Skip to main content

tv   Click  BBC News  June 11, 2017 3:30pm-4:01pm BST

3:30 pm
described theresa may as, "a dead woman walking". labour leader, jeremy corbyn, says there could be another election soon and he is preparing an alternative queen's speech. welcome back to westminster where a short distance from where we are is downing street and we can cross the road to our political correspondent ellie price for any reshuffle news. some coming and going there, any detail yet? no detail, we are eagerly anticipating them. thejustice secretary liz truss has just walked m, secretary liz truss has just walked in, as well as damian green who was at the department for work and pensions. they could possibly be moved but that is prospective asian at this stage. we know that damian green is a good friend of the prime minister, so it would be unusual to
3:31 pm
be invited in and then sacked. i think we can imagine they will both have a cabinet position. we are waiting to hear both they do get moved around. damian green had been rumoured to get a biggerjob than his currentjob at the department of pensions. it is worth noting that yesterday, the prime minister, actually on friday, the prime minister confirmed that her big beasts, if you like, of her main cabinet would stay in place, so that is the chancellor at number 11, philip hammond was remaining really was and amber rudd at the home. borisjohnson at was and amber rudd at the home. boris johnson at the was and amber rudd at the home. borisjohnson at the foreign office and david davis as brexit secretary at michael fallon at defence. those are staying the same but we have had two cabinet ministers, former cabinet ministers, coming in, we have yet to find out what will happen to them and we expect to see more following them. six junior ministers lost their seats at this election, and it is expected that those rules will need to be felled and, of course, there was one
3:32 pm
minister who had a cabinet position, ben gummer, he lost his seat, so there is still one vacancy around there is still one vacancy around the cabinet table, we have yet to find out who will fill it. good to get that brief update, we will be back with you once there is any further news. ellie price at downing street. and joining me now is the former conservative party leader, michael howard, lord howarth, thank you very much forjoining us on the bbc news channel. as someone who knows about the pressures of leadership, what would your advice be to theresa may right now? -- lord howarth. well, ithink be to theresa may right now? -- lord howarth. well, i think she be to theresa may right now? -- lord howarth. well, ithink she is be to theresa may right now? -- lord howarth. well, i think she is doing the right thing, i think that she can stay and that she should stay. i wasjust reflecting can stay and that she should stay. i was just reflecting and trying to put events into some kind of perspective. jeremy corbyn won 30 seats on thursday. i won 33 seats in 2005 and resigned the next day. sol
3:33 pm
do not think that we should let the thought that a jeremy corbyn has won some runaway victory take hold, because that is not the position at all. it may not be the position, but i suppose lots of people would argue that theresa may has not won a runaway victory either, and that she campaigned on getting a stronger mandate to enter brexit negotiations and that to me, she hasn't, high she? of course, that is perfectly right. but we are about to start is very important negotiations, one week tomorrow, and we need stability, i think it would be immense with disruptive to those negotiations if we had either a leadership election in the conservative party or a general election. sol conservative party or a general election. so i think theresa may should stay, should conduct those negotiations, they are meant to take two years, that will be put to parliament at the end of that period of time, and then we can see where
3:34 pm
we are in two years' time, but while those negotiations continue, it is absolutely correct that theresa may should stay and it is the duty of every conservative member of parliament to give her their strong support. you talk about the need for stability, is not also the possibility that theresa may, she continues, will be seen as a weekend prime minister by eu brexit negotiators and that, therefore, the best dealfor negotiators and that, therefore, the best deal for the uk cannot be achieved under her leadership? no, i do not think so at all, i do not agree with that at all. when the eu negotiators are facing her across the table, they will be facing the prime minister of the united kingdom. when they are facing david davis, they will be facing the secretary of state for brexit for the uk. they will not be negotiating with groups of members of parliament. i do not think it will affect the course of negotiations andl affect the course of negotiations and i was much encouraged by what
3:35 pm
angela merkel has reported to have said yesterday, that there is a need for a good deal for europe and the uk. they are the biggest market, we wa nt uk. they are the biggest market, we want them to prosper and vice versa. i think there is every prospect of a deal that is good for the uk and good for the eu. do you think that a deal, the nature and shape of it, that it will change as a result of this election? i cannot see how or why. i heard jeremy corbyn this morning say rather more clearly than everl morning say rather more clearly than ever i have heard him before, that leaving the european union means leaving the european union means leaving the european union means leaving the single market. well, thatis leaving the single market. well, that is the position of the government. he has said that he wants free trade access to the single market, that is the position of the government. the labour manifesto said they did not want to continue with the free movement of people, that is the position of the government. so the overwhelming numbers of members of parliament in the house of, and are all the same mind, support the position of the
3:36 pm
government. if i may interrupt you, the dup, however, we are firmly of the dup, however, we are firmly of the position that there must be a deal and theresa may repeatedly in the campaign had said that no deal would be better than a bad deal. so that means that there must be some sort of deal, doesn't it? well, i think there will be, you cannot go into negotiations saying you will acce pt into negotiations saying you will accept a deal at any price, that is accept a deal at any price, that is a recipe for disaster, so you must go into the negotiations saying that fio go into the negotiations saying that no deal would be better than a bad deal and i no deal would be better than a bad dealand i can no deal would be better than a bad deal and i can imagine some terrible deals which would be worse than no deals which would be worse than no deal at all. but i am very confident that we will arrive at a deal with the european union that is good for them and good for us. you began this interview telling us that you think theresa may can and should stay, but do you think the divisions within the party, over europe, that, of course, have been there for a very long time, do you think there is a danger that the divisions between those who would wish to see it
3:37 pm
harder brexit and those who are co mforta ble harder brexit and those who are comfortable with a softer brexit might affect now whether she can stay on as prime minister?” might affect now whether she can stay on as prime minister? i think we ought to stop using those terms. i think they are ridiculous. i think we ought to talk about the kind of brexit do want and we want a brexit which the overwhelming majority of conservative party members want this also, and others too, they want a brexit that involves leaving the single market and the customs union, but reaching a very good agreement within the european union, that is the benefit for them and others. unless we get rid of these quite misleading terms of hard and soft, then we will not be better off under discussion will not be better off, so we discussion will not be better off, so we must do that. you have called them misleading terms, but they are well accepted for the nature of the brexit that the uk might face. very well accepted and used by yourself
3:38 pm
and your colleagues in the media. i am afraid it is much more illuminating to talk about what we actually mean and what we actually wa nt actually mean and what we actually want from brexit, that is the kind of discussion that we ought to be having. lord howard, thank you very much for your time today. thank you. ican much for your time today. thank you. i can talk to professor catherine barnard, professor of eu and employment law at the university of cambridge who joins me employment law at the university of cambridge whojoins me now. thank you forjoining us on the bbc news channel this afternoon. i will put that question to you that i put to lord howard. did you think that the nature of the brexit that the uk can accept will change as a result of this election? well, everything is to play for at the moment because theresa may remains prime minister and she is committed to a hard brexit, and indeed, the conservative manifesto largely replicated what theresa may had said in her
3:39 pm
lancaster house speech back in january 2017, namely that we would be leaving the single market and leaving the customs union. the complicated factor is that there will now be some sort of arrangement with the dup, the northern ireland's parliamentary party, and it could be that it parliamentary party, and it could be thatitis parliamentary party, and it could be that it is not in the interest of northern ireland to have a very hard border between the north and south, and that means he cannot leave the customs union, so the interesting question is, going forward, is that the possibility that we might stay in the customs union and perhaps lead the single market? jeremy corbyn himself said this morning that we would be leaving the single market but that leaves the question as to the fate of the customs union open. we havejust as to the fate of the customs union open. we have just seen david gauke go into number ten as we watch for news of a cabinet reshuffle from theresa may. returning to the issue of the border, between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, which, of course, is one of the key
3:40 pm
issues for the eu negotiators, just eliminate for us, if you would, how the dup's position on that, vis—a—vis, the conservative position, might affect the brexit? well, arlene foster, the leader of the dup, had said priorto well, arlene foster, the leader of the dup, had said prior to the election that she did not want a ha rd election that she did not want a hard border between the north and the south, and if we leave the customs union and there is nothing put in its place, the northern ireland border will be the ultra—border with the eu, and so, for that reason, if we left the customs union, there would be a hard border, they would have to be customs checks on all of the goods coming from the south and indeed the re st of coming from the south and indeed the rest of the eu, into northern ireland, and once you start talking about the hard border, you are really into quite difficult territory, because there are 300 crossing points between north and
3:41 pm
south ireland, it will cost a large suit] south ireland, it will cost a large sum of money to police those crossings, yes, some of it can be done by electronic devices, but all of that will take time and money to setup. and of that will take time and money to set up. and the moment you start to say that you will police the border, that resurrect some of the issues that resurrect some of the issues that arose 20 or so years ago, when you had a hard border, police were oi'i you had a hard border, police were on the border and that raised tensions between the north and the south of ireland. if you would, professor, could you give us an insight into how the eu negotiators will be looking at all of this, not just the border issue, of course, but their approach to brexit and what, with just over one week away now from those negotiations starting? the eu is extremely organised over brexit, what has really struck me is the level of the paperwork, the transparency of the documents that we have produced. and they're very clear timetable, and what is really important to remember is that the eu can only act with the
3:42 pm
powers given to it, and that means, at the moment, the commission can only negotiate what is this one issues and this one issues are citizens rights, the rights of eu nationals in the uk and uk nationals in the eu, issues about the border, and issues about the so—called brexit feed. and these are going to be the first things up for discussion, which starts injust over one week's time. the eu negotiators, you were struck that they were very organised, did you get the same view about the uk negotiators? the civil service have been working very hard, but they are dependent on political leadership and as we know, political leadership has been somewhat distracted by having a general election campaign for the last seven or so weeks and now, there is a degree of uncertainty about the direction of travel going forwards. this is where the hard and soft brexit make it in because it depends upon what sort of
3:43 pm
deal theresa may does with the dup. there is some talk about the dup insisting that perhaps nigel farage has a role, that would be pushing this very much towards a harder brexit. what the eu will not be looking at is to say, actually, this is not the very strong prime minister that they were hoping for seven weeks ago, they were hoping that she would be able to have a large majority and therefore, she would be able to steer through the negotiations in the direction that she wanted, and at the end of the process, deliver on a deal and get it through parliament. of course, all of that is very uncertain, so i think from the point of view of the eu, they are worried, and also, they are more concerned fiow eu, they are worried, and also, they are more concerned now that there is are more concerned now that there is a greater chance that we walked away with some sort of chaotic brexit work no deal at all because the negotiations break down at a very early stage. professor barnard, thank you very much. professor
3:44 pm
catherine barnard, professor of european law at cambridge university. as i was speaking to her, you will have seen on your screen more arrivals at downing street. let as head back there now, our political correspondent ellie price is keeping an eye on what is going on. various mps arriving, i think they represent a fairly broad range across the conservative party in terms of their position on the relationship with the eu. absolutely, we have heard damian green, a big friend of syriza me and a strong campaigner for the remain side in the eu. he was in the department for work and pensions, he has not come outjets department for work and pensions, he has not come out jets to tell us that he has a newjob. we have seen liam fox walking in on the last few minutes. he is the secretary for international trade, minutes. he is the secretary for internationaltrade, but minutes. he is the secretary for international trade, but we do not know if he will remain there. lots of people coming in, david gauke, the treasury minister, he has been tipped for bigger things, he was a treasury minister. we do not all of
3:45 pm
hisjob might treasury minister. we do not all of his job might have treasury minister. we do not all of hisjob might have been changed and he could have been promoted. quite a queue of people coming in, i would suspect there is a queue waiting to see the prime minister. but we have not heard what any of these newjobs might be. we know that the big, big jobs have been taken, there has been no movement in the home office, foreign office, defence ministry or indeedin foreign office, defence ministry or indeed in the treasury. so those big jobs have already been taken up, but, as yet, we await to see if there is going to be a reshuffle elsewhere. some quite well—known names have just locked into downing street. ellie price, thank you very much. we will be back at westminster. right now it is time for click. think robots and maybe you'll
3:46 pm
picture something like this. or this. but what about robotic muscle and smart materials that could act as human skin, all clothes that rehabilitate you as you wear them? well, that is part of what's called soft robotics and this team at bristol robotics lab are bioengineering technologies to do all of that and more. i went to take a peek at their labs. this is a bucket of alien saliva, right? yeah, this is the same stuff that drips out of the alien mouth. so ridley scottjust used a whole bunch of that. though, in this case, it is to simulate blood. this soft robot mimics how some bacteria move through our bodies.
3:47 pm
in the future, it is thought that nano robots will take a similar trip through our veins looking for infection and illness. oh, that's awesome! some of the projects they are working on here involves making assistive technology for elderly and disabled people, like this pneumatic artificial muscle. it can be made into any shape and built into clothing. as you apply air, it changes its shape so it could for instance help people with limited grip strength. its forces only dependent on how much air pressure you apply. and here is some material that can sense when that pressure should be applied. this diametric elastomer can detect when it's being stretched, so it can sense when you are trying to move and add extra power to maybe help you up the stairs. and it can not only detect movement, it can also change its shape when you apply a high enough for teach. you could use it for changeable clothing, clothing that
3:48 pm
can change its colour. you can use it as a sort of second skin to help with deep vein thrombosis, to assist with pumping blood. it can even be layered up to create stronger artificial muscles. it doesn't seem like it is doing a lot, but, actually, it is very thin, it weighs almost nothing — the active part of which only weighs, let's say, four grams, and it can lift two kilos. in one respect none of this is complicated, none of this is extremely high—tech, using like billions of transistors, and it is simple voltage and a piece of material. i think that is one of the big advantages of soft robotics, the simplicity, redundancy. in a complicated robotic system you have a lot of elements that can go wrong. with these sorts of things it is very simple and it is very adaptable. the intelligence is in the design and immediately used, rather than in the complexity. the robotics lab in bristol is 50,000 square feet of innovation filled with hundreds of different types of robots. but what nearly all have in common
3:49 pm
is they need power to run. over in the bio energy lab, scientists are working on one freely available re—source the world will never run out of — urine. each one of these cylinders is a microbial fuel cell device. it turns waste water into electricity using microbes. so the microbes eat the waste? they eat the waste. that is their favourite item on the menu. right, ok! i've been to that restaurant, yeah. in this unit, two litres of urine is fed into the fuel cell pack. the microbes eat what they need, creating electrons as a by—product. and because they are attached to an electrode's surface, it is all collected to produce about 30—40 milliwatts of power. now that's enough to slowly charge a smartphone, power smart displays, or power internal lights for their special portable toilets.
3:50 pm
this is only one unit of many. when we do it out of the lab, we install these units out of the lab, we have many more of them connected together as a stack. if you are going to glastonbury this year, you might see these screens near the urinals. if you choose to use the urinals, you'll be part of an experiment which is literally putting the p into power. these are e ink displays, which don't require a lot of power. but a lucky few may be able to charge their phones for a bit, but only after donating. most of the pee used here comes from staff donors at the lab. it's only good for the microbes foran hourorso, so a constant supply is needed. although, i think i'll hang on. hello and welcome
3:51 pm
to the week in tech. it was the week that uber refunded customers for journeys taken near last saturday night's london terror attacks, after pricing had automatically surged due to demand — a function they disabled later that evening. the comment section on britney spears instagram account has been used by russian speaking hackers to test malware. and snapchat specs have gone on sale in the uk. if you think this is
3:52 pm
a sensible way to go out. google's streetview cars have been tracking air pollution. after a year of the vehicles driving around the streets of oakland, california, data localised to individual roads has become available, with initial recordings of black carbon, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide being revealed. anyone with kids can tell you what it's like trying to get play—doh out the carpet. but, sadly, i don't have a new gadget to tell you about that. it's actually the play clay that's gone high—tech. doh universe can conduct electricity and aims to help kids learn about circuits, sound, light and movement through play. and, finally, researchers at mit have developed sensors for the grippers of robotic arms that aimed to help bots grab things with the right amount of pressure. the gelsight sensors aim to make negotiating smaller objects possible, as well as making general household tasks easier to approach — which would be handy, if one day robots are to become ordinary household companions. around the world, scientists are looking at different ways of improving our quality of life. here, it is alternative sources of power. at soft robotics, it's smart materials and possibly in the future bionic limbs. but in italy's scuola superiore sant‘anna, they are looking at sensation. ana matronic went there to look at attempts to simulate touch. i am at the biorobotics lab where researchers are trying to merge human physiology with machine engineering. the team are working on a bionic fingertip that is capable
3:53 pm
of detecting texture. the human sense of touch is an incredibly complex one. i don't even need to look at these three pieces of plastic to sense the differences in the coarseness of the ridges. this of course presents a huge problem to people designing artificial limbs. how do you transfer that same sensitivity into a prosthetic hand? to create a machine capable of sensing and transmitting tactile data, first we need to understand how bodies decode sensory stimuli. fingertips have the highest concentration of sensation almost anywhere in the human body. thanks to 20,000 nerve fibres on each finger. and these tiny receptors. they react to sensory information as we move our fingers across different surfaces. each receptor has a different role. some respond to pain, some to temperature. others react to pressure or vibration. this is the characteristic that allows our skin to interact
3:54 pm
with the environment and that will allow an object, when manipulated, not to break. the bionic fingertip registers the textures it touches as electrical spikes. on screen it may look simple, but that is exactly the language that our nervous system speaks. as we touch objects, it sends nerve impulses to the brain. and the tiny, subtle variations in how the skin deforms as we touch changes those impulses and how we perceive texture. this capitalises on an actual principle and can be more effective as humans and animals in general can interact with the environment. the professor and his team have already had some success. dennis sorensen was one of the first amputees to try out the bionic fingertip. the output from the finger was directly connected to the healthy nerves in his upperarm.
3:55 pm
i could tell the difference between where it was very rough and smooth. yeah, that was amazing. and, since this first clinical trial a couple of years ago, the team had been trying to increase the number of textures the patients can feel. the experiments that we are showing now are demonstrating the capability to encode, for examples silk, from cotton, from elastic, from wool, from different kinds of materials. and in this way we could restore a more natural sense of touch to the person wearing the prosthesis. what is learned here can be transferred to other applications. for example, a surgical robot could use this technology to identify tumours, which would feel different in texture to healthy tissue. another kind of application is for rescue.
3:56 pm
to allow robots to be present in the environment, not only through vision, but to have more senses available when exploring an environment. think for example of the nuclear disasters, or in the case of underwater application. the robot can go and touch in the perceived environments, based also on the sensory feedback that you can have remotely controlling their arm. once this technology is mastered, it can be integrated into simple things like gloves. for instance, i could be anywhere in the world. my husband back in new york can give me the sensation of petting our cat. and that would be transferred through these actuators to me anywhere in the world. i want one right now. well, i can't give you that
3:57 pm
at the moment, ana, but in the meantime, how about a hug from this chap? that's it from the bristol robotics lab. next week, we are going to be in los angeles for the annual e3 video games extravaganza. it is going to be brilliant. we will tweet everything we see at bbc click. you can also follow us on facebook for loads of extra content throughout the week. thanks for watching and we will see you in la. hello, we will start with a quick look at the satellite sequence. it shows it was a lovely day across east anglia and the south—east. it will stay wed in western scotland into the early hours. scattered
3:58 pm
showers on the western side of england and wales. largely dry further east and pretty much across the board, temperatures in major towns and cities around 11 degrees, lower in rural spots but not cold anywhere. into the morning, the breezy day for the central lowlands of scotland, dusty and breezy further south. showers feeding in england and wales, good spells of sunshine for the afternoon. wet weather for western scotland but the east does well, 18 degrees in aberdeen and 19 or 20 towards the london area. for tuesday, there will bea london area. for tuesday, there will be a bit ofa london area. for tuesday, there will be a bit of a breeze, the north and west of the uk with thicker cloud and rain. not so further south, light winds here and pleasantly warm and sunshine. this is bbc news at apm. i'm annita mcveigh at westminster, where senior government ministers have warned theresa may to change her leadership style, as she reshuffles her cabinet. damain green is moved from work
3:59 pm
and pensions to the cabinet office. trade secretary liam fox has also entered number ten in the past few minutes. perverse is this even street where —— this is the scene in downing street where an announcement is expected on further appointments soon. there is open speculation by senior conservatives over the prime minister's future. theresa may is a dead woman walking. it's just how long she's going to remain on death row. what's your guess? i think we will know very shortly. i mean we could get to next week and it all collapses for her. downing street is forced to clarify its position over a deal with the dup.
4:00 pm

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on