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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 12, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin theresa may prepares to face criticism of her election campaign and leadership style in a meeting with her own backbenchers. today, the prime minister need to explain to the mps why the election result was a disaster. we will be asking experts about the future of britain. we also have our very own larry the cat. we also have our very own larry the cat. good morning, it's monday the 12th of june. also this morning: also, steph is finding out what
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businesses think of the election results. new research suggests that confidence has fallen because of the political uncertainty following the election and concerns about brexit talks. i will be talking about it with business leaders. just weeks after he was elected president of france, emmanuel macron is on course to secure another stunning victory, this time in the country's parliamentary elections. in sport, mixed emotions for wales. they take a point in serbia but yet another draw in world cup qualifying onlyjust keeps alive their slim hopes of qualifying for next year's finals in russia. cheese that grows on plants and fish fingers made from chicken, we'll find out where some children think their food comes from. and carol has the weather. a breezy day ahead. particularly windy across scotland and north—east england. we have showers, many will fade and many of us will have a dry day. i will have more details in about 15 minutes.
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good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will today meet backbench conservative mps and set out her case for staying on in downing street. the prime minister will also chair a meeting of her newly reshuffled cabinet. michael gove — one of the driving forces behind brexit — has returned to the front bench. mrs may is also still trying to secure a deal with the democratic unionists to ensure they'll back her at westminster. our political correspondent tom bateman reports. back at the heart of government, michael gove's last regular appearances on this street were before to may became pm. she sat to old opponent after the bruising eu referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside borisjohnson. referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside boris johnson. the referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside borisjohnson. the two men spectacularly fell out over the tory leadership contest last year. the foreign secretary has denied having his eye on the top job again, calling for mps to rally around mrs
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may. jeremy corbyn did not win this election. it is absolutely right that she should go at head, form a government and deliver on the priorities of the people. i'm going to be backing her, absolutely everybody i'm going to be talking to is backing her as well. mrs may's reshuffle sees damian green, an old friend of the prime minister, become first secretary of straight. effectively mrs may's number two. the former secretary liz truss has been demoted, taking a lower ranking job in the treasury. other key figures as they when iraq —— they are, including jeremy hunt and liam fox. mrs may will hope the reshuffle, most notable for its lack of changes, will help every gel to tory mp. she said last night she intends to stay in herjob. tory mp. she said last night she intends to stay in herjobli tory mp. she said last night she intends to stay in herjob. i said during the election campaign that if re—elected, i would intend to serve a full—time. what i am doing now is actually getting on with the immediatejob.
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actually getting on with the immediate job. —— actually. actually getting on with the immediatejob. —— actually. i think thatis immediatejob. —— actually. i think that is what the public would expect. they want to see government providing that certainty and stability. but life without a majority the house of commons will be very different. the pm may have to wait goodbye to some of her policy plans. today, she will meet with her own backbenchers, many of whom will be looking for reassurances. she now faces the challenge of starting brexit talks with her authority weekend and her long—term future still in doubt. in a moment we'll speak to our ireland correspondent chris page in belfast, but first chris mason is in downing street. chris, it's been a tough few days for the prime minister, and potentially more trouble ahead today? and huge day this morning for the prime minister. this is the last thing she would have imagined just a week ago. the whole point of this election campaign was to turbocharge her authority, to cement her
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position as the dominating political figure of the coming years. instead, as opposed to being turbocharged, the result has wheel clamped, really, her future. she the result has wheel clamped, really, herfuture. she is a stark and really struggling to impose her authority on her party. publicly, we are seeing senior figures are saying they want to support and backup but along stampedes —— amongst mps, particularly those who lost their seats, there is a visceral anger. a real disappointment. this was a volu nta ry real disappointment. this was a voluntary decision to go to the electorate and has turned out to be a complete disaster. plenty will hope she will be humble in front of backbench mps meeting this afternoon at around five o'clock. the other big question, i couldn't resist bringing this out this morning, it is this document. it is meant to be the sacred text of government for the sacred text of government for the next five years with the conservatives winning big, that was heraim. instead, conservatives winning big, that was her aim. instead, she conservatives winning big, that was heraim. instead, she will conservatives winning big, that was her aim. instead, she will have to decide with the conversations with the dup, how much of it gets ripped up. fascinating times. now to chris page, who's in belfast. chris, there was confusion
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at the weekend about whether there is actually a deal in place with the dup. what's the latest? well, the talking will continue but i think there is little doubt that a deal will be done. the question is what shape that you will take. in terms of what the dup are pushing for, according to sources in the party, they are keen for more investment and more money for the economy in northern ireland and want a stronger voice on brexit as well asissues a stronger voice on brexit as well as issues specific to this part of the uk. they want to talk about part of the whole of the uk for example patterns and they want at the winter fuel allowance for older people to be protected. —— pensions. what is less certain is to whether there will be an agreement to restore power sharing here in northern ireland. talks will begin egg and this morning after there was a pause during the general election campaign. —— to begin this morning
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again. sinn fein increased their strength in the general election as well and they have strongly criticised the deal between the dup and the conservative party and say it shows the british government cannot act as an independent, impartial paparone, if you like, in a talks process. that impartiality is in the good friday agreement which is the foundation stone of the power—sharing settlement here. there has been concern expressed that nothing should happen to put the good friday agreement at risk. they will be back to the talks table at dell fast today. thank you very much for that, chris. —— dell fast today. thank you very much forthat, chris. —— belfast. later we'll be hearing from a former dup northern ireland assembly member about what they'd be expecting from a potential deal. that's at 6:40. nicola sturgeon will call for a cross—party "four nation" approach to the brexit negotiations as she joins scottish national party mps at westminster later. the first minister of
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scotland wants membership of the european single market and the customs union to be "at the heart" of any agreement, with the rights of eu nationals living in the uk guaranteed with immediate effect. the snp won 35 seats in last week's general election, down 21 on its 2015 result. detectives investigating the london bridge attack have made a further arrest in east london. a 19—year—old man was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences shortly before ten o'clock last night. six other men remain in custody. exit polls following the first round of france's parliamentary election suggest president macron‘s new centrist party is on course for a landslide victory. projections show la republique en marche and its modem ally look set to win up to a45 of the 577 seats in france's national assembly. the final outcome will be decided in a run—off next sunday. it is amazing when you consider they
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are only one—year—old. both the white house and downing street have dismissed a report that donald trump wants to delay his proposed state visit to the uk, until he has the support of the british public. an online petition was signed by nearly two million people who wanted to block the american president's trip to britain. the opposition was inflamed by mr trump's criticism of london mayor sadiq khan's response to the london bridge terror attack. many children are confused about where their food comes from according to a new poll. in a survey of more than 5,000 children between the ages of five and 16 some thought cheese comes from plants, tomatoes grow underground and nearly a fifth of the very youngest thought fish fingers were made from chicken. andy moore has the details. the healthy eating week threw up some surprising results. around a
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quarter of all children thought strawberry jam could be quarter of all children thought strawberryjam could be included as one of their five—day portions of fruit and vegetables to a lot of people thought that fruit pastilles would count. there was a bit of confusion about where food came from. something reflected in their responses of these youngsters. do you know what fish fingers are made from? chicken. blair fish. dead fish. fish and breadcrumbs. tomatoes, where do you get those? the shop. trees. the ground. 5 tomato plants. dew nowhere cheese comes from? no idea. -- do you know. no. not sure. it's made out of milk. just under a quarter of a 5—7 year
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old in the survey thought that prawns were plant and one fifth thought that chips were made from animals. the managing director of the british nutrition foundation said that schools and families should and could work together to educate children about making healthier choices. andy moore, bbc news. i'm not sure which is my favourite thing. a tree that grows cheese or a prawn plant. i loved it when they said where the fish fingers come from and she said, the. clever, clever child. cast your mind back one year ago. we were dreaming around this time of welsh glory, won't we? yes. remember, it was hugely positive, really exciting, we were hanging all of our hopes on them. they still have major challenge on
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their hands. there was a shot from their hands. there was a shot from the penalty shot but the group leaders equalised leaving aside four points behind with four games to play. for the first time since 1966, and england football team has won a world cup. everton forward scored the only goal of the game. everton forward dominic calvert—lewin scored the only goal of the game as the under 20's beat venezuela 1—0 in south korea to get their hands on the trophy. lewis hamilton dominated the canadian grand prix, leading from start to finish in montreal to cut sebastian vettel‘s championship lead to 12 points. vettel could only finish fourth. and in paris, rafael nadal won a record tenth french open title. the king of clay made light work of stan wawrinka in the final. what you do to celebrate? you throw
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yourself on the clay. that's what he has done every year. ten! ten! it's ludicrous. he is coming to queens in a couple of weeks, yeah. andy murray is obviously number one at the moment that he won queens and wimbledon so he needs to pick up those ranking points because guess who could be number one now, it could be batman there. incredible to think that he has come from a wrist injury -- think that he has come from a wrist injury —— that man. he thought his career was over, not so much. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the weather is quite changeable this week. what we have is some rain and week. what we have is some rain and we have showers around this morning. it will be breezy at times. temperatures could hit high 20s in the south by the time we get to wednesday. the other thing worth bearing in mind is pollen levels. they will be higher this week across much of the uk. if you have an
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allergy to grass pollen, buried in mind. a lot of showers are coming in on the breeze today —— bet that in mind. the wind will be strong today across parts of central and southern scotla nd across parts of central and southern scotland and north—east england, particularly the final across the corridor. they're that in mind if you are travelling. 40— 15 mph. you mightfind you are travelling. 40— 15 mph. you might find some restrictions on the forth road bridge. we have showers today in northern england and also some sunshine. as we go into wales, the west midlands, again, showers are around but not all of us are seeing duscher was. a bit of cloud as well. in southern counties, east anglia and the south—east, a similar scenario. some bright spells but many of the date —— many of the showers will fade throughout the day and we will see some writer breaks develop in this cloud. it will be quite a breezy day, particularly in the north to the centre of the low
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pressure. temperatures up to 19 or 20 today. not quite dizzying heights of 2a that east anglia saw yesterday. a pleasant enough day. a lot of dry weather around. in the south south—west, some patches of fog forming. becker cloud will introduce outbreaks of rain across northern ireland, south—west england, parts of wales and also western parts of scotland. that is courtesy of this weather front here. as we move further south, i pressure is becoming more established settings will be quieter and more settled. there goes that rain, moving towards the east throughout the day. a lot of cloud is associated with it but further south, we are into the sunshine and it will warm up tomorrow. we are looking at highs of the 23— 2a mark. further north, we are still in the mid— high—teens. for wednesday, wednesday is looking at the warmest day for the week in the south. we
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could hit 27 or 28 in the sunshine. uv levels will be higher, up to eight in the index. normally in the uk, the highest weekend is ninth circuit that in mind. in the north, we have the weather front producing some rain. —— so bear that in mind. as we split up into aberdeen. for thursday, mixed fortunes. a lot of dry weather and sunshine and temperatures 17— 23. all we bit of everything going on in the weather this week. we shall look forward to that. it is with us to have a look at the papers today. it is nice to be back. let's have a look at the front page of the times this morning. we told you the story earlier on about trumpet
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visiting britain. their main story this morning is that may signal is a soft brexit. we will be discussing that throughout the morning. michael gove returning to the front bench and more of a shuffle than a reshuffle, really. not that many changes made and this picture here ofan changes made and this picture here of an actress who spent the day judging a dog show. i can't reveal any spoilers from her show, i am yet to see it. the daily telegraph has a picture of michael gove is being called in to save theresa may. we also have analysis on the programme about the deal or no deal with the d up. about the deal or no deal with the d u p. the irish prime minister warned theresa may that he packed with the dup theresa may that he packed with the d u p could put the peace process in northern ireland at risk. questions have been raised about the possibility of the government
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remaining unbiased. another horror crash, richard hammond rolling down the hill on a car but eventually caught on fire. he came out with a fractured knee in the end. the main story is that labour is in a power bid. jeremy corbyn says he can prime minister in months, forming a minority government. sale, what do you have? i know many people had a lot of fun of the last couple of days saying england have won the world cup. it isjust days saying england have won the world cup. it is just because as broadcasters we like to be able to save at least once in a generation. talking about this image here. this is the england under 20 goalkeeper yesterday fool ‘s son of the former goalkeeping coach at newcastle united and this boy here, this man, is gareth southgate's godson. how is that for footballing heritage? is gareth southgate's godson. how is that forfootballing heritage? his
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good friends with andy woodman and was asked to be godfather to his son and now he is the hero, the penalty saving hero for the england under 20 side. there was a great penalty save because he went the wrong way and still managed to get a powerful hand on it. that was lovely. fantastic to see. but talking about legends, we mentioned him a moment ago. rafael nadal, last year he left roland garros in tears but here he is, triumphant yesterday fool ‘s dog an incredible ten time winner. the king of paris they call him. he celebrated in his traditional style by rolling around in the clay. the front page of the guardian talking about theresa may pleadings of support as her future about theresa may pleadings of support as herfuture hangs in the
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balance. and this is how the front page of the mail has written it. a lovely piece inside one of the papers today, a great quote from adam west, the batman legend who died over the weekend. when robin, in one episodes is to batman, where did you get a live fish from, as he whips out a live fish. adam, as batman, says the true crime fighter a lwa ys batman, says the true crime fighter always carries everything he needs in his utility belt. even a live dish. 20 past six. good morning to you. theresa may will today meet conservative mps and set out her case for staying in downing street. theresa may will meet her newly—formed cabinet later to discuss a deal that could see the conservatives supported in parliament by the democratic unionist party. as news spread of a possible deal on friday, the dup‘s website crashed as people tried to find out who the party are, and what it stands for. it was founded by ian paisley back in 1971. it is pro—union, pro—brexit and socially conservative. the dup is the biggest party
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in northern ireland. it has ten mps in westminster, making it the fifth largest party. some of its policies have come under scrutiny. it opposes same—sex marriage and is anti—abortion. but in return for supporting the government, its expected the party will instead focus on extra cash for northern ireland, and likely oppose big austerity changes to pensions and benefits. nelson mccausland is a former dup member of the northern ireland assembly and joins us from belfast. so the first question, has a deal been done yet? i think the leader of the d been done yet? i think the leader of thedup been done yet? i think the leader of the d u p has been clear that discussions are still ongoing. they will continue today and probably tomorrow as well. i think you picked up tomorrow as well. i think you picked up on tomorrow as well. i think you picked up on some tomorrow as well. i think you picked up on some of the key points there. the party are generally anti— extreme as regards austerity. they area extreme as regards austerity. they are a compassionate party and so is
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to oppose the removal of the triple lock for pensions and to oppose, for example, the introduction of means testing for winter fuel payments. so it is generally pro— brexit, strongly prounion party. and going into discussions are now they will be looking very much at the interests of the united kingdom as a whole because of this particular time there is a real need for stability. they would want to ensure that there is as much stability of was able at westminster. picking up on some of the policies we discussed. we know, for example, views on same—sex marriage and is very much an anti—abortion party. would they be proposing that those should be extended for northern ireland? the position of the d u p is to be pro— life and pro— family. the reality is that these are matters that are devolved to the
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north of ireland assembly, they are not issues that would be dealt with at westminster. those things not even being discussed. are they read lines as far as the d u p are concerned? despite one of the big issues for the party will be around brexit because of the land border between northern ireland and the irish republic. they want to ensure that whatever the final shape of the outcome it does not impede movement across the border. at the same time, they want to ensure that nothing is done to restrict free movement from northern ireland into the rest of the united kingdom and right across the united kingdom and right across the united kingdom and right across the united kingdom. let's talk a little if we can about for example, what the irish prime minister was saying, he called theresa may to express his concern over a deal. he said he was seeking assurances to make sure that nothing would put the good friday agreement at risk. in the uk government continue to be an honest broker within this
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environment? i listen carefully to what he said. the strongest criticism of the position of the conservative party has come from his party but then they have a record of a lwa ys party but then they have a record of always criticising secretaries of state. previously they would ——... i don't suspect there will be much support. the reality is that the conservative government is the government of the day. the secretary of state is the person to look after the affairs of northern ireland should have no problem there in terms of negotiations to restore devolution in ireland. what do you say to people of concern about the length of the d u p to a violent past? the reality is there are links toa past? the reality is there are links to a violent past. it is a democratic unionist party. members of the party were targeted by the provisional ira, along with reddish soldiers and a lot of other innocent people. the fact is it is a
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democratic party and has views very much in line with some within the conservative party on many issues. thank you for your time this morning. we should make clear as we did on saturday, that we have put m, did on saturday, that we have put in, we have a d u petre talked with the and to this point they have refused an invitation. —— we have asked the d u p to talk to us. hopefully we will be speaking to someone from the party a little later on. we'll have the headlines in a moment, but first steph is in the city of london for us this morning. good morning from mansion house, the official residence of the lord mayor of london. across from me you can see the bank of england — a lot of people having to work this morning. lots of business people and people in general are wondering what on earth is going to happen next. what does all of this legal uncertainty mean for our economy and
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for daily business life at the moment? there has been some research by the institute of directors, an organisation that lots of business leaders are members of, looking at what exactly i mean, at how people feel about it. they polled their members and asked them about how they felt stuck around 65% of them said that they feel that business confidence is fallen now, they feel uncertain about what the future may hold. that is political uncertainty we have now is not really helping them. many people are thinking come on, we need to get on with brexit talks and get some certainty into the business world so they can plan and work out their investment with a nest. this does not help the mood in the city like this. businesses all over the country are trying to work out what it means. there was an initial reaction on friday to the result in the currency markets. since the referendum we have seen how much the pound has fallen against the euro and against the dollar and obviously when that
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happens it really hits the cost of buying things from abroad so bringing things into the country gets more expensive. it is good for exporting, goods manufacturers who sell things bought the then buying components from other parts of the world can add to the cost of things for them which is why we are starting to see prices going up in the supermarkets. because of that cost and the change in currency markets. it fell dramatically when the referendum happened, when we got that result and we saw a fall again on friday with the pound down about 1.796. on friday with the pound down about 1.7%. falling a bit of the back of all that. it may change again. we will get more information about what is going on. i will be here talking to business leaders about what will happen next for them. first, to business leaders about what will happen next forthem. first, new travel and weather from where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. borough market is slowly beginning to return to some sort normality follow a the terrorist attack there last saturday. police have arrested another man in
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connection with the attack stop he was detained embarking on suspicion of terrorism offences. six others remain in custody. the cordon around the market and southwark cathedral was lifted over the weekend which allowed a church service to take place yesterday. but, it's understood stalls will not begin trading back at the market until at least wednesday. the owner of one of london's oldest football clubs has been given until today to pay the club's debt. if francesco bechetti doesn't settle leyton orients debt then he will have to sell the club. a winding up hearing is due to start at the high court later. brexit and its impact on the tech industry is set to be one of the main themes of london tech week which begins today. industry leaders are expected to discuss how the sector will respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by leaving the eu. and one of the most prestigious galleries is embracing our love of phones. the saatchi gallery in central london is asking budding artists to submit interesting photographs taken on their mobile
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phone. the winner will then be given the chance to put on their own exhibition in the space which once housed works by the likes of damien hirst and tracey emin. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good surface on the tube at the moment. there are problems on the train with problems at waterloo station. platform 13 is out of action which means fewer services can run on some lines. on the roads, this is the north circular. down to one lane eastbound towards tottenham after a lorry caught fire. and elsewhere, colders green is still closed. finally in girls caught the traffic light at warwick road are not working and part of the junction is coned off for safety. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. there is cloud around and it is thinning. leading to decent spells of sunshine. it is, still, however, quite breezy. we've had a windy
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wrekin in the briefest with us. in most cases it stays completely cannot rule out the odd shower. this afternoon, is fine dry bright sunshine with temperatures reaching around 20. bearing in mind from today into the rest of this week the pollen count is very high so if you suffer from hay fever, pollen count is very high so if you sufferfrom hay fever, tissues pollen count is very high so if you suffer from hay fever, tissues at the ready. overnight tonight clear spells with patchy cloud and temperatures between 12 and 1a celsius as the minimum. from tuesday, fine, dry, sunshine with brea ks tuesday, fine, dry, sunshine with breaks in the cloud and wind is a little lighter. the temperature is i'll warmer. we look at a maximum of 22, 20 three celsius. uv levels from tomorrow are very high as well. the high—pressure dominates weather this week leaving a dry and warm from wednesday evening we could see a couple of showers pushing up from the south mixed in with some warm airso we the south mixed in with some warm air so we could hear a rumble to office under there. but as i mentioned, high—pressure dominates. from wednesday onwards, blue skies and sunshine and those temperatures
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rising steadily. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we've brought number ten to salford — complete with larry the downing street cat — we'll be finding out what drove britain to vote the way it did and where we go from here. as the prime minister continues trying to strike deal with the dup to create an effective government, we'll speak to brexit secretary david davis he was given just months to live but ian toothill took on one of the biggest challenges in the world. he became the first cancer patient to conquer everest and he'll be here to tell us about his extraordinary achievement. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may will today meet backbench conservative mps and set
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out her case for staying on in downing street. the prime minister will also chair a meeting of her newly reshuffled cabinet. michael gove — one of the driving forces behind brexit — has returned to the front bench. let's speak to our political correspondent chris mason who's in downing street. chris, it's been a tough few days for the prime minister, and potentially more trouble ahead today? i think that is an understatement. it will be as very difficult few days that the prime minister. the whole point of this election would that it would turbocharge her authority and she would be the dominating politicalfigure of authority and she would be the dominating political figure of her time. ahead of those brexit talks starting in a week. instead of it being a turbocharged, she has wheelclampers political authority. hugely diminished within her own party and across the country,
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yesterday's cabinet reshuffle was an indication of that. a cabinet reshuffle is meant to be a big exercise of prime ministerial power and authority. it was pretty much a non— event and that tells you everything you need to know about theresa may's diminished authority. yes, she has brought michael goes back and that is symbolic. she is trying to make the case that the conservative tent is broad and she is willing to listen that this is the exact opposite. the absolute nightmare scenario where she would like to be a week ago. i have waited —— weight is around a bit in brea kfast. —— weight is around a bit in breakfast. this is the conservative ma nifesto. breakfast. this is the conservative manifesto. ——i have waived this around. how much of this will she have to shred publicly in order to accommodate that dup of northern ireland? and proper self up into government. nicola sturgeon will call for a cross—party "four nation" approach to the brexit negotiations as she joins scottish national party mps at westminster later.
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the first minister of scotland wants membership of the european single market and the customs union to be "at the heart" of any agreement, with the rights of eu nationals living in the uk guaranteed with immediate effect. detectives investigating the london bridge attack have made a further arrest in east london. a 19—year—old man was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences shortly before ten o'clock last night. six other men remain in custody. exit polls following the first round of france's parliamentary election suggest president macron's new centrist party is on course for a landslide victory. projections show la republique en marche and its modem ally look set to win up to a45 of the 577 seats in france's national assembly. the final outcome will be decided in a run—off next sunday. nearly five months after president trump took
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office his wife, melania, and son barron, have moved into the white house. they had stayed behind in new york so 11 year—old barron could complete the school year. the first lady is the first in modern times not to move straight in, but she's tweeted that she is looking forward to the memories the family will make in their new home. a new poll suggests many children are confused about where their food comes from. nearly a third of five to seven year olds surveyed by the british nutrition foundation thought that cheese came from a plant, not an animal. just over one in five of the infants believed that animals provide us with pasta. nearly a quarter thought prawns come from plants. and a fifth of those questioned thought that chips were also from animals. if you are watching us this morning
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and your children think that food comes from funny places, do get in touch. so much sport going on. it was a busy weekend. i am dying to talk to you about the triathlon. exciting doesn't begin to describe it. wales manager chris coleman thinks they need to win all four of their remaining world cup qualifiers if they're to make sure of reaching next year's finals. a penalty from aaron ramsey gave them the lead against serbia in belgrade. but the home side equalised, leaving wales four points behind the group leaders, with four games left. we were looking to win it in the last ten minutes. once they equalised, we had two or three break away is where it could have been different but overall, a good game,
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a tough game. two good things for us. a point, it's a good point. the republic of ireland are second in that group, level on points with serbia — and they‘ re still unbeaten after a 1—all draw with austria in dublin, thanks tojon walters' late equaliser. for the first time since 1966, an england national football team has won a world cup. the u20's beat venezuela 1—0 in the final in south korea. everton's dominic calvert—lewin with the goal. it was a nervy ending for england. they needed keeper freddie woodman to save a penalty in the second half. and the national side's senior manager believes this could be a turning point. obviously, ultimately, the aim is that those players come through to the seniors and a big part of that now is the event to get opportunities with their clubs because i think they have shown, if the under 20s were world champions, there is enough players there to fulfil careers in the game without
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looking elsewhere. rafael nadal said he thought he'd be fishing on his boat by now, not winning a grand slam for a record 10th time. he cruised past stan wawrinka in straight sets in the french open final, to take his 15th major title — and he thinks one of his best, considering he's now into his thirties. i have 31 already. because of the level of tennis and accepting i have been under physical problems for a couple of times in the last three for time, it is an important one. you cannot write him off. who else can you never write off? the brownlees. this is the first time we have seen them compete since mexico
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last year when alistair carried johny over the finish line. there was a familiar sight in leeds — but still a thrilling one — when for the second year in a row, double olympic champion. alastair brownlee beat his brotherjonny to victory in the world triathlon series in their home town. it was their first race together since alistair carried jonny over the line in last year's finale in mexico. johnny came out those in the swimming and alastair caught him out and on the back leg, they were over one minute ahead. where was everybody else behind them? over one minute. incredible. a brilliant performance. england's women were beaten by the netherlands in their hockey international in london. the dutch are the world's number one team and they went 2—0 ahead before sophie bray brought england level. it went to penalties — and there was some revenge for the netherlands, who lost in a shoot out to teamgb in last year's olympic final in rio. in their very first season, wasps have won the netball super league.
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the coventry—based side pipped loughborough lightning in a tight final yesterday. 55—51 the final score. lewis hamilton's formula 1 title challenge is back on track after he won the canadian grand prix. he lead from start to finish in montreal to take the chequered flag there for the sixth time — and cut sebastian vettel‘s championship lead to 12 points after he could only finish fourth. my my first win here, ten years ago, this is incredibly special. i have to thank my team that made this impossible. the guys back in the factory to work hard to really fix what we had in the last race to bring it here. if you are looking at the television at home thinking that they recognise the sports broadcaster. it is, in fact, broadcaster. it is, infact, sir patrick stewart of star trek and x—men fame. what are we going to talk about now?
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four days on from the general election and there still seems to be more questions than answers. we've brought downing street to us here at breakfast. dan has gone downstairs to a mock—up number ten where he's meeting voters and experts. dan. iam not i am not really inside the real number ten. this is more perspex than glass but look at our little set that we have managed to put together. it is complete with some of the lamp posts and the front door, the famous front door, just slightly smaller than it is in real life. the way you can tell is it is fake, the door actually opens from the outside because the real number ten doesn't even have a keyhole in it and you can only open it from the inside. we have our slightly own slightly dishevelled —— very own
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slightly dishevelled —— very own slightly dishevelled —— very own slightly dishevelled larry the cat. in case you were wondering, it is not real. we have been talking about protest a nd not real. we have been talking about protest and policy. we have a panel of voters with us throughout the morning. the first is that of austerity. you are a midwife. i wonder how austerity generally affects your everyday work as a midwife. leak on the nhs needs investment. —— clearly, the nhs needs investment. you will see a division in the care that is provided otherwise. the public sector pay cap was one of the reasons that i voted labour. it
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really is public services in general but specifically the nhs. the staff that work there need investment. they are tired, they are demoralised, they need to be rewarded for the... demoralised, they need to be rewarded for the. .. so when you cast your vote last week... investment in the nhs was absolutely key. as a midwife, the promise in the manifesto about proper support for infa nt manifesto about proper support for infant deaths and bereavement support for parents who lose our baby, these things are really, really important to me and labour we re really important to me and labour were promising what i wanted them to do and specifically invest in the nhs which we all use, we all should be proud of it. with you feeling that in the education sector as a teacher as well? absolutely. we are
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creating unequal economies, unequal communities. stress is being put on families. children are turning up to school hungry and teachers as well as teaching and learning are having to deal with the well—being of their child. the decision is being made whether to give them breakfast. it is impacting on the well—being of the child. in terms of the life of the child. in terms of the life of the child, they are in a classroom where there are unprecedented numbers. the social divide between the children who are there and doing very well who have access to technology, access to wonderful life experiences and yet at the same time, the poorest, the fifth of the community who are there without the same life chances and life experiences are having to compete together, worked together and what message are we giving to those children when we want them to succeed and do well for our country? well covered in terms of healthcare,
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we have a midwife and two doctors. from your perspective, social care has been a big issue in this election campaign. the last few weeks and months as well. was austerity are part of that and a decision on when you cast your vote? completely. i am a gp. we are a rare and dying breed. you can't get in to see a gp. you can't get a hospital bed and we are short of money. everybody knows we are short of money. it's a great idea, let's take another service that is short of money and join the mob. that will generate lots of new money that will look after all of the shortfall in and we will have a marvellous, working, fully paid for nhs? no. it won't happen. we have seen people picking up the pieces. doctors,
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nurses, people are doing it from a vocation and goodwill and actually, thatis vocation and goodwill and actually, that is running out. gps are leaving. jeremy hunt made this promise to recruit gps and he has lost gps since he made that promise. people are seeing it and feeling it every. people are in pain and waiting longer to see doctors. so, alison, small business. where you nodding when you heard reports like that from the other side of the sofa ? like that from the other side of the sofa? i am nodding but one thing i think, what we've failed in is lack of support for small business in both manifestoes. after all, would we have power of the x amount of cash and if we don't support businesses than that pot of money
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stays exactly the same. for me, again, more support and i think what we find it now is that entrepreneurs are very resilient. they are used to moving and doing things on a sixpence per what they will do now is, if we do not support them, they do not employ people. and we don't —— do not employ people, we do not get tax. it perpetuates. it's great to say that we can support social ca re to say that we can support social care and the nhs but without the port itself, the criticisms i saw where people were changing was to do with the money tree comments. you know what? there is no money tree. there is a set amount of money that we have and we need to support small business to increase the size of that money tree. it is an interesting issue. but speak to two of our experts who will be with us through the morning. tom from the head of pensions at lansdown, we we re head of pensions at lansdown, we were together in north wales, in
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london. and tom, austerity, you hear the difference it makes to people's lives. as it has been an issue since 2010 in elections, are we likely to see theresa may and the conservatives easing off a little after the result? they do have an interesting conundrum because i am sure they still believe in the imperative to balance the books, everything we used to hear from philip hammond and george osborne. they were not successful bringing the budget deficit down, they spoke about it, they did not really deliver it. they have been punished at the polls for being too austere now. so do they, did a double down on the austerity? do they say no, it is still about being fiscally prudent, balancing the books, getting finance back in order? we still really need to get the public sector back in place where it is not haemorrhaging money, which is how they perceive it. or, do they say
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look, we were punished at the pollster that, let us listen up a little bit. but spend a little money on the state pension triple lock. but spend money on the nhs, make ourselves popular again because, probably, they have half an eye on the next election and how that one will play for them. one of the other issues we saw last week was to using the conservatives may be overestimated what happened with the ukip vote was to mark maybe half of the wing conservative but half of the wing conservative but half of the winter labour party as well.|j think they got the vote wrong in the sense that the assumption was that if we talk a lot about brexit, ukip voters will come to us. many ukip voters will come to us. many ukip voters had fled from labour and they assume brexit is a done deal now and they did not like what they have from the conservatives about the economy so they went back home to a party that, in the context of brexit, will would invest more on public service. that debate about austerity, left the conservative shot. partly because philip hammond was not allowed out on the campaign
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trail so he could not come out and counter some of the promises from labour on spending. counter some of the promises from labour on spendinglj counter some of the promises from labour on spending. i noticed that nobody has touched a pastry so far so please feel free to tuck in. we shall be back on our sofa outside fa ke shall be back on our sofa outside fake ten and will later on that lets catch up with the weather. if you are stepping out and you have an allergy to graphs pollen, these are the levels. high or very high. —— grasp them. warmer this week and by wednesday parts of the south could have ted richards reaching 27 or 28. uv levels will also be high, we look at a figure of eight, about as high as it gets in the uk. this week we will see very little in the way of rainfall is that there will be some, but nothing too heavy. breezy at times and warmest mid week in the south. today, low pressure dry sao weather. this front introducing some showers. you can tell by the squeeze on the ice above there will be a fairly breezy day
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but particularly windy across central and southern scotland and north—east england. in northumberland in particular. you can see the funnelling effect we have across the valley where there will be discussed is the wind. showers across scotland and across to northern ireland in northern england. quite a lot of cloud around this morning as well. some showers as well across wales and the north midlands, fewer showers across southern england but it is a lot of cloud. nonetheless, we will see that cloud. nonetheless, we will see that cloud turnover and some of us will see some sunshine, particularly so as we lose a lot of the showers through the course of the afternoon and we see sunshine developed elsewhere. it will be breezy, the wind is easing a touch on the north of the country and if you happen to be in the sunshine, it will not be as warm as was yesterday, especially in east anglia. the warmest part the uk 24 celsius, today we look at 20 may be 21, pleasant enough still. as the head on into the evening and overnight there will be clear skies
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developing with the patchy mist and fog falling across southern counties and into the south—west. and then a new set of weather fronts, our way of bringing rain. no particular cold night won't be particularly cold start to the day. these are the front bringing that rain, turning or shower, large space between the highs of us are not as windy. that means that the southern areas that will be warm and sunny and drier thanit will be warm and sunny and drier than it has been today. showers rivalling from the north—west of england across the north—east, they will be hit and miss and the rain coming in from scotland. top temperatures today between 14 and 24. into wednesday, high pressure still has a good grip on whether in the south a lot of sunshine around this is when it will be particularly warm but in the north we do have
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front introducing rain. away from that it will still be pleasant, looking at 20 and aberdeen, 21 in newcastle, but the highest temperature over east anglia and the south—east. thank you very much, carol. look at that. how wong will it be? first the business leader since the election result reveals concern that the political uncertainty could have a negative impact on the economy. stephanie is in the city of london for a sore morning to gauge reaction there. good morning. good morning. good morning, everyone. business as usual here this morning with lots of people heading into work. you can see behind me here is the bank of england is at the famous landmark from around london. you have the gherkin building popping its head up there. all the buildings, all the crazy names here. of course there will be many people heading to work today wondering what on earth does all the political uncertainty now mean for our economy and what can
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business do to try make sure they can carry on doing what they do best? we have a couple of guests with us to chat to this morning. catherine from the city of london corporation and carolyn from the cbi to represent business. what's your reaction to all of this? it has been such a crazy few days. we have expected it and like you said, it creates great uncertainty for this sector. it is destabilising and something we need to try to on to was quickly as we can. move —— move on from. we need to look at how to cope with brexit. that is an existential question what we need to be doing is moving towards a deal as soon as we possibly can, and deal which listens to the needs of the sector because it is a sector that affects the real economy and which gives us what the country needs to
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thrive for the future, clearly, talking to the sector they need to weigh access to market which benefits europe as well as it benefits europe as well as it benefits up. access to the best people for the bestjobs and attendances or periods we can through this smoothly. now we hope that having seen the country divided over the past we were taken that parliament will take the opportunity to look carefully at what the sector needs because, as i say, it affects so many people. we have talked lots over the last year about all of the different things from brexit and everything else going on. your organisation represents thousands of businesses. what is your worry about this? good morning. uncertainty has gone right up the richter scale. that does matter. it matters for all of us. it makes companies hit the pause button on investment and investment today'sjobs pause button on investment and investment today's jobs in the future. it really matters. what we think the opportunity now is is to
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change the mindset. 0r think the opportunity now is is to change the mindset. orthe think the opportunity now is is to change the mindset. or the economy right back at the top of the agenda, talk about all the things that matter to jobs talk about all the things that matter tojobs and talk about all the things that matter to jobs and growth. talk about all the things that matter tojobs and growth. bring business in as participants, not just as observers in the whole thing. do you feel like business we re thing. do you feel like business were spoken to enough in the run—up to the election by politicians? there were some good engagement, for example, the business secretary had a lot of good discussion. the opportunity now is to take it to a different level, you know? we are all in this together and i think business has a lot to contribute. frankly it will be a business success that creates the living standard of the future. an brexit let's get the focus right up there on single market access. after trade. so many jobs on single market access. after trade. so manyjobs are linked to that. a cat home it is about action on homes on digital on road and rail, the things that matter to all of us and make it easier to do business. it is an opportunity, i think, to have a mindset change and to get things going. businesses used
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to get things going. businesses used to dealing with uncertainty so they are to dealing with uncertainty so they a re often to dealing with uncertainty so they are often good at dealing with these circumstances. we are a great force for good in all of this. bring stability and investment. they are optimistic about all of this but they do need some support from government around the infrastructure, around the right deal on brexit and if you can get some kind of movement on those things, i think business can be a great partner in all of this and do some very great partner in all of this and do some very good things. great to hear that optimism. we will speak to you later on. thank you for your time this morning. i will be here through the morning but first, news, travel and weather from where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. police have arrested another man in east london in connection with the london bridge terror attack. the 19—year—old was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences. meanwhile the cordon around borough market and southwark cathedral was lifted over the weekend — although the market itself isn't expected to start trading until wednesday. a specialistjudge will look at
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whether one of london's oldest wool should be wound up day. —— football clu bs should be wound up day. —— football clubs should be wound up today. if francesco bechetti doesn't pay leyton orient‘s creditors then he will have to sell the club. london tech week starts today with brexit likely to be high on the agenda. industry leaders are expected to discuss how the sector will respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by leaving the eu. one of the world's most prestigious galleries is embracing our love of our phones. the saatchi gallery in central london is asking aspiring artists to submit photos taken on their mobiles and the winner will be given the chance to put on their own exhibition. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tube at the moment. there are problems on the trains with problems at waterloo station. platform 13 is out of action which means fewer services can run on some lines.
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on the roads, this is the north circular. down to one lane eastbound towards tottenham after a lorry caught fire. and elsewhere, golders green is still closed. finally in earls court the traffic light at warwick road are not working and part of the junction is coned off for safety. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. there is cloud around and it is thinning. leading to decent spells of sunshine. it is, still, however, quite breezy. we've had a windy weekend and the breeze still with us. in most cases it stays completely dry, but you cannot rule out the odd shower. this afternoon, is fine, dry, bright sunshine with temperatures reaching around 20. bearing in mind from today
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into the rest of this week the pollen count is very high so if you suffer from hay fever, tissues at the ready. overnight tonight clear spells with patchy cloud and temperatures between 12 and 14 celsius as the minimum. for tuesday, fine, dry, sunshine with breaks in the cloud and wind is a little lighter. the temperature that little bit warmer. we look at a maximum of 22, 23 celsius. uv levels from tomorrow are very high as well. the high—pressure dominates weather this week leaving it dry and warm. from wednesday evening we could see a couple of showers pushing up from the south mixed in with some warm air so we could hear a rumble or two of thunder there. but as i mentioned, high—pressure dominates. from wednesday onwards, blue skies and sunshine and those temperatures rising steadily. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. theresa may prepares to face criticism of her election campaign and leadership style in a meeting
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with her own backbenchers. her majority crumbles, her authority tumbles. today the prime minister has to explain to her mps why the election was a disaster. this is our own downing street set, just outside our studio, where we'll be talking to voters and experts about the future for britain, as the prime minister insists she'll serve a full term in post. good morning, it's monday the 12th of june. also this morning: steph is in the city of london finding out what businesses think of the election result.
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new research suggests that confidence has fallen because of the political uncertainty following the election and concerns about brexit talks. i will be talking about it with business leaders. just weeks after he was elected president of france, emmanuel macron is on course to secure another stunning victory, this time in the country's parliamentary elections. in sport, mixed emotions for wales. they take a point in serbia but yet another draw in world cup qualifying onlyjust keeps alive their slim hopes of qualifying for next year's finals in russia. cheese that grows on plants and fish fingers made from chicken, we'll find out where some children think their food comes from. and carol has the weather. it isa it is a cloudy and breezy day. many
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of the showers will fade in some of us of the showers will fade in some of us will see some sunshine. especially this afternoon. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will today meet backbench conservative mps and set out her case for staying on in downing street. the prime minister will also chair a meeting of her newly reshuffled cabinet. michael gove — one of the driving forces behind brexit — has returned to the front bench. mrs may is also still trying to secure a deal with the democratic unionists to ensure they'll back her at westminster. our political correspondent tom bateman reports. back at the heart of government, michael gove's last regular appearances on this street were before to may became pm. she sacked her old opponent after the bruising eu referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside borisjohnson. the two men spectacularly fell out over the tory leadership contest last year. the foreign secretary has denied having his eye on the top job again, calling for mps to rally around mrs may. jeremy corbyn did not
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win this election. it's absolutely right that she should go ahead, form a government and deliver on the priorities of the people. i'm going to be backing her, absolutely everybody i'm talking to is going to be backing her as well. mrs may's reshuffle sees the pro—european damian green, an old friend of the prime minister, become first secretary of state. effectively mrs may's number two. the former justice secretary liz truss has been demoted, taking a lower ranking job in the treasury. while other key figures stay where they are, including jeremy hunt at health and liam fox at international trade. mrs may will hope the reshuffle, most notable for its lack of changes, will help her reach out to tory mps. she said last night she intends to stay in herjob. i said during the election campaign that if re—elected, i would intend to serve a full term. but what i'm doing now is actually getting on with the immediate job. and i think that's what's important, i think that's
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what the public would expect. they want to see government providing that certainty and stability. but life without a majority in the house of commons will be very different. the pm may have to wave goodbye to some of her policy plans. today, she will meet with her own backbenchers, many of whom will be looking for reassurances. she now faces the challenge of starting brexit talks with her authority weakened and her long—term future still in doubt. in a moment we'll speak to our ireland correspondent chris page in belfast, but first chris mason is in downing street. chris , it's been a tough few days for the prime minister, and potentially more trouble ahead today? the big plan for today would be the day that theresa may would invite a
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whole flock of people that would cement her as the dominating ahead of the brexit negotiations. instead, she has been humbled and her majority shrivelled nothing. she is much, much weaker figure as a result of minority government. i am speaking to a conservative mp and it says there has to be a humble approach from the prime minister. she has to recognise how she has gone wrong. gavin barwell was a minister, then he lost his seat now he is the prime minister's new chief of staff. this is the manifesto i spent the campaign waving around but it will be shredded in the negotiations to come with northern ireland's democratic unionist party. now to chris page, who's in belfast. chris, there was confusion at the weekend about whether there is actually a deal in place with the dup.
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what's the latest? i think there is little doubt that they will be at deal, itjust depends on what shape it will take. the dup will be pushing for more money, more investment for northern ireland and want a stronger voice with regards to breakfast —— brexit. they want a say in what happens to the whole of the uk for example the pensions policy. fuel allowance for older people being protected. the westminster government is looking like it is on the cards. what is less certain talks to get devolution backed up and running again. the five main party leaders will be meeting with the british and ireland irish governments. while the talking
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will be starting in belfast this morning, the mines in many people here will be on what is going on in london. later we'll be speaking to the brexit secretary david davis. that's at around 7.40. detectives investigating the london bridge attack have made a further arrest in east london. a 19—year—old man was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences shortly before ten o'clock last night. six other men remain in custody. exit polls following the first round of france's parliamentary election suggest president macron's new centrist party is on course for a landslide victory. projections show la republique en marche and its modem ally look set to win up to 445 of the 577 seats in france's national assembly. the final outcome will be decided in a run—off next sunday. both the white house and downing street have dismissed a report that donald trump wants to delay his proposed state visit
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to the uk, until he has the support of the british public. an online petition was signed by nearly two million people who wanted to block the american president's trip to britain. the opposition was inflamed by mr trump's criticism of london mayor sadiq khan's response to the london bridge terror attack. many children are confused about where their food comes from according to a new poll. in a survey of more than 5,000 children between the ages of five and 16 some thought cheese comes from plants, tomatoes grow underground and nearly a fifth of the very youngest thought fish fingers were made from chicken. andy moore has the details. the poll for healthy eating week threw up some surprising results. around a quarter of all children thought strawberryjam could be included as one of their five—a—day portions of fruit and veg.
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around 11% of teenagers said that fruit pastilles would count. there was quite a bit of confusion about where food came from. something reflected in the responses of these youngsters. do you know what fish fingers are made of? chicken. fish, dead fish. fish. fish and breadcrumbs. tomatoes, where do you get those? you get them... from the shop. ground. trees. umm. . .tomato plants. do you know where cheese comes from? no idea. no. not sure. it's made out of milk. just under a quarter of a 5—7 year old in the survey thought that prawns were plants and a fifth believed that chips
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were made from animals. the managing director of the british nutrition foundation said that schools and families could and should work together to educate children about making healthier choices. andy moore, bbc news. you up—to—date with the latest news. you up—to—date with the latest news. you are watching breakfast. we've been at westminster so much over the past few days, we thought we'd bring downing street to us. just outside our studio in fact. and dan is there finding out what inspired so many young people to head to the ballot box in this election welcome to our not so real downing street. this is ourfabrication. we've post, street names, larry the cat and all of that stuff. it is a really important week this weekend, a cabinet meeting. talks about the
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dup this afternoon. what we're looking at is of the key issues on how we cast our vote in the general election. we have already spoken about austerity. one of the other massive factors was the youth vote. i'm sure you saw claims from the labour party, 75% of those young people voted. we will get confirmation later this week but it is that —— if it is anywhere near that number, it is up around 30% of last time. we have some young voters here. these people all qualify for young voters under the age of 25. what was it for all of you that in due to vote the way you did last
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week? as a young person growing up under successive tory governments, i have seen first hand the way that they ripped apart the social fabric of our communities, i have seen it the way they made people divide amongst one another, i've seen that the way that community is no longer have the centres for young people, nurses have been driven to food banks. successive tory governments have stopped investing in young people for the future. for us, personally, we have had enough of being demoralised. corbyn came along and said it doesn't need to be like this, there is an alternative, we as a society do not need to have the tories ideal community. we can care for each other, we can be an outward looking country and stop being intolera nt towards looking country and stop being intolerant towards others. we don't need to look at having such diverse
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committees as a bad thing. i feel like also the way thatjeremy corbyn has been betrayed in the media and even betrayed his own labour mps was absolutely disgusting. i feel at that encouraged me more to get involved and look at him as a person. he stood on the right side of history on every single issue in my opinion and i prefer that over theresa may who didn't even believe in things they write a couple of yea rs in things they write a couple of years back, so. i suppose the cynical point of view is to say that jeremy corbyn offered your generation free stuff and it worked. yaman. and actually, it did work. i believe, well, ithink yaman. and actually, it did work. i believe, well, i think there were two sorts of voters that i could see. those people who wanted to vote tory didn't like theresa may and those people who actually did genuinely like jeremy corbyn. i think what's happened is a total
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rejection of theresa may's ideals. from young people. even when you look at the amount of us that turned up look at the amount of us that turned up to vote for the referendum who voted for remain as well. i feel that this election, i feel she has lost her mandate to go for hard brexit. she had no choice but to compromise and to listen to us, the young voters. the tories still won is over 300 seat she has not really been wiped out that they still have more seats than labour. she entered because she thought she would have a landslide and a mandate for brexit and she has lost. in terms of the landscape of society, there has been a shift and, you know, i society, there has been a shift and, you know, lam society, there has been a shift and, you know, i am sure there are many young people out there today and who have voted and people who have not
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voted for much of their lives and have voted to go and vote and say to those people, don't lose hope. we made one step in the right direction. the fact we have been able to take some secure, you know, conservative seat from constituencies and put them in the hands of labour, for example, the ukip voters. they were discussing on the bbc that they have been more or less equally disbursed between the other parties, all the seats that you could have lost. now for voters to change their psychological preferences... the ideas of ukip on the right, past new labour, plus the labour of tony leonard to social democrat jeremy corbyn, that labour of tony leonard to social democratjeremy corbyn, that is labour of tony leonard to social democrat jeremy corbyn, that is a massive ship a makeshift. —— shift. you are from bite the ballot trying to get people engaged in politics.
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we have three young people clearly engaged over here. were you surprised by the numbers that came out last week? no. if you look at the figures became after the referendum method of young people turned up. that was a result of it being a single issue, an issue of their future. this being a single issue, an issue of theirfuture. this general being a single issue, an issue of their future. this general election was also was about young people realising that this is about participation. if you get involved you can make change. brexit showed that if you participated you could make a change. victoria river from the university of leads. do you think that given the success the labour party had with young voters will see the conservatives try to tap into that under the parties as well? i think they probably will otherwise villa may be difficult for them to do so. conservative relies on what is called the great foe. what we saw was a feeling that,
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actually, they relied on it so much that they did not need to play to it any more. we saw the removal of the triple lock, and replacing with a double lock. we saw issues relating to what has been dubbed the dementia tax. these things are deeply worrying for that sector. because the conservatives may go back and refocus on that sector because it is more conservative “— refocus on that sector because it is more conservative —— traditional territory for them. influences on the way that people that voted. you are one of the people hit on westminster bridge. this security an issue for you? it has always been an issue for you? it has always been an issue for you? it has always been an issue for me and i'd don't think the attack changed anything along those lines. you can play politics, personally i think... i don't think the sort of events should be politicised as many people have done. but, yeah, with regards to security being an issue, i don't
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think... while it is an issue in every election i don't think it played any further issue in this election. preliminary polls were already coming out and it shows that in this pushback against terror, the pushback against the effect of terror, people have not really allowed that to influence their vote. if that makes sense. thank you very much. i am glad to see you are doing well. great to have you back here on the sofa. thank you to all of you. the weather outside here this morning as little dismal, carol. can you tell us what it will be like? what we're looking at this week is a little bit of rain on the forecast at times. we have that this morning. breezy at times as well and it will be quite warm, particularly so on wednesday. today, low pressure drives the weather and that
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introduces showers and you can tell by the squeeze on those isobars that it will be breezy, particularly windy across central and southern scotla nd windy across central and southern scotland and north—east england. especially northumberland. that will spread east through the day along with the showers. cloud will turn over and sunny spells will develop. in the sunshine it will feel pleasant. yesterday we hit 24 celsius in east anglia, was the highest temperature in the land, todayis highest temperature in the land, today is more likely to be 20 or 21 somewhere in the south—east. through this evening and overnight, dry weather and clear skies forming. there will also be patchy mist and fog across southern and south—western part of both england and wales and we have rain spilling across northern ireland, was in scotland, north—west england and also north—west wales. another cold night, and a cold start to the day. those weather fronts coming in from the atlantic. high—pressure drives this weather to the south so things will settle down across southern england and also south wales. here is the temperature rising through
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the day to about 23 or four. patchy rain moving from the west to the east across northern england and tending to fade and moving out across northern ireland and scotland will become more chari and nature through the rest of the day. the temperature will reach about 18 in the north, 23 24 in the south but then, as i mentioned, it will reach 2728 on wednesday. look at that. thank you very much, carol. you might be about to battle through the monday morning traffic but it's unlikely yourjourney will be as epic as this one. at nine o'clock, a 67—year—old coach with a top speed of 40 miles per hour is setting off from norwich to its original home in the shetland islands. that's a journey of 1200 miles, but it's a labour of love for the driver. fiona lamdin is in norwich to tell us more. good morning. yes, as you say, 67
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yea rs good morning. yes, as you say, 67 years old. you can see that destination, 1200 miles. she will be setting off in a few hours. in the 50s, 60s, 70s, she really was the lifeline to the islanders. she would ta ke lifeline to the islanders. she would take children to school, fishermen to both start looking for it. how often you see a code with a sunroof like this? if you are still warm, the driver even has his own personal air—conditioning stop the seats are still the same, they are original. yesterday i was lucky enough to take a journey through the norfolk countryside. this 1950 bedford obe is finally on her way home. and behind the wheel, that —year—old john ward. her way home. and behind the wheel, that -year-old john ward. it was a pleasure driving a bus like this. for years, this pair were a lifeline to hundreds of islanders living on the shetlands. delivering children
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to school, fishermen to their boats, even bringing people home in time for dinner. and one of those children was nicki ridgeley. this is the first time on the bus for 50 yea rs. the first time on the bus for 50 years. same seat covers and everything. do you remember we used to set? sometimes i was nervous. i was starting secondary school it was a big step to go on the bus with all of the other big bull children, you know? back when i was four wheeze to use it for a sunday school picnic. going to the beach to the day. it was a going to the beach to the day. it was a big adventure to go for a day out. in 1979 after many miles and many years of service, she was brought south, ending up in norfolk for her retirement where the owner has spent the last six years restoring her. but nick is gifting
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his bus back to the island from which it came. you look after her. here are the keys. look after her, please. and so for the next 12 days the team will travel 1200 miles at 40 miles an hour, to get her home. will love it up there. they remember it. it is a part of their history. it is not part of mind, it is theirs and that is where it should be. how do you feel that it is coming home? very happy. extremely happy. iam i am with the original owner, the current owner and the next few minutes to be the new owner again. coming over to nick. why are you giving her away? john contacted me from the shetland islands and i knew the coach came from the shetland islands. many came go to seed clearly was very emotional. i was so touched by that moment i thought you know, it has to go back. it was a trigger moment. can you believe you
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are getting her back? it is wonderful. all credit to nick for doing this. will she make it? it is a long journey. i hope so. the bishop will bless us so that may help. she is only 28 horsepower which is a quarter of the size of the mini so, you know, she will struggle but i am sure she will get there. as you heard that, the bishop will bless. he will do that in the next hour or so. it is interesting to know that she does not have brea kd owns to know that she does not have breakdowns are they are very confident she will make it. i hope people waved to the coach on the wave is that it is so beautiful.m looks rather impressive, doesn't it? 25 minutes past seven. i have made it all the way back now from downing street. quite a long journey. i thought you did it in a tardis. the
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financial markets and businesses are still assessing the impact of election results. stephanie is out about as this morning. she is in the of london. good morning. good morning everyone. we are outside the bank of england here. a lovely place to watch the world go by, everyone start their working day. many people wondering what on earth the political uncertainty is going to mean. many businesses trying to work out what impact it may have. we have a regular on the show with us. there's many ways of looking at this, aren't there, in the currency market, server is happening, what are your thoughts? three things to look out. visible, the currency. but moved quite the last week. it recovered addicted to other key things, confidence and competence. business confidence. today, information showing that business confidence is tweaking consumer confidence, we know we began to wea ken confidence, we know we began to weaken and that is the largest part of our economy. two thirds of it is
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down to you and me, don't yeah spending. in terms of confidence, why is it falling? what is the worry? a couple of things. business wa nts to worry? a couple of things. business wants to know what is happening with brexit. what is the next stage? will the government get a majority in fattening policies through? consumers are in debt. how much further can they take that? how much more can expand with a those are the big questions. and many have issues in regard to house prices with signs that may be weakening and, remember, that may be weakening and, remember, thatis that may be weakening and, remember, that is a primary assets of people and if it does we can, so are you. we were talking to a letter in the programme as well as other business leaders about what they are hoping to hear from politicians leaders about what they are hoping to hearfrom politicians given leaders about what they are hoping to hear from politicians given all of the election fallout. at first, let's get the news, travel and weather were this morning good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. police have arrested another man in east london in connection with the london bridge terror attack.
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the 19—year—old was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences. six others remain in custody. meanwhile the cordon around borough market and southwark cathedral was lifted over the weekend — although the market itself isn't expected to start trading until wednesday. a specialistjudge will look at whether one of london's oldest football clubs should be wound up today. if francesco bechetti doesn't pay leyton orient‘s creditors then he will have to sell the club. it is the second time in three months that the high court has examined the club ‘s finances. london tech week starts today with brexit likely to be high on the agenda. industry leaders are expected to discuss how the sector will respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by leaving the eu. one of the world's most prestigious galleries is embracing our love of our phones. the saatchi gallery in central london is asking aspiring artists to submit photos taken on their mobiles and the winner will be given the chance to put on their own exhibition. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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a good service on the tube at the moment. there are problems on the trains with problems at waterloo station. platform 13 is out of action which means fewer services can run on some lines. this is the m4 on the road where there are usual delays on the elevated slope tunnelling through there. and elsewhere, golders green is still closed. finally in earls court the traffic light at warwick road are not working and part of the junction is coned off for safety. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. there is cloud around and it is thinning. leading to decent spells of sunshine. it is, still, however, quite breezy. we've had a windy weekend and the breeze still with us. in most cases it stays completely dry, but you cannot rule out the odd shower. this afternoon, is fine, dry, bright sunshine with temperatures
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reaching around 20. bearing in mind from today into the rest of this week the pollen count is very high so if you suffer from hay fever, tissues at the ready. overnight tonight clear spells with patchy cloud and temperatures between 12 and 14 celsius as the minimum. for tuesday, fine, dry, sunshine with breaks in the cloud and wind is a little lighter. the temperature that little bit warmer. we look at a maximum of 22, 23 celsius. uv levels from tomorrow are very high as well. the high—pressure dominates weather this week leaving it dry and warm. from wednesday evening we could see a couple of showers pushing up from the south mixed in with some warm air so we could hear a rumble or two of thunder there. but as i mentioned, high—pressure dominates. from wednesday onwards, blue skies and sunshine and those temperatures rising steadily. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning and welcome back. this
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is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. theresa may will today meet backbench conservative mps and set out her case for staying on in downing street. the prime minister will also chair a meeting of her newly reshuffled cabinet. michael gove — one of the driving forces behind brexit — has returned to the front bench. mrs may is also continuing efforts to secure a deal with northern ireland's democratic unionists. she's hoping a deal with arlene foster's party will secure support for the tories on big votes in the house of commons. but earlier, a former dup assembly member told us any potential agreement would rest on assurances from the prime minister over brexit. one of the big issues for the party
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will be a round brexit because there isa will be a round brexit because there is a border between northern ireland and the irish republic. we want to ensure that whatever the final shape of the outcome, it doesn't impede on movement across the border and at the same time ensure that nothing it would be done to restrict free movement from northern ireland into the rest of the united kingdom and across the united kingdom. nicola sturgeon will call for a cross—party "four nation" approach to the brexit negotiations as she joins scottish national party mps at westminster later. the first minister of scotland wants membership of the european single market and the customs union to be "at the heart" of any agreement, with the rights of eu nationals living in the uk guaranteed with immediate effect. detectives investigating the london bridge attack have made a further arrest in east london. a 19—year—old man was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences shortly before ten o'clock last night. six other men remain in custody.
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exit polls following the first round of france's parliamentary election suggest president macron's new centrist party is on course for a landslide victory. projections show la republique en marche and its modem ally look set to win up to 445 of the 577 seats in france's national assembly. the final outcome will be decided in a run—off next sunday. nearly five months after president trump took office his wife, melania, and son barron, have moved into the white house. they had stayed behind in new york so 11 year—old barron could complete the school year. the first lady is the first in modern times not to move straight in, but she's tweeted that she is looking forward to the memories the family will make in their new home. a new poll suggests many children are confused about where their food comes from.
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—— coming up on the programme, we'll be back at our mock downing street with dan gauging the views of voters in the aftermath of the election. a lot of people are desiring the unionjack a lot of people are desiring the union jack lounge. sally a lot of people are desiring the unionjack lounge. sally is here with us as well looking at a busy week. we have a world cup win, triathlon at first. we will start with wales and their hopes to get to russia 2018. still quite a lot of work to do for them. they need to win all four of their world cup qualifiers if they are to be sure of rushing the finals in russia. wales manager chris coleman thinks they need to win all four of their remaining world cup qualifiers if they're to make sure of reaching next year's finals. a penalty from aaron ramsey gave them the lead against serbia in belgrade. but the home side equalised, leaving wales four points behind the group leaders, with four games left.
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we were looking to win it in the last ten minutes. once they equalised, we had two or three break aways there where it could have been different but overall, a good game, a tough game. two good things for us. the point, it's a good point. the republic of ireland are second in that group, level on points with serbia — and they‘ re still unbeaten after a 1—all draw with austria in dublin, thanks tojon walters' late equaliser. for the first time since 1966, an england national football team has won a world cup. the u20's beat venezuela 1—0 in the final in south korea. everton's dominic calvert—lewin with the goal. it was a nervy ending for england. they needed keeper freddie woodman to save a penalty in the second half. and the national side's senior manager believes this could be a turning point. obviously, ultimately, the aim is that those players come through to the seniors and a big part of that now is for them to get opportunities with their clubs
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because i think they have shown, if the under 20s were world champions, there is enough players there to fulfil careers in the game without clubs looking elsewhere. hopefully we will see more of them playing in the premier league, too. rafael nadal said he thought he'd be fishing on his boat by now, not winning a grand slam for a record 10th time. he cruised past stan wawrinka in straight sets in the french open final, to take his 15th major title — and he thinks one of his best, considering he's now into his thirties. i am 31 already so...i'm not a kid anymore. but, yeah, because of the level of tennis and accepting i have been under problems, physical problems, for a couple of times in the last period of time, it is an important one. india crushed south africa to reach the semi—finals
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of the champions trophy. they were chasing just 191 runs for victory at the oval — and they made it with 12 overs to spare. the last of the semi—final spots will be decided today, when pakistan face sri lanka. a great day yesterday at the triathlon in leeds. the brownlees brothers. you were there. i'm still a little bit excited. i didn't have much sleep last night because i was dreaming about the triathlon which isa dreaming about the triathlon which is a bit sad but it was fantastic. the atmosphere was amazing. johnny and alistair were... and then, johnny came out first in this wind and alastair caught up later —— caught up. completely dominated on the bike. alastair brownlee beat his brotherjonny to victory in the world triathlon series in their home town.
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it was their first race together since alistair carried jonny over the line in last year's finale in mexico. johnny came out those in the swimming and alastair caught him out and on the back leg, they were over one minute ahead. where was everybody else behind them? over one minute. incredible. a brilliant performance. she helped her sister who wasn't well. her run—up was like that. that's why she hadn't been feeling well in the run—up to the race. but she still decided to go ahead. they are all beasts. alistair brownlee and jonny brownlee. incredible. it isa and jonny brownlee. incredible. it is a fantastic sport to watch. fantastic for them to win in their home city. is there a new generation of triathletes coming through? i met them. they were all out there. there was so much going on over the weekend. there really is a strong team. it's fantastic. i know i'm biased. england's women were beaten by the netherlands in their hockey international in london. the dutch are the world's number one team and they went 2—0
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ahead before sophie bray brought england level. it went to penalties — and there was some revenge for the netherlands, who lost in a shoot out to teamgb in last year's olympic final in rio. in their very first season, wasps have won the netball super league. the coventry—based side pipped loughborough lightning in a tight final yesterday. 55—51 the final score. lewis hamilton's formula 1 title challenge is back on track after he won the canadian grand prix. he lead from start to finish in montreal to take the chequered flag there for the sixth time — and cut sebastian vettel‘s championship lead to 12 points after he could only finish fourth. i had my first win here ten years ago so to repeat it this weekend is incredibly special and i really have to thank my team who made this possible. the guys back at the factory have worked so hard to really fix what we had in the last
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race to bring it here. it is great to see new young broadcasters coming through. yes, thatis broadcasters coming through. yes, that is sir patrick stewart. the world famous hollywood actor. great, isn't it? they always put a bit of stardust at the grand prix. a lot of famous people do the closing interview. sir patrick stewart was obviously enjoying every moment. lucky him. the first poll of business leaders since the election result had revealed a uncertainty having a negative impact on the economy as well is delaying the crucial brexit negotiations. it is looking busy in the city at the moment, isn't it? business as usual here. you can just see. iam business as usual here. you can just see. i am in front of the bank of england and the famous london landmarks in the heart of the city
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of london, the financial district, where lots of people are trying to work out and will be for the foreseeable, what does all this political uncertainty mean for them ? what that mean for businesses the economy and as you said, there have been talking to 700 businesses across the country to ask them how they feel about it and a lot of them are saying the majority, about 65%, that they think it will have a negative effect on the economy. lots of different things to think about when you are assessing what impact this could have. one of them being the currency markets and that reacted across today when the result came out on friday. we saw it go from 150 data 130. a huge drop. comparisons are relatively small and it has recovered again. the two elements you talked about when talking about business confidence, important. money needs to be invested in the economy. if you are going to hold it back, it will be more difficult. garner i will bring
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in carolyn fairburn from the cbi. --i will in carolyn fairburn from the cbi. ——i will bring in carolyn fairburn. how do they feel about it now? are they worried? leigh uncertainty has gone up the richter scale since last week. it really matters because it affects investment which is jobs for the future. they are looking for the economy to go right back centrestage. and for business activity participants, not just spectators in what we are seeing. when talk about uncertainty, there is always uncertainty. we have talked about this for over a year since brexit. what can businesses do with this? there is a sense they have to get on with it. businesses that do and they are really good at it. this is one of the reasons we have seen real resilience and investment has been continuing. when uncertainty reaches of such a level. you get pause beginning to be pressed. you just don't want to see that. it is time for a bit of a
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reset, a reset, a bit of a mindset change, to listen really well to what businesses need because it matters to all of us. it is what pays for the health service, it is what pays for salaries. it is a chance to put some of these questions about digital infrastructure, how we will build homes, how we will get better rail services and brexit negotiations on track, right at the centre of the conversations we are having everyday. if you are the prime minister, what would you be doing for business? i will be going out there talking about how important there talking about how important the economy is in terms of quality of life, london and the regions everywhere, getting the brexit negotiations onto a really positive track so we can see positive outcome on really good access to the single market and then it is all about action, action on the things that really matter like skills, housing, digital, getting on with it. that is what will give us more confident
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with, as i say, business as participants, right in there, helping to set the problems with government, notjust observe on the sidelines. is notjust about how businesses feel that the impact on things like the currency market. justin was talking about things like a fall justin was talking about things like afall in justin was talking about things like a fall in the value of the pound. just the impact of that because it is to be bad for businesses, isn't it? it depends on what kind of distant —— business you are. if you are an exporter, order books are looking great. manufacturing is on the march is that is great but if you are an importer, that is tough. you see inflation starting to come through. that is another level of uncertainty where government has a role to play. bringing stability and predictability where possible. we are still an economy that is largely driven by consumer spending is it is about how we feel as people out
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there spending as well, isn't it? there is our lot in that and we have seen consumers doing what they do best, they have carried on shopping and that is fantastic but we need to keep confidence going. the more that can be done to create a business environment that is encouraging our companies, encouraging consumers to feel confident and these are all the things that i think will make a real difference in this next stage. will be back in one—hour. it is so mad and busy here. not even eight o'clock yet. it is exactly quarter to eight. i am your own personal time check. it's ok. we have had very little sleep, it is ok. do not be terrified, it is quarter to eight. a reminder now of the top stories for you this morning.
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theresa may will meet conservative mps and set out her case was staying on in downing street. the prime minister says a cabinet reshuffle has brought in talent from across the party. the new lineup includes michael gove is environment secretary. i tell you what time it is, time for the weather with carol. good morning um carol. look at that. look at those pollen levels. good morning. we do have high levels of pollen this morning. as we go through most of this week they will be high or very high across much of the uk. as temperatures rise, especially in the middle of the week, the uv levels will be as high as they get in the uk across southern areas. this is the forecast for this week. green and breeze at times and warmest conditions will be midweek. low pressure dominates the weather at the moment. weather fronts attached to it introducing some showers but if you look at the squeeze on those isobars on the chart you can tell it is going to be
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a breezy day, particularly windy this morning across central and southern scotland and north—east england. a lot of cloud, quite a few showers, particularly in the north and west. many of those will fade as we go through the course of the afternoon. the cloud cover we have will turn over and we will see some sunshine. at about afternoon across south—west england and wales but generally across southern counties, there still will be glad around but it will be mostly dry and, at times, the sun will come out. across england could see a couple showers p0p england could see a couple showers pop over the pennines but for north—east england, the wind eases and we will see sunshine. sony or bright spells across northern ireland, the wind is in scotland and, again, the north and west get the showers. the rest of scotland, particularly in the east, there will be sunshine. through the evening and overnight, we will start the season clear skies develop and there will bea clear skies develop and there will be a lot of dry weather, some patchiness to and fog across southern counties and in the next set of weather fronts, we,
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introducing cloud and rain, initially across northern ireland and across north—west england scotla nd and across north—west england scotland and wales. that is down to the said fronts. the space on the ice buzz tomorrow a much wider so will not be as windy. i pressured dominates the weather in the south so here you will be fairly settled. the temperature will continue to rise and we will see highs from about 23, 20 four celsius. the rain coming in across northern ireland, scotla nd coming in across northern ireland, scotland north—west england in north—west wales will turn showery, one of two showers getting ever to the east of england but they will be the east of england but they will be the rather than the rule. in between there will be so bright skies. utter richer range about 18 in aberdeen, 19 in cardiff but 23 as we are pushing towards the london area. on wednesday, the warmest day of the week, particular in the south when temperatures will hit 2728. uv levels will be high in southern england especially along the south coast. highest level will be hate and that is what we will have. ——
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highest level will be eight. temperatures very pleasant and we have a weather front or two is getting across northern ireland in north—western scotland and that will introduce some splashes of rain. thank you very much, carol. 26 in london as well. we have an amazing story coming up right now. after being diagnosed with our counsellor in 2015, ian was told he had two months to live. two years at best. he was determined not to be defeated. last month he made a dream a reality when he reached the summit of mount everest. it is thought is the first cancer patient actually do so. proves anything possible in hopes of this story will inspire others to achieve their life goals. and, you probably guessed it, we are delighted to say he is with us on the sofa. lovely to see you. i'm sure these pictures which you are familiar to you. many years of watching and looking and now you can say you have been to the summit.
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yeah. it is not a thing i would have thought of maybe a few months ago. wonder the side, tibet, slightly different but it has been an amazing story from start to finish. when you set out to do this money mental task, it is something for anybody to do, how what particular difficulties did you have as a cancer patient? on a personal level, not really discuss this, but there were energy levels. iam this, but there were energy levels. i am always ready for a nap and you do not get to sleep on everest. and then there is the diet stopped i had a specific diet before i went and i knew i would have to change that and eat whatever i could get on everest, sugar, all the food you are not meant to be eating if you want to be healthy. we can see some of the conditions you went through there. we saw your tent flapping around in the wind there. what were the conditions like and how demanding was to get to the top? it was an unusual year for weather and the wind was very strong. that was when
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my tent was destroyed and a lost my agreement on food. i got a few things out and then we had to evacuate the camp won an expedition was over. and then overnight that was over. and then overnight that was mean a couple of guys who really to go back up. i begged and borrowed bits of equipment and food and a sleeping bag and got back up the next day. so you wake up in the early hours on the day, as it were, in the early hours of the morning and then what happens? when the tent was destroyed? no, when you are climbing to the summit. you get there late in the afternoon. you are meant to have a few hours and then you set off at about one o'clock in the morning. you do not get a lot of sleep, i had no sleep. it was surreal for sleep, i had no sleep. it was surrealfor me. i was sleep, i had no sleep. it was surreal for me. i was focused on it. i cannot actually remember that much about it. people speak about flow state or being in the zone and that was what it was like for me. i had a
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problem with my feet for the first few hours were thought might lose a toe but then came back to life and i was happy at that point then i was now reached the summit because it is thought, yes! iam now reached the summit because it is thought, yes! i am fine again! five hours left and then having to turn back, that would have been horrible. at what point did you think everest was a good idea? something you could actually do? how far back you to go before you thought you know what, i am suffering from cancer, so what i will do is climb the tallest mountain on earth. it sounds stupid when you put it like that. i think... i was diagnosed, i got rid of the cancer and many have scans andi of the cancer and many have scans and i think was nervous about the scan. i had won the next day and this was, maybe, august of last year. it was the day before, i was walking back from the shop and full summaries reason i walking back from the shop and full summaries reason i thought that if i am got diagnosed i will have to try. there are so many things in it. it was ludicrous. after a few weeks you
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get a solution to that problem and wa nt to get a solution to that problem and want to this problem so wasn't until this february that it became a serious thing. we did not have long to get going, which is probably a good thing in a way. we had a 1096 plan and it worked out. are you a climber? yeah. no, ijust went up climber? yeah. no, ijust went up there and had a go at it! i have done climbing before and have climbed in the himalayas before. done climbing before and have climbed in the himalayas beforelj know you had a tough time because the weather was not great when you the weather was not great when you the summit either, were you, and you we re the summit either, were you, and you were snow blinded? we ran out of windows to get up there. it was the last window of the season, a half window. we got up there and it was stormy with a lot of snow me and three other guys we were caught in that. it took us ten hours to get down, we were drained and exhausted, dehydrated and then we got snow blind so i had to come down from camps rewind. you won't see this
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programme, i don't think, but the man who helped me, he is a good buy. asa man who helped me, he is a good buy. as a proud sheffield wednesday fan, we have pictures he reviewed placing a sheffield united flag. yes. this has been photoshopped! tellers that truth... —— tell us the truth. has been photoshopped! tellers that truth... -- tell us the truth. we started fundraising at the weekend andi started fundraising at the weekend and i got 60 by my friend. he asked the site and i said if you put a thousand pound in i will take a sheffield united flag to the top. then i got a screenshot, he had put the money miedecke count. they supported this project so much, sheffield united. thank you very much. was lovely to talk to you. we are still raising money. claiming everest for cancer. —— climbing
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everest for cancer. —— climbing everest for cancer. another like to wish one of the guys on expedition to get well soon. just coming up to eight o'clock. minster is coming your way is in a moment that first we are in norwich this morning at the start of what we can describe as an emotionaljourney. the start of what we can describe as an emotional journey. good the start of what we can describe as an emotionaljourney. good morning. this 67—year—old bedford o b is off on her way home. she is returning to the shetland islands where she has been a lifeline to the communities in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. many people that they did not have cars and this coach used to take children to school, get people to the shops, it took everyone everywhere. let me show you around. there is a sunroof and a buzz up here. if you sit in the driver ‘s seat, of course we
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have air—conditioning. even the original seats. in the next hour, as we said, she is off. the bishop of norwich will be here to bless her. they are making the last few arrangements as they get ready for the 1200 mile trip. important to know that they do not even have breakdown, they are that confident. what we have going on here? we have our bags that you can see a few spare parts so we are not totally trusting, you know... it is only 28 horsepower. it will struggle but it is well built so i am sure it will make it. we will be back here in hr share. now so the news, travel and weather wherever you are this morning. —— we will be back here in an hour. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. police have arrested another man in east london in connection with the london bridge terror attack. the 19—year—old was detained in barking on suspicion
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of terrorism offences. six others remain in custody. meanwhile the cordon around borough market and southwark cathedral was lifted over the weekend — although the market itself isn't expected to start trading until wednesday. a specialistjudge will look at whether one of london's oldest football clubs should be wound up today. if francesco bechetti doesn't pay leyton orient‘s creditors then he will have to sell the club. it is the second time in three months that the high court has examined the club ‘s finances. london tech week starts today with brexit likely to be high on the agenda. industry leaders are expected to discuss how the sector will respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by leaving the eu. one of the world's most prestigious galleries is embracing our love of our phones. the saatchi gallery in central london is asking aspiring artists to submit photos taken on their mobiles and the winner will be given the chance to put on their own exhibition. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tube at the moment. there are problems on the trains with problems
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at waterloo station. platform 13 is out of action which means fewer services can run on some lines. there are minor delays on the trams as well. that is because of a faulty train. the m25 is slowing to clockwise. that is because of a crash involving a motorbike. and elsewhere, golders green is still closed. finally in earls court the traffic light at warwick road are not working and part of the junction is coned off for safety. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. there is cloud around and it is thinning. leading to decent spells of sunshine. it is, still, however, quite breezy. we've had a windy weekend and the breeze still with us. in most cases it stays completely dry, but you cannot rule out the odd shower. this afternoon, is fine, dry, bright sunshine with temperatures reaching around 20.
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bearing in mind from today into the rest of this week the pollen count is very high so if you suffer from hay fever, tissues at the ready. overnight tonight clear spells with patchy cloud and temperatures between 12 and 14 celsius as the minimum. for tuesday, fine, dry, sunshine with breaks in the cloud and wind is a little lighter. the temperature that little bit warmer. we look at a maximum of 22, 23 celsius. uv levels from tomorrow are very high as well. the high—pressure dominates weather this week leaving it dry and warm. from wednesday evening we could see a couple of showers pushing up from the south mixed in with some warm air so we could hear a rumble or two of thunder there. but as i mentioned, high—pressure dominates. from wednesday onwards, blue skies and sunshine and those temperatures rising steadily. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and louise minchin. theresa may prepares to face criticism of her election campaign and leadership style in a meeting with her own backbenchers. her majority crumbles, her authority tumbles. today, the prime minister has to explain to her mps why the election was a disaster. we've also brought downing street to our studio, complete with larry the cat, as we chat to voters and experts about the future for britain. you might have spotted that was in fa ct a you might have spotted that was in fact a fluffy cat! let's hope they
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did. good morning, it's monday the 12th of june. also this morning: steph is in the city of london finding out what businesses think of the election result. good morning. research suggests that businesses are worried about what impact this political uncertainty will have it on the economy, and of course what it means for the important brexit talks. we will be talking to business leaders here about their thoughts about all of this. in sport: another draw for wales, who are yet to qualify for russia 2018. butjoy for england's youngsters, as the under—20s side wins the nation's first world cup since 1966. cheese that grows on plants and fish fingers made from chicken, we'll find out where some children think their food comes from. and carol has the weather. good morning, it is a breezy day ahead, it's also fairly cloudy with ahead, it's also fairly cloudy with a few showers. most of the showers will aid and we will see sunny spells developing. if you are travelling, it is windy at the
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moment because central and southern scotla nd moment because central and southern scotland and north east england. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will today meet backbench conservative mps and set out her case for staying on in downing street. the prime minister will also chair a meeting of her newly reshuffled cabinet. michael gove, one of the driving forces behind brexit, has returned to the front bench. mrs may is also still trying to secure a deal with the democratic unionists, as our political correspondent, tom bateman, reports. back at the heart of government, michael gove's last regular appearances on this street were before to may became pm. she sacked her old opponent after the bruising eu referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside borisjohnson. the two men spectacularly fell out over the tory leadership contest last year. the foreign secretary has denied having his eye on the top job again, calling for mps to rally around mrs may. jeremy corbyn did not
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win this election. it's absolutely right that she should go ahead, form a government and deliver on the priorities of the people. i'm going to be backing her, and absolutely everybody i'm talking to is going to be backing her as well. mrs may's reshuffle sees damian green, an old friend of the prime minister, become first secretary of state. effectively mrs may's number two. liz truss has been demoted, taking a lower—ranking job in the treasury. other key figures are jeremy hunt and liam fox. mrs may will hope the reshuffle, most notable for its lack of changes, will help every tory mp.
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she said last night she intends to stay in herjob. i said during the election campaign that if re—elected, i would intend to serve a full—time. what i am doing now is actually getting on with the immediate job. i think that is what the public would expect. they want to see government providing that certainty and stability. but life without a majority the house of commons will be very different. the pm may have to wave goodbye to some of her policy plans. today, she will meet with her own backbenchers, many of whom will be looking for reassurances. she now faces the challenge of starting brexit talks with her authority weakened and her with her authority and her long—term future still in doubt. in a moment, we'll speak to our ireland correspondent chris page in belfast. but first chris mason is in downing street. chris, it's been a tough few days for the prime minister, and potentially more trouble ahead today? what's happening today, good morning? good to you, this was meant to be the proud moment when a new flock of conservative mps came to westminster and theresa may had a majority which would ensure she was the dominant political figure of her age. instead, the opposite. she is
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diminished and weekend and bruised. instead, having to explain to her collea g u es instead, having to explain to her colleagues how it was possible that an election that she called voluntarily could lead to her party going backwards. she wanted it to turbo—charge her authority. instead, it acts as a wheel clamp on her future. so, in these discussions she has to decide what she can do to try and hold her government together. and it starts with this, a document i have waved around one breakfast like a rather a lot in the last couple of weeks, the conservative ma nifesto. couple of weeks, the conservative manifesto. this was meant to be her proud sacred governing text fulham next five years instead, in all likelihood, whole chapters will be ripped up
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now to chris page, who's in belfast. chris, there was confusion at the weekend about whether there is actually a deal in place with the dup. what's the latest? exit polls following the first round of france's parliamentary election suggest president macron's new centrist party is on course for a landslide victory. projections show la republique en marche and its modem ally look set to win up to 445 of the 577 seats in france's national assembly. the final outcome will be decided in a run—off next sunday. a woman's been arrested on suspicion of murder after a man was hit by a tram in manchester. it happened in the city's victoria station at around 7:45pm last night. the man died at the scene, and a 31—year—old woman is being held for questioning. both the white house and downing street have dismissed a report that donald trump wants
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to delay his proposed state visit to the uk until he has the support of the british public. an online petition was signed by nearly two million people, who wanted to block the american president's trip to britain. the opposition was inflamed by mr trump's criticism of london mayor sadiq khan's response to the london bridge terror attack. many children are confused about where their food comes from, according to a new poll. in a survey of more than 5,000 children between the ages of five and 16, some thought cheese comes from plants, tomatoes grow underground, and nearly a fifth of the very youngest thought fish fingers were made from chicken. andy moore has the details. the poll to healthy eating week threw up some surprising results. around a quarter of all children thought strawberryjam could be included as one of their five—day portions of fruit and vegetables
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to a lot of people thought that fruit pastilles would count. there was a bit of confusion about where food came from. something reflected in theirform. do you know what fish fingers are made from? chicken. fish and breadcrumbs. tomatoes, where do you get those? the shop. the ground. trees. do you know where cheese comes from? not sure. it's made out of milk. just under a quarter of five to seven—year—olds in the survey thought that prawns were plants and that chips were made from animals.
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the managing director of the british nutrition foundation said that schools and families could and should work together to educate children about making healthier choices. some people say that cheese does grow on plants for some people if you're vegan! that's why we love brea kfast! when theresa may made the surprise announcement in april that she'd be holding a general election, she said she was doing it to improve her negotiating position for brexit. before the election, the conservatives were operating with a working majority of 17 seats in the house of commons. the pm had hoped to increase that. but this is how things stand now. the tories lost 13 seats. they're still the largest party, but no longer hold a majority,
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ending up in a worse position than before the election. instead, it was labour who increased their number of seats. talks are now underway with northern ireland's dup for a deal that would see them support the conservatives in key votes. but the clock is ticking. the queen's speech and the start of brexit negotiations are both scheduled for monday. let's speak now to labour's shadow secretary for international trade, barry gardiner, who joins us from westminster. ina in a week's time brexit negotiations talk. are you going to try and undermine the negotiations? what's your position? no, look, absolutely not. we have been very clear that the british people spoke in the referendum. we will leave the european union. what, of course, we wa nt european union. what, of course, we want is to see the very best outcome and we will do everything to ensure that we get the best outcome. i think it's very interesting to see now that the complexion of the
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cabinet has changed. the power dynamic within the cabinet has changed and i think that's a very good thing for the brexit negotiations because this idea that there could be an outcome which was to have no trade agreement with the european union, the no deal option is clearly off the table with people like philip hammond really more in the ascendant. so, in essence, i can understand from what you're saying and correct me if i'm wrong, with regard to the brexit negotiations you will back the prime minister? well, look, it's not a question of backing the prime minister. it's a question of ensuring making sure that parliament is able to get the very best outcome negotiated on behalf of the people of this country. that means leaving the european union, but doing so in a way that doesn't damage jobs. that doesn't damage our economy. and that has been the great fear that we've
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had because of course, the government was prepared to do a no deal. they were prepared to go on to world trade organisation rules to increase the additional burdens and barriers that would have meant for our companies trying to export into the european union. i'm pleased that that prospect seems to have receded because theresa may has lost the power and influence that she might have expected to have as prime minister through running such a disastrous campaign and having gone to the country to say that she wa nted to the country to say that she wanted to get a mandate to negotiate a stronger position, she has ended up a stronger position, she has ended up in a stronger position, she has ended upina a stronger position, she has ended up in a weaker position, but in a sense that's good for the country because it means that other voices in the conservative party are now in the ascendant. jeremy corbyn said that an
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alternative queen's speech will be brought. the queen's speech is about all of the programme for government that we put forward in our manifesto and that was so deeply popular. i think what will be very interesting is to see whether in the queen's speech the government has now dropped its appalling manifesto commitments to end the triple—lock, to ta ke commitments to end the triple—lock, to take away people's houses when they're receiving care in their homes, i think these are all the elements that it will be very interesting to see what the government's queen's speech looks like. i'm very confident about what ours will look like. it will be talking about the popular things that we had in our manifesto and that we had in our manifesto and that clearly were so attractive to many people in the country. so you're going to put it before parliament. what do you expect to happen then? well, i think, what we will be doing constantly over this
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next period in parliament is challenging the government to do the right thing. challenging the government to show that actually more austerity is not going to grow our economy and of course, the vital thing for everyone now is that we do grow our economy, that we're able to trade our way out of our present situation and grow the economy so that it's good forjobs, it's good for business. it's good for people and that's the way that we develop a stronger country, but we do that by valuing people, by valuing our public services and making sure that actually money is in the pockets of those who are most likely to spend it and therefore, to give business that shot in the arm that it needs to grow the economy. will you try and vote down the government's own queen's speech? look, it would be premature for anyone to say that they will vote against something
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without having seen it. so let's see what the government brings forward. but i imagine that if they stick to their manifesto commitments then it would be something that we, of course, would find it very difficult to support. let's talk about jeremy to support. let's talk aboutjeremy corbyn. there is some members of the labour party talking about jeremy there is some members of the labour party talking aboutjeremy corbyn becoming prime minister. you're still 60 seats short of a majority. is that talk not premature? look, i think, what we have seen is an extraordinary change in the mood in the country from just seven weeks ago. at that point we were 24, 25 points adifficulty in the polls. we've come to neck and neck. 40% share of the vote. this is the largest and swiftest turn around in political fortunes that we have seen in the uk since clement attlee back in the uk since clement attlee back in the 1940s. so i do think that we
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need to make sure that we recognise that. now, what we will be doing in parliament is putting forward the popular policies and trying to persuade the government that these are things that are in the national interest. we want to do the best by the british people in every area, whether it's in education, whether it's in health, whether it's in business, whether it's in trade. all of these are areas where we have put forward imaginative policies that people want and need and we will be doing our best to persuade everyone in the house of commons, in the new house of commons, that it's important to get those through. barry gardiner, thank you for your time on breakfast. in the next 20 minutes, we will be speaking to david davis, secretary of state for exiting the european union. it's 8.18am and carol can tell us
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about the weather. what we have is a little bit of rain. it will be breezy at times. we have got that today and the warmest weather will be midweek. we will have temperatures into the mid—or the high 20s in some parts of the uk, but pollen levels through this week will be high or very high and its grass pollen that's the prevalent one. so if you're aleshlgic to grass pollen bear that in mind. we have low pressure driving our weather. you can see from the squeeze on the isobars, it's breezy wherever you are, but particularly windy across central and southern scotland and northern england. gusting to 40mph. on the satellite picture, you can see the extent of the cloud cover, but you will notice the ripples in the cloud. that's largely down to the wind. the wind will be a feature of weather for sometime across the north of the country, easing through the afternoon. we've got showers in the afternoon. we've got showers in the north and the west. many of those away from scotland will fade
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as we go through the day and the cloud will start to turn over. so we'll cloud will start to turn over. so we' ll start cloud will start to turn over. so we'll start to see sunny spells developing. for some, we'll start to see sunny spells developing. forsome, that we'll start to see sunny spells developing. for some, that process will start earlier than others and it will be a fine afternoon across south—west england and south wales, southern counties, prone to high cloud at times, so it will be bright perhaps rather than sunny and temperatures getting up to 19, 20 celsius, possibly 21 celsius. for northern england there are one or two showers left in the forecast. some of them around the penninesment for northern ireland, bright spells of sunshine and showers. the same for scotland, bright spells, shine and showers. most of the showers in the north and the west and wind continuing to ease. now, there this evening and overnight, we'll start to see more clearance in the sky and there will be some patchy mist and fog falling across southern counties. at the same time a set of weather fronts will introduce thicker cloud and rain. you can see that quite nicely here on the chart. high pressure however starts to
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dominate the weather in the south. so things will settle down here. there will be more sunshine around and the tfr ture will also be higher. meanwhile, all this rain coming in from the west will turn more showery in nature. as is the nature of showers, not all of us will see some of those and we will see brighter breaks developing too. temperatures in the north tomorrow, 14 to 18 celsius. in the south, 23 celsius, possibly 24 celsius. by the time we get to wednesday the temperature really starts to pick upment more especially in southern areas. this is where we will have the highest temperatures in the sunshine. it is feasible we could see 27 celsius or 28 celsius. further north in the dry and sunnier conditions, we will have 20, 21, 22 celsius, but there will be more cloud in the north and the north—west. where we've got some rain, and it's also worth mentioning the uv levels. the uv levels at best in the uk tend to get up to eight. that's high for us. and on wednesday, we will see eights across southern england and especially along the south coast. if you're
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tempted to go to the beach, bear that in mind. what a lovely idea now you've suggested it carol, thank you very much. we've been at westminster so much over the past few weeks, we thought we'd bring downing street to us. just outside our studio in fact. dan is there now. good morning. this is it, look at our little number ten set here this morning, complete, we have seen the real one with our fake stuffed version of larry the cat. the knocker is real, but one of the reasons you can tell it's not a real door is that actually the proper number ten only opens from the inside out. there is not a keyhole on the real number ten. that's why you can rest assured this is our fa ke you can rest assured this is our fake door. we are talking about the keyissues fake door. we are talking about the key issues that made us vote the way we did last week in the general election. we have a panel of voters and experts with us. good morning,
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thank you for being part of the programme. i'm going to come to you first if we can alison. you're a small business owner. you voted conservative last week. yes. the issue we're going to talk about now issue we're going to talk about now is the issue of austerity. we have seen why it was so important to so many people. was that key for you last week when you put your cross in the box? i think for me one of the main deciding factors, obviously i'm scottish. i was brought up labour. i'm new conservative rather than silver spoon conservative. for me it has always been the party for small businesses. so as a small business owner that's why my focus went. we worked with david cameron's government. for me it was an easy decision. but something happened the week before when they were doing the hustings. they did the live poll and for the first time i think in their
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history, conservative didn't come out on top. so, there was a bit of an article yesterday in the mail on sunday from vicky owen that even prior to the election theresa may hadn't sold herself to small businesses and again i'm a sales trainer so it's always about selling yourself and the popularity. i think they kind of let themselves down because of the lack of support. we are the lifeblood of the uk economy. so, you know, keep us happy and we'll feed the nhs. we'll feed social housing, but if you don't get that bit right then we won't. we have tom, the head of pensions at hargreaves lands down. on that issue particularly that alison was talking about there, tom, of austerity, do you think now with that reduced majority that there will be a change to the conservative policy on this issue particularly? i certainly think they will be making a calculation about their priorities and what they can put into their legislative programme and what
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government bills they can get through and we'll hear more about that next week and there is a lot of negotiating going on over the next few days on this particular i shall eye. the question —— issue. the question of government borrowing will be one to watch. 0r question of government borrowing will be one to watch. or do they now acce pt will be one to watch. or do they now accept this message that they have been sent by the electorate that says, "we've had enough of austerity. spend more money. that's what we want from this government." of course, they will be keeping an eye on how this will play out if they have to go back to the country at some point in the next few years. anna one of the mantras was theresa may's jams, the just about managing. did that not resonate? it is the case they weren't as successful in winning the traditional labour heartland seats in the north and in the midlands as they hoped to be and i think part of that was an element of distrust in the sense that if
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you're annoyed by austerity and you think your life could be better if government invested more, a lot of people said we don't trust the conservatives to do that for us so we'll go back to where we came from which is the labour party.|j we'll go back to where we came from which is the labour party. i know, it's topsy—turvy, but the conservatives did win the election, it was a reduced majority, but they won more seats than any other party. we have been talking about how austerity has been affecting other areas of the uk's community and markets as well, we've got the nhs and education represented here. briefly, if we could, austerity, that issue for you as a teacher, has that issue for you as a teacher, has that been felt particularly for you in the profession? education was talked about during the campaign. it has dropped off. we really need to bring it back to the table. consider the decisions that headteachers and senior teachers are making in schools and the resources to ensure that a child has equal opportunities and equal life experiences and
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consider also teachers have been saying it for years, but listen to the parents and listen to what the pa rents a re the parents and listen to what the parents are saying and really bring it back on to the table. sarah, ten secondsif it back on to the table. sarah, ten seconds if you can as a midwife in the nhs? it's so important to reinvest back into the services and also students. the fact that labour we re also students. the fact that labour were promising to bring the bursaries, that's huge. we need new midwives. we need new nurses. we need junior doctors. they have got to reinvest. you've got a future in telly. i asked you for ten seconds and you delivered. now, it is time for the news, the travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning.
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we have got quite a changeable week this week. for many northern parts of the uk, it's going to be quite wet at times. we're going to see a series of weather fronts just moving away further north and west. towards the south and east of the uk, something a bit drier. and certainly this morning, plenty of dry weather across southern areas with some sunny spells. showers across northern parts, which will become few and far between as we go into the afternoon. for the north west of scotland, it's going to stay quite cloudy. there will still be outbreaks of rain, and temperatures about 14—15d. by you notice that towards the east of the higher ground, the murray firth, aberdeenshire, southern scotland, things becoming drier here. it will turn warm as we go into the
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middle part of the week. through this evening and tonight we will see a lot of dry weather around. a batch of rain moving up into scotland by the early hours of tuesday morning, temperatures no lower than 11—13dc. during tuesday it will be quite u nsettled during tuesday it will be quite unsettled in these northern areas, but as we go down towards southern parts, high—pressure starting to move in from the south. it is a sign of things to come. northern and western parts during the day. it will become drier here, and the best of the sunshine across the eastern and southern parts of england. temperatures 16—18d in the north, about 23 degrees further south and east. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. britain's prime minister convenes her new cabinet for its first meeting since last week's tumultuous election. live from london, that's our top story on monday 12th of junne. as theresa may fights to stay in power — business leaders warn prolonged political uncertainty will ta ke prolonged political uncertainty will take its toll on the economy and sterling. also in the programme...|t could be all change at the top for uber after a damaging investigation into its corporate culture throws the transport technology giant into chaos.
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