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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 10, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin, live from westminster. a prime minister under pressure. just a day after clinging to power, theresa may faces a backlash from fellow tories. the conservative leader is forming a minority government with the support of the democratic unionist party, but there are questions from some of her own mps over how long she can remain in thejob. the deal with the dup is also under scrutiny. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, says she has raised concerns with the prime minister about the unionists‘ opposition to gay rights. labour has ended its election campaign on a high. jeremy corbyn‘s party took kensington from the conservatives for the first time in its history, by just 20 votes. this morning, we'll be live at downing street with the latest. and we'll be hearing how people across the uk have been reacting to friday's result. a big services, cut, nhs, social
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care, education. and i think people are looking for something more positive, it does not have to be that way. they just thought they we re that way. they just thought they were going to win, didn't they? end of story. i think you can forget about brexit. these guys are from norfolk, we are at the kenilworth agricultural show in warwickshire. we've also got great people to introduce you to, to talk us through what has happened over the last 2a hours, and indeed, what happens next. good morning — it's saturday 10th june. we're on college green in westminster for a special programme, as we look at what happens next after the 2017 general election resulted
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in a hung parliament. also ahead... police reveal that the london bridge attackers had tried to get hold of a seven—tonne lorry, and that petrol bombs were found in the van they did eventually hire. detectives are now appealing for information about the knives used in the attack. in sport — the lions face their toughest game yet on their tour of new zealand, as they take on a crusaders side unbeaten in the league and containing eight all blacks. and philip avery has the weather. good morning. it is an ok start to the day in sussex, but i'm afraid it is not like that everywhere. i will have the detail on the weekend's weather in just a few minutes. good morning. this is breakfast, live
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from college green in westminster. our top story this morning... the prime minister is facing pressure from within her own party, as she moves to form a government with the help of the democratic unionists. theresa may's failure to secure an outright majority has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. our political correspondent emma vardy has this report on the fallout from the 2017 general election. a valuable result in the uk's richest constituency. almost 2a hours after the polls closed, it took a third recount in kensington took a third recount in kensington to finally reveal labour had taken this seat from the tories for the first time ever, and byjust 20 votes. it means the conservatives
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and the campaign with 318 seats, labourup by 30 and the campaign with 318 seats, labour up by 30 to 262. now, theresa may is reaching out to the democratic unionist party in northern ireland for support. with the ten dup mps, the conservatives will have a working majority in the house of commons. but there are early signs that for some, this will be an uncomfortable alliance. the dup is anti—abortion, and northern ireland is the only part of the uk where same—sex marriage is not legal. scottish conservative leader ruth davidson last night sought assurances that any deal with the dup rust not affect gay rights across the uk. meanwhile, concerns remain over whether the prime minister can hold on. one senior tory has told the bbc she has to go.
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and this was the transport secretary, chris cook grayling, on question time. my view is that she should stay as prime minister for the foreseeable future. what was once sold as strong and stable now feels ever so shaky. a few minutes ago, the prime minister's former communications chief told us she was certain that some cabinet members would be considering mrs may's future. i'm sure they will be looking at the long—term, thinking, will this be five years of theresa may, or am i in witha five years of theresa may, or am i in with a shot? there will be people in the cabinet who will be backing the prime minister, because we are ten days away from the start of the brexit negotiations, and that should be the first thing on their mind. for the latest, let's speak to our political correspondent eleanor garnier, who is at downing street this morning. you would imagine many difficult
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conversations going on for theresa may. particularly, are there other tory ministers and mps having conversations about who might be leader? there are, and that's why theresa may has come out of this election not with that increased majority that she was after, but instead fighting for her own role. that's why we are hearing questions being asked about just that's why we are hearing questions being asked aboutjust how long she can hang on here in downing street. conservative mp heidi 11 says she thinks theresa may has gotjust six months thinks theresa may has gotjust six m o nths left thinks theresa may has gotjust six months left here in no 10. even one minister has said they cannot see how she can stay on. that's why we are getting lots of questions about just how long theresa may can last in no 10. it looks like ultimately, this political gamble she took in calling the election hasn'tjust cost the conservatives their majority, but it is also costing theresa may her long—time future. let's just talk about what is going on with the conservative party and
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the dup as well — what can you tell us the dup as well — what can you tell us about these conversations? well, theresa may needs to get a deal done with the dup as soon as possible, before the queen's speech, which is a week on monday, which will set out the government's agenda, and of course the same day that the brexit negotiations start. there have already been concerns raised about a potential deal with the dup, overviews on, for example, marriage and abortion, but also over a potential problem when it comes to negotiations for power—sharing in northern ireland, where typically the british government acts as a neutral broker between republicans and unionists. so, this is going to bea and unionists. so, this is going to be a tricky thing for theresa may to get done, and the pressure is on, not just get done, and the pressure is on, notjust in terms of the timing, to get it done before next week, but also to keep all sides happy. it's been revealed that one of the london bridge killers tried to hire a seven—and—a—half—tonne
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truck on the morning of the attack. police say khuram butt‘s payment failed to go through, so he hired a white van from b80 that was eventually used instead. two more people have been arrested in connection with the attack. a total of eight people are now in custody. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. this was the weapon found still strapped last saturday night to the body of khuram butt. he and his fellow attackers used three identical ceramic knives to murder five people. counter—terrorism detectives want help, to find out where these knives were bought. the men had already killed three other people on london bridge with a van hired from b&q. throughout the carnage, heroic members of the public tried to stop them. we have stories of people who came out armed with chairs, other items, throwing bottles, anything they could get
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their hands on, with a view to trying to prevent the attack is coming into pubs and bars, but more importantly to scare them off, to try and stop other people being attacked. afterwards in the van, police found 13 petrol bombs, made with lighter fluid and cloth from tracksuit bottoms, as well as two blowtorches. the day had started with the ringleader, khuram butt, who was on police bail, trying to hirea who was on police bail, trying to hire a seven—and—a—half—tonne truck. he did not have enough money so instead, he hired the white van from b&q instead, he hired the white van from b80 in romford, which they pick up sometime after 630pm. then, leaving barking soon after 7.30, they set offa barking soon after 7.30, they set off a central london. at nine o'clock they arrived in london bridge, driving across it and back again, before ploughing into pedestrians on their third pass. by the time they crashed the van at seven minutes past ten, they had fatally wounded three people. they then used the knives to kill five more. at 16 minutes past ten, they we re more. at 16 minutes past ten, they
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were killed by police. there was a safe house, a flat in this street in london, above a row of shops, and it is here police believe they prepared for their attacked. it is ten past eight, you are watching bbc brea kfast. eight, you are watching bbc breakfast. this morning, we are discussing so many things about the indications of the result of the general election. we will talk about the dup, the future of theresa may, and what perhaps went wrong and what went right for people during the campaign. labour has enjoyed huge successes across london, gaining marginal seats from the tories and increasing majorities elsewhere in the capital. in a moment, we'll speak to labour mp ruth cadbury, who improved her party's majority in brentford and isleworth by nearly 12,000, and the former conservative housing minister gavin barwell, who lost his croydon central seat and gave this emotional speech. i'd like to say thank you to my family come to my mum and to my wife
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karen and to my three boys. if there is one up side to this result from my post, on a personal level, it is that they will get more of my time, that they will get more of my time, that they will get more of my time, that they so richly deserve, and i'm really grateful for the support that they have given me. and gavin ba rwell joins they have given me. and gavin barwell joins us now. they have given me. and gavin barwelljoins us now. also ruth cadbury mp, a0 of ale. thank you both of you forjoining us. gavin, if we can pick up your thoughts. where did it go wrong, from your point of view? i think the results we re point of view? i think the results were particularly bad in london. nationally, it is quite mixed picture. clearly, we didn't get the result we wanted in overall seats, and labour share of the vote went up and labour share of the vote went up a very significantly. i think we
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need to give them some credit for that and understand howjeremy corbyn managed to motivate people who do not normally vote to come out and vote. definitely we could have runa and vote. definitely we could have run a better and vote. definitely we could have runa better campaign, and vote. definitely we could have run a better campaign, but it is also about understanding why some people were motivated to come out and vote who do not normally do so. it is worth pointing out to people, in your constituency, you were defending a majority ofjust a06 to five votes, you ended the night with a majority of more than 12,000 votes. is that correct? those figures are correct. it is extraordinary. it was an extraordinary. it was an extraordinary result in brentford and isleworth, but in many, many seats across the uk. and it is a loss on to welcome so many new collea g u es loss on to welcome so many new colleagues to westminster, as we will be doing next week. it was a good result for labour. and it was a bad result for theresa may and the conservatives. i did overhear the two of you having a conversation before we came on air, and you were
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both expressing some surprise. i am not betraying any secrets there was an element of surprise from both of you what happened on the night? the numbers are incredible. i was beginning to feel an extraordinary wave of warmth and recognition in the last few days, and i thought, 0k, we've run a great campaign locally, and ibra getting to know me better, it has only been two years. but i didn't want to translate that emotional feeling into actual votes, but it turned out, it did. and there are a numberof but it turned out, it did. and there are a number of reasons for that, a rejection of conservative policies, a rejection of austerity, in our case, a rejection of brexit and hard brexit, a good campaign by labour and byjeremy brexit, a good campaign by labour and by jeremy corbyn. and i think you have already alluded to the youth vote, young people voting in number is they have not done before, and that has got to be a good thing.
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i think it is more complicated than that. the conservative share of the vote has gone up significantly as well. so, you have got to understand, there's different things which have happened. if you had said at the start of the campaign, we would have got a3%, that is not too bad, but nobody would have predicted labour would have got a0% of. bad, but nobody would have predicted labour would have got 4096 of. the people use but two on the doorstep, what will change, do you think, from a conservative point of view, are they going to have to make changes to policy? i hope all politicians listen and learn from election campaigns. from our point of view, there are two main lessons in terms of why i lost my seat. firstly, clearly we need to do better among younger voters. second, labour did especially well in my seat amongst those who voted remain in the referendum. so we need to say, we are trying to get a brexit deal which brings the country together, addresses the concerns of leave voters and also others. can you
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speak freely now? i could speak freely before! resume you are still a member of the conservative party, but not a serving mp any more. that's correct. when you saw her making her first speech outside that's correct. when you saw her making herfirst speech outside no 10, and she made no reference to the election at all, when you saw her recorded interview, when she said she was sorry to people like you but did not talking about the young people you have just mentioned, who possibly she should have token to —— spoken to, was your head in your hands a little bit? no. were you thinking, here is a moment in time when you have to think differently and say different things, but she did not? i am a big fan, and as housing minister, iworked did not? i am a big fan, and as housing minister, i worked very closely with her and i know the qualities she has. but one of the difficulties is, in your profession, you have to reflect immediately on what has happened. and actually, the parties need to go away and look in
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detail at these results. london was the best area for labour, the conservative did very well in scotland, for example. we need to reflect, but it does not need to happen instantaneously. so, can she stay on as leader and should she stay on as leader and should she stay on? yes and yes. we are the only party forming a strong government to take us through these brexit negotiations. i think as a party, we need to get behind theresa may, but the whole party needs to do that analysis and learn the lessons. ruth cadbury, theresa may would have us ruth cadbury, theresa may would have us believe that nothing has changed, and in some ways, as far as the labour party is concerned, there is some truth in this trick you are still the party of opposition, you did not win the election, so in practical terms, what difference does this make? the early to say that theresa may should stay on i think is completely wrong. she was wrong to call the election, she was wrong to call the election, she was wrong in her response yesterday. there has been a clear rejection of
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conservative policies. gavin is very respectful to his leader, but actually, we know that there is strong dissent in the conservative party about the campaign. strong dissent in the conservative party about the campaignlj understand party about the campaign.” understand that but that is not my question. what difference does it make that you have done better, you have still lost, and... and the governing party has increased its share of the vote. well, it looks like we are going to have to continue in opposition for the time being, but we do so with confidence and unity and a strong bolasie mandate which is popular. and we will be back in parliament next week, and we will be pushing the conservatives on the basis of what people have told us on the doorstep over the last eight weeks. in the past you have yourself being critical ofjeremy corbyn. what now? well, i was clearly wrong. he has
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led a brilliant campaign, we have got a popular manifesto, it's fully costed, it is what people want to see. will you get behind him now, then? of course, we all will, because he has to really well in this election. he has stood up in the debates and in the interviews, and he's clearly the leader that we had some concerns with a year ago, after the referendum. gavin, it is interesting, ruth cadbury used the words, i was wrong — why can't theresa may ever use those words?” think she has acknowledged that we didn't get the results we were hoping for. what she has not said is, igot hoping for. what she has not said is, i got anything wrong, throughout the campaign, she never used those words about the mr collations. on social care, i think she clearly listened to the concerns people expressed. what she said at the
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time, the quote was, nothing has changed. there was clearly a change in policy and i think she was right to listen to feedback. she has been very clear that we did not get the results, although she increased the share of the vote, in terms of seats, we did not get the results we wanted, and we're going to learn from that. i have worked with her closely, as housing minister and she has will qualities. these negotiations are crucial to the future of our country. and i think she's the right person to take us to that. we need to listen to the electorate and learn the appropriate lessons. thank you both very much. we have spoken to a former communications adviser to theresa may about exactly that, whether. .. what her thought process might be
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this morning and everything. as you can see, we are at westminster this morning. earlier on, it was quite cold, but the sun has come out and it is really quite warm where we are sitting now. philip, is that reflected elsewhere in the country? charlie, you are never happy, now, it's too warm! let's forget all concepts it's too warm! let's forget all co nce pts of it's too warm! let's forget all concepts of being wrong, as we move into a bbc weather forecast! down concepts of being wrong, as we move into a bbc weatherforecast! down in the south—west at the moment, it looks like this. and in the north of england, some are already fully engage with this area of low pressure. rain has already hit parts of scotla nd pressure. rain has already hit parts of scotland and northern ireland and the north of england. increasingly it will be affecting parts of wales and the western fringes of england during the course of the day. in the middle of the afternoon, the rain
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pushes towards the northern isles? 22 degrees there. no escaping the fa ct 22 degrees there. no escaping the fact that all the way from the south—west, through wales puts, some of the rainfall totals really rocketing up. dry in the south—east. eventually we can expect some decent weather for scotland versus england, and also quite nice conditions in azerbaijan for the northern ireland match. pollen levels quite high across a good part of england and wales as well. plenty of showers overnight across scotland and northern ireland. not a cold night. into sunday, we've still got that low pressure close by, with a lot of
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isobars, so it's going to be a blustery day for northern ireland. down towards the south—east tomorrow, rather cloudy late on, but once the sunshine comes through, we will be looking at up to 22 degrees. blustery conditions across scotland and northern ireland as i say. we're going to have a look through the papers, and then we're going to talk about them in more detail with asa bennett and owen talk about them in more detail with asa bennett and 0wenjones. front page of the guardian, your front—page! this was a shot of theresa may walking back into no 10. theresa may walking back into no 10.
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the daily telegraph, talking about theresa may fighting to remainpm. and the i... it talks about a catastrophic misjudgement. and the daily mirror — their headline is the coalition with crackpots . asa bennett, what went wrong? obviously, this is not where theresa may wanted to be, she wanted to be lionised as the new a little bit, then you blair, with a huge majority. it was a low—energy campaign, she decided it was not worth facing jeremy corbyn in the studios, she decided to let the argument take root, because he was a socialist etc. the only thing she mentioned regarding the manifesto was the social care
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fiasco, she did not mention anything else. in the meantime, now, she's having to scrape into power with a victory speech which seemed to have been prewritten, saying, fax to r&a is in the dup... it isjust a matter of, how long does she survive, at this rate. owen jones, just down the road here, she is in number 10 downing street this morning. can you give us an idea of where you think her head is at this morning, she gives the impression of business as usual? it is at a few mediation, her authority lies in ruins. we have a prime minister now who, actually, heads coalition of chaos and crackpots, dup, anti—women's rights climate change deniers and backed by northern ireland terrorists. that is where we have ended up. in terms of where we have ended up. in terms of where we have ended up. in terms of where we have ended up, it is right
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to look at the shambolic embarrassment that was the conservative campaign, and i would say, these newspapers, the bile that they poured out during this campaign, and they thought they were the kingmakers, that they could decide who the government was. the public look at that bile and rejected it. but equally, labour offered a vision which inspired people. those ideas had been ridiculed in the media and elsewhere for many years, but at the electorate out there were inspired by the idea that the tax rich people in orderto by the idea that the tax rich people in order to pay for public services, you bring services back under public ownership, and you write of student debt. and the media does need to acce pt debt. and the media does need to accept that. can theresa may but away with the, i won anyway idea? she is right to say that it is our constitutional duty, as the largest party, nearest the post, to get on and try and form a government. jeremy corbyn is rightly proud of having made headway, but the tories
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have also built on their vote share, so obviously, it wasn't enough. jeremy corbyn is in a far worse position, if he wanted to form a government. jeremy corbyn would have had to work with the snp, the liberal democrats, and so much more. so, this morning, the winners look like losers and vice versa. what i also want to know from you, 0wen jones, in practical terms, for those people who voted for labour, for example, and maybe we will get the detail of the youth vote, what difference does it make that this happened? labour have come far closer to government than they were. a few weeks ago, people were questioning whether labour would exist as an electoral force by the end of the election. they ended up getting their highest share of the vote since tony blair. and kensington chelsea is now labour you are! interbreed, which was conservative since the 19th century,
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is now labour you are. the conservative party on the other hand is in absolute chaos. clearly they have a leader with no authority. we now have hard right back benches and the dup forming a coalition. i don't know whether this government can la st very know whether this government can last very long finger i think we could see a general election in the next two years which will bring labour to power on the platform which obviously inspired the people. i think that could happen in the not too distant future. theresa may, she is in no 10 right now. we are told this morning by one of her closest advisers, herformer media this morning by one of her closest advisers, her former media adviser, that there will be plotting going on right now. obviously, you look at the cabinet reshuffle. she has very little authority by which to exercise that. philip hammond has remained as chancellor. she is
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unable to make change, it is mainly junior ministers. that is a good point, she does not even have the authority to shovel her own cabinet, so authority to shovel her own cabinet, so how on earth can she negotiate with the eu? she sees her duty now as getting brexit under way. she ke pt as getting brexit under way. she kept telling us during the campaign... why would a single european leader take her seriously? she struggles on that point but because she said, vote for me, strengthen my hand. talking about chaos, it sounds like a terrible scenario, if that is what you are talking about? people are saying, some conservative voices, get things started, very difficult, and then... if they have a leadership election immediately, it almost hands downing street to jeremy corbyn on immediately, it almost hands downing street tojeremy corbyn on a plate. there is horror in the tory ranks,
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because they think, this is a prime minister who turned a 20 point lead in the polls into nearly giving jeremy corbyn power. so there is nervousness in the ranks. thank you bows, you're probably quite tired? very, very! i'm going to hallucinate, this was all a dream! it wasn't. anyway, thank you very much forjoining us. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. as you can see we are in westminster discussing all the reaction to the results of the election, what it means for parliament, what it means for you as well. everything in the next hour and a half, we will discuss all these things. let's have a summary of the latest developments this morning. the prime minister is facing pressure from within her own party, as she moves to form a government
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with the help of the democratic unionists. theresa may's failure to secure an outright majority in the general election has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. earlier, herformer earlier, her former communications chief said she was certain sum cabinet ministers would be considering the prime minister ‘s future. they will be looking at the long term wondering if we will have five yea rs of term wondering if we will have five years of theresa may or if they will be in with a shot, they will be crowding around her, backing because we are ten days away from brexit negotiations and that will be the first thing on their mind but yes, long—term, probably. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, has raised concerns about the prospect of a deal with the democratic unionists. she's asked the prime minister for assurances that gay rights won't be eroded by the dup, which opposes same sex marriage. catriona renton is in glasgow for us this morning. just explain what has been said so
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far. ruth davidson being quite open about her issues around the choice that's theresa may has made. that's right. i think we must put this into the context that the conservatives in scotland gained 12 seats on thursday so that gives them 13 seats and there is no doubt that they have helped theresa may keep her place in downing street. merritt davidson spoke to theresa may yesterday and is clearly u nco mforta ble spoke to theresa may yesterday and is clearly uncomfortable about the prospect of an alliance with the dup over gay marriage which the dup is. ruth davidson said there were things that mattered to her more than the party and one of them were lgbt rights. she said she received a categorical assurance that they would be no dilation of lgbt rights in britain from the prime minister and the prime minister would try to
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advance lg bt rights and the prime minister would try to advance lgbt rights in northern ireland. it's a bit wider, the influence with davidson might have. she was against brexit, campaigned against it and voted for the uk to remain. and she has said previously that the uk should have the largest mud of access to the single market. that is another issue that with davidson will be speaking to theresa may about in the coming days —— the largest amount of access. although she says she intends to form a separate conservative party in scotland. the political landscape in scotla nd scotland. the political landscape in scotland has changed, the snp still much the biggest party although they did lose 21 seats on thursday, or than 60% of people voted for the pro—reunion party so that brings up another issue of where independence is but at the moment ruth davidson seems to hold many cards in the negotiations happening now in downing street. thank you. meanwhile in the final constituency
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declaration, labour took the conservative seat of kensington in west london. after a third recount emma dent coad won by just twenty votes, overturning a majority of seven thousand. now the other main stories this morning. two more people have been arrested in connection with the london bridge terror attacks. in total, eight people are now in custody. police investigating the killings have revealed that the three men who carried it out had wanted to hire a lorry but their payment was declined. petrol bombs and blow torches were found in the van they did use. 25 people have been arrested on suspicion of committing hate crimes since the london bridge terror attacks according to the metropolitan police. the number of officers on the streets has been increased to reassure communities who may feel worried as they gather in their places of worship. those are the main stories this morning. it is 8:35am. we will be back in the next few when it's to talk to young
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voters about how they may have voted and how it affected the outcome in the general election coming up shortly. we are in westminster, in bright sunshine, leaving mike in the studio. good morning, mike. i will milk the sympathy coming here all alone, and missing you! plenty to watch here, especially the lions, we begin in a chilly christchurch, the lions are to stop the toughest challenge yet. bonner called cold they are fielding their strongest tea m they are fielding their strongest team yet, 0wen on kicking duties. they brought the lion along as well. they brought the lion along as well. the crusaders are one of the most successful international teams in the world and they have eight all blacks in the team tonight, they are just about to kick off. it's a big responsibility for farrell in the next hours. for england and scotland football fans, they don't come much bigger than this.....a world cup qualifier at hampden park...with scotland badly needing a win,
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because they're 6 points behind, group leaders england. england will have a new captain, — tottenham's harry kane, as his manager looks to rotate the skipper‘s armband,but an away match at hampden, is not an easy start though. . . scotland are unbeaten at home in their last five matches. he's got huge belief in himself and his ability. he has always had that. when he played in the under 21s he wasn't in the tottenham team. he was looking to break in. but he had great self—belief even then. he has really grown to be an outstanding player. the game is there to be enjoyed, and the enthusiasm of the players and the time they have put in, they are ready, they are ready for the game. physically and mentally, they are ready for the game. we have real assets in our team and real assets
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as a group, and we have to use them. scotland and england are not the only home nations in action today. northern ireland travel to azerbaijan looking to cement second place, in theirgroup. andy murray said he'd had "a good tournament, all things considered", after losing in the semi—finals of the french open. he was beaten in five sets by stan wawrinka, in a match, which lasted over four—and—a—half hours — murray does leave paris in better shape, though, than when he arrived, and he tried to take some positives from his run. i'm not happy right now, i am disappointed and frustrated and tired after a long, long couple of weeks, but i am proud i have put myself in a position when there was a lot of doubt coming into the event and i didn't feel great at the beginning of the tournament. but i worked through it and i accepted the position i was in and i gave a reasonable account of myself. stan wawrinka will play nine—time champion rafa nadal
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in tomorrow's final, after he beat dominic thiem in straight sets. nadal has yet to drop a set at this year's tournament. and there is still british interest at roland garros. alfie hewett is through to his first grand slam wheelchair singles final — he takes on defending champion gustavo fernandez — and he'll also play in the doubles final, alongside gordon reid. england's cricketers are looking to make it three wins out of three, in the champions trophy, when they take on australia at edgbaston today. eoin morgan's side have already qualified for the semi—finals, but australia need a win after their first two games were washed out by rain. playing against australia always has an extra bit of baggage, regardless of how the teams are going or where they are at. probably considering they are at. probably considering the fortunes australia have had with the fortunes australia have had with the weather is as they've come, they area the weather is as they've come, they are a strong side, if they get on top, they do hammer things home. so
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it is up to us to produce some of our best cricket. bangladesh will be cheering on england — they'll be through to the semi—finals if england beat australia. bangladesh stunned new zealand, knocking them out with a five—wicket win, thanks largely to a record 22a—run partnership between shakib al hasan, and mahmudullah. lewis hamilton's mercedes was fastest in first practice for the canadian grand prix. he edged out his title rival, ferrari's sebastian vettel, who's now 25 points clear in the standings. but hamilton was beaten into second place in p2, by kimi raikkonen in the other ferrari. chris froome is up to second place in the criterium du, dauphiny, after making up ground on stage six. in a sprint finish, denmark's jakob just crossed the line ahead of froome — and richie porte, who
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took the overall lead. he's 39 seconds ahead of froome. hull fc moved up to third in the super league, with an impressive win at second—placed salford red devils. and how about this for an unusual try. . . more like the sort of play you see in the round ball game...as albert kelly kicked his way over the line. hull are now a point behind salford, who missed the chance to narrow the gap on leaders castleford. st helens beat widnes vikings in the day's other game. that's all the sport for now, they arejust under way that's all the sport for now, they are just under way in christchurch, we will update you on the score in about one hour's time. thank you. we are joined about one hour's time. thank you. we arejoined on college about one hour's time. thank you. we are joined on college green about one hour's time. thank you. we arejoined on college green by some young voters in the 2017 and general election. the reason we are talking about the young voters is that eve ryo ne about the young voters is that everyone is saying it has been so significant, especially forjeremy corbyn and is increased vote in the number of seats they have won. let's chat with these young people, mark
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and luke, both conservative voters, we understand, and further down the line we have hollie and rayyan. a very good morning. they are both labour voters this time. rayyan, a lot of people are saying jeremy corbyn was the draw. was he for you the reason you voted labour? definitely for me he was the reason i voted labour, definitely for me he was the reason ivoted labour, he definitely for me he was the reason i voted labour, he has the leadership and he has the qualities i was looking for in a leader. previously leaders like ed miliband and even other possible candidates such as 0wen smith, they were not what i was looking for, they were new labour, jeremy corbyn ‘s traditional socialist values are exactly what i wanted and what a lot of other young people wanted. hollie, a big nod from you. you are a youth worker. you were nodding.” voted labour because i very much think it should be speak for the many and not the few. jeremy corbyn
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is very honest, i have done a lot of research into him and soon he is a very honest politician. he has been campaigning since he was young. he comes across as authentic and i agree with his manifesto in the way he puts across what he wants to win and he really cares for the majority of the public. the four of you don't know each other from before, luke, you were nodding along, you voted conservative, but you understand that many younger people, as we understand it, we don't have the full figures but you understand that people would want to someone they had not seen in politics for a long time. it was evident, you could see it on social media, all forms of social media. people were drawn to it. there was this untapped market of people that got a kick up the backside after brexit. jeremy corbyn saw it and utilised that one year later. sorry to interrupt, you say that, yet you still stayed with the
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conservative party. did you do that because you felt you should, what was your reasoning? because i think we should do one thing at a time. strengthen our and with brexit before anything else because £250 billion is a lot to spend when we don't know what our deal with the eu will be, we should do that first and then once we know our can't look at what we will do next, rather than spending first. mark, you are a bit older, these guys are about 1819, you are a little older, yet young people have turned out, many of the first time, what was your thinking going into the polling booth?” voted conservative, i am a member of the conservative party, i voted remain, ifelt the conservative party, i voted remain, i felt that in this election you had two stark choices. a relatively hard brexit with theresa may or fancy politics withjeremy
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corbyn. i found there was no credible middle ground which is where a lot of the populists would go. so i agree that brexit is the main thing we need to look at at the moment. ifelt main thing we need to look at at the moment. i felt that a boat for theresa may would get that sorted so we could afterwards concentrate on things the country needs sorting out. you an activist. have you guys wa nt to out. you an activist. have you guys want to politics recently because sometimes people say, perhaps u nfa i rly sometimes people say, perhaps unfairly that young people are not fundamentally engaged, is that changing? i never used to watch the news or really get involved with politics, to be honest but recently i've realised that the lack of knowledge of politics, what is going on, and even the language of politics, it creates a negative stigma in the minds of young people. now that things are coming to light, young people are really getting involved, it has changed my opinion. although i voted for labour to win, for me the positive thing is that
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young people are now really getting involved with politics and realising it's a problem, that they need to be involved and it will affect their future. it has been very interesting talking to you, i'm sorry, future. it has been very interesting talking to you, i'm sofi’y' we future. it has been very interesting talking to you, i'm sorry, we are almost out of time, one thing i think, during your talk, this seems to be quite a lot of agreement. there's a lot of nodding about involvement. thank you so much for being here. we will be having more coverage, we've got a beautiful day cure, although slightly in the shadows but blue skies above. we are lucky. how is it looking in the uk? it's a mixed bag, some areas which are very nice, in the channel islands, little while ago, pontypridd, someone had to let us down. it's notjust you. the influence of this weather front has been felt in northern ireland, parts of scotland, and through
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wales, as you have seen through our weather watchers, i think the heaviest, north west wales and north—west england, a0 or 50 millimetres of rain. that front, as you see, going on into the middle of the afternoon, not moving very fast. it does go through northern ireland and scotland, but with brightness in the north—east of scotland, not far behind in northern ireland, even in this zone with the cloud and rain it will not be cold. mid—teens to upper teens. if you get some brightness, 2a-25, teens. if you get some brightness, 2a—25, watch out in the south—eastern quarter, the pollen levels high, it should improve at hampden for a bit of a kick around between scotland and england at five o'clock! it's not just between scotland and england at five o'clock! it's notjust the pollen levels, the uv levels are especially high in east anglia and the south—east. if you are out for any length of time about that in mind. this weather front working its way
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or too late in the day before parts of the north, come the wee small hours it's down into the south—east and east anglia, a mild night everywhere, then off and running into sunday which proves quite blustery. a lot of isobars on the charts, you'll notice. if you are close by the centre of that low then we have quite a view showers there, especially for scotland and northern ireland but eventually after a dry start they are just coming in towards parts of the west of england and also into wales. the odd weather front and also into wales. the odd weather fro nt ta kes and also into wales. the odd weather front takes time to ease its way further south and east, some dry weather between all of that. tops on the day of 21 degrees. a lot going on, i'll see you a little later. back to you guys. we canjust we can just feel it warming here. at six o'clock it was quite nippy. it's good to be in westminster because you forget what a beautiful, historic place it is. we are talking
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about the fallout from the election, what it means for you. a lot of families having conversations, perhaps arguments over the last 2a, a8 hours. we've been out and about asking what you think about what you wa nted asking what you think about what you wanted and what has happened. john maguire is in kenilworth. he's taken the bbc breakfast butty van and he has changed its name! the brown bats club? really? he's with more voters. morning, louise, the old bbc brea kfast morning, louise, the old bbc breakfast bacon is on its last legs, i think it will be the last time we go close. we are at the kenilworth agricultural show, we've got the dog and duck show. bismarck is the sheepdog, he's hurting the drugs somehow. is this as tough as it looks, warren? it's more technical
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thanit looks, warren? it's more technical than it appears! what are you doing. we are doing what is called balancing, he is standing at 12 o'clock opposite the ducks, they can't get away, so if i took a step in any direction he would balance and counteract it. take it away, good stuff. balance is one thing we have all been concerned within the last couple of weeks. the butty van is here, watch out, and we've got the sofa. a couple of gentlemen you may have seen an brack, nigel and ian, good morning to you both, the brexit brothers! when is in favour of leaving, one remaining, one supports arsenal, the other chelsea. how has the last 2a hours gone and does it make a difference and brexit negotiations? it is a disaster for this country that we don't have a strong and stable government now, we must ask ourselves how we got into
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this mess. theresa may '5 strategy of pursuing a hard brexit, being anti—immigration and programmer schools and introducing a dementia tax in the middle of a campaign has landed her in this situation. she has vacated the centre ground and thatis has vacated the centre ground and that is why she has not won. nigel, iam sure that is why she has not won. nigel, i am sure you that is why she has not won. nigel, i am sure you agree that is why she has not won. nigel, i am sure you agree with everything your brother said. weak almost everything. it certainly hasn't helped theresa may in any way. clearly she went out to get the strong mandate for brexit and we've ended up with an election that has discussed everything except brexit in my view. mr corbyn hijacked it, if that is the right word, and has just been promising free things which people like. in my view, it's economically and affordable. difficult for brexit now but we are into negotiations shortly and we must make the best of it. something you guys have been talking with each other about, one of your business man, one a farmer, is there much
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common ground, is it getting better orare common ground, is it getting better or are you still poles apart? we still arguing a bit. or are you still poles apart? we stillarguing a bit. nigel likes or are you still poles apart? we still arguing a bit. nigel likes the idea of a clean break, hard brexit, but want a pragmatic solution with the eu. what has happened is quite helpful to my side because there isn't a mandate for that hard brexit anmer hall, the british have turned away from that and we will enter these negotiations as soon as we have a stable government of some kind looking for a pragmatic solution with the eu which in the end will be much better for us.” don't accept it will be like that. it will be difficult, there is no question of it, she went to the country to get the strong mandate and she hasn't got it. i don't believe this election was what i brexit. that is the problem. the people through an brexit i am not sure has changed. 0ther people through an brexit i am not sure has changed. other issues have the litigant events and by default
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have weakened the hand. thank you. doctor mike finn from the university of warwick, good morning, going forward , of warwick, good morning, going forward, we've been talking about this as if it was a speed bump in the road for the prime minister, has had been as weakened as some say? absolutely yes. i said earlier that the speech yesterday was at right angles to reality. that's the case because she's not just angles to reality. that's the case because she's notjust in partnership with the dup, she is in partnership with the dup, she is in partnership with the dup, she is in partnership with her own party. if you think about successful minority governments they need to want to be in power, they need to want to remain in power and if you look at harold wilson's government in 197a at least they wanted to limp on, it's not clear with the noises the tories are making that many of them wa nt to tories are making that many of them want to stay under her leadership for any direction of time so in that senseit for any direction of time so in that sense it will be very difficult further to carry on. thank you. will there be a tory party leadership
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election, will there be another general election, will the butty van payback? this is alice. what's the name of the sheep? it's chris the sheep. we'll be here for the hour. we will talk to you later, weren't we chris. look at that lovely sheep. i think i could have been guessing for a month and i would never have guessed chris. we will be back later with john, would never have guessed chris. we will be back later withjohn, he was talking about the dup and we will talking about the dup and we will talk about them now, they the ten mps looking set to keep the tories in power, if you don't know much about them, you're alone. yesterday the phrase dup manifesto is one of the phrase dup manifesto is one of the most frequently searched on the internet. in a moment we will speak to professorjon tonge about them, first, a brief history. as they celebrated winning ten of
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the agencies in northern ireland people across britain were busy googling the dup, who they were exactly googling the dup, who they were exa ctly a nd googling the dup, who they were exactly and what they might want from theresa may. founded by the evangelical minister the reverend ian paisley in 1971, keeping northern ireland in the uk has a lwa ys northern ireland in the uk has always been a priority. at its heart always been a priority. at its heart a right—wing loyalist and unionist party with extremely conservative views. the religious influence may have ebbed yet the party still takes a hard line on issues like same—sex marriage, abortion laws and they are divided on climate change with their former environment minister sammy wilson describing it as a con. yet traditionally the dup's relationship with the stories has been strong but what demands they will make of theresa may are not clear. when it comes to brexit the dup have spoken of the need for a frictionless border with the republic and the guarantee they will be no special status from northern ireland in brexit talks, a key policy of sinn
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fein. but the priority for the dup will be keeping closer ties with the uk. the union is our guiding star. we may represent northern ireland constituencies in the house of commons but we are a seized of the interests of the uk as a whole as we are for northern ireland. professorjon tonge is a political a nalyst professorjon tonge is a political analyst from the university of liverpool and has written a history of the dup. they were set up as a political vehicle for the fundamentalist protestantism of the reverend ian paisley. it was a small party and the free presbyterian church which ian paisley said up, the dup gave voice to that. very fundamentalist. 1 million miles removed from the gentle church of england type persona of theresa may.
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the free presbyterian church is obviously opposed to same—sex marriage, it does no business on the sabbath, there will be no discussions on sundays. the dup was instrumental in campaigns against the legalisation of, sexuality in northern ireland. the dup has mellowed in recent years, the free presbyterian church only accounts for one third of the membership yet its origin is very much rely in its religious background, it's moved more and more into a more mainstream vehicle although its views with still be seen this side of the water by some as fairly extreme. help us with that one, jon. we now know that thatis with that one, jon. we now know that that is through the tories will be doing business with. we know that will happen. what are the areas they have in common first? then we can talk about the areas where they differ. it's a case of needs must
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for theresa may, she has no other allies in westminster, it is the dup on 01. they are both in favour brexit, 70% of dup supporters subverted brexit. they opera brexit. passionately supported brexit. they have a different vision from theresa may. they both want a softer border. the dup may be in favour of british sovereignty over northern ireland but they don't want a hard border with ireland because they know it is important for trade to grab a sea mless important for trade to grab a seamless border with the republic. the dup don't want special status for northern ireland linked to the european union because they see that asa european union because they see that as a slippery slope for a united ireland. we're almost out of time, let's talk about this idea of minority government, will there be a formalised deal with the dup, how will it work. a loose and largely unspoken arrangement. the dup will support the tories in westminster so
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that the tourists collapse, if they did they would be an election this autumn. the price tag from the dup will be very high, lots of money for northern ireland, continued vetoes on social conservatism like same—sex marriage and in terms of the legacy of the troubles they were investigations into what the british soldiers did during the troubles. —— fewer investigations. thank you for being here. i know you have struggled with your voice. it's 24 hours of talking about the dup!” wonder how many people have missed sleep in the last a8 hours, i expect there are many thousands of us. thank you. the headlines coming up injusta thank you. the headlines coming up injust a moment. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin, live from westminster. a prime minister under pressure. just a day after clinging to power, theresa may faces a backlash from fellow tories. the conservative leader is forming a minority government with the support of the democratic unionist party,
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but there are questions from some of her own mps over how long she can remain in thejob. the deal with the dup is also under scrutiny. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, says she has raised concerns with the prime minister about the unionists' opposition to gay rights. labour has ended its election campaign on a high. jeremy corbyn's party took kensington from the conservatives for the first time in its history, by just 20 votes.
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