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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 11, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson. good morning. downing street and the democratic unionist party say no final deal has yet been reached over a parliamentary pact. late last night, both parties said talks will continue next week and that the detail of an agreement is still to be determined. borisjohnson has rejected newspaper reports of a leadership bid, giving theresa may his full support. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, says he's ready for another general election, insisting he can still become prime minister. good morning. it's sunday the 11th ofjune. also ahead: we will be live in westminster and belfast very shortly. pictures of the fake explosive belts worn by the london bridge attackers are released by police,
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as we hear from one of the first officers on the scene. richard hammond is recovering in hospital after the tv presenter‘s car crashed in switzerland. in sport, scotland are denied victory in their world cup qualifier against england. two superb free—kicks looked to have won it for the scots, only for harry kane to equalise late on. and phil has the weather. hello. good morning. nota bad and phil has the weather. hello. good morning. not a bad start to the day in norfolk. can we keep it going? it will eventually be a day of sunny spells and showers. i will have the full forecast in 15 minutes. thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. the democratic unionist party says it has had "positive talks" over a possible deal to support a conservative minority government, but that no final agreement has yet been reached. yesterday, a statement from downing street suggested that the dup had agreed in principle to support theresa may with the details to be put
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to the cabinet tomorrow. late last night, both the tories and the democratic unionists released statements revealing that further discussions will take place later in the week. let's speak to our political correspondent, leila nathoo. can you explain this for us? it is interesting timing. first we get a statement saying the deal has been done. then a statement saying not quite, more details next week. you are right. there was some confusion last night about the status of the talks between downing street and the dup. early in the night we had a meeting from downing street where they said they agreed with dup to support the conservative government. just a few hours later, we had another statement from downing street and a statement from the dup saying actually these talks and the deal had yet to be finalised and talks are ongoing and will resume next week. clearly, there is some confusion about how far these talks had gone. of course, what this is
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all about is a confidence and supply agreement, that is what downing street initially referred to, meaning the dup would support the government on key votes like the budget and no—confidence votes. in other areas it would be decided on a vote by vote basis. as yet, there is no further update. talks are ongoing between the dup and the conservatives to form this crucial majority. that is the confusion. what about the pressure on theresa may that did not let up over the weekend? some papers are suggesting borisjohnson could weekend? some papers are suggesting boris johnson could be weekend? some papers are suggesting borisjohnson could be trying to oust her. he says that is not true, let us get on with the job. but the pressure continues. this is not going away. until this agreement is set in stone with the dup, they will be rumours around about potential
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leadership bids. boris johnson be rumours around about potential leadership bids. borisjohnson has a lwa ys leadership bids. borisjohnson has always been in the frame for that. you mentioned newspaper reports saying he has support from senior cabinet ministers for his bid. he is clear that is not the case and 196 1% backs theresa may. and jeremy corbyn. we mentioned how he could end up at number 10 in another general election. is their truth to this? jeremy corbyn is feeling confident with his election result. he has said labour is ready to govern as a minority. he is ready to keep up the pressure on the prime minister, saying he could vote down the queen's speech, the programme for government set out in the coming weeks. what will be announced in the queen's speech will depend on any
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agreement between the dup and the conservatives. labour will potentially vote that down to be jeremy corbyn is clearly very confident. a lot is still at play. jeremy corbyn still sees a role for him and his party. good to talk to you and get your opinion. she was live from westminster. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, and the defence secretary, michael fallon, will both be on the andrew marr show later this morning. that is nine o'clock on bbc one, of course. scotland yard has released pictures of the fake suicide belts worn by the london bridge attackers. the officer leading the investigation says it's the first time he's seen the tactic used in the uk. last night, a week on from the attack, people visited bars and restaurants in the area in a show of unity and resilience. simonjones reports. designed to create maximum fear, these are the fake explosive belts worn by the three attackers. they are actually disposable water bottles covered in masking tape, but
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police said anyone who saw them on the night would believe they were real. they believe they wanted to create a siege operation with them. police spoke to 262 people from 90 different countries, 78 described as significant witnesses. three people we re significant witnesses. three people were killed as the attackers drove across london bridge, five stabbed to death in borough market. they we re to death in borough market. they were remembered last night. in a show of defiance, people flocked to the bars and restaurants. people reflect on it. we have to do that. but it does not stop me from coming out at all. we cannot not think about what happened. i was wondering about what happened. i was wondering about what happened. i was wondering about what the mood would be like, but it is really celebratory and find. we stick together. that is what we do. it is what london is about. in pubs, people are being told to donate to the victims of the
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manchester and london attacks. told to donate to the victims of the manchester and london attacksm told to donate to the victims of the manchester and london attacks. it is absolutely right on the anniversary of what happened last weekend, the tragic events, londoners can go out and do what londoners do. repairs are continuing to buildings damaged by the killers, but the cordons have been lifted and southwark cathedral has been reopened. at around 8:50, we'll be speaking to a former policeman who rushed to the aid of people on the bridge when the attack happened. time for some to other news now. three men have been arrested after an easyjet flight to sta nsted was diverted because of suspicious behaviour. the plane, which was flying from slovenia, made an unplanned landing in germany, with passengers evacuated down emergency slides. a backpack belonging to one of the men was blown up by police. the tv presenter, richard hammond,
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has been treated for a fractured knee after crashing a car while filming for his new motoring show, the grand tour. he was driving an electric supercar in switzerland when it left the road on a bend. the a7—year—old, who suffered brain injuries in a crash while filming top gear 11 years ago, got out of the vehicle before it burst into flames. his co—host, jeremy clarkson, tweeted that it was the "biggest" and "most frightening" crash he'd seen. competitors in a yacht race from plymouth to the united states have been rescued after their boats were damaged in a severe storm in the middle of the atlantic. five vessels were affected. one of them sank and two were abandoned. caroline davies reports. close to safety, after surviving what's been called a once—in—a—lifetime storm. this is the moment a 73—year—old yachtsman was rescued by a luxury ocean liner, the queen mary ii. he'd been taking part in a transatlantic race when a storm hit. but across the atlantic, they hit 15 metre waves
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and 60 knot winds. many of the boats were damaged. tamarind, the boat rescued by the liner, was just one of them. a boat called happy suffered a damaged mast and another, called furia, sank. all the crews were rescued. other ships, like this research vessel, also diverted to help, co—ordinated by the canadian military. with cases like this, that far out in the middle of the atlantic, they a lwa ys in the middle of the atlantic, they always ta ke in the middle of the atlantic, they always take a day or more. even those who run the race were surprised by the conditions. i've been involved with this race for 25 years. and i must say, we've never had this kind of depression. with these conditions, i can't remember them, so it's unusual, it's extreme, but it does happen in the north atlantic. now safely on board and heading to halifax in canada, at least one yachtsman will enjoy an easier journey, according to the captain
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of the liner. and i think he will have a much more leisurely and luxury transit to the other side of the atlantic than he would have done in his 38—foot boat. despite the damage, organisers have said the race will go on. caroline davies, bbc news. good morning. you are watching bbc brea kfast. good morning. you are watching bbc breakfast. the front pages. a lot to discuss following the election last week on thursday. the front page of the mail on sunday. borisjohnson launching a bid to be prime minister as may clings on. it was denied furiously by borisjohnson already saying he has no such plans and is fully supporting the prime minister. the same story on the front of the sunday times. five cabinet ministers urge borisjohnson to topple the reason may. and they are talking about the outcome of brexit. —— theresa may. negotiations are expected to begin within the week. people are demanding a softer brexit
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for business. that could be good news for businesses who have been concerned about the impacts on the market and trade deals coming up with the eu. in office but not in power, that is how the sunday telegraph describes it today. they also detailed the events in downing street over the last couple of days, in particular, the resignations of the prime minister's closest advisers, nick timothy and fiona hill, who many in the party blamed for the disastrous campaign. it is worth remembering that she did increase the amount of people voting for her, but many more went around this time because of high numbers of people voting in the collapse of the ukip vote. we will get to that later on. some of those details in the 0bserver. on. some of those details in the observer. that is the headline. a plan to drop hard brexit plans. and they are talking about the coalition
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with dup and what it could mean for the party. some tories are concerned it could damage the brand they have spent years trying to detoxify. the front pages. richard hammond. today. he was involved in another crash. this one looks absolutely horrific. he was in an electric supercar. here he is at the bottom. it is £18 million electric rimac being charged in this car. ——a £2 million. luckily he was entirely unheard. he had a crash in 2006 which left him in a coma. all sorts of issues there. this time he was almost completely unscathed. it looks absolutely horrific, the aftermath of that incident. 11 years! where does the
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time go! this is breakfast. the main stories. the dup says it has had positive talks over a possible deal to support a tory government, but the details are yet to be finalised. scotla nd the details are yet to be finalised. scotland yard has released images of the fake explosives worn by the man who carried out the london bridge attack last week. here's phil with a look at this morning's weather. if that is the weather today, that is promising. i am here, if that is the weather today, that is promising. iam here, amid fa ntasy is promising. iam here, amid fantasy because i was just thinking of how lovely it would either have bacon of how lovely it would either have ba co n rolls of how lovely it would either have bacon rolls and a cup of tea with this view. showers are also in the mix of what will be a half decent day. dominated by an area of low pressure that brought wind from yesterday. some of you got tied up with the old weather
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front that was producing a miserable day for some. that is now way down toward the south—east. calling on behind, some areas are already seeing a bit of shower activity. that goes for parts of scotland and northern ireland. a couple of showers elsewhere across northern and western parts of the british isles are, essentially, many of you away from the centre of the low are off toa away from the centre of the low are off to a dry start. there is enough about the old weather front here across the south—east for the odd bit of rain that will not amount to much. if you have plans outside in the south—eastern water, things will improve as the last of the cloud and rain falls away towards the continent. as we get on into the afternoon we begin to see how much blueberries on those charts. not politically, that is, it is just many showers across scotland and northern ireland. would not be surprised if there was a rumble of thunder as well. hopefully the cloud stays good enough for the airshow at
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crossford. a decent day in the midlands and all points south and east. if you are out this evening, showers with you across and northern ireland although many across england and wales will have faded away by this stage. we're not looking at a particular goldmine, given that all breeze around that area is coming in from the south—west. just a word to the wise, i say breeze, the central goal of scotland tomorrow morning for the commute, some of the gusts of 35, 40 for the commute, some of the gusts of 35, a0 miles an hour or so on what is going to be another breezy day in as we push that low pressure across the top end of the british isles, concentrating showers, less intensely on monday than on sunday but elsewhere cloud around and also a lot of dry weather. not a bad start to the new week. doctor richard there is 20 and the temperature is set to rise for many as we get on through the week. —— top temperature there is 20. when disaster hits the uk, one of the first images we often see is of the emergency services rushing towards danger
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to protect civilian lives. last week, during the terror attack on london bridge, inspectorjim cole was one of the first police officers on the scene. he's been talking to us about his experience. as soon as the call came out the police station burst into life because we had two shifts. they were changing over. so everybodyjust got into any police vehicle that would work and off we all went. it was almost pandemonium. people running. i could see somebody injured on the floor by the pub on the corner. fortu nately floor by the pub on the corner. fortunately i had a police medical on board so i called the medic and i instructed him to go over to the entrance to the bar, the bar
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katzenjammer and set up a triage there. at that point there were still many shots ringing out. i did not know whether it was ours or the bad guys. and then a stream of people came out of the market, running and screaming. we literally pushed them into big basement of the pub. it seemed the safest place to put a large volume of people at that time, out of harm ‘s way. i have been a police officer for 18 years and it all just been a police officer for 18 years and it alljust happened. it happened automatically, really. there was no thought process going on. it seems surreal in hindsight it almost feels like it was not real.
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amazing and moving testimony there. as we have heard this morning, the democratic unionist party has said it has had positive talks. but no final agreement has yet been reached. both sides are working towards a confidence and supply agreement. but how will that work? historically friends hoping to shape the future working together. without a conservative mps to form her own government, theresa may has turned to the democratic unionist party. she outlined her intentions straight after the shock election result, to help regain her political balance. we will continue to work with our friends and allies in the democratic unionist party in particular. the d unionist party in particular. the d upnow unionist party in particular. the d u p now has ten seats to use as a
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powerbroker, to back theresa may on key votes such as the queen ‘s speech and budget. not as full coalition, but in a looser agreement. that is prompting speculation about what the pro— brexit socially conservative party may want in return, cursing concern among some tory mps, but not all.|j don't among some tory mps, but not all.” don't think we will go backwards in terms of social legislation. i think it is part of our dna now and what makes us the great country we are. i am sure the d u p understand that. the balancing the interests of two parties could have an effect.” cannot see how the queen ‘s speech cannot see how the queen ‘s speech can be laden with interesting pieces of legislation because many of them are going to be items which will cause dispute within the conservative party and certainly between the conservatives and the d up. between the conservatives and the d u p. so, the most unexpected result of the election has been to make the job of governing here at heart than
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ever. let's turn our attention to something entirely different. some of the biggest names from the sport of triathlon will be swimming, cycling and running their way around leeds this afternoon as the city hosts the only uk stop in this year's world series. among the elite competitors taking part is 2013 world champion non sta nford. born in swansea, non now lives in leeds. and she's been showing breakfast‘s own keen triathlete, louise, around one of her favourite training routes .itis . it is lovely to be on your home turf stop where are we going? we will have our, and have a blog around the area. a few hills, it is pa rt around the area. a few hills, it is part of our monday loop. a small pa rt part of our monday loop. a small part of our monday loop. a small part of it. shalli part of our monday loop. a small part of it. shall i follow you? # i wa nted part of it. shall i follow you? # i wanted to follow when she goes # i
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wa nt to wanted to follow when she goes # i want to let it take control. do you just go as fast as you can? yeah. i love it will ——. this has not been my most consistent time. we have had a few bumps in the road. i am definitely not where i would love to be. but, at the same time, i did well in china and japan and there we re well in china and japan and there were many positives to be taken from that. i am not too worried. this is a full—timejob, isn't that. i am not too worried. this is a full—time job, isn't it? that. i am not too worried. this is a full-time job, isn't it? yeah, it really is. the life of a triathlete is quiet when you are training. you get to a point in the middle of a competition where you wonder why you are doing this? yes. at most races you start to wonder why you are
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doing this to yourself. generally one hour before the race when the tension is building and you are apprehensive. you start to question yourself and your life choices. your boyfriend? partner sounds old. yes, boyfriend. what does he think of the weather here? he was initially shocked at how we did was. he's quite disappointed that his australian accent has diminished but he loves the terrain. it is beautiful, you cannot deny that. so you were living together with vicki. she moved away. do you miss? yes. i miss her a lot. we were so co mforta ble miss her a lot. we were so comfortable training together, living together. you get to know
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someone really well and, i don't like to say i have gotten used to it because it would always be wonderful if she came back. tell me about your aims for leads. do you want to smash it? always. i was disappointed in the race last year. i had possibly the race last year. i had possibly the worst swim of my career so hopefully we have addressed that and fingers crossed it will not happen again. in front of a home crowd makes it much more special. you do wa nt to makes it much more special. you do want to it for your home crowd. you wa nt to want to it for your home crowd. you want to give the british fans a win. we are nearly there. non, thank you so much. i'm glad i could show you
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around. thank you for coming. how me more miles to you still have a head? —— how many more miles to you still have to go? no, not today. i am worn out watching that. you can watch all the action from the triathlon world series in leeds from one o'clock this afternoon on bbc2. we still do not know all the details about how theresa may's new government will operate but so far one of the biggest changes has been behind—the—scenes. two of her closest advisers have quit and pave the way free new chief of staff at number10. the way free new chief of staff at number 10. the bbc understands that mrs may was warned that she faced a leadership challenge unless she sacked fiona hill and nick timothy. what impact will the to have an theresa may? we'rejoined now by the managing editor of the spectator and a former speech writer for michael
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gove. thank you forjoining us early on this sunday morning. can you give us on this sunday morning. can you give usa on this sunday morning. can you give us a sense on this sunday morning. can you give us a sense of how sick you using the position of theresa may is in number 10. not at all. the resignation of timothy and hill yesterday proved that the cabinet is in charge. theresa may is in office, but not in power. i think what we will see is the cabinet asserting their authority, the party asserting there as well an theresa may will effectively need to play ball with them if she wants to keep herjob. these two people, they would not have been widely known to people generally, to people involved in the world of objects that may be different. without them, does it make her more vulnerable and as a personality, how does this affect the way she operates government? she has been dependent on both of these people at the home office for a period and in number 10.
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people at the home office for a period and in number10. i people at the home office for a period and in number 10. i think whether she can survive without them is open to question. she has appointed a new chief of staff now, appointed a new chief of staff now, a former mp, who was one until thursday, gavin barwell. without her two chief of staffs there who guided her on policy, guided her press coverage, she is going to be in a sticky situation, i believe. watching that speech on friday when she returned from seeing the queen, it was extraordinary. for many people was as if the election had not happened. do you think we will need to see a change in the way she approaches? something more honest and says that she acknowledges, perhaps, that things went wrong? one of the strangest things about the election campaign was that the public got to know her quite well and found her to be a little defensive, a little brittle and not really that open. she did not do a tv debate and in press conferences
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and interviews that she came across as irritable. and we had a bizarre sight on friday which was her giving a victory speech, as such, or as if she had won a landslide when they did not happen. she needs to be more open and more collegiate with her colleagues. a little warmer, really, if she is to survive. other people have said that nick timothy was one of the great progressive brain is driving forward new and innovative policy thinking number 10 and, particularly, his grip on the challenges faced by this country when it comes to big issues like social care and how we fund it. was it was about the policy itself and more about the way the message was sent and conveyed ? more about the way the message was sent and conveyed? to be honest, i think that was a terrible policy. so it could not have been sold very easily at all. however you do that. ido easily at all. however you do that. i do think the problem with the ma nifesto, i do think the problem with the manifesto, which, obviously, nick timothy co—authored, is that it basically came across as the tory
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party, the nasty party that we used to be warned about, the dementia tax, the removal of lunches from children, from free school lunches. i think children, from free school lunches. ithinki children, from free school lunches. i think i really, there were structural problems and that ma nifesto. structural problems and that manifesto. in terms of presentation, theresa may has a long way to go and i'm not really convinced she has it in her. i wonder if she really wants to be there. that is another question as well. it was said that she has a great sense of public service. do you think that is why she is determined to carry on? of course, inevitably, the sunday papers are now full of speculation about whether there will be a leadership challenge. boris johnson has denied any plans, we would expect him to do that. what is your reading of the situation?” expect him to do that. what is your reading of the situation? i think it hangs in the balance. we will probably find out over the next two or three days whether or not there area or three days whether or not there are a group of mps coalescing around
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boris. i think he is the obvious alternative. my understanding is that the one thing the cabinet and, in fact, all the tory mps are afraid of is another election in autumn they really worry at this point that they really worry at this point that they may lose. jeremy corbyn very much has momentum and is theresa may doesn't step aside and let someone else in, then it looks as if they may have defied jeremy corbyn again and, this time, they may not win. thank you very much. the sunday mirror has an interview withjeremy corbyn today saying he was preparing for another election. we will talk to alistair campbell, a former labour politician later on. just approaching 630. stay with us. the lines are up next. —— headlines are up lines are up next. —— headlines are up next. hello. this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson. coming up before 7am, john has a round—up of the sports news and phil will be here with the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the dup says it has had "positive
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talks" over a possible deal to support a conservative minority government, but that no final agreement has yet been reached. discussions are set to continue in the week. john campbell is our northern ireland economics and business editor. as we have heard overnight, negotiations continued. they will resume on monday. what will be the next sticking point? in terms of what the dup want, they will want some financial package. more money for infrastructure here. we saw back in 2015 it looked like there could bea in 2015 it looked like there could be a hung parliament at that time and the dup produced a document to say what they wanted to give support to the conservatives or labour. it was about that financial package. in terms of policies the conservatives have that dup would not support,
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they don't want more austerity. they say they will not support the ending of the triple lock and the state pension. they want the winter fuel allowa nce. pension. they want the winter fuel allowance. these things the conservatives can put into the queen's speech. there has been a lot of chat about the dup social policies. they don't back extending 93v policies. they don't back extending gay marriage and abortion rights to northern ireland. i do think that will feature at all. those are devolved matters to northern ireland. they will say don't get involved. they are unlikely to push that agenda. another interesting point will be around brexit. time and again, the prime minister has said no deal is better than a bad deal. she is prepared to crash out of the eu with no transition arrangements. the dup do not share that vision as they don't want a border a long ireland. they also
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don't want special status in ireland. they do want do not see more passport checks in ireland. those are the main issues. brexit, austerity, and what sort of financial package the conservatives can give the dup? back in 2015 with the potential hung parliament, there was talk dup would look for a package worth about £1 billion, and it was denied at the time. i would not be surprised if we saw something that would be in that ballpark. brief word, that is obviously what the dup and tories will contend with. i wonder how it is going down politically with the other parties. the big issue is the good friday agreement which depends on impartiality. it says the government is supposed to act with rigourous impartiality. the question is how
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can the conservatives be seen to be acting with rigourous impartiality when they are now so dependent on the dup? let's remember, talks are due to get under way on monday. the second estate this post to get those talks. the chair cannot be impartial when they rely on the dup. —— is supposed to chair those talks. thank you. borisjohnson has described newspaper reports that he is planning to oust theresa may as "tripe." last night, the foreign secretary took to social media to respond to a report in the mail on sunday which claimed he was planning to launch a bid to become pm. writing on twitter he said "i am backing theresa may, let's get on with the job." jeremy corbyn has said that he believes he can still become prime minister. speaking to the sunday mirror, the labour leader said that his party could attempt to vote down a queen's speech when theresa may brings
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one to parliament. he told the paper that he has a mandate to deal with poverty and wants to end austerity. scotland yard has released pictures of the fake suicide belts worn by the london bridge attackers. each belt had three disposable water bottles covered in masking tape attached to them. the belts were still on the attackers who murdered eight people when they were shot dead by police. the officer leading the investigation says it's the first time he's seen the tactic used in the uk. three men have been arrested after an easyjet flight to sta nsted was diverted because of suspicious behaviour. the plane, which was flying from slovenia, made an unplanned landing in germany, with passengers evacuated down emergency slides. a backpack belonging to one of the men was blown up by police. the tv presenter, richard hammond, has been treated for a fractured knee after crashing a car while filming for his new motoring show, the grand tour. he was driving an electric supercar in switzerland when it left the road on a bend.
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the a7—year—old, who suffered brain injuries in a crash while filming top gear 11 years ago, got out of the vehicle before it burst into flames. his co—host, jeremy clarkson, tweeted that it was the "biggest" and "most frightening" crash he'd seen. another big escape. a major rescue operation has taken place in the mid—atlantic after a yacht race from plymouth to the united states was hit by a severe storm. luxury ocean liner the queen mary two rescued lone yachtsman mervyn wheatley after he issued a mayday. a massive storm, which saw 15 metre waves and 60 knot winds, left a number of yachts in trouble. good morning. it is time for sport. so much to talk about. a brilliant and packed weekend. the french open. a lot of rugby. i could talk about it all morning. no pressure. ithink
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we will start with the football. after the buildup, if you weren't watching the match with scotland and england in the qualifying match, for the world cup, it all happened at the world cup, it all happened at the end. three goals in six minutes to turn the game. we will show you them. scotland thought they had an incredible victory. harry kane equalised later on. and we will show you those goals now, shall we? it was a thrilling finish at hampden park. scotland looked as though they'd snatched victory only for harry kane to equalise. england remain top but for scotland, well, i think the fans expressions after the match said it all. david 0rnstein was at hampden park. in the end, it was heartbreak for scotland. from joy to despair, denied a famous and incredible victory by england. the newest instalment of international football's allders rivalry, one that goes back to 1872, each encounter laced with anticipation. —— oldest.
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security was increased after recent terror attacks. there was a minute's silence in memory of the victims before kick off. this was a match scotla nd before kick off. this was a match scotland had to win, something they had not done at home to england in 32 years and which looked unlikely as the visitors applied the pressure. that pressure told after half—time, alex 0xleyjavelin came off the bench to make an immediate impact. —— 0xlade—chamberlain. scotla nd impact. —— 0xlade—chamberlain. scotland were bruised, but not beaten. they equalised in the closing stages. they were invigorated. the drama was far from over. three minutes later, unbelievably, in almost identical fashion, griffiths did it again, to send his fans and team into dreamland. with three priceless points almost within grasp, the celebrations came to an abrupt end, as harry kane had the final say, the
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captain for the game for england. it isa it is a huge moment for the team. the questions around us centre on character, they centre on the ability to withstand events that go against you. and, umm, yeah, that is what we have to show. we have to be 18 that i never beaten. -- 18. that —— 18. that was colin's best ever free kick and the second—best ever free kick and the second—best ever free kick. —— scotland. i have never heard noise like that after that before. i look at the players and say it is unfair that you have to keep coming back and taking notes like that, but i will tell them to do it. there was a late drama for northern ireland, too. they boosted their chance of reaching the finals when leeds midfielder, stuart dallas, scored the only goal of the game in the 92nd minute. they're still second in their group, behind world champions,
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germany, who are well placed for a play—off spot. england's women stepped up their preparations for euro 2017 with a really impressive a—0 win away to switzerland. arsenal striker, jodie taylor, scored twice. it's all good news all—round for the home nations in rugby union. the lions‘ victory on their tour of new zealand, there were wins for england and scotland, too. england's summer tour of argentina began in breath—taking style, eddiejones‘ side snatching a 38—3a victory when denny solomona went over with just a minute left on the clock. it is great, the result. we were disappointed with our performance. we gave them too many points. it showed a can of team ethic today. ten young guys came in in a difficult situation chasing a game
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and they just difficult situation chasing a game and theyjust did theirjob brilliantly, which was fantastic. gregor townsend's reign as scotland coach started with a 3a—13 win over italy. ross ford ran in two of the scots' five tries in singapore. they'll face australia next weekend. a magnificent ben stokes' century helped england to victory over australia in the champions trophy. there was a stunning piece of fielding from jason roy, as the aussies were restricted to 277 at a rainy edgbaston. england were chasing a reduced target, and stokes finished unbeaten on 102, as they won by a0 runs and knocked out australia. what a catch that was. beating a side like australia again when we have had nothing to gain is a big step forward for us because we beat one of the better sides around the world. it is about competing in future tournaments. we need to win games like this. the women's french open final was a thriller, with 20—year—old jelena 0stopenko beating simona halep over three sets. the latvian had been a set behind and three love down in the second
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but produced an incredible comeback. she is the first unseeded woman to win at roland garros since 1933. i was losing 6—a. then i thought, i will just i was losing 6—a. then i thought, i willjust enjoy i was losing 6—a. then i thought, i will just enjoy the i was losing 6—a. then i thought, i willjust enjoy the match and i will try to fight until the last point. and then the match turned my way. i just cannot believe it. it was my dream. it can true. i will understand it in a couple of days, or maybe a couple of weeks. someone to look out for. chris froome has an awful lot to do if he's to win a third straight criterium du dauphine. froome's team—mate peter kennaugh won the penultimate stage, with australia's ritchie porte increasing his overall lead. he's now over a minute ahead of froome. the top three women's hockey teams in the world are taking part in a tournament in london this weekend.
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england, argentina, and the netherlands, are all going head—to—head, but it's got off to a rather rocky start for the hosts. ryan burnett is the new ibf bantamweight world champion, beating lee haskins tonight in northern ireland. belfast native, burnett, took control in the fight, knocking the champion, haskins, down in the sixth and eleventh rounds. the fight did go the full twelve rounds, unbeaten burnett taking the win on points and picking up his first world title. england's laura massaro won the squash world series finals title in dubai for the second year running. the world number four beat the world champion, nour el sherbini, to become the second woman to win the title twice, after malaysia's nicol david. lewis hamilton said being presented with one of ayrton senna's helmets was better than any trophy, he equalled his hero's total of 65 pole positions ahead of the canadian grand prix, clocking the fastest qualifying lap ever seen in montreal. he was then stunned to be handed the helmet sent by senna's family. he said he was shaking at the honour. and as we know, that is one of his
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all—time heroes. it says something if he thinks that is better than every trophy he has ever gotten. incredible. thank you for that. and that try against argentina for england was beautiful as well. the main news stories this morning. the dup says it has had positive talks to support a majority government, but they are still too finalise details. and he met police give out
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information about the attack last week. here's phil with a look at this morning's weather. proof that we have actually got on to the weather on time for once. rather cloudy there in london this morning, in westminster. will it be the same up and down the country? phil promised us some sun a little earlier, there is no sun there in westminster but let's speak now and hopefully will we will get some better news. i have indeed. a word to the wise, i am not certain whether this is this morning or yesterday morning before all the cloud and rain arrived again. it was a miserable day, i know i'm being upstaged here by the dog... what robbie cloud and rain was the weather front which is why you still have the cloud of the westminster area and widely over the south—eastern quarter of the british isles at the moment. that exit stay
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dry and what we are left with is the possibility, the probability, in fa ct, possibility, the probability, in fact, of shower activity through scotla nd fact, of shower activity through scotland and northern ireland. it is there from the beginning for many of you and through the day we will find showers through the north of england, through the west into wales as well. no doubt about it, the most intense one will be later in the day across scotland and northern ireland. here we come to cloudy zone across the south—eastern quarter. the odd spot of rain before it moves off into the north sea. bright skies follow behind. it is all there to be head in the wash down to the midlands. here come the showers during the course of the afternoon. would not be surprised in the heaviest of those you may hear a little thunder and lightning. top temperature is 21 or 22 degrees. a word to the wise, if you are out and about and there is a lot of things going on, a big international airshow, for example, the uv level
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is quite high at the moment and the pollen levels are very high, especially in the south. 0vernight will keep some of the showers going because the low pressure is adjacent to scotland by the states that the shower there to be had across the north of the british isles further south there is a somewhat drier prospect, not a call by by any means at all. what are the strengths of the wind as that low pressure trundles across the northern scotland. some ofs there could be pushing towards a a0 miles an hour to expose temperatures, some of the exposed roots could get quite gusty there for a time. as a whole on monday there are showers to be had across scotland, not to the intensity we will see today. further south, somewhat drier with a lot of cloud around that i think we would get some brightness in many areas on the tops of the day around about 20 or 21 degrees. and now, back to the studio. and nothing could upstage you, just for the record. nothing. the headlines coming up in a few moments here on breakfast. but now it's time for click. think robots and maybe you'll
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picture something like this. or this. but what about robotic muscle and smart materials that could act as human skin, or clothes that rehabilitate you as you wear them? well, that is part of what's called soft robotics and this team at bristol robotics lab are bioengineering technologies to do all of that and more. i went to take a peek at their labs. this is a bucket of alien saliva, right? yeah, this is the same stuff that drips out of the alien mouth. so ridley scottjust used a whole bunch of that. though, in this case, it is to simulate blood. this soft robot mimics how some bacteria move through our bodies. in the future, it is thought that nano robots will take a similar trip through our veins looking for infection and illness. oh, that's awesome! some of the projects they are working on here involves making assistive technology for elderly and disabled people, like this pneumatic artificial muscle. it can be made into any shape and built into clothing.
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as you apply air, it changes its shape so it could for instance help people with limited grip strength. its force is only dependent on how much air pressure you apply. and here is some material that can sense when that pressure should be applied. this diametric elastomer can detect when it's being stretched, so it can sense when you are trying to move and add extra power to maybe help you up the stairs. and it can not only detect movement, it can also change its shape when you apply a high enough for teach. you could use it for changeable clothing, clothing that can change its colour. you can use it as a sort of second skin to help with deep vein thrombosis, to assist with pumping blood. it can even be layered up to create stronger artificial muscles. it doesn't seem like it is doing a lot, but, actually, it is very thin, it weighs almost nothing — the active part of which only weighs, let's say, four grams, and it can lift two kilos. in one respect none of this
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is complicated, none of this is extremely high—tech, using like billions of transistors, and it is simple voltage and a piece of material. i think that is one of the big advantages of soft robotics, the simplicity, redundancy. in a complicated robotic system you have a lot of elements that can go wrong. with these sorts of things it is very simple and it is very adaptable. the intelligence is in the design and immediately used, rather than in the complexity. the robotics lab in bristol is 50,000 square feet of innovation filled with hundreds of different types of robots. but what nearly all have in common is they need power to run. over in the bio energy lab, scientists are working on one freely available resource the world will never run out of — urine. each one of these cylinders is a microbial fuel cell device. it turns waste water into electricity using microbes. so the microbes eat the waste?
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they eat the waste. that is their favourite item on the menu. right, 0k! i've been to that restaurant, yeah. in this unit, two litres of urine is fed into the fuel cell pack. the microbes eat what they need, creating electrons as a by—product. and because they are attached to an electrode's surface, it is all collected to produce about 30—a0 milliwatts of power. now that's enough to slowly charge a smartphone, power smart displays, or power internal lights for their special portable toilets. this is only one unit of many. when we do it out of the lab, we install these units out of the lab, we have many more of them connected together as a stack. if you are going to glastonbury this year, you might see these screens near the urinals. if you choose to use the urinals, you'll be part of an experiment which is literally putting the p into power.
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these are eink displays, which don't require a lot of power. but a lucky few may be able to charge their phones for a bit, but only after donating. most of the pee used here comes from staff donors at the lab. it's only good for the microbes foran hourorso, so a constant supply is needed. although, i think i'll hang on. hello and welcome to the week in tech. it was the week that uber refunded customers for journeys taken near last saturday night's london terror attacks, after pricing had automatically surged due to demand — a function they disabled later that evening. the comment section on britney spears instagram account
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has been used by russian speaking hackers to test malware. and snapchat specs have gone on sale in the uk. if you think this is a sensible way to go out. anyone with kids can tell you what it's like trying to get play—doh out the carpet. but, sadly, i don't have a new gadget to tell you about that. it's actually the play clay that's gone high—tech. doh universe can conduct electricity and aims to help kids learn about circuits, sound, light and movement through play. and, finally, researchers at mit have developed sensors for the grippers of robotic arms that aimed to help bots grab things with the right amount of pressure. the gelsight sensors aim to make negotiating smaller objects possible, as well as making general household tasks easier to approach — which would be handy, if one day robots are to become ordinary household companions. around the world, scientists
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are looking at different ways of improving our quality of life. here, it is alternative sources of power. at soft robotics, it's smart materials and possibly in the future bionic limbs. but in italy's scuola superiore sant‘anna, they are looking at sensation. ana matronic went there to look at attempts to simulate touch. i am at the biorobotics lab where researchers are trying to merge human physiology with machine engineering. the team are working on a bionic fingertip that is capable of detecting texture. the human sense of touch is an incredibly complex one. i don't even need to look at these three pieces of plastic to sense the differences in the coarseness of the ridges. this of course presents a huge problem to people designing artificial limbs. how do you transfer that same sensitivity into a prosthetic hand? to create a machine capable of sensing and transmitting tactile data, first we need to understand
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how bodies decode sensory stimuli. fingertips have the highest concentration of sensation almost anywhere in the human body. thanks to 20,000 nerve fibres on each finger. and these tiny receptors. they react to sensory information as we move our fingers across different surfaces. each receptor has a different role. some respond to pain, some to temperature. 0thers react to pressure or vibration. this is the characteristic that allows our skin to interact with the environment and that will allow an object, when manipulated, not to break. the bionic fingertip registers the textures it touches as electrical spikes. on screen it may look simple, but that is exactly the language that our nervous system speaks. as we touch objects, it sends nerve impulses to the brain. and the tiny, subtle variations
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in how the skin deforms as we touch changes those impulses and how we perceive texture. this capitalises on an actual principle and can be more effective as humans and animals in general can interact with the environment. the professor and his team have already had some success. dennis sorensen was one of the first amputees to try out the bionic fingertip. the output from the finger was directly connected to the healthy nerves in his upperarm. i could tell the difference between where it was very rough and smooth. yeah, that was amazing. and, since this first clinical trial a couple of years ago, the team had been trying to increase the number of textures the patients can feel. the experiments that we are showing now are demonstrating
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the capability to encode, for examples silk, from cotton, from elastic, from wool, from different kinds of materials. and in this way we could restore a more natural sense of touch to the person wearing the prosthesis. what is learned here can be transferred to other applications. for example, a surgical robot could use this technology to identify tumours, which would feel different in texture to healthy tissue. another kind of application is for rescue. to allow to be present in the environment, not only through vision, but to have more senses available when exploring an environment. think for example of the nuclear disasters, or in the case of underwater application. the robot can go and touch in the perceived environments, based also on the sensory feedback
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that you can have remotely controlling their arm. once this technology is mastered, it can be integrated into simple things like gloves. for instance, i could be anywhere in the world. my husband back in new york can give me the sensation of petting our cat. and that would be transferred through these actuators to me anywhere in the world. i want one right now. well, i can't give you that at the moment, ana, but in the meantime, how about a hug from this chap? that's it from the bristol robotics lab. the full—length version is right now. “— the full—length version is right now. —— is an eye player right now. next week, we are going to be in los angeles for the annual e3 video games extravaganza. it is going to be brilliant. you can also follow us on facebook for loads of extra content
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throughout the week. thanks for watching and we will see you in la. hello. this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson. downing street and the democratic unionist party say no final deal has yet been reached over a parliamentary pact. late last night, both parties said talks will continue next week and that the detail of an agreement is still to be determined.
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