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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 11, 2017 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines at 2pm. i'm annita mcveigh at westminster. downing street is forced to clarify its position over a deal with the dup. the defence secretary says a conservative deal with the democratic unionist party would only apply to "big issues" it falls on us now to build a government in a national interest and that is what we are working with with our friends in the and that is what we are working with with ourfriends in the dup and that is what we are working with with our friends in the dup to do. dup leader, arlene foster is expected in london on tuesday, she says nothing is finalised but there had been some good discussions on reaching a deal. one that would bring stability to the nation, and those discussions continue. we have made good progress but that discussions continue. amid the confusion over attempts to secure a majority, there is now open speculation over the prime minister's future. theresa may is a dead woman walking. it's just how long she's going to remain on death row.
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what's your guess? i think we will know very shortly. i mean we could get to next week and it all collapses for her. labour leader, jeremy corbyn, says there could be another election soon and he is preparing an alternative queen's speech. we are ready and able to forward a serious programme which would have support from people in this country. i'm shaun ley, with the rest of the day's news: the fake suicide belts designed to spread terror in the london bridge attack. police say anyone seeing the belts worn by the attackers would have assumed they were real. one of the first police officers on the scene describes what they faced. it was almost pandemonium, people we re it was almost pandemonium, people were running. at that point, there we re were running. at that point, there were still lots of shots ringing out. i didn't know whether they were asked all the bad guys. three british men are detained after a passenger plane made an unplanned landing in germany after the pilot was alerted to a suspicious conversation on board. the tv presenter richard hammond
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is recovering in hospital after his car crashed and burst into flames while filming in switzerland. and england win a world football trophy for the first time since 1966 — they beat venezuela 1—0 in the under 20s world cup final. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. good afternoon from westminster where the fallout from the general election is continuing today. as work to find a deal with the democratic unionists continues, members of theresa may's cabinet have backed her despite open speculation from other senior tories about her future. overnight, the government and the democratic unionist party both issued statements, making clear that a deal between them has yet to be finalised.
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let's take a look at some of the main developments. defence secretary michael fallon says a deal can be done with the dup on major issues but clarified that there was no final agreement on the terms of a minority government deal. dup leader arlene foster is due to meet theresa may in downing street on tuesday. meanwhile, there has been much speculation about theresa may's future as prime minister , with former chancellor george osborne , calling her, a dead woman walking. borisjohnson was getting ready to form a leadership challenge which george osborne said was a permanent
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leadership challenge. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he is ready to fight another election , which he says could happen in the next few months or early next year , and in the meantime he will be putting together an alternative queen's speech. our political correspondent, leila nathoo reports. deal or no deal — confusion last night from downing street over whether the dup had already decided to back theresa may and give her the majority she lacks. this morning, clarification that talks were still ongoing. we had very good discussions yesterday with the conservative party in relation to how we could support them in forming a national government that would bring stability to the nation, and those discussions continue. we have made good progress but that discussions continue. no detail yet on what they will demand in return. will they are socially conservative views clash with a tory party wanting to modernise? there will be no formal coalition, at most, only support for key votes. this is what is traditionally called a confidence and supply arrangement, where the dup will support us on big things like voting for the queen's
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speech, budget and finance. they support us on defence, on the big issues. it will be a fragile arrangement. doubts over how long the prime minister can't last. the prime minister can last. theresa may is a dead woman walking, it'sjust how long she will remain on death row. i think we will know very shortly. one o ne stewardess 7 i think we will know very shortly. in other words, we could easily get to the middle of next week and it all collapses. she is flawed, in a desperate situation. our position is untenable, and i think she knows that. if theresa may manages to hold on here, there will be huge questions of the polity she will be able to get through. even with dup support, the majority will be tiny and she will likely have to ditch contentious parts of her manifesto. and with brexit negotiations starting in just over a week, her task is to get her party and parliament behind her approach. the fact is that if the tory party
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doesn't lance the boil of brexit, you are opening the doors for corbyn‘s premiership. he wants thatjob now and says he is ready to govern. he will amend the queen ‘s speech, putting forward what he says is an alternative vision for the country. we have a minority government relying on the dup to get legislation through the house of commons when they have no agreement on key issues. it seems to be chaotic. we are quite ready and able to put forward a serious programme which obviously has massive support in this country. she thought she would win more support, now it is her looking to others to stand beside her. as we have heard, the prime minister is trying to hammer out a deal with
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the dup to secure her a working majority. arlene foster is expected here in london on tuesday, the leader of the dup. it doesn't sound like we will get the news or confirmation of a deal until then. at the earliest, although time is of the essence for the pm. but there area large the essence for the pm. but there are a large number of people concerned that a deal with the dup could have a negative impact on the attem pts could have a negative impact on the atte m pts to could have a negative impact on the attempts to get the power—sharing assembly at storm on stored. because of the concerns of nationalist republicans in northern ireland, that the government would effectively not be a neutral boy get any more, if it was in an arrangement with with the dup. —— neutral broker. i spoke to somebody who said that it would be morally reprehensible to put power ahead of the northern ireland peace process.
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we also know now that the taoiseach, enda kenny has spoken to theresa may for some reason on twitter that he has spoken to him saying —— speaking to her say nothing should put the good friday agreement at risk. a lot of concern that the delicate balance of concern that the delicate balance of northern ireland politics cabaye upset by a deal that is done here. let's cross to downing street. our correspondent ellie price is in downing street. has there been any reaction from number ten to that tweet from the irish prime minister? as yet, i have not heard anything. but what we are expecting in the next few minutes, and ours, is a cabinet reshuffle. we expect to see a number of mps walking out the door, seeing if they have been told they have newjobs. we know amber rudd, home secretary
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and boris johnson, we know amber rudd, home secretary and borisjohnson, pollock secretary —— foreign secretary, philip hammond and david davis have all kept their jobs. beyond that, theresa may has do continue with business as usual and needs to appoint a cabinet. that is what we are waiting for here. but is what we are waiting for here. but is set to happen in the next few hours. she very much wants to give the appearance of business as usual. all the while, this turmoil is unfolding around her. take us through the level of support that he has, ellie. both in terms of cabinet members and conservative backbenchers? it interesting, a number came out as you imagine on the sunday programmes this morning. we heard from graham brady, chairman of the backbench 1922 committee, the of the backbench1922 committee, the mainstay of the conservative party backbenchers. he was relatively
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loyal to the prime minister, but he pointed out that a number of key ma nifesto pointed out that a number of key manifesto pledges would now have to be watered down. he, for example, was a cheerleader of the campaign for more grammar schools nationally. he admitted they would now maybe some kind of modest pilot in urban areas for grammar schools, for example. beyond that, i would areas for grammar schools, for example. beyond that, iwould be unsure if he could implement that. it was a relatively controversial policy on its own. we heard some pro—remain mps, like anna seabury and george osborne who were in the reports just now. they suggested that maybe was like a support was wavering. —— theresa may's support was wavering. but there was a sense now is not a good time for a
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leadership contest with brexit negotiations due to start in the next weeks. beyond that, there seems to be little support for her. in the long—term future. for now, as i say, i think there is no real appetite within the party. we certainly had the michael fallon this who said that theresa may does have the backing of her cabinet, and nothing has changed. that is also what he said with regards to brighton, nothing has changed. but we have heard that before. —— with regard to brexit. regarding brexit, are we in a situation where the brexit that may in visit weeks ago is going to change. ultimately, this was a general election that was called, theresa may herself said, it was called to steady her mandate, to steady her hand in the forthcoming
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brexit negotiation. and essentially, that it was up to the voters that they backed her strong and stable leadership going into these negotiations and that would seem that the results would suggest otherwise. at michael fallon this morning said nothing has changed, but the government's vision of brexit has remained the same. but there are questions the conservative party as to whether that is sustainable. george osborne suggested today that if the dup and conservative entered into an arrangement, it is important to amend memo that the dup are pro—brexit but would call for no ha rd pro—brexit but would call for no hard border with the rest of ireland. that would be difficult to achieve in the event of no deal on leaving the eu. others say, there was the common travel arrangement in place before the eu but it throws up a number of issues. whether the hard brexit that theresa may was looking for can happen now. obviously, the
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calls for no suggestion of trying to stay in the single market, questions today as to whether that will be an option that theresa may or whoever negotiates this brexit might need to look at. thank you very much, ellie. the former culture secretary, john whittingdale, joins me now. thanks forjoining us. surely this notion put forward by michael fallon earlier that nothing has changed with regards to brexit must surely that cannot be the case as things stand? well, the negotiations will start as was planned in ten days' time. theresa may asked for a mandate for brexit and set out her plans. but in actual fact, mandate for brexit and set out her plans. but in actualfact, most mandate for brexit and set out her plans. but in actual fact, most of us plans. but in actual fact, most of us who were fighting the election found that brexit was fairly low down on the list of issues. it wasn't brexit that determined the result of the election. both the
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main parties went into this election committed to brexit. the labour party made clear that they supported it, they respected the outcome of the referendum, they voted for article 50. to that extent, nothing has changed. nevertheless, to reza made made at her mantra that she was going in —— theresa may was going into the election to get a good deal for brexit. some are now saying it would be in the national interest for her to resign. because the eu brexit negotiators will look at her and see, here is a prime minister, if she continues in the short—term, who is damaged by the election and he will not be in place further down the line. i think the idea of a vacuum at the top of the conservative party and the inevitable controversies that the leadership would throw up, that of the last thing we want now. we want
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to ta ke the last thing we want now. we want to take stock, of the outcome of the election, to demonstrate that we can still govern with a majority in parliament. therefore, iwould still govern with a majority in parliament. therefore, i would not wa nt to parliament. therefore, i would not want to see theresa may resign. i think it would add to the instability if she were to do that. instability if she were to go now, instability if there was as a result to bea instability if there was as a result to be a leadership election for the conservatives. in the meantime, we have the queen's spieth approaching rapidly. do you think that will be -- queen ‘s speech. do you think that will be thin, given the arrangement with the dup. we know that will have an impact on policies. it's bound to and the arithmetic of the new house of commons will make it harder to take through very difficult and potentially unpopular, controversial policies. i think you'll find that a
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number of those are watered down. some things have to happen. we are committed to brexit, those talks begin. the great repeal bill, for example, work on a new immigration policies, both have do begin now. we will fill still see that now. but we won't see quite the same queen's spieth if we had had a large conservative majority. if we combine that with the two senior adviser stepping down, that makes her look like a figurehead who is subject to the demands of forces within her party? outside forces that role? rather than someone who can effectively lead. there is no question that authority has damaged by the election. it would be stupid to deny otherwise. i think it's in the national interest that we should
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continue that in barking on a change of leader but obviously she will need to need to listen to people in the conservative party but also the dup. i was in parliament at a time when we did not have a majority and isa when we did not have a majority and is a nightmare. there is total uncertainty, the government can't be sure of a majority in the house of commons and it makes it more difficult. john whittingdale, we appreciate your thoughts come. thanks forjoining us. with me is thejournalist and broadcaster, rachel shabi. said to have you with. let's about labour. jeremy corbyn looking and sounding very relaxed this morning in interviews as we were reflecting earlier. what his next move? will try to bring back into the fold some of those labour mps who stood down from the labour front bench when he first became party leader?” from the labour front bench when he first became party leader? i think jeremy corbyn is right to be in a
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good mood today. hejust jeremy corbyn is right to be in a good mood today. he just prove everybody wrong, against the odds and the polls and the pundits. against everyone saying this will never happen. against the press. he has a 40% vote share, the first time that has happened in decades. he is absolutely right to feel good about that. in terms of what happens next, a lot will depend on what this conservative government in waiting is going to do. at the moment, it's a complete shambles. i don't see how they can form a coalition with the dup, very bigoted and sectarian party, as we have seen the irish by minister has warned of doing that because of the consequences it would had for a hard—fought. .. because of the consequences it would had for a hard-fought. .. you say that about the dup, but they have shared power with sinn fein in northern ireland for many years. they have worked in partnership with them, we saw the lowest in combe martin mcguinness, former ira
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—— whistles martin mcguinness working with ian paisley. perhaps they have moved on from their roots. they were founded with bigoted and homophobic routes. it is a dangerous situation northern ireland, it has stalled in terms of the political process. theresa mayjust made it worse. if the irish pm is saying this jeopardises the good friday agreement, that is worth listening to. in terms of what labour does, a lot will depend on how this will unfold. it surprises me that we haven't heard from the prime minister any words of reassurance about what is going on in terms of the deal with the dup and the potential impact on the process in northern ireland ? potential impact on the process in northern ireland? it doesn't surprise the at all. in this six—week campaign, she has shown herself to be quite unresponsive and
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unaccountable. please run a very presidential campaign and it has spectacularly backfired. this seemed so spectacularly backfired. this seemed so much in keeping with the kind of prime minister that she seeks to be. i think the 40% vote share for the labour party, of course that is in pa rt labour party, of course that is in part support for labour's left agenda and its vision for a better society. but it's also a rejection of theresa may and the kind of government and country that she wa nts government and country that she wants this to be. just a thought on level or degree of instability. what do you think is in the national interest here? wii hasjohn whittingdale say he thinks it's better if it oosthuizen theresa may stage than if conservative goes into goes into leadership on this. if she we re goes into leadership on this. if she were to go, it would lead to a rapid new election. what are your thoughts? it interesting we are framing this in terms of what is best for the country, seems to be what's best for the conservatives.
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they have proven themselves, twice now, that they are quite prepared to ruthlessly put their own party ahead of the good of the country. i think we should stop looking at it in terms of what will work for the conservatives, what work for the country is we need stability and the labour party and now has a mandate. it has reached people across all kinds of divides, young and old, white and black, rich and poor. it has prevented a vision —— presented a vision of a people's brexit putting the jobs and economy first. it seems there is a lot support and it is growing as days goes on. we would like to see another election? i think the labour party could run a minority government if they wanted to. good to hear your thoughts, rachel. that's it for the moment from westminster, we will be back with analysis and interviews throughout the afternoon. back to
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you, sean, in the studio. a service has taken place this morning at a re—opened southwark cathedral to remember those who died in the london bridge terror attack. the service of those injured or killed. meanwhile police have released pictures of the fake suicide belts the three attackers were wearing when they struck last saturday night. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford southwark‘s medieval cathedral, caught up last saturday in a 21st—century atrocity. caught up last saturday this morning, for the first time since the london bridge attack, it opened its ancient doors to worshippers again. just over a week ago, this cathedral and this community witnessed terrible things which should not have happened. a young nurse gave her life by the entrance to montague chambers, trying to save a fellow human being under attack. others suffered terribly, and many more would have been killed and injured had it not been for the rapid and effective
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response from the police. overnight, scotland yard released these pictures of the fake suicide belts the men had constructed in the top floor bedsit in east ham from plastic bottles and duct tape. the plan, apparently, to instil more terror during the rampage with knives through borough market. during the horror, police officers created a safe shelter and casualty station in the katzenjammers bar. the inspector in charge of that unit explaining what it was like to be caught up in what he called pandemonium. there were still shots ringing out, then a stream of people came out the market, running and screaming. so we literallyjust pushed them into the basement of the pub. it was quite a big venue, and it seemed like the safest place to put a large volume of people at that time so it was out of harm's way. the police search of the crime scene
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at borough market is now over. it should reopen in the next few days, though detectives investigating last saturday's carnage are still working through mountains of cctv footage. there were no new arrests overnight. three men have been arrested after an easyjet flight to stansted was diverted because of suspicious behaviour. passengers were evacuated down emergency slides after the plane, which was flying from slovenia, made an unplanned landing in germany. the pilot was alerted to a suspicious conversation on board, including what police called "terrorist content". a backpack belonging to one of the men was blown up by police. a month after electing emmanuel macron as their youngest ever president, the people of france are now voting in the first round of parliamentary elections. the new president is hoping his centrist party, formed a little over a year ago, will win an outright majority. half of the party's candidates are new to politics. our correspondent,
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hugh schofield is in paris. how important are these elections to the president, given that he once had a thumping majority himself in the presidential contest? indeed. they are important though, because the french system is president shall often caricatured as a system where only the president count. he or she does count for everything if they have got a majority in parliament. if not, they have decaux habit, as it is called here, which means all sorts of compromises and dealing with different governments and parties. he needs to get the majority, in stark contrast to what seems to be happening in britain, there is apparently a real momentum behind him. all the polls have shown we are in for a sweeping change in parliamentary politics. everything
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is suggesting in france but his -- his —— his party will get a majority. it isa —— his party will get a majority. it is a two round system with results today but we will get a sign next week when the second round takes place. the polls suggest he is in for a big majority with two main established parties, the republicans are rightand established parties, the republicans are right and the socialists on the left, in for a drubbing. the socialists have been wiped out almost completely. contrast to british politics where confusion seems be raining. macron seems to be sitting pretty on a wave of confidence around him. thanks for joining us. let's return to our top story, the
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potential deal with the dup. we have had confusion this weekend about whether the deal is done, downing street said it was yesterday and then admitted it wasn't. arlene foster will be at westminster next week for further talks foster will be at westminster next week forfurther talks on foster will be at westminster next week for further talks on to say. what do you think other potential stumbling block? ithink what do you think other potential stumbling block? i think you have to do except that the democratic unionist party has something to lose in this as well as theresa may. their votes are here in northern ireland and much depends on how this place in northern ireland. they are offering themselves effectively as the mudguard for the tories. to ta ke to take the flak for any to take the fla k to take the flak for any to take the flak for any legislation in the next few years. that is a sacrificial thing to do. they want to enter with some care. this might seem to the
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tories and theresa may that arlene foster will be absolutely cock—a—hoop at the prospect of being inade cock—a—hoop at the prospect of being in a de facto partnership with her. but there are potential dangers for the dup as well. what they are looking for is a material advantages northern ireland people. they will also look into the electorate who will be interesting in things like legislation on flagler parades, the kind of thing that appeals to the one section of society of the protesta nt one section of society of the protestant unionist community. they will either have to publish the deal or explain to their own support those why they didn't do that. that isa those why they didn't do that. that is a good example of something where evenif is a good example of something where even if theresa may were to say we would try to legislate on it, there could be enough voices even with their own conservative party to ensure that didn't get in the statute books. that is it. who
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knows? we don't know what the ma nifesto knows? we don't know what the manifesto is going to be. the manifesto... has obviously been shredded. it is likely that the dup, although it is evangelical christian and right—wing on social legislation, it is a working—class party which is averse to austerity and the trimming of the national health service, for instance. they will not want to be held accountable for unpopular conservative moods. older viewers and maybe you will be old enough to remember this, will memberjim callaghan sanctified extra bits of money in the late 19705 extra bits of money in the late 1970s to ensure unionists didn't vote him out. presumably money is something westminster has to provide to the assembly to ensure their support? there was talk in the
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beginning of the peace process in northern ireland, £1 million peace dividend, and acknowledgement that there had been a huge damage done to be in the structure here by the troubles and restoring normality would cost money. that dividend never came through though we heard secretary of state juggling figures and giving accounts of expenditures as if to incorporate it. it didn't come. there was one thing they might be asking for. they are also under pressure to reform the whole hell structure, with too many small hospitals here according to one or several —— the whole structure. too many small hospitals. there may be new hospitals or support for the heart health service. but the kind of issues for them is prosecuting soldiers for bloody sunday, by the british army during the

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