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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2017 10:00am-10:30am BST

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you're watching bbc news. i'm jane hill, at westminster, where theresa may is under pressure to try to shape a new government, after failing to win a majority in the general election. the prime minister is expected to finalise her team of ministers and enlist the support of the democratic unionist party. the scottish conservatives leader is one of several to express reservations about mrs may doing a deal with the democratic unionists. she has made herself a hostage to the dup, which means she cannot be the dup, which means she cannot be the independent mediator between the two sides. labour took the conservative seat of kensington in west london — the final constituency declaration, after a third recount. we'll bring you the latest reaction from westminster, belfast and edinburgh, as questions remain about how long mrs may can remain as prime minister. also today, police reveal the terror
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attack is on london bridge tried to hirea attack is on london bridge tried to hire a seven—and—a—half—tonne truck but their cards were declined. police also discovered the safe house where they prepared for the attack. detectives want help in tracing three knives used by the attackers, and paid tribute to members of the public who put up a fight. people who came out armed with chairs, other items, throwing bottles a nd with chairs, other items, throwing bottles and then think they could get their hands on. resident troop —— president trump accuses james comey of being a liar, saying he is 100% willing to speak under oath about their conversations. and harry kane will be the new england captain as they take on scotland in the world cup qualifier at hampden park. good morning from westminster,
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where following on from thursday's shock election result, theresa may is expected to finalise her team of ministers, as she seeks to lead a government with the support of the democratic unionist party. the prime minister's failure to secure an outright majority has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. our political correspondent emma vardy has this report on the fallout from the 2017 general election. a valuable result in the uk's richest constituency.
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almost 2a hours after the polls closed, it took a third recount in kensington to finally reveal labour had taken this seat from the tories for the first time ever, and byjust 20 votes. it means the conservatives end the campaign with 318 seats, labour up by 30 to 262. now, theresa may is reaching out to the democratic unionist party in northern ireland for support. with the ten dup mps, the conservatives will have a working majority in the house of commons. but there are early signs that for some, this will be an uncomfortable alliance. the dup is anti—abortion, and northern ireland is the only part of the uk where same—sex marriage is not legal.
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scottish conservative leader ruth davidson last night sought assurances that any deal with the dup must not affect gay rights across the uk. meanwhile, concerns remain over whether the prime minister can hold on. one senior tory has told the bbc she has to go. and this was the transport secretary, chris grayling, on question time. my view is that she should stay as prime minister for the foreseeable future. what was once sold as strong and stable now feels ever so shaky. our assistant political editor, norman smith, joins me now. i don't know how you are still standing after the events... we had plenty of a chair, at least! where
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is theresa may, is she in no 10, is she working, what is going on?” think the truth is, she's probably trying to just regroup after the battering she received at the general election. one thing which strikes me as most curious, here we have an election after which there has really been hardly any site or sound of any senior figures in government. there is almost complete radio silence. normally you would expect senior ministers to becoming out and saying, the prime minister is doing a fantasticjob, we now go on to do this, i am delighted to be pa rt on to do this, i am delighted to be part of the government... we have heard nothing. you get the sense that by and large, senior ministers are looking at each other, trying to see who is going to do what, trying to plan what actually is going to happen next, because we are into this sort of complete uncertainty about how long mrs may is going to continue for. and i do think it is how long. when you talk to many tory mps, they now view her more as an interim prime minister. and even
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now, the day after the election, there is a sense that power is beginning to drain away. i was very struck by ruth davidson, the scottish leader, openly expressing her disquiet about this proposed deal with the democratic unionist party. privately, many, many tories are very, very cautious about what this means, and how far it risks detoxifying the tory party because ofan detoxifying the tory party because of an association with a party which has very socially conservative views on marriage, on abortion, on gay rights. what a number of tories are concerned about is that the conservative party has spent decades, probably about 20 years, probably going all the way back to theresa may's we are not the nasty party speech, trying present a more modern, tempered contemporary, socially liberal image. and the real fear about this agreement with the dup is that it risks undermining all that has been achieved. and that is so that has been achieved. and that is so interesting, we will talk more
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about that in edinburgh and belfast. the fact that we had fairly swiftly that announcement saying that the key cabinet posts were remaining, foreign secretary, home secretary, was that an attempt to save, have and continues as normal, business as usual? i think it was more brutal than that. i think it is simply, mrs may cannot move any of the big beasts, even the signs were that she did want to move philip hammond but she can't, because she risks antagonising people and making potential enemies, and then the whole pack of cards could come down. so, she is basically weakened to the extent that she cannot now form the cabinet that she wants to form. and i think, we got a further sign of that yesterday, when we had that statement in downing street, which many tory mps thought failed to appreciate and recognise the scale
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of what had happened and the personal rebuttal she had suffered. there was no acceptance of responsibility. and then in the afternoon, we had another statement, afternoon, we had another statement, after she had met tory mps and i think been told by them, that was not good enough, and we had a ,. ifz'ii m ti foot. 5 e’t’” is ejééfi’; at. one % is ejééfi’; as. one of! is ejééfi’; 95 one of the ez' ' '% points is advisers, nick 9.9.9.7 ,,, ~ ~ advisers, nick timothy 9.9.9.7 ,,, ~ ~ advisers, nick timothy and a”? ,,, ~ ~ advisers, nick timothy and fiona ,,, ~ ~ key advisers, nick timothy and fiona hill. a lot of the anger has been directed specifically at them, ilfeet-ee' e’e’e’tif rail; 3 ”then-1 , j they these izziq—éz 9&2; izzl'z’z elf/£9 elf/zs; 9531! we re very izziq—éz 9&2; izzl'z’z elf/£9 elf/zs; 9531! were very 51-4445; to i? ~ aggazaaaéi'g £9122; ;. l;.,;l 199 .. . . -.. ...s s w .. 9999999999999: 9919.9; 9. 999,91 99 9 . . 99 9.9 9 99 9 for 9999999999999: 9919.9; 9. 999,91 99. .. . . 9.. 9.9 9 ..9 .. for the - the 9999999999999: 9919.9; 9. 999,91 99. .. . . 9.. 9.9 9 ..9 .. for the the was for some of the in 99.999 9.9. . 9999 . 99. . .99 .... _ 99.999 9.9. 9. 99.99 9. 99. . 99. .... _ 99.999 9.9. 9. 9999 9. 99. . 99. .... _ w7? i has a if: mrs can if: mrsza‘; what has gone rid vhat has gone and. .. ..... .... . rid zf these gre 3—5 9 9 rid zf these two% 3—5 9 9 rid zf these two individuals 9: 9 9 getting rid of these two individuals is seen by many tories as a first step. if she says no, and they stay,
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i think step. if she says no, and they stay, ithinka step. if she says no, and they stay, i think a lot of tory mps will think, she's clearly not going to change, she will have to go sooner rather than later. before i let you 90, rather than later. before i let you go, a quick thought about the brexit talks. we have heard time and again about the need first ability and the fa ct about the need first ability and the fact that the talks start very soon, what, a week on monday, inferior — where are we as a nation, what happens now, realistically, how much do we know about what is going to go ona do we know about what is going to go on a week on monday?” do we know about what is going to go on a week on monday? i think all that will happen on monday is, hello, how do you do?” that will happen on monday is, hello, how do you do? i don't think there will be any detailed negotiations, in part because i suspect the europeans are wondering who actually is going to see these negotiations through. who actually is going to see these negotiations throughlj who actually is going to see these negotiations through. i imagine they will take the view, it's probably not going to be mrs may. that said, there is no desire to delay the start of the negotiations amongst the brexiteers. they are desperate for the talks to start, because
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their realfear is for the talks to start, because their real fear is that this election result provides a key to unlock brexit and to claw back brexit. and it is certainly true that the remainers within the tour party, those who are not at all happy about the sort of deal, no deal, even, that mrs may was looking for, want to re—enter the debate about staying inside the single market and taking off the table the idea of no deal, which is viewed as catastrophic. so, there is going to bea catastrophic. so, there is going to be a tussle over brexit, although the talks will still begin, at least in name, on monday. thank you very much — for now! as we've been hearing, the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, has raised concerns about a deal with the democratic unionists. she has asked the prime minister
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for assurances that gay rights won't be eroded by the dup, which opposes same sex marriage. our correspondent catriona renton is in glasgow for us this morning. this just shows what a strong position ruth davidson is now in, that she can be so vocal about this? i think that is precisely the point. ruth davidson gained 12 seats on thursday, the conservatives here now have 13 seats. and that has come in the context of the conservatives losing in other parts of the country. so i think ruth davidson is going to expect to be able to have a bit of a say in the gun —— in the negotiations which are happening at downing street, now that she is in that strong position. she has said she is not entirely comfortable about an alliance with the dup, the party which is against gay marriage. ruth davidson is engaged to be married to her female ruth davidson is engaged to be married to herfemale partner and she has made that point strongly in a conversation with theresa may
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yesterday, that she has said that there are things that matter to her more than the party. and amongst those are writes for gay people. she said she received a categorical assurance from mrs may that there would be no delusion by lgbt rights. that is one area where ruth davidson has already got in on the conversation. i think another area that we will see ruth davidson making strong points on will be on brexit. the conservatives in scotla nd brexit. the conservatives in scotland campaigned to remain within the eu. ruth davidson has previously said the uk should have the largest amount of access to the single market possible. so, there's going to be an area there where she will be able to flex muscles. she had a good result here, the best result conservatives have had in scotland since 1983. and she has got some
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clout. she is definitely part of the reason why theresa may is still in downing street this morning. let's talk about the other aspects of the deal with the dup as well. senior sinn fein leaders say they're concerned that a deal between the dup and the conservatives could put the northern ireland peace process at risk. power sharing in stormont broke down in january, and nationalists say they expect the british government to remain neutral in efforts to revive it. this current arrangement may well prove to be reckless, but we will have to wait and see. we have argued for some considerable time that the british government have been working in cahoots with particularly the democratic unionist party, to the disadvantage of the political process here. in fact they called off the talks here recently to re—establish our institutions. we would add that the british public
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should have close scrutiny of the dup and what that party represents. briton that was the view from sinn fein. we can get more on all of this now. annita mcveigh is in belfast. good morning. iam good morning. i am at queen's university in belfast, where the professors of politics and their stu d e nts professors of politics and their students certainly have much to think about, as one of northern ireland's tended political parties, the dup, finds itself in the thick of those discussions with theresa may, to find out whether they can give her a working majority, and what kind of deal if any can be worked out, and in other parts of the uk, of course, many people are playing catch—up, trying to find out more about the democratic unionist party. that's why a little while ago here at queen's university belfast, i spoke to professor richard english and asked him to tell us more about
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who the dup are. the dup was founded in the early years of the northern ireland troubles, and it has two main elements. one is a staunch defence of northern ireland's place within the united kingdom, defending against the threat from irish rap that in as an front national is. the other thing is something which ian paisley for a long time would have represented, which was a commitment toa represented, which was a commitment to a socially conservative way of viewing society and politics. and the interweaving of those two really defines the essence of the democrat unionist party. so, on the subject of social conservatism, obviously, a lot has been said so far about the dup's opposition to gay marriage. but in terms of the discussions which are going to happen with theresa may, that is not going to be so much an issue for the dup, although it might be for other people? i think in terms of some of the people who will be critical of a
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conservative relationship with the dup, perhaps on the british left, and perhaps in the conservative party as well, it might be something ofa party as well, it might be something of a vulnerability, something they will highlight. we have seen elements of that already in the media today. in terms of the dup's policies in relation to northern ireland, they will think they will control that anyway once they are backin control that anyway once they are back in power in northern ireland. it isa back in power in northern ireland. it is a little over a week until the brexit discussions start. just take us brexit discussions start. just take us through what the dup's views on brexit are, and how closely they are aligned with the conservatives, and secondly, what other demands do you think they're going to make in return for supporting theresa may? on brexit, there is a reasonably neat match, in the sense that the dup favour brexit, but they're very concerned about the way brexit affects northern ireland and affects the irish border and economic
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aspects across the border. in all of that i think the dup reflects some of the things which the conservative party a nyway of the things which the conservative party anyway will need to think about in terms of brexit. i think the other two main demands will be, the other two main demands will be, the dup will be looking for very strong support against anything which seems to dilate the union. but also there will be specific aspects of getting extra funding for northern ireland, making sure there are certain aspects of uk support economically for what happens in northern ireland, where vdu pee now, might have greater leverage in westminster than otherwise would have been the case. well, no prizes for guessing what story is on the front of all the northern ireland newspapers this morning. this is from one cartoonist trying the dup leader arlene foster as the queen, two of her mps on either side of her. the signpost to dublin in the background, and theresa may kneeling
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before her. i suppose the big question as we go into these discussions between the dup and theresa may is, whether she needs them more, and they need her? more from belfast during the day. we can to bronwen maddox, the director of the institute for government. good morning to you. i was very struck yesterday in particular, as all the votes were unfolding, we were learning what it all meant the number of comments and questions which came into the bbc, an awful lot of people saying, oh, my god, a hung parliament, what does it mean? it is still quite unusual in this country just i'm not it is still quite unusual in this countryjust i'm not understanding this. you are the perfect arson to put that point to, as a starting point? thank you very much. a hung parliament does not mean the system
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is broken, we shouldn't panic. we have got a constitution and a series of rules which allow us to deal with hung parliaments. yes, they're unusual but they're not completely absent in british politics. there are conventions for how someone tries to form a government. what is unusual from other countries is, there is a rule which says, this party gets to form the government first. theresa may has done the sensible thing of saying, i'm going to reach for what looks like the easiest partner, and i can get the confidence of parliament and former government, and our system allows for this. it allows for it, but already, people are having concerns about talking to the dup, from social views, people will say but doesn't it, by definition, make things more fragile, because you haven't got a clear point of view, there is not one party saying, this
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is what we believe in, this is way you voted for us. i wonder whether asa you voted for us. i wonder whether as a nation, we think that is dangerous, that we can't get anything done? we are a nation which is used to majority politics, one party or other getting a thumping majority. but our system does allow for minority governance, and actually, minority governance do not have to fall. what matters is that you do not have a majority against you, voting you down. you can simply keep trying to get your bills through the commons, and that's absolutely possible. the trouble is that this government has some very, very difficult things to get through. one is brexit. this election showed that people are also very, very concerned about austerity and the public services as well. yes, and that's how we got the vote we did. it implies that we are back to the old days of the two big parties commanding people so support ina parties commanding people so support in a traditional way, if you like.
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however, it is confusing, because within those two parties, you have now got such a range of views, it is very different from the old days, when people said, i am labour, i am tory. when you think about it, the referendum and theresa may calling this election were an attempt by the tory leader to roll the conservative party, ina tory leader to roll the conservative party, in a sense of. and you have got the same with labour, a huge range of views in there. you have got something which is very different from the old days of party loyalty. before i let you go, a thought about the brexit talks, they're not far off, the start date — does a hung parliament, everything we're going to be ceren, the negotiations with the dup, does it hamper things, does it change things? it changes a lot but almost immediately, theresa may has to get an agreement from the dup on how to approach brexit. and they seem to
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wa nt approach brexit. and they seem to want brexit but none of the convocations or unfortunate things which might follow from it. so she has got to tease that out. a bigger problem it seems to me is that there's going to be something in any dealfor someone to there's going to be something in any deal for someone to dislike, and the question is, whether that gives a lot of ammunition to people either within her party or the other parties, to start blocking her, to the point where it becomes impossible to move forward. thank you very much, we will let you go for now! as the election results sink in and preparations begin for talks on brexit, how are people feeling about what happens next? our correspondentjohn maguire is finding out for us. he's at the kenilworth agricultural show in warwickshire this morning. over to you. thank you very much, jane. bright and breezy here in warwickshire, right in the heart of england. in the main show ring here,
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we have got some of the atkinson horses, putting on their display. i think they will bow down, maybe, for the camera. quite impressive! if you areafan the camera. quite impressive! if you are a fan of poldark, tune in on sunday night, apparently some of the horses are involved in some of the big stunt sequences. we have been going around the uk for the last seven weeks or so during the election, read so vergne as well. —— the red sofa as well. still, everybody is talking about the election. crewe, one constituency which was conservative, has just gone labour with a narrow majority. this is what people in crewe said to me yesterday. i tend to agree with the labour policies on domestic policies. but i think we needed strong leadership for the negotiations in brexit. and that has ina negotiations in brexit. and that has in a sense been denied, so i'm not
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sure what to think at all.” in a sense been denied, so i'm not sure what to think at all. i think she should be able to get a decent deal on brexit, but i don't think that outweighs jeremy corbyn's policies, i think for the younger generation, he's absolutely perfect. i don't think she ran a great campaign. if she had done, we would be looking at something very different now, and people would probably think, at least now everything will be planned out and we know what the next steps are. she will not have a free hand in what she's doing now, she's got to do what the others want as well. i think we could be in a bit of a mess. i would have preferred to labour, to be honest. but i suppose at the end of the day, we've just got to deal with what we've got. the same as the brexit thing, the people who didn't want to leave the eu, with all got to get on with it and make the best of what we've got and that's really it. so, at these agricultural shows, lots of things to see and do, and also a good
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chance for farmers to get together and gossip about things. including the election and brexit. i want to introduce you to the brexit brothers, the brexit boys! ian and nigel baxter, one voted to leave, one voted to remain. one is an arsenalfan, one one voted to remain. one is an arsenal fan, one is one voted to remain. one is an arsenalfan, one is chelsea. and also to a local farmer. what have you made of the last 2a hours? also to a local farmer. what have you made of the last 24 hour57m has been a bit of a shock, to be honest. i did not expect the conservative party to be in the mess that it now is and it's going to be quite challenging now to get through the things that i hoped to see in terms of brexit. and you want brexit? absolutely, yes. i campaigned for it and i have not changed my opinion since that time. we need to push on now with getting it. i think this election has been hijacked on other agendas, to be honest. it started out with trying to secure a strong mandate for breakfast... breakfast?! brexit! and
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clearly it has shifted away from that. as a country, we now need to push on with it. i hope that somehow or other, we can get through the group ian, i'm not sure how much you agree with your brother. tell us your thoughts. well, i think theresa may fought the election, asking for a strong mandate, for a hard brexit, and the british people have not given it to her. and that's because the practicalities around brexit are becoming clear, it's very complicated, very difficult to deliver. and it's not what the country needs or wants. sol deliver. and it's not what the country needs or wants. so i think what we need is a pragmatic solution, led by a new prime minister, to get onto the centre ground of british politics. and change this difficult situation into something much better for everyone. nigel shaking his head there. i want to bring in william. as a farmer, you will be watching the brexit negotiations very keenly. do you think we are in a much weaker
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position now, what is your view? we might be in a weaker position said i think is only temporary. we have already made moves to start negotiations, trade deals have been struck already. it would have been better in my view to have the election after the 19th. i think the timing was off on this. we could have done better, we are in disarray at the moment, with what's happened with the election. and it's going to be more difficult going into negotiations. we're not quite fighting as a solid front that we we re fighting as a solid front that we were before. i don't know whether you would agree. i completely agree, i think you would agree. i completely agree, ithink our you would agree. i completely agree, i think our position has been undermined and diminished in europe. that's one of the big problems. today, i suspect, that's one of the big problems. today, isuspect, the that's one of the big problems. today, i suspect, the foreign press is laughing at us a little. and that's bad news for britain, regardless. i think the thing is
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that the people in the referendum wouldn't vote for the kind of hard brexit that theresa may has gone for. we will never know, because it was a binary in or out question, wasn't it? we have got that and we have got to go with it. we can't alter it, the public is voted. from alter it, the public is voted. from a farmer's point of view, the sheep farmers were worried 12 months ago that they could not produce lamb at the prices in new zealand and australia. that has all been and gone. we are dealing with something new as from now. gentlemen, thank you, i will let you three carry on chatting. i want to introduce you to somebody from the london school of economics. hello to you again. when we're thinking about the negotiations and agriculture, what are the important themes, do you think, that negotiators will need to bearin think, that negotiators will need to bear in mind? there are a number of things regarding agriculture. one of those things is going to be whether or not they will maintain the availability of seasonal labour. a
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number of those seasonal labourers come from other eu countries, and there are some sectors of british agriculture which are heavily dependent on them, such as horticulture. something else that british negotiators will need to focus on is what the new tariff arrangements are going to be when britain leaves the european union. that will require discussions not just with the european union go see but also with the world trade organisation and a number of different talks. complex do you think and uncharted waters? yes, absolutely. and the british government will also need to decide belatedly if it wants to replace, and how it will do so, the subsidy scheme of the common agricultural policy, more than £6 billion a year. yes, it is a lot of money, isn't it? thank you very much indeed. we are going to hand back to you in westminster now. molly is here with a sheep, which you are showing
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today? yes. jane, can you guess what this sheet is called? would you call it dolly perhaps? this one is called chris! chris the sheep!” it dolly perhaps? this one is called chris! chris the sheep! i thought you were going to tell me it was called jane! have a lovely day! is much more from westminster coming up, plenty to mull over, we could share some of the more junior cabinet appointments and more besides and we will hear more from collea g u es besides and we will hear more from colleagues in belfast and edinburgh. we will pause on this lovely saturday morning, most unexpected for me to be outside in lovely weather.
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