. in the bluebell inn, conservative voters had their own theories. the cuts to the winter fuel allowance, the cut to the triple lock. if she had not said all about this cuts that she was going to do, she would have been fine. she shot herself in the foot, as far as i‘m concerned. they saw political suicide narrowly avoided in westminster. back in bury north, as the dust settled, there was a murder mystery under way. you‘re gonna spot the killer? i hope so, i hope so. did you spot the result,
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did you know was coming? i sort of hoped it wouldn‘t. this is a bellwether constituency. they have always followed the national trends. blue for thatcher, red for blair, back to blue for cameron. this time, they did not guess who done it. there was a 5% swing to red as theresa mayjust held on to power, but only with the help of the dup. what do you know of them? i do not know much. a quick look and the socially conservative views of the dup anti—abortion, anti—gay, are not palatable to all political conservatives. that is horrifying. as a tory supporter, how do you feel about this? as i said, i can‘t... i can‘t. i hope the murder mystery might be easier to solve. ahead lies a journey into brexit negotiations few would have imagined. theresa may says nothing will derail them. really interesting hearing people's
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voices. very much what we are trying to reflect. coffee has just arrived. 0ur eagle eyed fillip spotted earlier that lou has a blanket around her legs, because there is a d raft. as you can see we d raft. as you can see we are d raft. as you can see we are at westminster this morning, a special programme reflecting and looking ahead to what lies ahead in terms of theresa may‘s administration. tell us what is important you. we will try to get some of those questions answered. stay with us. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. coming up before 8:00, philip will have the weather. we are here in westminster, discussing the fallout of the latest
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general election, what it means for us general election, what it means for us and what it means in parliament. we will be live to downing street through the morning, where theresa may will just be through the morning, where theresa may willjust be waking up and looking at the papers which we will also be looking at here on bbc brea kfast. also be looking at here on bbc breakfast. we will keep you right up to date with everything happening. michael have the sport, as well. first, let‘s take you through the main developers. —— developments. the prime minister is facing pressure from within her own party, as she moves to form a government with the help of the democratic unionists. theresa may‘s failure to secure an outright majority in the general election has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. a few minutes ago the prime minister‘s former comedic ‘s chief told us she was certain some cabinet members would be considering theresa may‘s future. —— communications chief. they will be looking at the future and thinking, is this five yea rs future and thinking, is this five years with theresa may, or am i in
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with a shot? there will be people in the cabinet who are gathering around the cabinet who are gathering around the prime minister, backing her, because we are ten days away from the start of brexit negotiations, and that will be the first thing on their minds. but long—term, yes, probably. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, has raised concerns about a potential deal with the dup. she has asked the prime ministerfor deal with the dup. she has asked the prime minister for assurances that 93v prime minister for assurances that gay rights will not be eroded by the dup, which opposes same—sex marriage. senior sinn fein leaders say they‘re concerned that a deal between the dup and the conservatives could put the northern ireland peace process at risk. power sharing in stormont broke down in january and nationalists say they expect the british government to remain neutral in efforts to revive it. this current arrangement may well prove to be reckless but we‘ll have to wait and see. we will reflect on the. we have argued for some considerable time, especially recently, that the british government have been working in cahoots with the dup to disadvantage —— to the disadvantage of the
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political process here. they called off the talks here very recently to re—establish our institutions. the british public should actually have close scrutiny of the dup, and what that party presents —— represents. in the final constituency declaration, labour took the conservative seat of kensington in west london. the labour candidate w011 west london. the labour candidate won byjust 20 votes, overturning a majority of 7000. two more people have been arrested in connection with the london bridge terror attacks. in total, eight people are now in custody. police investigating the killings have revealed that the three men who carried it out had wanted to hire a lorry but their payment was declined. petrol bombs and blow torches were found in the van they did use. 25 people have been arrested on suspicion of committing hate crimes since the london bridge terror attacks, according to the metropolitan police. the number of officers on the streets has been increased to reassure communities who may feel worried as they gather in their places of worship.
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those are the main stories this morning. it is 7:34 a.m.. we are in westminster, leaving mike a bit lonely in salford. good morning. yes, i miss you. iam keeping the sofa warm here. good morning, everyone. for england and scotland fans they don‘t come much bigger than this — a world cup qualifier at hampden park. with scotland badly needing a win, because they‘re six points behind group leaders england. england will have a new captain, tottenham‘s harry kane, as his manager looks to rotate the skipper‘s armband — but an away match at hampden is not an easy start. scotland are unbeaten at home in their last five matches. he has belief in himself and his ability. he has always had that. when he played in the under 21s he wasn‘t in the tottenham team. he was looking to break in. he had great self—belief even then.
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he has really grown to be an outstanding player. the game is there to be enjoyed, and the enthusiasm of the players and the time they have put in, they are ready, they are ready for the game. physically and mentally, they are ready for the game. we have real assets in our team and real assets in our team as a group, and we have to use them. scotland and england are not the only home nations in action today. northern ireland travel to azerbaijan looking to cement second place in their group. andy murray said he‘d had "a good tournament, all things considered", after losing in the semi—finals of the french open. he was beaten in five sets by stan wawrinka, in a match, which lasted over 4.5 hours. murray does leave paris in better shape than when he arrived, though, and he tried to take some positives from his run.
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i‘m not happy right now, i am disappointed and frustrated and tired after a long, long couple of weeks, but i am proud i have put myself in a position when there was a lot of doubt coming into the event and i didn‘t feel great at the beginning of the tournament. i worked through it and i accepted the position i was in and i gave a reasonable account of myself. stan wawrinka will play 9—time champion rafa nadal in tomorrow‘s final, after he beat dominic thiem in straight sets. nadal has yet to drop a set at this year‘s tournament. and there is still british interest at roland garros. alfie hewett is through to his first grand slam wheelchair singles final. he takes on defending champion gustavo fernandez and he‘ll also play in the doubles final, alongside gordon reid. lions coach warren gatland has named what‘s probably his strongest side yet for this morning‘s match
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against canterbury crusaders. 0wen farrell starts at fly—half, as gatland begins to hone in on his side for the first test. crusaders are the form team in super rugby, so the challenges are only getting tougherfor the lions. england‘s cricketers are looking to make it three wins out of three in the champions trophy when they take on australia at edgbaston today. eoin morgan‘s side have already qualified for the semi—finals, but australia need a win after their first two games were washed out by rain. playing against australia always has extra baggage, regardless of how the teams are going and where they are at. we will probably consider the fortunes australia have had with the weather since they have come, it adds something extra. they are a strong team and if they get on top they hammer things, so it‘s up to us to produce some of our best cricket. bangladesh will be cheering on england — they‘ll be through to the semi—finals if england beat australia.
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bangladesh stunned new zealand, knocking them out with a five—wicket win, thanks largely to a record 224—run partnership between shakib al hasan and mahmudullah. lewis hamilton‘s mercedes was fastest in first practice for the canadian grand prix. he edged out his title rival, ferrari‘s sebastian vettel, who‘s now 25 points clear in the standings. but hamilton was beaten into second place in p2, by kimi raikkonen in the other ferrari. chris froome is up to second place in the criterium du dauphine, after making up ground on stage six. in a sprint finish, denmark‘s jakob fuglsang just crossed the line ahead of froome — and richie porte, who took the overall lead. he‘s 39 seconds ahead of froome. hull fc moved up to third in super league with an impressive win at second—placed salford red devils. albert kelly scored two of their six tries. the win moved the visitors to within a point of salford, who missed the chance to close the gap on leaders castleford.
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st helens beat widnes vikings 26—10. the sort of try you don‘t see very often. that is all the sport for now. in an hour, the lions‘ latest match will have begun, so we will have news on that. it is brightening up here. blue skies gradually emerging over westminster this morning. not that the weather is enormously important. what is important is what is happening in politics. a seismic change. we do have the prime minister remaining in downing street, but so much has changed in terms of the landscape and the arguments in the campaign. we will be discussing all sorts of things this morning. public anger over cuts to services seem to have helped propel the labour party to its highest
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share of the vote since tony blair‘s landslide victory in 2001, so how will the election results affect theresa may‘s future plans for austerity? joining us now are conor d‘arcy from the resolution foundation, and bronwen maddox from the institute for government. good morning to you both. could you give us your thoughts on the arguments we have had during the election campaign, and the key issues that you believe genuinely started to make people think about how they were going to vote? public services and the cuts to them were a much bigger issue than the parties seemed to think they were, going into the election. everybody thought this was going to be the brexit election. that is certainly how theresa may wanted to play it, even though she didn't talk about it much. but what came out very clearly was that anger and concern about public cuts to local government, education, the nhs, was really running very high. and i think in a funny way, in westminster, when you are in the westminster bubble, politicians will think that was the
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la st politicians will think that was the last government's arguments. but of course all those cuts were still coming through. and people are really beginning to feel the effect of it. labour really capitalised on it on the campaign trail. what seems to have come out is that it was not just older generations perhaps feeling that, it was very much the younger generation feeling that as well? yes, absolutely. we don't have the turnout data yet, but the suggestion is that lots of young people have swung towards labour. but there are also longer term trends like wage growth being porphyry younger generations, and not being able to afford a home, that has sparked people to turn out when they haven't before. —— wage growth being poorer. and jeremy corbyn had a very different ma nifesto. corbyn had a very different manifesto. yes, when we are talking about cuts to welfare, they would
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not will be reversed under labour, so not will be reversed under labour, so there is a broader picture. we we re so there is a broader picture. we were talking with theresa may‘s former communications adviser who worked with her until about six weeks ago. the suggestion is that she can‘t do things any differently. she doesn‘t do that listening thing that other politicians somehow do better. bearing in mind the issues you say, people are concerned about them now, and her suggestion is that we should carry on as before. is there a problem there? she is going to have to listen. in fact, she is going to be told, notjust by the dup but byron party, what they are prepared for her to do. she will have to give way to some of these voices and i think you can expect a bit of a pulling back on austerity and some of those things. she will have to. that is interesting, because that is not her style. her stylistically what she said she was going to do and stick to it, and even when she does a u—turn, she makes out that it is something else. it is or isa makes out that it is something else. it is or is a balance in political
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leaders. they have to be a leader, they have to say that this is the direction we are going in, but they also have to have antenna for pulling in what people really care about. that's the bit she lacks. she doesn't have a choice at this point. if she is going to stay in office, her party, let alone the dup, will be keeping a tight rein on her. what is the reality here? do cuts still have to be made? there is always a question of how they are made and the balance across them. one of the themes that theresa may brought up was social care, our ageing society, and who is going to pay that. those are important questions that are not going to go away. but it is about the balance of any cuts, or where money is taken from. is it being drawn from working—class families or is it being spread more broadly across people who have done quite well, the baby boomer generation and so on. well, the baby boomer generation and so on. the fact is that the national finances are very tight and any politician is going to face that. there is not as much money around as the country would like. there is a
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lot of debt and deficit. i think we do face a big economic question behind this, about whether we are just going to go a bit easier on the deficit and spend a bit more, which is really the political bait —— debate that didn't get teased out, but that may be one of the artefacts of this election. you mentioned the social care issue that arose during the election, that plan the conservatives have, though they had to backtrack and start changing their ideas. it will be brave to go back into that territory again, isn‘t it? because it was so toxic. these are obviously emotional issues, when you are thinking about the end of life. but these are big questions that we don't really have a big answer for at the moment. when you have that more fragile coalition it is difficult. but i think in the long—term these generational issues are the ones we have to get to grips with, and have such traction, so having a good answer for them is a real vote winner. thank you, both of you. you brought the sun with you. it was chile, and now you have got the sunshine. i might even put my blanket away. what a beautiful morning it has
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turned out to be. we can get the weather. good morning. let‘s rub. it is also glorious in guernsey and quite widely across the channel islands. —— rub it in further. it is miserable across some parts of the british isles because some of you are tied up with this weather fronts already, which produced a wet night in northern ireland for example and we continue to push this rain further eastwards and further northwards. but at least it is moving. for some of you that‘s good news. but the cloud and rain looks like it is shy of the south—west. 0nce like it is shy of the south—west. once it moves in the dev anand cornwall, perhaps somerset and dorset eventually, you keep it for a good part of the day. —— devon and cornwall. some parts are moving. 0nce
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cornwall. some parts are moving. once the rain clears from scotland, about 22. northern ireland not far behind. there‘s the great swathe of cloud. that‘s where it sits, with only a gradually eastwood creek. if you are in east anglia, the east midlands or the south—east of warm afternoon in prospect. edgbaston, i wish you were further east, but the cloud will be a feature. light could be an issue later on. the uv levels are quite high so watch out. you don‘t get to see the cloud and rain until quite late on in the day. in fa ct until quite late on in the day. in fact it is overnight before we push the remnants of that towards east anglia and the south—east. not a cold night by any means, wherever you are spending the night. we are all influenced by the low pressure. notice the number of isobars. another blustery day on sunday. if
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you are close by to the low there will be showers for scotland, northern ireland, north and west england. generally speaking, as you get down towards the diagonal from lincolnshire into the midlands and the south, you‘ve got a better chance of staying dry, with sunshine. too far to the south—east and you have the front with cloud and you have the front with cloud and the odd spot of rain. even here it will be over 20 degrees. see you soon. thank you very much. as if to reflect on what philip was saying, look at that sunshine! we have a special programme this morning, reflecting on some of the politics from westminster and trying to reflect some of the conversations you may be having to about where are politically. and what happens next. now we want to go tojohn maguire, who is finding out some of the
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a nswe rs who is finding out some of the a nswers to who is finding out some of the answers to that. he is at an agricultural show in warwick this morning and joined by a horse and stu nt morning and joined by a horse and stunt rider! what‘s going on? good question! you might recognise this horse from poldark and victoria. i was very impressed by him coming out of the saddle and falling down. i‘ve done that myself but i didn‘t manage to get back on. impressive stuff here at the agricultural show in warwickshire. the election really is the nation‘s conversation, as we‘ve been saying all morning. everywhere you go people talking about it and asking those questions. whatjust happened and what will happen next? we took the van to an area gained by the conservatives byjust 48 votes. this is what people talk me. -- told me. i tend to agree with the labour
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domestic policies, but i think we needed a strong leadership for the negotiations on brexit and so i am really not sure. gutted. she might be able to get a decent deal on brexit, but i don't think that outweighs the policies of what jeremy corbyn has given. he is perfect for the younger generation. i think she is in a good position to call the election but i don't think she rana call the election but i don't think she ran a good campaign. i think if she ran a good campaign. i think if she did it would be very different now and people would probably think, well, at least now it will be planned out. she had a free hand on what she was doing, now she has to do what the others want as well and i think we could be in a bit of a mess. i suppose at the end of the day we've just got to deal with what we've got. the same as the whole brexiting. the people who didn't wa nt brexiting. the people who didn't want to leave the eu, they've just sort of... we've got to get on with
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it and make the best of what we've got. unsurprisingly, a range of views yesterday. some concern, some not so. it to a couple of farmers. good morning. the sun has come out, which is what we like to see when we are talking farming! what did you think of the last 24 hours? quite eye opening. a lot of deep thinking to be done. the government has got to be done. the government has got to all pull together to make a success of the situation. as far as you are concerned , success of the situation. as far as you are concerned, is it all about brexit, the brexit negotiations?“ that foremost in your mind? no, no, it‘s a combination of brexit and the ruling of this country, the smooth running of the country. what were your main concern throughout the
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election over the past day or so? a lot of seasonal workers on your straw brie farm, about 400? 300 at present. we are obviously worried because the whole system has gone up the window. tell us what that is. seasonal workers who used, and have a short period on each farm. —— used to come. they would pick our crop and then return to their country. now the big concern is where the next lot of stuff will come from. i've grown up where it indians, pakistanis, romanians, polish, where will the next people come from? we worry for the next couple of years. thank you very much indeed. good morning, maria, from the london school of economics. what are the main issues, especially thinking
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about the brexit talks with regards to agriculture? within those negotiations, what are the things that farmers will be concerned about? are three key areas would be what‘s going to happen with seasonal labourers, will they be readily available? that will be wanting to be looked at in the brexit negotiations. another area is what the new tariff rules will be once britain leads the eu and finally the subsidies farmers get from the agricultural policy. and it will be watched very closely by the agriculture sector because it has been so intrinsically linked with subsidies over the last 40 years? absolutely. the uk farmers received £2.6 billion worth of subsidies this year, from the common agricultural policy, and especially for smaller farm holdings that can be quite significant in their overall income. thank you very much, dr chen, for
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joining us this morning. we have a good crowd of farmers, local business owners to talk to us this morning later this morning. i am not quite sure what the weather will do. a bit of sun, a bit of clout, not quite sure what the weather will be like for ducks, but we will try to see if we can train a sheep dog to herd ducks later. as long as the ducks are ok! we are here in westminster this morning for a special edition of bbc breakfast. we will tell you about the weather and other news as well, but we are trying to get to the bottom of what this election result means for all of us and for parliament and theresa may. here to tell us more is dr andrew blick, constitution expert from king‘s college london. it has been called a minority government. what does that mean? it has been called a minority government. what does that mean7m means that no party has an actual
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majority of mps in the house of commons. the largest party, the conservative party, will try to govern without having a majority, what will try to win the crucial votes in parliament and try to demonstrate that although it party doesn‘t have a majority, it does have what we call the confidence of the house of commons and that‘s a critical thing. people will remember, those images are always fascinating, of the prime minister travelling to buckingham palace to present the case to the queen and seek permission to set up a government. take us through the next steps. what will happen next in terms of the official part of this process ? terms of the official part of this process? when parliament reconvenes, the government, theresa may, as to demonstrate it can win a crucial votes, that it can win the vote on the queen‘s speech and get a budget through. it doesn‘t have to win every single vote to carry on governing but they have to be able to show that when it comes to the
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crunch on the fundamental issues they‘ve somehow got the majority, which obviously means having the support of more than just their mps. what have they done with the dup? is ita what have they done with the dup? is it a deal, a conversation, and understanding? we suspect it won't go as faras understanding? we suspect it won't go as far as the full coalition that we saw between the lib dems and conservatives between 3010 and 3015, so conservatives between 3010 and 3015, so it won‘t be a full coalition. —— 2010 and 2015. there will be key issues on which they agreed key parts of the legislative programme and certain things which the dup will want to hold out for. the significance being that with the dup mps they have just enough to have a working majority? yes, so it's not as stable as the previous coalition, whether conservatives and lib dems are secure within them. so not quite as safe position as was for david cameron. you are constitution expert rather than a political expert, but
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inevitably people are left with a situation where theresa may... it‘s a marriage of necessity, isn‘t it? this isn‘t a political alignment, as such. she needed the vote and had to seek them from somewhere. the result is of course, in terms of the government we have, is that we have a new influence in the government. certainly there has been some collaboration between the dup and the conservatives in the recent past, so it is like they are completely... this puts them on a different footing? absolutely and it gives them an added sense of urgency to the priorities of the dup. clearly what it thinks has now become an awful lot more important thanit become an awful lot more important than it was previously, so it will need alterations on the agenda of the government and one area where it will be very interesting to see how things work out is over brexit and what exactly is the dup position? they seemingly wanted brexit, they campaigned for it, on the other hand they don‘t like some of the possible
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impacts of it in northern ireland how that plays out will interesting. it's how that plays out will interesting. it‘s not necessarily where your speciality is, but theresa may stood there and said" another five years". e.g. mean another five years of her, is that sustainable, or of the government? —— does that mean. what‘s the alternative? another general election? are mps going to wa nt to general election? are mps going to want to vote for another general election? there‘s no other real coalition you can put together in parliament to stack up. so in a sense this is the only option. whether it means theresa may is the one in charge for the full five yea rs one in charge for the full five years is another difficult question, but certainly all the alternatives just don‘t seem palatable, so that might be where we are. we've already spoken this morning to theresa may‘s former communications adviser, who we saying the reality is that a lot of people around this place will know that some plotting may well be under way already. technically, what
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is the procedure if there were to be a change in the leader of the conservative party? the way these things will happen probably in reality, as this law with margaret thatcher, is in the end there may be some kind of leadership challenge. there is a process for doing that if it was to happen, it probably there will be informal ways of approaching this if it is becoming clear that there is a serious body of resistance. but clearly that will be hugely damaging, if you are trying to runa hugely damaging, if you are trying to run a government in a difficult position, especially with negotiating over brexit, and there isa negotiating over brexit, and there is a formal leadership challenge. that could be more damaging to the conservative party than sticking with the leader they‘ve got. fascinating to talk to you. thank you very much. that was a constitution expert from king‘s couege constitution expert from king‘s college london. the negotiation for brexit will begin on monday. we will be talking about what european leaders may be thinking of in the next hour. we will take a break for a moment.
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the headline is coming up in a moment. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin, live from westminster. a prime minister under pressure. just a day after clinging to power, theresa may faces a backlash from fellow tories. the conservative leader is forming a minority government with the support of the democratic unionist party, but there are questions from some of her own mps over how long she can remain in thejob. the deal with the dup is also under scrutiny. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, says she has raised concerns with the prime minister about the unionists‘ opposition to gay rights. labour has ended its election campaign on a high. jeremy corbyn‘s party took kensington from the conservatives for the first time in its history, by just 20 votes.
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