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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 11, 2017 9:00am-9:31am BST

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this is bbc news at 9am. i'm annita mcveigh at westminster, where downing street seeks to clarify the status of a potential deal with the dup. both sides issued statements late last night to say no final deal had been reached, and that details of an agreement for a parliamentary pact are still to be determined. denial of a leadership bid from borisjohnson, who denial of a leadership bid from boris johnson, who dismisses newspaper report as tripe and says theresa may has his full support. ready for another general election, labour leaderjeremy corbyn insists he can still become prime minister. the other headlines — the fake suicide belts designed to spread terror in the london bridge attack. police say anyone seeing the belts worn by the attackers would have assumed they were real. one of the first police officers on the scene describes what they faced. there was almost pandemonium, people were running. at that point, there were still lots and lots of shots ringing out. i didn't know whether they were us,
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our chaps, or the bad guys. richard hammond is recovering in hospital after the tv presenter‘s car crashed and burst into flames while filming in switzerland. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35. this morning's reviewers are the sunday times‘s foreign editor and james righton. good morning from westminster, where the government and the democratic unionist party have both issued statements overnight, making clear that a deal between them has yet to be finalised.
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let's take a look at some of the main developments over the last 2a hours. the dup says it has held "positive talks" over a possible deal to support a conservative minority government, after tory chief whip gavin williamson travelled to belfast yesterday. theresa may, who fell eight seats short of a majority in thursday's election, is due to meet with her cabinet tomorrow. yesterday, her two closest advisors nick timothy and fiona hill resigned. meanwhile, foreign secretary boris johnson has dismissed reports in many of today's papers of a tory party leadership bid as "tripe", saying he was backing the prime minister "100%". these are pictures of theresa may and her husband arriving to church this morning in sonning in berkshire. the democratic unionist party says it has had "positive talks" over a possible deal to support a conservative minority government, but that no final agreement
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has yet been reached. both sides are understood to be working towards what's called a confidence and supply agreement. so how will it work and what challenges could it pose? here's our political correspondent, mark lobel. historically friends, hoping to shape the future working together. without enough conservative mps to form her own government, theresa may has turned to the democratic unionist party. she outlined her intentions straight after the shock election result, to help regain her political balance. we will continue to work with our friends and allies in the democratic unionist party in particular. the dup now has ten seats to use as a powerbroker, to back theresa may on key votes such as the queen's speech and budget. not as a full coalition, but in a looser agreement. that is prompting speculation about what the pro—brexit, socially conservative party may want in return,
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causing concern among some tory mps, but not all. i don't think we will go backwards in terms of social legislation. i think it is part of our dna now and what makes us the great country we are. i'm sure the dup understand that. but balancing two parties‘ interests could have an effect. i cannot see how the queen's speech can be laden with interesting pieces of legislation because many of them are going to be items which will cause dispute within the conservative party and certainly between the conservatives and the dup. so, the most unexpected result of the election has been to make thejob of governing here harder than ever. along with news of some development in those talks between the conservatives and dup, the other top line this morning is the denial from
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borisjohnson line this morning is the denial from boris johnson that line this morning is the denial from borisjohnson that he is eyeing up theresa may's job, borisjohnson that he is eyeing up theresa may'sjob, calling report in many newspapers tripe. let's discuss all of this now with lucy fisher from the times newspaper. good morning to you. before we get into some of the detail, i wondered this sunday morning, have you had a chance to truly reflect on the enormous events of the last few days? it is absolutely incredible, i don't think anyone thought we would be here with a hung parliament, theresa may's position incredibly weakened after she had this gamble but just incredibly weakened after she had this gamble butjust did not pay off. she started the campaign seven weeks ago with a 2k point lead and is now irrevocably damaged by the results. talking about boris johnson, do you think people believe him when he says that he is not looking at a leadership bid?” him when he says that he is not looking at a leadership bid? i don't think he even said he is not looking ata think he even said he is not looking at a leadership bid, it is classic boris to use the word like tripe, it intends to dismiss without ruling out, classic non—denial denial as
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the spin doctors would say. very interesting details in the sunday newspapers this morning suggesting there are backbench conservative mps willing to state kamikaze missions, they can be seen as the aggressors in the move to spot a leadership election that could allow boris to come through. it is interesting but certainly his allies are manoeuvring on his behalf if not him himself.“ there a split between government ministers at the moment and the rest of the party, the backbenchers?” think there is a lot of confusion, i think there is a lot of confusion, i think people think there is a lot of uncertainty here. people are agreed an immediate leadership election in the next few weeks would be a bad thing to put into process but i think in the medium term the question of whether theresa may will still be in downing street by the end of the summer is really unclear. thank you for your time this morning, lucy fisherfrom thank you for your time this morning, lucy fisher from the times. let's discuss in more detail what is happening in terms of the talks between the democratic unionist
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party and theresa may with our correspondentjohn campbell in belfast, in fact on the roof of the belfast, in fact on the roof of the belfast newsroom. he is bbc northern ireland's political and economics editor. good morning, john. tell us what you have learned, what is the inside track on the discussions that have been going on, statement issued overnight from both the dup and the prime minister? it was a bit messy overnight with that statement ping—pong in the early hours but ultimately what is going on here is the dup are looking for a financial deal. if we go back to 2015, the dup had planned specifically for a hung parliament and what they would want in return for their support for propping up a minority government. at the heart of the document were three things. they wa nted the document were three things. they wanted real terms increase in health and education spending overfive yea rs, and education spending overfive years, they wanted investment in northern ireland infrastructure, and they wanted help with transforming public services. those are quite
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vague requests, they are also potentially very expensive. the dup does not want to seek further austerity, back in 2015 there were calling for the abolition of the bedroom tax. this time round they say they don't want to see a cut to the state pension, nor do they want to see means testing for winter fuel allowa nce, to see means testing for winter fuel allowance, so those are the sorts of things they will be talking about. if the deal is done we could potentially see some of that dup influence coming through in the queen's speech injust influence coming through in the queen's speech in just over a week's time? absolutely, yes. if you look at the conservative ma nifesto, if you look at the conservative manifesto, they wanted to end the triple lock on the state pension, they also wanted to get rid of the universality of the winter fuel allowa nce, universality of the winter fuel allowance, but i think the dup —— with the dup involved, it is unlikely those measures would make it to the queen's speech. in terms of the impact of this on the political process in northern ireland and on talks to restore the assembly, we heard yesterday from the republican party sinn fein warning the government that it has
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to remain neutral in any discussions, saying how difficult it would be for it to be neutral if it does a deal with the dup. we haven't heard much from the dup yet, have we, on what it thinks the impact might be on the northern ireland political process? we haven't but i was talking to some unionist voters on the streets of belfast yesterday and they were delighted because they think it puts unionism in a stronger position than it has been in for a very long time. as you might imagine the flip side is that nationalists are not too happy, sinn fein issued a statement last night saying previous attempts by unionists to proper british governments have failed, they think or perhaps hoped this would be an arrangement which could end in tears for the dup. interestingly they are calling for the irish government to make its voice heard and, as they say, speak up voice heard and, as they say, speak upfor voice heard and, as they say, speak up for all of the citizens of northern ireland. 0k, john campbell, thank you very much for that in
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belfast. i am joined thank you very much for that in belfast. iam joined here thank you very much for that in belfast. i am joined here by our political correspondent leila nathoo. what is the view from westminster on how this possible deal is progressing? i think it is very much still in progress. we were led to believe last night that the agreement had been reached, certainly the principles of an agreement for the dup to support the government on a confidence and supply basis, the dup getting the conservative government backing on key votes like the budget, but then the dup had this clarification that the talks have been positive so far but they are very much still ongoing next week. there is a sense of theresa may and her people trying to push the pace on this, both when she went to the palace to see the queen and indeed with these clarifications going on overnight about where
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exactly the deal is, all the progress of the deal is? absolutely, there has to be a deal agreed as quickly as possible for theresa may to bolster her position, she is very vulnerable at the moment without this deal in place because only when that deal is in black—and—white on paper can she say she has a majority and can get her queen's speech at least through parliament. but there have been personnel changes in downing street, asa personnel changes in downing street, as a very fluid situation and theresa may is vulnerable so they will want to get this deal nailed down as soon as possible, but for now there is not a deal in place. do you think we will get as far as the queen's speech with theresa may as prime minister? george osborne has just as prime minister? george osborne hasjust said on as prime minister? george osborne has just said on the andrew marr show that she is a dead woman walking, strong words, and we know he has an axe to grind and clearly there is a very fluid situation and theresa may is vulnerable so they will want to get this deal nailed down as soon as possible, but for now there is not a deal in place. do you think we will get as far as the queen's speech with theresa may as prime minister? george osborne has just said on the andrew marr show that she is a dead woman walking, strong words, and we know he has an axe to grind and mean his view is incorrect and there are not people out there who think she should go straightaway. there is certainly deep unease result but there is no doubt that she has been critically wounded in
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this process and she is now doing her best to best to try to get the backing of those ten dup mps, as she is certainly proceeding on the assumption she will get the queen's speech. jeremy corbyn though clearly thinks he has everything to play for, he still thinks he can be prime minister, he says he is intending to conservative party over her position, she thought she had no choice but to go to the queen to ask to form a government after the election result but there is no doubt that she has been critically wounded in this process and she is now doing her best to try to get the backing of those ten dup mps, as she is certainly proceeding on the assumption she will get the queen's speech. jeremy corbyn though clearly thinks he has everything to play for, he still thinks he can be prime minister, he says he is intending to vote down, considering voting down the he has said labour is ready to govern in a minority government. i think there is definitely a very fluid situation, certainly developing very quickly but we will wait to see if this deal with the dup does get finalised in a couple of extraordinary times, thank you very much, leila nathoo, our political joining very much, leila nathoo, our politicaljoining us from our swa nsea politicaljoining us from our swansea studio. thank you for your time, these are extraordinary times, incredibly volatile. can you recall a time in your political career when it has been this lord peter hain, former labour northern ireland secretary, is joining labour northern ireland secretary, isjoining us from our swansea studio. thank you for your time, these are extraordinary times, incredibly volatile. can you recall a time in your political career when it has been this volatileno, not going back to 1974, even, when ted
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heath called an election on who governs and was told, not you. labour took power. i can't recall anything quite like this, however i am going back to 1974, even, when ted heath called an election on who governs and was told, not you. labour took power. i can't recall anything quite like and in particular the situation where theresa may is trying to do a deal with the democratic unionist party in northern ireland, which is unprecedented and could, in my view, destabilise the good friday, depending how it plays in northern ireland, we want to talk to you about this possible deal. we have not heard much from the dup yet about what it of course, given your expertise in northern ireland, we wa nt to expertise in northern ireland, we want to talk to you about this possible deal. we have not heard much from the dup yet about what it will impact might be on the northern ireland political process, presumably the dup will say, we are looking for an economic package to improve public services, develop infrastructure, they will say that will but of course there is the big question of neutrality, isn't there? jess, the dup unionist credentials and that is why it is in a dominant
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position in the conservatives, they are not tories, they are a populist party that is very strong on its unionist credentials and that is why it is ina unionist credentials and that is why it is in a dominant position in the make sure that public services are better but it will demand a high price economically from the conservatives, and quite rightly so. they are not an austerity party, either, they will want investment in northern ireland, investment to make sure that public services are better their pensions cuts proposed by theresa may in her election campaign, so all of that could prove very positive and could stop this relentless austerity being pursued ona uk relentless austerity being pursued on a uk bases by the conservative party. however, the negative side of this is that the tories will then be in hock to one party amongst all the others across northern ireland and it has been a cardinal principle of all british governments, whether
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conservative or labour, up until now, that you are neutral between the parties in northern ireland, that you cannot take sides with any of them. there are no direct allegiances between any party, so you are seen as genuinely as a nonpartisan player. that was the only way i gained the trust of ian paisley, then leader of the dup, and gerry adams and martin mcguinness, leaders of sinn fein. the only way i could do it. if those two were able to trust me as secretary of state and tony blair as prime minister, thenit and tony blair as prime minister, then it was possible to get them to begin to understand that they could work with each other, even though they had never exchanged any words with each other directly. so the northern ireland peace process and the good friday agreement process, which was bitterly hard—fought four, took over ten years to achieve, going back tojohn major's day, not just tony blair's heroic efforts, it
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is like carrying a glass of champagne on a high wire suspended between two mountains, it is a very delicate process, and there has been an unfortunate neglect by this conservative government, both under david cameron and under theresa may, of the crucially important role that number ten has and the british government has in making sure that the northern ireland process keeps moving forward, and ifear now the northern ireland process keeps moving forward, and i fear now that it could take a damaging step backwards. yes, potentially a big price to pay for any deal. just a final thought, if you would, on the wider situation. if the deal is done between the dup and theresa may, how sta ble between the dup and theresa may, how stable do you think that could be, and secondly can you envisage a situation where jeremy and secondly can you envisage a situation wherejeremy corbyn could be prime minister in the next short while? the daily mirror is carrying an opinion poll showing that labour
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underjeremy corbyn is now more popular than the conservatives under theresa may. so anything could happen in the next few volatile days and weeks. the electorate clearly have said to the political class, a plague of your house, especially the conservatives, although the tories did poll more votes than labour and retain more seats. right across the democratic world, in europe, in america, where we saw donald trump unexpectedly elected, last year in britain when brexit happened against all expectations, in france where the dominant party since the second world war have been brutally shouldered aside by a fascist party under marine le pen and then a emmanuel macron's centrist party, the old politics is dissolving under our feet, the old politics is dissolving under ourfeet, and in these the old politics is dissolving under our feet, and in these circumstances we could see a whole series of
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changes in british politics in which labour, yes, underjeremy corbyn, could emerge as the dominant party asa could emerge as the dominant party as a result. so we have to wait and see, but meanwhile my message to theresa may is, do not play party politics with northern ireland, because there is nothing more important in northern ireland and to the rest of britain than we keep the peace and stability that has been so hard—won and peace and stability that has been so ha rd—won and has peace and stability that has been so hard—won and has been achieved through power—sharing, all the old enemies together in stormont. now, at stormont is suspended, it should be her priority not to do side deals with the dup but to get the parties to agree to reinstate northern ireland's elected and accountable, directly accountable government in stormont again. that should be the priority and i fear that is at risk by this deal with the dup. peter hain, lord lane, thank you very much for your thoughts this morning.
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as for that deal between the dup and theresa may, the status of it, we may hear more about that tomorrow in terms of how much progress, or not, has been made, but it is very clear that everyone feels the situation is incredibly volatile in politics right now, very uncertain, perhaps to an unparalleled degree in many people's memories, and boris johnson, as we know, has denied that he is preparing to take over from theresa may, but he hasn't said that in so many words, he said the reports were tripe, and as we heard from one of our guests a short while ago, there are so many nuances to read into a description like that. we will have much more on the unfolding situation at westminster through the morning but right now, it is back to ben in the studio. thank you very much indeed. the latest headlines on bbc news:
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downing street and the democratic unionist party have both issued state m e nts unionist party have both issued statements overnight making clear that a deal between them has yet to be finalised. borisjohnson has dismissed as tripe newspaper reports that he is preparing a new bid to become prime minister. the former chancellor george osborne has described theresa may as a dead woman walking. scotla nd may as a dead woman walking. scotland yard has released pictures of the fake suicide belts worn by the london bridge attackers. more on that, scotland yard releasing those pictures of the fake suicide belts worn by the london bridge attackers. the officer leading the investigation says it's the first time he's seen the tactic used in the uk. last night, a week on from the attack, people visited bars and restaurants in the area in a show of unity and resilience. simonjones reports. designed to create maximum fear, these are the fake explosive belts worn by the three attackers. they're actually disposable water
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bottles covered in masking tape, but the police say anyone who saw them on the night would have thought they were real. they believe the attackers might have been planning to use them to create a siege situation. as part of their investigation, police have spoken to 262 people from 19 different countries — 78 are described as significant witnesses. three people were killed as the attackers drove across london bridge, five were stabbed to death in borough market. they were remembered last night. in a show of defiance, people flocked to the area's bars and restaurants. you still reflect upon it and think about those people that that happened to, but it doesn't stop me from coming out at all, no. you can't not think about what happened, and i was wondering about what the mood would be like, but it's really celebratory and fun. we stick together, that's what we do, that's what london is all about. in pubs, people are being encouraged
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to donate to the british red cross' fundraising drive, to raise money for the victims of the london bridge and manchester attacks. it's absolutely right that, on the anniversary of what happened last weekend, the tragic events that happened last weekend, that londoners can just go out and do what londoners do. repairs are continuing to buildings damaged in the hunt for the killers, but the police cordons have now been lifted. southwark cathedral is reopening. an effort to bring back a sense of normality to an area which has experienced so much suffering. simon jones, bbc news. southwark cathedral has opened its doors this morning for the first time since the london bridge attacks. the cathedral was in the area that was cordoned off after the attack. our correspondent richard lister is outside the cathedral for us. yes, gorgeous, sunny day here and a
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change of mood, i think, is what people are trying to approach today even though it is just a week since those horrific attacks last saturday. southwark cathedral, as you say, has been closed since then, this area very much treated as a crime scene, police cordoned in place all the way around, and southwark cathedral was damaged in the aftermath of the attack, you can see the boa rded—up the aftermath of the attack, you can see the boarded—up door behind me where police forced their way through in the immediate aftermath the event on saturday night to try and see if there were any further attackers using the cathedral as a hiding place and thankfully, of course, as we know, there were not. there are five services taking place at the cathedral today, one underway at the cathedral today, one underway at the cathedral today, one underway at the moment, a special service at 11am attended by the bishop of southwark, and the dean of suffolk, the very red and andrew nunn, told us the very red and andrew nunn, told us earlier that although the cathedral is opening, this will not bea cathedral is opening, this will not be a normal day. today we will be able to do normal
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services, as they were, but they won't be normal because we will be remembering all those who died, the books of condolence are here for people to sign and we anticipate lots of people will want to come into what is very much their cathedral within this area, we have been here for 1400 years, we have seen a lot of things happen in this city, we haven't quite seen a week like this, to be perfectly honest, and so it will be good to begin to do what we do day in, day out in this place. just give you a sense, the location of southwark cathedral, it is right next to both london bridge, which is where the attack started, of course, and borough market, where it ended. you can see the tape there, even though the police cordon has been lifted, the borough market is still closed off as businesses and residents are allowed in, to repair some of the damage to their property, and it is thought borough market probably won't open until sometime this week, and many of the
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entrances to borough market are still off and only business owners are allowed in at the moment although the police presence has substantially reduced. of course the big question for borough market and all major public spaces in london and other cities across the country is, how do you maintain that sense of openness, ease of public access, while also ensuring that people are kept while also ensuring that people are ke pt safe ? 0k, ke pt safe ? ok, richard, thank you very much indeed. three men have been arrested after an easyjet flight to stansted was diverted because of suspicious behaviour. the plane, which was flying from slovenia, made an unplanned landing in germany, after the pilot was alerted to a suspicious conversation on board, including what police called "terrorist content". passengers were evacuated down emergency slides. a backpack belonging to one of the men was blown up by police. the tv presenter richard hammond has been treated for a fractured knee after crashing a car while filming for his new motoring show, the grand tour.
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he was driving an electric supercar in switzerland when it left the road on a bend. the 47—year—old, who suffered brain injuries in a crash while filming top gear 11 years ago, got out of the vehicle before it burst into flames. his co—hostjeremy clarkson tweeted that it was the "biggest" and "most frightening" crash he'd seen. some secret nazi tunnels and bunkers have ben uncovered in the hague. they were built as part of the atlantic wall to stop allied forces invading during world war two. a total of 500 bunker remnants have been discovered in recent years. anna holligan has more. it's like an underground nazi village. there were spa facilities, kitchens.
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and in here is one of the dormitories and you can see up here on the wall, one of the german army eagles and there was once a swastika under here, it was scratched off by dutch teenagers after the war in an effort to delete that history. there would have been about 60, 65 soldiers living here during the war. and up here you can see where they put the directions, painted on the wall in black ink. k, the direction to the coast, and pak, the anti—tank guns. you find them down there. people come in here, they get a feeling about the war.
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the time capsule is decorated just like the guys have left yesterday. let's look at the weather forecast now with philae baru. thanks forjoining me, it is a day of sunny spells and blustery showers but it is never that straightforward. the bulk of the heavy showers across scotland and northern ireland you won't be at all surprised to hear reports of thunder and lightning in the heaviest of the showers and some of those across the border into the top end of the pennines, more in the way of showers breaking out eventually across the north midlands and into parts of wales and the south—west. the further south and east you are, the dryer and finer the day will be. watch out for the uv levels, really quite high, and the pollen very high across the south. overnight, showers and longer spells a rain going
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across northern scotland, they will be their first across northern scotland, they will be theirfirst thing across northern scotland, they will be their first thing on monday. dry weather elsewhere, eventually the cloud will break up which will help to push the temperatures to around 21, 20 to push the temperatures to around 21,202 to push the temperatures to around 21, 20 2 degrees to push the temperatures to around 21,20 2 degrees or so at to push the temperatures to around 21, 20 2 degrees or so at best. if you want more detail about the rest of the week, it is on the bbc weather website. hello. this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines: downing street and the democratic unionist party have both issued statements overnight, making clear that a deal between them for a parliamentary pact has yet to be finalised.
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