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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2017 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill at westminster, where pressure mounts on theresa may to shape a new government after failing to win a majority in the general election. the prime minister is expected to finalise her team of ministers and enlist the support of the democratic unionist party. the scottish conservatives leader is one of several to express reservations about mrs may doing a deal with the dup. she has made herself a hostage to the dup which means she cannot be an independent mediator between the two sides. labour took the conservative seat of kensington in west london — the final constituency declaration, after a third recount. we'll bring you the latest reaction from westminster, belfast and glasgow as questions remain about how long mrs may can remain as prime minister. i'm shaun ley with today's other headlines: police reveal the london bridge terror attackers tried to hire a 7.5 tonne
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lorry, but their credit cards were declined. petrol bombs and blow torches were found in the van they did use. police also discovered the safe house where they prepared for the attack. detectives want help in tracing three knives used by the attackers and pay tribute to members of the public who put up a fight. people who came out armed with chairs, other items were thrown, bottles, and anything they could get their hands on. and harry kane will be the new england captain as they take on scotla nd england captain as they take on scotland in the qualifier at hampden park. good morning from westminster, where following on from thursday's
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shock election result, theresa may is expected to finalise her team of ministers, as she seeks to lead a government with the support of the democratic unionist party. the prime minister's failure to secure an outright majority has led to questions from some conservatives over whether she should remain in charge, and about what a deal with the dup could involve. the bbc understands them will be no formal talks with the two parties this weekend. now this report on the fallout from the 2017 general election. a valuable result in the uk's richest constituency. almost 2a hours after the polls closed, it took a third recount in kensington to finally reveal labour had taken this seat from the tories for the first time ever, and byjust 20 votes.
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it means the conservatives end the campaign with 318 seats, labour up by 30 to 262. now, theresa may is reaching out to the democratic unionist party in northern ireland for support. with the ten dup mps, the conservatives will have a working majority in the house of commons. but there are early signs that for some, this will be an uncomfortable alliance. the dup is anti—abortion, and northern ireland is the only part of the uk where same—sex marriage is not legal. scottish conservative leader ruth davidson last night sought assurances that any deal with the dup must not affect gay rights across the uk. meanwhile, concerns remain over whether the prime
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minister can hold on. 0ne senior tory has told the bbc she has to go. and this was the transport secretary, chris grayling, on question time. my view is that she should stay as prime minister for the foreseeable future. what was once sold as strong and stable now feels ever so shaky. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, joins me. you have been talking to backbench mps. your sense of what people have been saying about theresa may and where this goes now? her leadership is in the balance. there is a view amongst many tory mps that she is 110w amongst many tory mps that she is now an interim prime minister and is so now an interim prime minister and is so damaged that she is not a viable
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option long—term, her authority has been profoundly weakened within the parliamentary party, that she lacks the mandate now to negotiate the deal in rational ‘s and the electorate has had a long hard look at her in the campaign doesn't like what it sees —— the deal in brussels. the issue now is when and how it is politically possible and least damaging to acquire another leader. that is the nature of the debate. in the short term, there is a desire for a complete re—style —— reva m p of a desire for a complete re—style —— revamp of her style. the view is she is far too tightly controlling every aspect of government, there is a lack of inclusion and involvement, the language has to change. she has two reach out and be more empathetic. and her team has to be opened up. there's particular
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criticism focused on her key advisers, fiona hill and criticism focused on her key advisers, fiona hilland nick timothy, who are thought to have far too much influence, by and large, and are regarded as, not out of control, but beyond the control of even senior cabinet ministers. it was interesting this morning listening to the former director of communications, katie perrior, talking about them and the climate they created in downing street. they are brilliant street fighters but at the heart of political government you need people who say, don't do that, we will make a mistake. in the manifesto preparation, we have landed badly on the doorstep and some mps didn't even know what was going to go in it so even know what was going to go in it so it is too tightly controlled at the top. i heard her on the radio as well.m
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a way they have become a litmus test for many conservative mps about how far for many conservative mps about how faers for many conservative mps about how far mrs may is really far —— willing to adapt, listen and repackaged her leadership. whether she will stand by them or let them go because many tory mps take the view that if she hunkered down with them it will be business as usual and it will not bind the party together and makes her prospects of survival even shorter. and what does all of that mean for brexit talks? they are imminent. we heard that over and over again doing the campaign. there are two camps who want to get on with brexit and a great fear is that if the talks are put on hold then it is used as a device to unlock the whole brexit process overview is to go through it. the view of the
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nonhybrid brexit supporters, is let us nonhybrid brexit supporters, is let us take another look at this. those who support remain see this as an opportunity to take off the table the idea of no deal. so there will bea the idea of no deal. so there will be a tussle about the tory approach to brexit albeit the talks will begin next monday. i think that will just be a handshake. hello, i'm theresa may and that's it. i suspect in brussels they take the view that it will not be theresa may doing the final brexit deal so they don't want to invest a vast amount of time and effort because the calculation is she won't be there. she has to reach some form of agreement with the dup. we should stress it is not a formal coalition, but she needs,
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mathematically, there is a huge problem there, isn't there? it's already bubbling up this morning in that many tory mps are deeply, deeply uncomfortable of having any arrangement, no matter how loose, with the dup because they hold very socially conservative views on things like gay rights, marriage, abortion and they oppose same—sex marriage and i think they are opposed to abortion. . many tory mps ta ke opposed to abortion. . many tory mps take the view they have spent the past 20 years trying to distance the conservative party from those views and present a more tolerable, liberal and contemporary stance on these positions. mary feel is, if i can put it this way, contamination that the tory brand is damaged by association with the dup and that is association with the dup and that is a real issue. there is real nervousness about the extent to which mrs may's attempt to hold onto power risks read toxic buying the
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tory party and doing profound and long—term damage, albeit mrs may a p pa re ntly long—term damage, albeit mrs may apparently gave ruth davidson, who raised this publicly, and assured there will be no backtracking on issues like gay rights. there will be no backtracking on issues like gay rightslj there will be no backtracking on issues like gay rights. i am struck by how quiet it is everywhere. we we re by how quiet it is everywhere. we were due to speak right now to someone were due to speak right now to someone who lost their seat, a conservative. he hasjust pulled out, which is a shame. but a distinct lack of people like that and a lack of cabinet ministers and we've been saying this since we stayed up over night watching the results come in. quite clearly number ten want complete radio silence and they would be happy if eve ryo ne silence and they would be happy if everyone sat in their gardens and ignored all phone calls and stayed quiet because they want to close it down. the other side is there's no one coming out and saying theresa may is terrific and what a great leader. that is surprising. she is
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still prime minister, she won the election. normally you would get senior colleagues coming out and saying, we now have a mandate to do this, that and the other and we will carry on. nothing. that is equally striking. we are in a curious... not a phoney war but a stand—off where eve ryo ne a phoney war but a stand—off where everyone is trying to size each other up, see who's doing what. no one is quite willing to do anything yet, but you can only do that for so long. eventually, in politics, you have too emerged into the daylight. you can keep quiet for now but it can't last. norman, thank you. let us can't last. norman, thank you. let us talk a bit more about the talks with the dup. senior sinn fein leaders say they're concerned that a deal between the dup and the conservatives could put the northern ireland peace process at risk. power sharing in stormont broke down in january and nationalists say they expect the british government to remain neutral in efforts to revive it.
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annita mcveigh is in belfast. thank you. yes, nationalists say that they want the government to remain as neutral brokers, if you like, in efforts to revive the talks here in northern ireland that they hope will lead to the restoration of the northern ireland assembly at stormont. the big question is if the dup are in a deal with the conservatives, how could a conservatives, how could a conservative secretary of state be truly said to be a neutral broker and that is the thorny question. that is what republicans are really sounding the alarm about today. this arrangement may prove to be reckless but we will have to wait and see. we have argued for some time and the
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british government have been working in cahoots with the dup to the disadvantage of the political process here. in fact, there were talks here to re—establish our institutions and we should add that the british public should have close scrutiny of the dup and what that party represents. the big fish behind me might be a clue as we have moved to the waterfront areas of belfast, one of the areas that has seen a belfast, one of the areas that has seen a huge amount of investment. this part of the city has improved belfast and northern ireland's reputation as a destination. we know that more investment in northern ireland is close to the top of the dup's wish list as they go into the talks with theresa may. i am joined by bbc northern ireland business editor. good to have it you with us. do you have any id how much the dup
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are looking for economic play out of this deal —— idea? are looking for economic play out of this deal -- idea? we had very little from arlene foster yesterday. going back to 2015, the dup produced a plan for that eventuality of a hung parliament. at the time, one newspaper reported they were looking for a package worth up to £1 billion but that was the night. i have no doubt they would be looking for something in that region at the least. what are the elements of the package? what would they want to spend the money on? talking about regeneration and in frustration —— infrastructure. in northern ireland investment fund and they were hoping the european investment bank would put the seed money into that, if you like. but they have rowed back because of the brexit vote. they could say to the uk that they want
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tens of millions to put into that fund. they also want to see the devolution of corporation tax to northern ireland. that would involve the block grant being cuts and they might sate give us a better deal on corporation tax. the border and brexit. give us a brief sense of the level of trade between northern ireland and the concerns of brexit on that? how closely are the dup and the conservatives aligned customer republic is the northern ireland should's biggest export partner. the agri— food sector. the feel is if you get a hard brexit with no transitional deals there would be lots of delays at the border and no one wants to see that. in terms of where the dup stand on brexit they are where the dup stand on brexit they a re close where the dup stand on brexit they are close to the conservatives. they wa nt to are close to the conservatives. they want to come out of the single market and the customs union and
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striking new trade deals around the world but the big differences they don't share the view of theresa may's that no deal is better than a bad deal. they have been careful never to engage in that rhetoric because they know if there is a hard wreck ticks —— brexit, it will be tough on the border. it could be that they want to reason made to give them an assurance that there will be a deal. —— theresa may. give them an assurance that there will be a deal. -- theresa may. 0k. thank you. so that sort of transitional arrangement that the dup might be looking for, a softer landing, if you like, there may have to bea landing, if you like, there may have to be a balancing act between terry isa to be a balancing act between terry is a taking into consideration the dup's wish list —— theresa may and ta ke dup's wish list —— theresa may and take into consideration is excess from the european union. negotiations are due to start. the
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eu has said they could be flexibility about that but in essence there's very little time for theresa may and the dup to wrap up these discussions. she will want to have the dup on board and have a working majority before those discussions start. it seems like the dup have a lot of power right now and are in an unparalleled position in terms of the deals they can make. it will be very interesting to see what they ask for and how far theresa may is prepared to go. back to you, jane. woman—macro has no choice in that she has to talk to the dup. moving into agreement with the party
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thatis moving into agreement with the party that is basically a bigoted party, the coalition of cruelty will do the conservatives no favours, nor the uk. we have to be clear what the dup stands for and the hypocrisy of a campaign run saying jeremy corbyn will take us back to the 1970s when essentially now the conservatives will take us back to the 19th century. ruth davidson says that she has an assurance from the prime minister that the prime minister is fully cognisa nt of minister that the prime minister is fully cognisant of everything you have outlined and that she has these conversations with the dup in that knowledge and knowing there are people who are not comfortable with this in the conservative party. people who are not comfortable with this in the conservative partym highlights elements of politics that are incredibly dark. women's rights have been undermined. women can't come here to have abortion and if they do it is on their own cost. it means that it is not accessible. it
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might notjust means that it is not accessible. it might not just mean means that it is not accessible. it might notjust mean something for the rights of people in britain, but the rights of people in britain, but the rights of women or lgb t people in northern ireland where they have been elected, the dup. the dup got less votes than the green party and yet they now have the balance of power. it shows how our electoral system gives power to different parties on an unequal basis. thank you very much. joining me now is george eaton from the new statesman to reason made herself said we shouldn't be the nasty party a few yea rs shouldn't be the nasty party a few years ago. -- theresa may. those on the liberal wing of the conservatives are worried she —— we re conservatives are worried she —— were worried she was talking about fox hunting and ending the ban on the ivory trade and the dementia tax. they are worried the tory brand is becoming toxic side again. and
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this is worrying for them, an alliance with the dup. but from a practical perspective it is the maths. yes and the prime minister is whoever can command the confidence of become a —— commons. the lib dems have said no deals and no coalition so you could see why they wouldn't wa nt to so you could see why they wouldn't want to suffer as they did before. so the dup is the only route. because of the problems associated with that then people like chris davidson have come out early and taken a clear davidson have come out early and ta ken a clear stance. davidson have come out early and taken a clear stance. -- ruth davidson. if there are such strictures and they say you will only have our support if you do so and so, what happens then because the brexit talks are about to begin? this is why britain is entering its most complex post—war period. this
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will be dependent on ten dups who have the nuclear option to bring it down. it will make it hard for the conservatives to get through any more austerities measures. there is a call for the abolition of the benefits —— bed tax and the conservatives are in opposition to lots of areas. fiscally conservative mps are worried people have forgotten the budget deficit. how will they get that under control? there are huge tension and there is the euro question. the dup want to maintain the customs area and frictionless and borderless areas. in fact, this whole area is opening up in fact, this whole area is opening up again. thank you for being with us up again. thank you for being with us at westminster. we have been trying to assess what
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people are making of it all as we digester what the election result was. john maguire has been finding out this morning at the kenilworth agricultural show. there are lots of things to see and do for the general public and it's a good chance for farmers to get together and gossip. the election, brexit is very much talk of the town. these are the brexit boys. ian and nigel baxter, one voted to leave and nigel baxter, one voted to leave and one voted to remain. and to our local farmer. what have you made of the last 2a hours? local farmer. what have you made of the last 24 hours? it was a shock. i didn't expect the conservative party to be in this mess. it will be quite difficult and challenging now to get through the things i hoped to see in
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terms of brexit. and you want brexit? absolutely and i've not changed my opinion since i campaigned for it. we need to push on now. this election has been hijacked on other agendas, to be honest. it was to secure a strong mandate for brexit and clearly it has shifted from that. the country now needs to push on with it and i hope that we can get that through somehow or other. ian, i'm not sure how much you agree with your brother. we know you don't agree with him on this. what are your thoughts? to reason made for this election asking for a strong mandate for a hard brexit and the british people haven't given it to her —— theresa may. it's very complicated and difficult to deliver and it is not what the country needs or wants. we need a pragmatic solution led by
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a new prime minister to get onto the ce ntre a new prime minister to get onto the centre ground of british politics and change this difficult situation into something much better for everyone. nigel is shaking his head there. william, as a farmer you have been watching the brexit issue and will watch the brexit negotiations very keenly. we might be in a weaker position but i think it's only temporary. we have made moves to start negotiations and trade deals have been struck already. it would have been struck already. it would have been struck already. it would have been better, in my view, to have been better, in my view, to have the election after the 19th. the timing was off on this. we could have done better. we are in disarray at the moment with what's happened with the election and it's going to be more difficult going into the negotiations. we are not quite fighting as a solid front as we were
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before. thoughts there in kenilworth. dateline london is coming up in a few moments and it will be very interesting to hear what journalists all over the world are making on events here at westminster. let us pause and catch up westminster. let us pause and catch up with a weather wherever you are in the country this morning. for some, it has been a glorious start. further north, the weather was ok. further north again and for a good part of wales and in the north of england, things were more dreary. for that you have two thank this area of cloud coming from the atlantic. it has enough about it for there to be quite a bit of rain
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across the north of england, wales and the western side of england. having made a journey from northern ireland in the first part of the day. it will be confined to the north —— northern isles in the afternoon. in the east, you could be looking at temperatures up to 22 degrees. northern ireland fares nicely as well. a lot of dry weather here until showers arrived later. the weather front is slow moving across the north of england and the cumbrian fells. up to 50 millimetres of rain could fall. what a contrast to the south—eastern corner. the uv levels are very high, as indeed the pollen quite widely across the greater part of england and wales. at hamden later this afternoon, scotla nd at hamden later this afternoon, scotland versus england should benefit from brightening sky is there —— although there may be a
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shower later. the showers will push across scotland and northern ireland to finish the day. in the small hours, it staggers its way into the south—eastern quarter to generate a mild and muggy night. not cold wherever you are spending it. sunday sta rts wherever you are spending it. sunday starts with a low—pressure anchored to the west of the british isles. quite a blustery day, especially if you are close to the centre of the loan. you may see more showers than sunshine in this area. the best of the sunshine perhaps is further east toward central and southern england. it eventually weakens, that weather front, across the south—east. hello. thursday was supposed to be may's day in the british prime minister's plan to strengthen her hand by holding and winning a general election. instead, she was left calling out "mayday" to a party in northern ireland,
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asking it to keep her conservative party in power, after her parliamentary majority evaporated. as forjeremy corbyn, the previously beleaguered leader of the labour party, he lost the election but won plaudits for his campaign and inspired a new generation of young voters. with me to discuss where this leaves british politics, and the imminent negotiations to get out of europe, are the biographer and long—standing contributor to germany's die welt newspaper, thomas kielinger, from ireland, the writer and broadcaster brian 0'connell, janet daley, columnist with britain's sunday telegraph newspaper, and 0wenjones, columnist with the guardian newspaper here in the uk. welcome to you all. janet daley, where did it go wrong? it was the worst campaign that i have ever seen, having lived in this country for 50 years. absolutely appalling. the more interesting phenomenon, because that one has been discussed endlessly, is the consequences for the labour party, which at least three quarters of its mps detest
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jeremy corbyn or his policies at any rate and are stuck with him for the indefinite future as leader. the second most devastated woman in the country must be a vet cooper, who really thought that her part of the party was going to reclaim its birth right —— yvette cooper. what happens now with the tories is almost impossible to call. there are a lot of rumours that theresa may is going to be removed
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