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tv   Talking Books at Hay Festival  BBC News  June 10, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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and david cameron were theresa may and david cameron were operating on a slim majority anyway. the dup supported them in all kinds of votes that you or i would not be talking about on tv and it didn't worry tory backbenchers then what the dup position was. and northern ireland generally doesn't seem to bother this tory party very much at all. nobody here talks about the fa ct all. nobody here talks about the fact the assembly has collapsed several months ago. they haven't been able to put humpty dumpty back together again. that seems to be of no concern to the prime minister before or since the election. she didn't even visit northern ireland to help out with that issue. a final thought about timescale because it's not on anyone's side, is it?|j suspect it won't be a coalition. we already know that. it will be eight confidence and supply arrangement, possibly a fairly loose arrangement.
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what everyone should remember is if you cast your mind back to the 1970s and the labour government, they were trying to do deals with all kinds of people, including the northern irish mps. it requires a huge amount of discipline and a lot of hard work. the other thing it requires is something that i think is pretty lacking in the prime minister and thatis lacking in the prime minister and that is the sort of chumminess but she's quite an iceberg and that doesn't augur well for the sort of relationships you need to build. it will be quite difficult to hold in place. very interesting. thanks for being with us. nick timothy and fiona hill have resigned in the last half hour. they
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have now gone and we will wait to see what happens next. more from here throughout the day. let's just pause and catch up with the weather forever you are in the united kingdom this afternoon. very lovely in london. let's find out what it is like everywhere. quite a variety of weather across like everywhere. quite a variety of weather across the like everywhere. quite a variety of weather across the uk. like everywhere. quite a variety of weather across the uk. we like everywhere. quite a variety of weather across the uk. we have like everywhere. quite a variety of weather across the uk. we have a weather across the uk. we have a weather front draped across the heart of the uk. bringing smart bricks of rain through northern england, wales and the south—west. head further south and east it is a lovely afternoon. i2 showers into scotla nd lovely afternoon. i2 showers into scotland and northern ireland. it is quite warm, actually. 19 and 20 for scotla nd quite warm, actually. 19 and 20 for scotland will stop maybe 2a degrees in the south—east with that sunshine. this evening patchy rain d rifts sunshine. this evening patchy rain drifts a priest was. i did a lot of dry weather. it would be quite blustery. a mild night. in some parts of the southeast no lower than
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16 or 17. quite a warm night here. sunday sees cloud for east anglia and the south—east. some spells of sunshine per share was to the western side of england and wales. in scotland and northern ireland the showers will be quite frequent. 16 01’ showers will be quite frequent. 16 or 17 showers will be quite frequent. 16 or17 in showers will be quite frequent. 16 or 17 in glasgow and belfast. hello. this is bbc news. the prime minister's chief advisers — nick timothy and theresa may's fiona hill have resigned. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, has demanded assurances from the prime minister that the dup‘s opposition to gay marriage won't be allowed to shape government policy. downing street has just announced that the cheap web is in belfast for talks with the dup.
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the metropolitan police has revealed the london bridge attackers tried to hire a seven and a half tonne lorry to carry out last saturday's attack — but the payment was declined. the three left eight people dead when they drove a van into pedestrians before stabbing people in borough market. donald trump has said he's willing to testify under oath about his conversations with james comey, the former fbi director he sacked. mr trump said he rejected mr comey‘s assertion that he had urged him to drop an investigation into links between his election campaign team and russia. for more of the event at westminster back to jane hill. a fast—moving day here at westminster. good afternoon from couege westminster. good afternoon from college green if you are just joining us. nick timothy and fiona hill have resigned this afternoon. two na m es hill have resigned this afternoon. two names perhaps not familiar to many people at all before the
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election, perhaps not even after the election, perhaps not even after the election but they were two key advisers. had been for many years. key advises to theresa may but there had been a concerted effort growing today. a lot of conservatives, some senior conservatives telling my colleague norman smith that if those two did not go down a leadership challenge would be mounted this coming monday. but they have now gonein coming monday. but they have now gone in the last half—hour. let's head back to downing street and norman smith is following it all from there. where they pushed? 0rdid theyjump? i from there. where they pushed? or did theyjump? i think it was a bit of both. there are probably shuffling towards the battlements and ushered towards there at the same time. there was a recognition that within team theresa may if the prime minister was to shore up her premiership, then she could not cling on to these two advisers, such was the animosity towards them. what
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was the animosity towards them. what was regarded as their role in the flawed election campaign, in the widely criticised manifesto and in particular, that contentious policy on social care. there were also criticised for the culture and the atmosphere. the blame for it within downing street with one former insider saying they created a dysfunctional and toxic atmosphere inside number ten. their departure was seen as intimately linked to, if you like, the main survival strategy. many mps took the view that they had to go for mrs may to demonstrate that she had got it. but she had understood what had happened in the election and shtick responsibility and that she was willing to do things differently. and for hire to be given space to do that their departure was the necessary price. she would have bought herself, i think, some
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breathing time and a bit of space but the fundamental question for many tory mps remains, which is, can she do things differently? can she be more inclusive? can she adopt more outgoing approach? can we see an different mrs may? because otherwise think there is a view that the tories may brand if —— the mrs may brand is damaged for the electorate. she has to find a way to engage with senior colleagues and bring them in. not operate within such a tight knit circle if she is to shore up her authority within the parliamentary party. so what we have seen parliamentary party. so what we have seen this lunchtime is two things. 0ne, seen this lunchtime is two things. one, i seen this lunchtime is two things. 0ne, ithink, seen this lunchtime is two things. one, i think, a sense ofjust how fragile mrs may's position is that she has had to discard these
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advisers have been with her through thick and thin and her determination to survive, that she is willing to get rid of them. it is so interesting. how much of it is symbolic, if you like? different leaders have different ways of leading, that's true in politics, that's two in business. it is true across the world. and it's as if there are people within the party who are saying, i've never liked those too. i don't like the way theresa may chooses to operate and now i still emboldened to say so. you are asking her to have a personality transplant but that is how she prefers to work. i think clearly, personality is a big part of all this. but it goes further than that, i think. it also underlines just the weakened state that mrs may is in. that critics if
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you like, pick of her two closest people. and these are individuals who, you know, art like her left and rightarm. who, you know, art like her left and right arm. they've been with her through the long hard years in the home office, should through the leadership contest, into government. they are absolutely, you know, is essential to theresa may's political make—up. so for her, it is an enormous step to discard them and so quickly and seemingly without any fight. and think thatjust underlines she knows she is fighting to save her premiership. not in the long—term, now. she is in an immediate battle to protect her leadership. the only thing which, the moment, i think, leadership. the only thing which, the moment, ithink, has leadership. the only thing which, the moment, i think, has held a lot of tory mps back is the proximity of the brexit talks. but they were not there then i think many people would find there was no particularly good reason to keep mrs may. because
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there is the enormity of brexit coming thundering down the track there is a view that whatever peoples personal take on to won's as prime minister it simply is too dramatic go to a leadership challenge when britain is facing this gargantuan generational change with brexit. norman, thank you so much as ever. as news broke about nick timothy's resignation i was talking to the conservative mp so we of course spoke about that resignation. it is not for me to say who she should appoint not. the prime minster won the majority share of votes. she won a majority of the... she one more season anyone else she is working hard on making a government. jonah hill and nick timothy worked for her for years and have been steadfastly loyal. for a long time, ever since the premise
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took office, there have been expressions of concern and advice that the circle that she needed to run the home office wasn't the same circle that she needed to run the government and it had to be wider. and i suppose that the election campaign did was bring that more outs to the fore. and at those concerns more demonstrable because of the campaign and what happened. certainly now if the prime minister using the opportunity to widen the circle of advice to her and be more inclusive of the party as a whole i'm sure that'll be the right thing to do. talking to mejust to do. talking to me just a little earlier in the other. norman was talking about the timescale and the argentines go because of the brexit talks. to do all of that, the prime minister needs the help of the dup in northern ireland. where saying that the press association is telling us that gavin williams and the chief whip are in belfast now to begin some talks with the dup. i
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should say it is only on pa at the moment. we have not had any clarification from the government that that is the case but pai saying the chief whip is that in the early stages of talks with the dup. anita mcveigh has been a belfast following development is there for us. thank you. as you mentioned there one area of concern for some people is the dup‘s socially conservative policies. for example, their opposition to gay marriage. it was an issue that was raised by the scottish conservative leader with davidson yesterday, who urged to theresa may not to allow that to be a factor in the discussions. to encourage lgbt rights here in northern ireland and speaking just a short while ago, the conservative mp was asked if he had any concerns about any concessions that might
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have to be given to the dup to secure their support for to theresa may. i come from the liberal wing and luckily we have a parliament now thatis luckily we have a parliament now that is going to count in terms of any legislation that is passable not going to support any legislation that i would regard as socially liberal or taken this country backwards. the dup are a party that do not support same—sex marriage. david cameron says it was one of his proudest achievements. if you have concerns about budding up with people like that? there are people in my party who did not support same—sex marriage, voted against open david cameron past it, but they remain colleagues and we can achieve good things for the country so i'm sure the dup have supported concerted and the conservative legislation passed. their democratically elected mps to represent their communities were studied and think we will go backwards. i think it is part of our
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dna now. i'm sure the dup understand that. i should say that talking to people here today, although concerns are being expressed about the dup‘s opinion on certain social issues including gay marriage, not getting any sense of the dup are going to be bringing those sorts of issues to the table. that they're going to be using theirs in any way as a bargaining chip. it is something that theresa may will be bearing in mind during these discussions with the dup. she would also be hearing and bearing in mind the concerns expressed by republicans, nationalists even northern ireland. about the potential neutrality of the conservative party in any discussions that would be going on to try to restore the power—sharing assembly at stormont which collapsed earlier this year. and senior sinn fein figures have been saying to the
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conservative party that the government has to to be a neutral broker in any of these discussions. this current arrangement, we will have to wait and see. we will reflect on that. we have argued in re ce nt reflect on that. we have argued in recent times, the british stormont have been working in cahoots with particularly the dup to the disadvantage of the political process here. they called off the talks are very recently to re—establish our institutions and die without that the british public should actually have close scrutiny of the dup and what that party represents. sinn fein at the ending our report from anita mcveigh in belfast. we've had confirmation that the chief whip is indeed there for those initial talks with the dup. we know that thatis talks with the dup. we know that that is now underway. if you are just joining that is now underway. if you are justjoining us, just to bring you up justjoining us, just to bring you up to date, in the last half hour it has been announced that nick timothy and fiona hill have resigned. they
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are those two crucial special advisers to theresa may. the bbc understood that senior conservatives we re understood that senior conservatives were demanding that the two of them went by the end of the weekend, or those conservatives were threatening to begina those conservatives were threatening to begin a leadership election this coming monday. in the last half hour, it has been announced that nick timothy and fiona hill have now resigned. much more from here at westminster from the top of the hour. will keep you up—to—date with all these deliverance. let's pause for a fume all these deliverance. let's pause forafume and all these deliverance. let's pause for a fume and it's a catch up with the latest technology to bromance. he is clicked. think robots and maybe you'll
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picture something like this or this. but what about robotic muscle and smart materials that could act as human skin close that the as you wear them? that human skin close that the as you wear them ? that is human skin close that the as you wear them? that is what is cold soft robotics and this team at bristol robotics lab our engineering technologies to do all about and more. i went to take a peek their labs. this is a bucket of alien saliva. this is what drips out of the alien mouth. ridley scottjust used a whole bunch of that. in this case it is to simulate blood. this soft robot mimics how some bacteria move through our bodies was up in the future it is thought that nano robots will take a similartrip to our
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thought that nano robots will take a similar trip to our brains looking for infection and illness. that is awesome. some of the projects involve making assistive technology are elderly and disabled people like this pneumatic artificial muscle which can be made into any shape and built into clothing. as you apply it changes its shape so it could for instance help people limited grip strength. it is dependent on how much error pressure you apply anti—some material which can sense when that pressure should be applied. this diametric elastomer candidate when it is being stretched so it can sense when you try to move and add extra power to maybe help you up the stairs. and it can not only detect movement, it can change shape when you apply a high enough voltage. you could use it for changeable clothing that contained its colour. you can use us as clothing that contained its colour. you can use us as a clothing that contained its colour. you can use us as a sort of second skint to help with deep vein
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thrombosis and assist with pumping blood. it can even be layered up to create artificial muscles. it does not seem to doing a lot but actually it is very thin and weighs almost nothing. the act apart only ways like say four grams and it can live two kilos. none of this is complicated. none of this is extremely high—tech using billions of transistors. it is simple voltage and a piece of material. of transistors. it is simple voltage and a piece of materiallj of transistors. it is simple voltage and a piece of material. i think thatis and a piece of material. i think that is one of the big advantages of soft robotics. simplicity. in a conjugated robotic system you have a lot of elements that can go wrong and with the sort of things it is very simple and it is very adaptable. the intelligence is in the design and immediately useful rather than the complexity. the robotics lab in bristol is a 50,000 square feet high of the innovation filled with hundreds of different types of robots but what nearly all have in common is they need power to
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run. over in the bioenergy lab scientists are working on one freely available resource the world will never run available resource the world will never run out of. you're in. each one of the cylinders is a microbial fuel cell device. it turns waste water into electricity using microbes. so the microbes eat the waste ? microbes. so the microbes eat the waste? they each the ways. that is their favourite item on waste? they each the ways. that is theirfavourite item on the menu. essentially. i have been to that restau ra nt, yea h. essentially. i have been to that restaurant, yeah. two litres of your lunar spread into the fuel cell power. the microbes eat what they need, creating electrons as a by—product. because they are attached to an electrode surface it is connected to the dues about 30 to 40 is connected to the dues about 30 to a0 minute watts of power. that is enough to slowly charge a smartphone or power internal lights for their special portable toilets. this is one use of many. and we do it out of the lab, when we install these units
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out of the lab we have many more of them connected together as a stack. if you are going to glastonbury this year is you might see these screens near the finals and if you choose to use the rhinos then you'll be part ofan use the rhinos then you'll be part of an experiment which is literally putting the p into power. these are displays which don't require a lot of power but a lucky few may be able to charge their phones for a bit. it only after donating. most of the p used here comes from staff donors at the lab. his only good for the microbes for an hour or so saw co nsta nt microbes for an hour or so saw constant supplies needed. although, i think i'll hang on. welcome to the week in tech. it was the week that goober refounded customers for journeys taken near last saturday
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night's terror attacks after surging demand. upload is launching a voice controlled speaker. the comment section on britney spears's insta gram account has been used by russian speaking hackers. if you think this is a sensible way to go out, anyone with kids can tell you what it is like trying to get play dough out of the carpet but serbia dough out of the carpet but serbia do not have a new gadget to tell you about for that. this aims to help kids learn about light, sound and movement to play. and finally, researchers at mit have developed sensors for robotic arms that aim to help bots grab things with the right amount of pressure.
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the aim to make negotiating smaller objects possible as well as making general household tasks easier to approach. this would be handy if one day robot are to become ordinary household companions. around the world scientists are looking at different ways of improving our quality—of—life auster pierces alternate sources of power. soft robotics, and possibly in future bionic limbs. but in italy's liability at other things. they are looking at simulating touch. researchers are trying to merge human physiology machine engineering. the team are working on a bionic fingertip that is capable of detecting texture. the human sense of touch is incredibly complex one. i don't even need to look at these three pieces of plastic to
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sense the differences in the ridges. how do you transfer that same sensitivity into a prosthetic hand? fingertips have a higher concentration thanks to 20,000 nerve fibres on each finger. it registers textures its touches as
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spikes. on—screen it may look simple but that is exactly the language that our nervous system speaks as we touch objects, it sends nerve impulses to the brain. the tiny su btle impulses to the brain. the tiny subtle variations in how the skin deforms as it is touched changes those impulses and how we perceive texture. this capitalises on the natural principle and so can be more effective as humans and animals in general can now interact with the environment. the professor and his team have already had some success. dennis was one of the first amputee to try out the bionic fingertip. the output from the finger was directly connected to the healthy nerves in his upper arm. connected to the healthy nerves in his upperarm. i connected to the healthy nerves in his upper arm. i could tell the difference between the way it was
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very rough and smooth. yet, that was amazing. since those first clinical trial cup of years ago the team have been trying to increase the number of textures that patients can feel. the experiments that were showing now are strengthening the capability to tell silk from cotton, wool from different kinds of materials. and in this way we can restore a more natural sense of touch to the amputee that is wearing the press he says. what is learnt it can be transferred to other applications, for example a surgical robot can use this technology to identify tumours which would feel different and texture to healthy tissue. another kind of application is for rescue, so another kind of application is for rescue, so to allow robots to be present in the environment not only
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to listen, but to add more sensors available when exploring and environment. think example of a nuclear disaster, so in the case of underwater application the robot can go and touch and perceive the environment based on the sensory feedback that you can have remotely controlling the robot. once this technology is mastered it can be integrated into simple things like gloves so for instance, i could be anywhere in the world, my husband backin be anywhere in the world, my husband back in new york can give me the sensation of petting our cat and that would be transferred through these actuators to me anywhere in these actuators to me anywhere in the world. i want it right now. i can't give you that at the moment but in the meantime how about a hug from this chap? that's it for the short cut of kick from this week. the full—length version is on ip right now. next week we're going to los angeles for the annual video
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games extravaganza. is going to be tweaking every thing that we seem. follow us on facebook. thanks for watching. we'll we' ll start we'll start with a look at the satellite sequence. it is bringing these were the systems across our shores. it has not got the saudis so here it is a lovely afternoon. sunshine and warm. we have this line of cloud and rain from the south—west and behind that one to shower us but a lot of dry weather for scotland and northern ireland.
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as high as 2a in the south—eastern corner. the seating design of cloud and patchy rain drifts further eastwards. behind it a few showers getting into scotland and northern ireland. temperatures around a0 degrees overnight. not lower in about 1617 for some positive south—east of quite a close night here. a fair bit of cloud to the south—east tomorrow. pine that there are sunshine to be had. the showers in scotland and northern ireland could well be quite frequent. 16 or 17 degrees. round about 20 or 21 in the south—eastern quarter. this is bbc news. i'm jane hill at westminster. in the last hour two of the prime minister's top advisers — nick timothy and fiona hill — have resigned. nick timothy sad he regretted not including a pledge to cap total social care costs — and that the party hadn't talked to the people who decided to vote labour. they went following what the bbc understands were demands from some conservative mps that mrs may would face a leadership challenge if they were not sacked by this weekend. nick timothy has been a good servant
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of the conservative party, but politics is a rough business. to shore up her government, mrs may is preparing for talks

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