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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 11, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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nearairports, congested areas or helicopters. try and fly smoothly. if you have smooth shots, it won't pull the viewer out of the experience. and film and fly when the light is beautiful. and if you say anything you think we should know about, don't forget to get in touch. that is all we have time for on this week's show. coming up next week... we are one of the biggest sporting events in the world, the america's cup in bermuda. the people who have been fantastic. finding out how top sportsmen and women are turning the spotlight onto the marine conservation of the island. join us thenif conservation of the island. join us then if you can. in the meantime, don't forget you can keep up with us while we are out of having adventures by signing up to our
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social media feeds. for now, from many in the rest of the team here it is goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson. the democratic unionist party say no final deal has yet been reached over a parliamentary pact with the conservatives. late last night, both parties said talks will continue next week and that the detail of an agreement is still to be determined. borisjohnson has rejected newspaper reports of a leadership bid, giving theresa may his full support. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he's ready for another general election, insisting he can still become prime minister. good morning, it's sunday iithjune.
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we'll be live in westminster and belfast shortly. also ahead — pictures of the fake explosive belts worn by the london bridge attackers are released by police. we'll hear from one of the first officers on the scene. at that point, there were still lots and lots of shots ringing out. i didn't know whether they were our chaps all the bad guys. richard hammond is recovering in hospital after the tv presenter‘s car crashed and burst into flames while filming in switzerland. in sport, scotland are denied victory in their world cup qualifier against england. two superb free kicks looked to have won it for the scots, only for harry kane to equalise late on. and how is the weather looking? phil has the details. not a bad start to the day in norfolk, can we keep it going? the date eventually will become one of sunny spells and showers, the details in a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story.
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the democratic unionist party says it has had "positive talks" over a possible deal to support a conservative minority government, but that no final agreement has yet been reached. late last night, both the dup and downing street released statements, revealing that further discussions will take place later in the week. let's speak to our political correspondent leila nathoo. bring us up to date with everything that we need to know so far. talk of a deal, there was suggestion last night something had been finalised, but what we are told today is it will be sorted out in the next few days? that is right, i think there was some confusion surrounding whether this deal had in fact been concluded. we heard from downing street early yesterday evening that there was agreement on the principles of a final deal between the democratic unionist party the conservative party, remember the support of those ten dup mps conservative party, remember the support of those ten dup mp5 is crucial for theresa may to get over the line and get a working majority
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in parliament. but no sooner had downing street put out that statement, we had a couple of hours later a statement from the democratic unionists saying that talks had so far been positive but they would resume next week to finalise an agreement. the agreement that was being talked about by downing street was something called confidence and supply, basically where the dup would agree to support the government on key votes like the budget, but the dup made no mention of that in as many words, and then downing street later was forced to clarify that the deal is still being finalised. i think theresa may is extremely keen to get something firmed up as soon as possible, but for now those talks very much still in progress. already there is talk around and about this morning of a possible leadership challenge, boris johnson's name inevitably in the frame already, what has been said about that? i think the longer these talks go on
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and the longer there is no agreement ona and the longer there is no agreement on a working majority, the weaker and more vulnerable she looks, so there will be speculating about whether she can continue in her position. there is clearly rumblings in the tory party, lots of tory mps still unhappy at her position, unsure whether she is right to carry on, and certainly borisjohnson's name has always been enough brain when we talk about the leadership and newspaper reports today suggest he is preparing to launch a leadership bid if theresa may does stand down, another newspaper reports suggesting he has the backing of senior cabinet members for such an endeavour. but boris johnson a shooting that down, saying he is 100% behind theresa may and dismissing the report is trite, but i think theresa may will certainly hear more of this in the coming days as she tries to finalise the deal. jeremy corbyn is on with andrew marr after breakfast this morning, it will be interesting to hear from after breakfast this morning, it will be interesting to hearfrom him but at the moment, what do the
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labour party do, do they wait and watch? i thinkjeremy corbyn's position is that there is all to play for still, he's dobbing c gambia prime minister, from the outset after that election result where labour gained 30 seats, not a victory but better than he expected, jeremy corbyn has been confident, insisting labour is ready to govern in a minority government situation. today he is suggesting labour will vote down the queen's speech, the programme for the government, that will be contentious, i'm sure many policies will have to be watered down from the conservatives in that speech, and that is assuming theresa may gets the support of those ten dup mps, butjeremy corbyn today saying he is considering voting against the queen's speech and that will be the first test for theresa may's government, sol first test for theresa may's government, so i thinkjeremy corbyn thinks the situation is still very fluid and he can potentially get himself into downing street. thank you very much. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn and the defence secretary michael fallon will both be on the andrew marr show
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later this morning. that is from 9am. scotland yard has released pictures of the fake suicide belts worn by the london bridge attackers. the officer leading the investigation says it's the first time he's seen the tactic used in the uk. last night, a week on from the attack, people visited bars and restaurants in the area in a show of unity and resilience. simonjones reports. designed to create maximum fear, these are the fake explosive belts worn by the three attackers. they're actually disposable water bottles covered in masking tape, but the police say anyone who saw them on the night would have thought they were real. they believe the attackers might have been planning to use them to create a siege situation. as part of their investigation, police have spoken to 262 people from 19 different countries, 78 described as significant witnesses. three people were killed as the attackers drove across london bridge, five were stabbed to death in borough market. they were remembered last night.
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in a show of defiance, people flocked to the area's bars and restaurants. you still reflect upon it and think about those people that that happened to, but it doesn't stop me from coming out at all, no. you can't not think about what happened, and i was wondering about what the mood would be like, but it's really celebratory and fun. we stick together, that's what we do, that's what london is all about. in pubs, people are being encouraged to donate to the british red cross' fundraising drive, to raise money for the victims of the london bridge and manchester attacks. it's absolutely right that, on the anniversary of what happened last weekend, the tragic events that happened last weekend, that londoners can just go out, do what londoners do. repairs are continuing to buildings damaged in the hunt for the killers, but the police cordons have now been lifted. southwark cathedral is reopening. an effort to bring back a sense of normality to an area which has experienced so much suffering.
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simon jones, bbc news. simon jones is outside southwark cathedral this morning. southwark cathedral of course reopening but, iwonder, you southwark cathedral of course reopening but, i wonder, you touched on it in your report, about the fake suicide belts, have we had any indication from the police about why they were used and, as we heard there, the first time they have been used in this sort of scenario? the police have released these images as part of the investigation and they said that people on the night to sort these fake suicide belts would have believed that they we re belts would have believed that they were real, and they say it makes it even more were real, and they say it makes it even more extraordinary that people were prepared to tackle
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the attackers, knowing potentially they could be resulting in an explosion. they believe that the attackers may have had the suicide belts perhaps because they wanted to develop some sort of siege situation or thought, wrongly, that it might result in the police not wanting to shoot them. here at the cathedral you can see behind me that it was damaged in the aftermath of the terror attack. we had police officers who forced their way in as they were going from building to building in this area making sure there were no more attackers at large. today the cathedral is reopening. this morning, at 8:30am, prayers will be said for the first time since the attack. the cathedral shop for a whole week, they said this is the first time it has happened in their history, it didn't even happened in their history, it didn't even happen in the world wars, but initially they could not get near it because the area was cordoned off, when they got back in they had damage to repair. just by me is borough market, which was of course the scene of the attack, right by the scene of the attack, right by the cathedral. that area, although the cathedral. that area, although the police have moved on and the police cordoned is gone, it is still being guarded by security officers
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because it is not yet safe for people to go back in. it is likely the market will reopen sometime this week. you absolutely get a sense of the geography there when you show it to us like that. thank you, simon jones, when you show it to us like that. thank you, simonjones, in borough market, one week on from those terror attacks. three men have been arrested after an easyjet flight to stansted was diverted because of suspicious behaviour. the plane, which was flying from slovenia, made an unplanned landing in germany, with passengers evacuated down emergency slides. a backpack belonging to one of the men was blown up by police. the tv presenter richard hammond has been treated for a fractured knee after crashing a car while filming for his new motoring show, the grand tour. he was driving an electric supercar in switzerland when it left the road on a bend. the 10—year—old, who suffered brain injuries in a crash while filming top gear 11 years ago, got out of the vehicle before it burst into flames. his co—hostjeremy clarkson tweeted that it was the "biggest" and "most frightening" crash he'd seen.
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the resignation of two of theresa may's closest advisors has appeared to ease some of the immediate pressure she was under following thursday's election result. it's understood the prime minister was told she'd have to make changes to her team, orface a leadership challenge after losing the conservative majority. they have been replaced by one of the losing conservative candidate, former housing minister gavin ba rwell. the conservative party has the most number of votes, the most mps, we are the only party who can take us through the brexit negotiations and we need to get behind theresa may. we did not get the results we hope to get and we will work from that. i have worked with her closely, having been higher housing minister. she has real qualities and she is the right person, these negotiations are going to start, they are crucial to our country and she is the right person to take us through that. we have to listen to what the electorate have to say and learn the appropriate lesson. alastair campbell was director
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of communications for tony blair during his time at number 10 and joins us from glasgow. you know exactly what it is like to be part of that inner circle inside a government when things don't a lwa ys a government when things don't always go according to plan. can you give us an idea of what the last few days would have been like for theresa may and her team? days would have been like for theresa may and her team7m days would have been like for theresa may and her team? if you do something as big as calling a general election where you think you will get a landslide and then you don't even get a majority, that is, by any stretch of the imagination, a sense of complete failure. and actually i don't think there are real comparisons to be made between our operation and theresa may's operation, because i think we were confident, we were all so, we reached out to the plp, to the labourmps, we reached out to the plp, to the labour mps, we made sure that the whole government at least felt part of what we were doing. this isn't about nick timothy and fiona hell, this is about theresa may. theresa may ran the home office with this
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very tight control and you can do that as a minister but when you are at prime minister, you cannot run the government like this, and sol think even what has happened since his election has underlined some of the extraordinary weaknesses in theresa may as a leader. her statement outside downing street was just incredible. there is gavin ba rwell just incredible. there is gavin barwell saying they will listen and learn, they are not listening and not learning. if she seriously think that by getting rid of two people most of the public have never even heard of, that it will somehow safer, she is living in la land. you say it is not about nick timothy and fiona hell but they did become part of the story, it is so often attributed to do, that if you become pa rt attributed to do, that if you become part of the story it is time to get out. as an unelected figure inside government, someone very close to prime minister, someone who also did get some people's backs up, you will understand. here is the thing, but i didn't do, i got the backs up in the
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media, for sure, but within the government, this is about the government, this is about the government, so these people have got in and they have gone out of their way, with theresa may's bacchin, with her permission, to basically bully and intimidate the civil service. you cannot govern without the civil service being on site, you have to work with them, and now they have to work with them, and now they have gone straight into this, honestly, this dup thing, she has no idea what she is playing with here. one ofjohn major's greatest achievement was laying the foundations for the good friday agreement. john major, even when he was weak and looking for numbers to get his stuff through parliament, he didn't even contemplate doing this because he knew it was playing with fire within the politics of northern ireland. you say she has no idea, the conservative party have been in negotiations with the dup for many yea rs. negotiations with the dup for many years. in the likelihood of an event like this coming up, they know full well the dup is all about, there is also a chance, supporters are
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saying, there was also a chance the dup will say they have the entire interests of northern ireland at heart and will go for what might be termed a slightly softer brexit in order to protect the interests of the people of northern ireland. just put to one side, i know it is difficult, but all this stuff about social conservatism, which most people in great britain find difficult to deal with, just park that for a minute. this is about the role of the government in the northern ireland peace process. when the peace process is in trouble, as it is at the moment with the administration not operating, the british and irish governments are the mediators between the unionists and nationalists. how can they be the mediator when the unionists have been brought into government? they have not thought this through! that is playing with fire. this is a prime minister, she has already tried, i think she will fail because ha rd tried, i think she will fail because hard brexit is dead in the water, she has already tried to destroy
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margaret thatcher's greatest achievement, the single market. now, if she's not careful, she will destroy the one thing john major and tony blairdid, destroy the one thing john major and tony blair did, which is peace in northern ireland. sorry to interrupt, just watching pictures of her going into church this morning. she needs help from above, i will tell you that. how would you advise her? i don't know, i don't know. what has been exposed, she called this election because she thought labour were weak and she thought she would get a landslide. the election designed to expose labour's wea knesses designed to expose labour's weaknesses has profoundly exposed hers and the country has realised she's not a prime minister. and what's more they have also realised, when i watched your news bulletin, seriously, if this country seriously thinking about going from vista borisjohnson?! thinking about going from vista boris johnson?! i was thinking about going from vista borisjohnson?! i was speaking to a politician in germany yesterday, he said, britain is doing a very good job of presenting itself as... let me finish! as the world's first
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world failed state. we are becoming a joke. david cameron and his stupid referendum, theresa may now, it has all been about their own survival and they are not putting the country bust. when they start doing that to the peace process in northern ireland, it is a disgrace! you people stop talking about the trivia on this, get into the real stuff! i'm trying to work out what the future is, so if it is not theresa may, is itjeremy corbyn? things you have said about him in the past, i'm sure these have been brought to your attention, "everything i've seen about the leadership of labour and his ability to hold the party together is low. if he wins, corbyn—mania will evaporate more quickly than click many did. i can see the road to defeat would be much worse. he is never see the road to defeat would be much worse. he is never ever see the road to defeat would be much worse. he is never ever going to be elected prime minister. it is a catastrophe, heading off a cliff, he
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is not the man to unite labour." were you wrong? can i make one point? the labour party has not won. what you have do take out of this election is that the british public have said, as things stand, we don't wa nt have said, as things stand, we don't want either of you. now, jeremy corbyn, as i acknowledged question time the other night, had a very, very good campaign, and a lot of people underestimated him. but we are still not in power. we have to see less of the celebration and more now of actually showing the plans that the labour party would have the power, and i will tell you one thing jeremy, i know he's on the andrew marr show later and i hope andrew tries to get him to push on brexit and say on brexit that actually he can now step into a leadership role and we will see. i'm not going to pretend that i've gone from being a total sceptic to a total supporter, because i'm going to say what i
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think. i still think the public have big reservations about labour. the labour party... i am trying to work out what you think the best thing for the country would be, would it be another general election?|j for the country would be, would it be another general election? i think the best thing for the country, i know this is difficult, but the best thing for the country in my view, lets get to the nub of what is causing this utter chaos, she goes on about the coalition of chaos, what is causing it is fundamental divisions in the country that have been exposed and triggered by the referendum, the european referendum, andi referendum, the european referendum, and i think if the politicians of all parties can somehow work out a way, let's just park that for a bit, let's work out a way forward on that, and i hope thatjeremy corbyn, because theresa may does not have the capacity politically or psychologically to do what she needs to do, and i hope jeremy corbyn comes in and says, i will talk the lib dems, the smb, i will talk the lib dems, the smb, i will work out whether there is a way of taking the june the will work out whether there is a way of taking thejune the 23rd referendum and doing something very,
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very different to what theresa may is trying to do. because part of what was rejected in this election is theresa may's interpretation of the referendum. in terms ofjeremy corbyn's leadership, we have seen the likes of angela eagle, yvette cooper, his doubters, do you turned on him, saying they now think he can lead the party, in a sense of abandoning their principles in favour of popularity, is that cynicism or pragmatism by politicians? how do you read it? cynicism or pragmatism by politicians? how do you read mm is very difficult if you are an mp, let me throw another thing into the mix, jeremy corbyn had a good campaign, iwill mix, jeremy corbyn had a good campaign, i will not take that away from him. but there are seats that labour won, for example kensington and chelsea was notjust outjeremy corbyn, that was about brexit. people like ben bradshaw, stella creasy, phil waltham up in sedgefield, these are people who fought very personal local campaigns. what has to happen for the labour party is we stop all of this divisional stuff, "i don't like
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him, he doesn't like me," red tory, blairite scum, blah, blah, stopped all that stuff, both ways, the labour party will only get back into power. i believe in saying what i think, and i have said i think jeremy corbyn had a good campaign. it is exactly the same with the people you are referring to. you are deliberately missing my point. we did not win this election, we will not win an election unless a very broad coalition of support in the country gets built. and the way to build that is to reach outfits, not inwards, and the lesson from theresa may is if you go for closed leadership the way she has done in the modern age, you have had it, and i'm sorry, theresa may, you can pray to god in that church right now, you have had it. alistair campbell, thank you for your time. cloudy skies in glasgow and in
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westminster. phil, is it going to get any better out there? let's have something more straightforward than british politics, how about british weather? the satellite tells the tale, yesterday's weather front is still of interest, cloudy skies across the south—east and east anglia, away to the north show was already but, in between, that is why i say it doesn't have to get any better because it probably can't get any better than that. it won't be dry all the way, there will be some showers, they are already in the southern part of scotland, already in northern ireland as well, and increasingly through the day where i am showing dry weather across much of england and wales at the moment, though there are one or two showers already, i think we will see many more showers developing. that won't be the case down towards the south—eastern quarter of the british isles because once that old front moves away taking the cloud with it,
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this is where we will see some of the driest weather of the day, but even the driest weather of the day, but even here some of the showers that develop in the west, and they will become widespread across northern england and west and wales, will drift further east but they are nothing compared to the showers we will see across scotland and northern ireland both in quantity and intensity. rumbles of thunder, lightning, that sort of malarkey, that won't be a problem if you are spectating or even involved in the ayrshire at gosford. what i would say to you is, the uv levels are really quite high for a good part of england and wales, and the pollen levels are very high indeed across the central and southern part of the british isles. through the evening and overnight, we will keep the supply of showers across parts of scotland, northern ireland, maybe the far north of england. further south it will turn dry, quite a bit of cloud around, the breeze still from the south and south—west so it won't be a cold night. i say breeze overnight, i want to highlight the fa ct overnight, i want to highlight the fact that tomorrow morning, just in
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time for the commute, the high ground to either side of the central belt and indeed in the central belt, the possibility of fondling, we could see gusts of wind around 40, maybe a bit more than 40 mph or so. showers not with the intensity of today will still be there for parts of scotland, maybe northern ireland. further south i am hopeful we will break up some cloud as the day goes on and see a bit of sunshine and we mightjust get on and see a bit of sunshine and we might just get temperatures on and see a bit of sunshine and we mightjust get temperatures around to this seasonal norm, other teams, maybe 20 if you are lucky. phil, thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the professor of politics from the university of liverpool is here to tell us what has caught his eye. plenty to keep us going if you are interested in politics. let's start with the mail, the possibility of another election. i don't know that the public will much relish that.
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what are the politicians saying? according to the male, 40% of the public think there should be another election this year and i think the likelihood of an election is very, very strong, however much that may fill us with beer. minority government are normally unstable. it would take a few conservative rebellion against theresa may, even with dup support, for the government to collapse. i think the likelihood of another election is very high indeed. jostling for position, the conservative leader, should theresa may be unable to carry on. her position is very precarious, very difficult. she will be regarded as the conservative leader whom mislaid their majority. the blame game continues about who lost it and why. interesting if you look into some of those statistics about whether it wasjeremy those statistics about whether it was jeremy corbyn's stance those statistics about whether it wasjeremy corbyn's stance on tuition fees, that was one of the things that won it for younger
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voters, or theresa may's refusal to ta ke voters, or theresa may's refusal to take part in the debates. early data suggests it wasn't a case of the conservative voters in 2015 going over wholesale to a more left—wing labour party, what it was was the ukip vote breaking substantially for labour and jeremy corbyn been very successful in exercising new voters, turnout was up and with young people... it wasn't particularly that the tories lost votes? they got their vote up, 331 seats is not bad in parliament, but not enough as we go back towards 2—party politics. labour got go back towards 2—party politics. labourgot up to go back towards 2—party politics. labour got up to 262 seats, so they look like the winners even though the conservatives are almost the winners. you have been writing in the observer this morning, a plug for your pc but nonetheless! excellent, incisivejournalism! this is about the ins and outs of the political deal—making that will go on, the deal with the dup if it
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is confirmed this week, but your suggestion here is it boils down to money? yes, the headline in the observer is correct. the dup's origins very much like in fundamentalist policy, most dup members oppose same—sex marriage in northern ireland and don't want the extension of abortion rights to northern ireland but that is not what the dup leadership will be batting for, what they want is plain and simple cash for northern ireland infrastructure. schools, hospitals, roads? in terms of changing the conservatives' social care policy, infrastructure. protection for pensioners? and increasing tourism by cutting air passenger duty, for example. there is a big shopping list for the dup. they are a good party in terms of delivering what they said they will deliver but they will strike a very hard bargain. theresa may has no option, she is friendless otherwise. we have seen pictures of theresa may go begin to
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judge this morning, possibly for some quiet reflection. jeremy corbyn has been more vocal, he is on andrew marr later and he is in the mirror this morning. he looks like a man without a care in the world, sipping cappuccino, looking fresher than the rest of them, and why not, he has 30 million voters, a increased labour's vote share, labour's seats. he didn't win the election, they are only back to where they were in 2010 when they lost under gordon brown but he has mobilised and with the wind in their sales they will be keen for an election, they will fa ncy keen for an election, they will fancy their chances. what you have seen, 172 members of the parliamentary labour party that no confidence injeremy corbyn, they are revising their views publicly over are revising their views publicly over the last 48, 72 hours and it is all hail tojeremy corbyn now from some of the people who were most critical. time is tight but ijust wa nt to critical. time is tight but ijust want to touch on something that is not politics, apparently the warm weather makes a selfish? it is an article in the mail on sunday from a
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respected journal, the european journal of psychology, for every half a centigrade the temperature goes up, half a centigrade the temperature goes up, we become more half a centigrade the temperature goes up, we become more selfish. it normal british summer that would be fine, we would be models of selfless corporation with each other, but we get very grumpy and it is notjust about the fact it is too hot to work, we start disliking each other the higher the temperature. that is why it is so call in here. thanks very much. stay with us, headlines are coming up shortly. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson. coming up before nine: john has a round—up of the sports news, and phil will be here with the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the dup says it has had "positive talks" over a possible deal to support a conservative minority government, but that no final agreement has yet been reached. discussions are set to continue later this week. our correspondentjohn campbell is in belfast. john, it is an interesting one — a lot of confusion about whether a
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deal has been done. it seems there are still a couple of sticking points and we will get more detail later in the week. it was messy overnight with that statement ping—pong, trying to clear up where the talks were. your previous guest was right — ultimately, this will be about money. in 2015, the dup produced a document aimed at this precise eventuality, where a party in westminster would rely on their support to prop up a minority government. at the heart of that document was a section where they talked about real terms increase in health and education spending over five years, more money for infrastructure and help with transforming northern ireland's public services. those are quite vague requests but also ones that are potentially quite expensive. good to talk to you,. thank you. —— good to talk to you, john.
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borisjohnson has described newspaper reports that he is planning to oust theresa may as ‘tripe'. the foreign secretary was responding to an article in the mail on sunday which claimed he was planning to launch a bid to become pm. earlier, the managing editor of the spectator told us a successful leadership challenge could trigger another election. my my understanding is that the one thing the tories are really afraid of is another election in the autumn, which they fear they might lose. jeremy corbyn very much as the momentum, and if theresa may does step aside and let someone else in, thenit step aside and let someone else in, then it looks like they might have to fightjeremy corbyn again, and this time, they might not win. jeremy corbyn has said that he believes he can still be prime minister. speaking to the sunday mirror, the labour leader said that his party could attempt to vote down the queen's speech when theresa may brings it to parliament. he told the paper that he has a mandate to deal with poverty and wants to end austerity. scotland yard has released pictures of the fake suicide belts worn by the london bridge attackers. each belt had three disposable water bottles covered in masking tape attached to them. the belts were still on the attackers, who murdered eight people, when they were shot
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dead by police. the officer leading the investigation says it's the first time he's seen the tactic used in the uk. three men have been arrested after an easyjet flight to stansted was diverted because of suspicious behaviour. the plane, which was flying from slovenia, made an unplanned landing in germany, with passengers evacuated down emergency slides. a backpack belonging to one of the men was blown up by police. the tv presenter richard hammond has been treated for a fractured knee after crashing a car while filming for his new motoring show, the grand tour. he was driving an electric supercar in switzerland when it left the road on a bend. the 47—year—old, who suffered brain injuries in a crash while filming top gear 11 years ago, got out of the vehicle before it burst into flames. his co—hostjeremy clarkson tweeted that it was the "biggest" and "most frightening" crash he'd seen. time for sport. and, john, the game
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got interesting in the last six minutes. scotla nd minutes. scotland thought they were on for a memorable win. leigh griffiths scored to make incredible free kicks. at that stage, they thought they had won it, minutes on the clock remaining, until harry kane scored. england got away with it, without playing particularly well. leigh griffiths scored two incredible goals, thinking he had done all it took to win it for scotland. the result means that england remain top of their group, but for scotland, well, the expressions after the match said it all. david ornstein was there. in the end, it was heartbreak for scotland. from joy to despair, denied a famous and incredible victory by england. the newest instalment
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of international football's oldest rivalry, one that goes back to 1872, each encounter laced with anticipation. security was increased after recent terror attacks. there was a minute's silence in memory of the victims before kick—off. this was a match scotland had to win, something they had not done at home to england in 32 years and which looked unlikely as the visitors applied the pressure. that pressure told after half—time, alex oxlade—chamberlain came off the bench to make an immediate impact. scotland were bruised, but not beaten. when they equalised in the closing stages. they were invigorated. the drama was far from over. three minutes later, unbelievably, in almost identical fashion, griffiths did it again, to send his fans and team into dreamland. with three priceless points almost within grasp,
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the celebrations came to an abrupt end, as harry kane had the final say, the captain for the game for england. it isa it is a point gain. before the game, we wa nted it is a point gain. before the game, we wanted to win, for sure, but the way the game panned out, scotland scoring two goals late on, with four minutes left of stoppage time to get anything, it is always tough. we came away happy. it puts us in a good position to qualify for the world cup. two goals and man of the match, but we should have had three points. instead of getting three points, we got one. there was late drama for northern ireland, too — they boosted their chances of reaching the finals when leeds midfielder stuart dallas grabbed
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the only goal of the game against azerbaijan in the 92nd minute. they're second in their group, behind world champions germany, and well—placed for a play—off spot. england are in a world cup final today, and it's not often we can say that. they face venezuela for the under—20 title in south korea. it's live on bbc two at 11 o'clock, and senior manager gareth southgate says that makes him very hopeful for the future of the international game. there is a myth that you have to go around the rest of the world to find good players to buy them. if some of ours are given an opportunity to play, they can flourish. we've seen that. some of the ways that the guys in the team have got their chance is random, and they have gone on and proved to play at the highest possible level, so there are other players out there that need the opportunity to play. england's women stepped up their preparations for euro 2017 with a 4—0 win away to switzerland last night. arsenal strikerjodie taylor scoring twice. some lions rugby news for you: captain sam warburton will return to lead the side
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against the highlanders in dunedin on tuesday after their win yesterday morning over the crusaders. it was good news all round for the home nations, with wins for england and scotland, too. england's summer tour of argentina began in breath—taking style, eddiejones' side snatching a 38 points to 34 victory, denny solomona scoring with his first touch of the ball, on his debut, withjust a minute left on the clock. it's great, the result, but we're disappointed with our performance. we gave them too many points. but what we did show was a tonne of team ethic today. ten young guys came in ina ethic today. ten young guys came in in a difficult situation, where we are chasing a game, and did their job brilliantly, which is fantastic. gregor townsend's reign as scotland coach started with a 34—13 win over italy. ross ford ran in two of the scots' five tries in singapore. they'll face australia next weekend. a magnificent ben stokes' century helped england to victory over australia in the champions trophy. but how about this for a a stunning
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piece of fielding from jason roy, as the aussies made 277 at a rainy edgbaston. england chasing a reduced target, stokes finishing unbeaten on 102, as they won by 40 runs to knock australia out. beating a side like australia in a game where we've nothing to gain is a big step forward for us, because we have been one of the better sides around the world. and if we're being serious about competing in future tournaments, we need to when grains of cricket like this. —— we need to win games of cricket like this. the women's french open final was a thriller yesterday with 20—year—old jelena ostopenko beating simona halep over three sets. the latvian had been a set behind and three love down in the second but produced an incredible comeback. she is the first unseeded woman to win at roland garros since 1933.
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i was losing, and then in my mind, i was, ok, i am just going to enjoy the match and fight till the last point. i stayed aggressive than the match turned my way. i still cannot believe it because it was my dream and now it came true and i think i am only going to understand that in like a couple of days or couple of weeks. and let's hope for more of the same today in the men's final this afternoon — rafael nadal going for a tenth french open title against stan wawrinka. you can follow it all on bbc radio 5 live. and maria sharapova has pulled out of wimbledon qualifying — she said her thigh injury wont heal in time for her to make the roehampton tournament. usain bolt said he was the most nervous usain bolt said he was the most nervous he had been before a race ever nervous he had been before a race ever before he ran his final 100 metres on home soil. a sell—out crowd of 30,000 in kingston watched as he won the race. the eight time
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olympic gold medallist will retire in august after the world championships in london. what a night for him! chris froome has an awful lot to do if he's to win a third straight criterium du dauphine. froome's team—mate peter kennaugh won the penultimate stage, with australia's richie porte increasing his overall lead — he's now over a minute ahead of froome. and kataryna niveadoma still leads with one stage to go of the women's tour. australia's sarah roy sprinted to victory in stage four in chesterfield. the race finishes in london today. northern ireland boxer bryan burnett has won his first title. he beat lee haskins in belfast, winning on points to take his belt. he is expected to defend the title before the end of the year. lewis hamilton said being presented with one of ayrton senna's helmets was better than any trophy, he equalled his hero's total of 65 pole positions ahead of the canadian grand prix, clocking the fastest qualifying lap ever seen in montreal. he was then stunned to be handed the helmet sent by senna's family — he said he was shaking
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at the honour. he says he will make it pride of place —— give a pride of place in his apartment in monaco. what a nice gesture from the family. a quick word on the french open, the player who won the ladies competition. you say she was a ballroom dancer. she was a passionate ballroom dancer in her teens and then she considered what to do, whether to dance or play tennis. she still tries to do
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ballroom dancing because she thinks it helps with her footwork, which you can understand. you can see how that would help. obviously a girl of many talents. congratulations to her. it's a deal that number 10 says will "provide the stability the whole country requires" although the details ofjust how the conservatives and dup will work together are still to be finalised. an arrangement might help theresa may get key bills through parliament, but what impact could it have on the northern irish peace process? lord peter hain is a labour peer and a former secretary of state for northern ireland. hejoins us now. good to see you. good morning. first, i'm interested in the fact that many see this as a hasty deal. in reality, these talks between the conservatives and the dup have been going on for a long time, haven't they? yes, they have. i think that i have been very concerned about is a
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former secretary of state is that the conservative party under david cameron and under theresa may has not been sufficiently neutral and nonpartisan in this whole process, andi nonpartisan in this whole process, and i don't say that from a party point of view was that i say that because traditionally in parliament, northern ireland politics has been bipartisan between government and opposition. i say it because you've got to be neutral and you cannot afford to be tied to any one faction, any one party, in northern ireland. that's the only way i could do myjob, the only way i found i was trusted by ian paisley, the then leader of the dup and martin mcguinness, who became his deputy first minister, and his colleague gerry adams, as well as the other party leaders. and the concern that i have, and it started with cosy dinners in number ten under david cameron, obviously planning ahead
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for the last election in case he didn't getan for the last election in case he didn't get an overall majority, and it has continued since. i had personal, one—to—one discussions with james brokenshire, the secretary of state for northern ireland, and! secretary of state for northern ireland, and i expressed my concern also on the floor of parliament. you have got to be neutral. if the government and the prime minister depend on the dup, then all sorts of backroom deals will be done which could impact on the good friday process , could impact on the good friday process, could put it in jeopardy, and could destroy confidence amongst the other parties. i don't only mean sinn fein — the sdlp, the ulster unionists and the alliance party are all crucial to keeping this peace process going forward. let's talk practicalities,
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then, of that. so, if we are in a situation where it comes the stormont negotiations. the secretary of state has the intervene and the dup want something in return, what happens? it depends what it is. if theresa may does not take for what her policies to her pensioners, i think everyone in the country would cheer. i have friends within the dup, and the focus has been on such issues as climate change and gay marriage and so forth, and i think understandably so. but actually, they are not a conservative party, they are not a conservative party, they are not a conservative party, they are quite a populist party in many respects. on their social policy, they are closer to labour. i don't think that's where the issues will arise. the issues will arise if, as the attempt to get the stormont parliament back up and running founders on the basis that the secretary of state for northern ireland and the prime minister are not seen as actually neutral in that process , not seen as actually neutral in that process, then that is very damaging,
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very damaging indeed. alistair campbell was talking to us earlier, and he said theresa may is simply playing with fire by doing a deal with the dup. i presume you share that view. it depends what happens, but it is this compromising of the neutrality of the government, the prime minister and the secretary of state. if that is compromised, you cannot actually build the confidence necessary to bring old enemies together. now, i know they have ruled northern ireland for ten years since we negotiated, and i was part of that, the settlement of 2007 that brought ian paisley and martin mcguinness improbably, as bitter old de minimis —— old enemies, together. to do that, you have to have confidence in the process. one of the consequences of this deal, if it happens, which could be positive, is
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that the dup will insist on a soft brexit. yes, they were in favour brexit, but northern ireland voted to remain, and if the border across the island of ireland, between the republic and northern ireland, if thatis republic and northern ireland, if that is in any sense a hard border, andi that is in any sense a hard border, and i cannot see how it could be anything else if we got out of the single market and the customs union, if it is a hard border, then the dup will be massively attacked at home. they don't want that, and therefore, this whole deal could impact on the brexit negotiation as well, and we could see the government effectively being pushed into a position where theresa may does not want to be, though there would be a majority in parliament forum at —— in parliament for it... the temptation is to look
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at this from one side as being what about the conservatives get out of the dup, but the dup will push strongly, and this may come down to more money for northern ireland. yes, i think they will. they are entitled to, and i would in their shoes. they will push very hard, and i'm sure they will want to secure more investment, better support for well per —— welfare provision, the provision of pensions, all of those issues, and they will strike a very ha rd issues, and they will strike a very hard deal. they are very professional negotiators. i have dealt with them and i have a lot of respect for them in that respect. i have friends in the dup who have been keeping me informed. i think she is going to find it very tough to strike a deal which doesn't involve handing extra money to northern ireland. if that happens, wales is going to say, what about us? scotland will say, what about us? scotland will say, what about us? ithink us? scotland will say, what about
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us? i think this has huge consequences for government policy under theresa may, but the most serious consequences could be for the peace process. for example, the dup may be more comfortable than any other party in northern ireland with the continuation of direct rule. that it's not their preferred option but they could live with it. if that is the situation, and the storm on talks to try to get the assembly, which has been in crisis and down now for months, that's a very serious situation, if the dup and the tory party actually decide their deal is more important than storm on being restored, that is very serious indeed. 0k. it is good to speak to you, peter hain, secretary of state for northern ireland formerly. we did ask to speak to someone from the government and the dup this morning but we were told no one was available to talk to us. coming up next on the andrew marr programme,
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michael fallon, the defence secretary, will join michael fallon, the defence secretary, willjoin andrew. it's time now to say goodbye to ben, who's going to do the news for andrew marr. but now here's phil with a last look at the weather. first, here is a picture. you said the sunlight breakthrough. this is the sunlight breakthrough. this is the view above westminster. a little glimpse of blue sky, phil. it was glorious to start the day in east sussex. and a great swathes of the country enjoys that. a decent speu the country enjoys that. a decent spell of weather at the moment. although yesterday's weather front is trying to pull away into the near co nsta nt, is trying to pull away into the near constant, it leaves behind an area of low pressure which is already supplying shallows to scotland and northern ireland, one or two into
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the north—west of england and west and wales. those will become more prevalent. the rain is growing more widely in the afternoon. across scotland, some intense showers, a rumble of thunder perhaps. watch out if you are thinking about walking outside in the afternoon. a dry start across the north of england and into wales, but showers later. the further south and east you are, after the cloudy start, the sun is breaking out. but watch out, it comes at a price. the pollen levels are very high across the south. if you do seem more than your fair share of sunshine, the uv levels are quite high at the moment, so you may need some protection there. overnight, the showers will continue over overnight, the showers will continue over scotla nd overnight, the showers will continue over scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere, a dry night, but not cold. if you are thinking of
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commuting in the central belt, gusts of wind up to 40 mph are possible. a bit of a buffeting there. elsewhere, a lot of dry weather. the cloud would have to break for brightness to come through, but there will be dry weather around during monday. top temperature around 20 celsius. i will hand you back to rachel. good morning. when disaster hits the uk, one of the first images we often see is of the emergency services rushing towards danger to protect civilian lives. last week, during the terror attack on london bridge, inspectorjim cole was one of the first police officers on the scene. clear the area now!
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as soon as the call came out, the police station burst into life. we had two shifts. everyone was changing over. everyone got into any police vehicle that would work and we all went there. it was almost pandemonium. people were running. i could see someone was injured on the floor. they were by the pub on the corner. i was fortunate i had a police medical on board. i called the medic and instructed him to go over to the entrance of a bar called to set up with his equipment. there were shots ringing out, and i did not know whether it was our chaps or the bad guys, but i could still hear shots. and then a stream of people came out of the market running and screaming. so we literallyjust pushed them into the basement of the pub.
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it seemed like the safest place to put a large volume of people at that time, out of harm's way. stay down! i have been a police officer for 18 years. itjust all happened, just happened, automatically, really. there was no thought process going on. in hindsight, it all seemed really surreal, thinking back to it. it almost seemed like it wasn't real. people came out last night to go to bars and restaurants, and to show a sense of unity. what was the atmosphere like? i think it was
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people responding in the absolutely right way. the traders and the community gathered that 10pm just to remember, one week on. but also, people were out enjoying themselves ona people were out enjoying themselves on a saturday evening, as people we re on a saturday evening, as people were trying to do last saturday. i think that combination of people remembering and not forgetting what happened but being fairly resolute about going forward is absolutely reflected in the mood of the people of london. this must have been devastating for you and your colleagues. i imagine almost eve ryo ne colleagues. i imagine almost everyone who works there knows someone who was affected or came close. absolutely, ithink someone who was affected or came close. absolutely, i think that's the case. the main food market was closed, but staff from that were socialising, and all the staff who work in the restaurants and bars around, and members of the public. so, it has touched people in different ways, and i think it will for weeks and months ahead, so there isa for weeks and months ahead, so there is a big task in the next week or so about not just physically
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is a big task in the next week or so about notjust physically reclaiming the market, but clay coming —— but taking back this place, which is a place of joy and taking back this place, which is a place ofjoy and fun but which has had this appalling act, and we have to bring that back, take that back, the community around our market. how do you balance that were trying to ensure do you balance that were trying to ensure security in the area as well? you know, ithink ensure security in the area as well? you know, i think there was a very good security network in london, especially amongst big venues that have lots of the public coming, and we will continue to work as hard as possible, particularly with the police, and it is that balance between making people feel safe and having all the right procedures in place. but a market, by its very nature, is open, its about people coming together to congregate and socialise, and it's essential to our way of life, of course, in cities like london, so it is that balance that we've always got to try to maintain. thank you very much. very nice to hearfrom
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maintain. thank you very much. very nice to hear from you this maintain. thank you very much. very nice to hearfrom you this morning. donald hyslop, the chair of borough market. that's it from breakfast today. dan and louise will be back tomorrow from six. until then have a lovely weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news at 9am. i'm annita mcveigh at westminster, where downing street seeks to clarify the status of a potential deal with the dup. both sides issued statements late last night to say no final deal had been reached, and that details of an agreement for a parliamentary pact are still to be determined. denial of a leadership bid from borisjohnson, who denial of a leadership bid from boris johnson, who dismisses newspaper report as tripe and says theresa may has his full support. ready for another general election, labour leaderjeremy corbyn insists he can still become prime minister. the other headlines — the fake suicide belts designed to spread terror in the london bridge attack. police say anyone seeing the belts worn by the attackers would have
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assumed they were real. one of the first police officers on the scene describes what they faced.
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