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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 12, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy, live from westminster. these are the top stories at ham: with around a week until the start of the brexit negotiations, theresa may insists it's business as usual, despite losing her majority at last week's election. the prime minister is expected to face tough questions about her leadership style from her backbenchers, but her cabinet is rallying around her. on to be in part of a team, united behind to rise to reason. i think she's doing a fantasticjob at the moment. thank you very much. thank you. this meeting comes as conservative mps demand more details about the talks with democratic unionists. the brexit secretary, david davis, admits that the government is prepared to walk away from the brexit talks, if the uk gets a bad deal. what happens if we don't get a deal? our argument is, under those circumstances you've got to be willing to walk away, right? you've got to plan for that even if you don't intend it. we'll bring you the latest reaction and analysis from westminster. and i'm joanna gosling.
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also this hour: president macron‘s party looks set for a landslide victory in france's parliamentary election. aviation officials are investigating an incident that forced a chinese plane to make an emergency landing in sydney with a large hole in one of its engines. both the white house and downing street dismiss reports that president trump wants to delay his state visit to the uk, until he has the support of the british public. good morning, we're live at westminster theresa may will face tough questions today from
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her backbench mps. they are expected to raise concerns about her leadership style and press for more details on talks with the dup. mrs may's new cabinet will also meet for the first time after a limited reshuffle. david davies insists he intends to begin brexit negotiations ina intends to begin brexit negotiations in a week's time but argues the uk will still need to pull out of the single market because otherwise it will not be able to control its own borders. he says the government are still prepared to walk away with no deal in the brexit negotiations. we have said from the beginning we want to have a free trade area, customs agreement and a deep and special relationship and every other aspect of international policy. and even keir starmer said this is not hard brexit. services where we start. the area of argument will be about what
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happens when we don't get a deal. under those circumstances we have to be willing to walk away. it is not the central aim, it is simply what we do if it does not work out. what we do if it does not work out. what we will be doing, as i have through the last ten months, is listening to all contributors and saying if you have better ideas, tell me. for those of you thinking last thursday feels weeks ago and have been hiding under the duvet sets, this monday morning reality kicks in. let's bring you up—to—date with where we are with westminster politics. back at the heart of government, michael gove's last regular appearances on the street were before theresa may became pm. she sacked her old opponent after the bruising eu referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside boris johnson. the two men spectacularly
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fell out over the tory leadership contest last yea r. fell out over the tory leadership contest last year. the foreign secretary has denied having his eye on the topjob secretary has denied having his eye on the top job again, calling for mps to rally around mrs may. jeremy corbyn did not win this election. it is absolutely right that she should go ahead, form a government and deliver on the priorities of the people. i will be backing her, absolutely everybody i am talking to will be backing her as well. the reshuffle shows damian green become first secretary of state, effectively mrs may's number two. liz truss has been demoted, taking a job in the treasury. other key figures stay where they are including jeremy hunt in health and liam fox in international trade. mrs mabel hoped the reshuffle, most notable for its lack of changes, will help her reach out to tory mps. she said last night she intends to
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stay in herjob. i said during the campaign that if re—elected i would intend to serve a full term. what i am doing now is getting on with the immediatejob am doing now is getting on with the immediate job and i am doing now is getting on with the immediatejob and i think am doing now is getting on with the immediate job and i think that is what is important. i think that is what is important. i think that is what the public would expect. they wa nt to what the public would expect. they want to see government providing that certainty and stability. but life without a majority in the house of commons will be very different. the pm may have to some of her policy plans. today she will meet with her own backbenchers, many of whom will be looking for reassurances. she now faces the challenge of starting brexit talks with her authority weekend and her long—term future still in doubt. so it looks like theresa may is set to have a busy few days ahead of her. the prime minister is expected to meet with the 1922 committee of backbench mps at about five o'clock today. then tomorrow, the new parliament will return after is was dissolved for the general election. and theresa may is expected to meet dup leader arlene foster on the same day, as talks continue between the two parties.
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next monday, the queen will present her speech to parliament, setting out the government's plans for the year ahead. and brexit talks are also expected to begin next monday. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. this was supposed to be the day everything was back to normal. of course that queen's speech looms. everything was back to normal. of course that queen's speech loomslj suspect it will be quite short. i think the truth is everything now is in flux. we do not know how long theresa may will remain prime minister, we don't know whether she will be able to put together any sort of stable majority in parliament, relying on a day by day basis of the dup, and we don't know what impact the election will have on the sort of brexit we now negotiate. all that it seems is up in the air, albeit the message from tea m in the air, albeit the message from team may this morning, a rather
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depleted team in may, is business as usual. we will have a political ta blet usual. we will have a political tablet this morning then mrs may will meet backbenchers this afternoon where i'm sure the message will be, i'm listening and i expect conservative mps will come out swearing undying loyalty to her. one of the particular concerns for many mps will be the nature of this arrangement with the dup. albeit the chairman of the 1922 committee said mps would at least be pleased it was being discussed with them ahead of any deal that mrs may might reach. she wants to talk to colleagues and heartheir she wants to talk to colleagues and hear their views before any veal is finalised with the dup. i think it isa very finalised with the dup. i think it is a very good sign of her recognising the importance of cohesion in the party, the importance of us all working together if we are to make government work in these difficult circumstances. i think she
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understands that we need to work in a very cohesive, collegiate way and lam a very cohesive, collegiate way and i am delighted she has chosen to come to the committee so soon to start that process of engagement. what will you be telling her about your hopes and desires for this deal? the committee is a committee of all conservative mps, we are a broad church, there will be many views expressed. but i think most colleagues accept and understand first that it is essential that we get on with government, and that we therefore offer our support to the prime minister, secondly understand that because of the numbers we have been left with after the election, we can't offer that steady government the reliability and expectation that we can continue with a steady, reliable government and ourown, we with a steady, reliable government and our own, we need to bring in support from other parties. the
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obvious place, because they share many of our views on key national issues, in particularthe negotiations with the eu, the obvious place to open is with the dup. and some people have said it is an odd match given some of the social policy views of some of the dup members, that really isn't an issue because those things would be included in any agreement. they are devolved matters for northern ireland. it will not change british policy in england, in any way. the key phrase is steady, reliable government on the back of support from the dup. i am joined by crispin blunt. is it not the case that the dup are unlikely to provide stable government because they will have demands, perhaps on parades, perhaps amnesty for soldiers, which will be
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very difficult for the conservative government to meet? all of those issues will be sorted in the course of this week once the terms of the confidence and supply arrangement are made. we will have to see how those discussions go. but what we have in common is the certainty that a government led byjeremy corbyn would be a thoroughly bad thing for the uk, and also the fact that we have to get a brexit deal done. and both parties have a mandate then for the uk to leave the eu, to deliver the uk to leave the eu, to deliver the referendum decision of last year, and arlene foster knows that her duty is to make sure the country has a government that can do that. do you think that will be stable on a daily paper basis, asking the dup to support each piece of legislation? there is no reason they would not agree to that. it gives
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them leverage. but that is the deal that will be done this week. we will see how they choose to play the hand. they want this to workjust as much as we do because you have those two key objectives, making sure we do not have a catastrophic economic policy inflicted on the country by a government led by jeremy policy inflicted on the country by a government led byjeremy corbyn, and equally we have to get the brexit deal done. let me put it to you that it is profoundly irresponsible because of the potential impact on getting the power—sharing executive up getting the power—sharing executive up and running again because sinn fein will say we are not going into power—sharing executive if the british government is in cahoots with the dup. we will have to find a way of compartmentalising james brokenshire's objectives, where he is an independent arbiter... how can he be? it is a bit like having a
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referee in a game where he is known to bea referee in a game where he is known to be a supporter of one side and then has to referee independently. of course that will be a difficulty. he will be under massive observation to see whether he matches up to the requirements of the northern ireland devolved settlements. whilst at the same time there is a uk government to support. we will have to find a way of doing that. let's talk about brexit. do you accept the sort of brexit. do you accept the sort of brexit we now negotiate has been thrown in the air by this election? the position of the uk government is obviously weaker, because it was a strong negotiating mandate that theresa may was seeking from the electorate. we cannot disguise that. there is therefore more responsibility on the conservative party to unite behind david davis in the negotiation. equally we need to explore all the options and be very clear about what is at stake for the united kingdom. we are trying to get
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toa deeper united kingdom. we are trying to get to a deeper comprehensive free trade agreement also involving issues like security and foreign policy co—operation with our eu partners. that is what we are trying to do. there is then the issue of the divorce terms and then the rich to how we get to that free trading arrangement. it will always be a discussion about the transitional arrangements between the single market today and to the free trade arrangements in the future, because they will be difficult to get a free trade arrangement done in two years. it may make slightly easier knowing that no deal is much more difficult to deliver here, but if the eu overplays their hand and demands u na cce pta ble overplays their hand and demands unacceptable terms even to ordinary labour mps because they can see there is no way forward to a new relationship, that is where we may
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be driven. but this is much more about the position the 27 takes them the position the uk takes. there are an awful lot of moving parts now. we wait to see what happens in terms of negotiations. we also note the scottish conservative leader ruth davidson is seeing the prime minister today to reassert her agenda and her version of brexit. we have scotland's first minister also arriving at westminster to call for arriving at westminster to call for a pause in the brexit negotiations and a reassessment of whether we should remain part of the single market. there is a lot going on. and the real overarching question is not can mrs may survive but what happens 110w can mrs may survive but what happens now to brexit? thank you very much. joining me now is paul goodman, editor at conservative home. this was supposed to be made's
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monday. it is now manic monday. everything seems to be up in the air. the one thing she has done is reshuffled cabinet. what you read into what she has done so far? when people look at cabinet reshuffle is they usually ask has this moved the party to the left, to the right? what's it mean that brexit? i think all those questions are secondary. what this is about is circling the wagons for theresa may's survival. she has in one of the oldest friends, damian green, to be in fx deputy prime minister, to work with a small team to shore her up. otherwise the changes are pretty minimal barone, otherwise the changes are pretty minimal bar one, which is bringing back michael gove, the man with whom she quarrelled like cat and dog in government. someone who she was joking and jesting about only last week. she has brought him back because she needs him. she has a tough day, particularly this afternoon with the 1922 committee. our bruising could that be? it is
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tough but i wonder if the fundamentals in a sense are on her side. there is one fact that matters here, conservative mps havejust been through a bruising general election. the one thing they do not wa nt election. the one thing they do not want and election. the one thing they do not wantandi election. the one thing they do not want and i imagine election. the one thing they do not wantand i imagine no one election. the one thing they do not want and i imagine no one else wa nts, want and i imagine no one else wants, is another one. if they throw theresa may out now as she goes over the bus and they bring in someone else, borisjohnson, whoever, guess what? you have another prime minister without a mandate and pressure for an election would grow. they know that. so at the moment, looking at everything, it is a balance between how angry they feel about what has happened on top of their conviction that she cannot leave them into another general election, and the question about whether they do something now. and given what happened luckiest week they will not want another election? that is the point i am making. they don't want to face the prospect of maybe losing their seats. the general public do not want it. so on the hull the odds are that while
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they think she cannot lead them into they think she cannot lead them into the next election they will try to put off the difficult choice for a bit. so we have the queen 's speech next monday. that'll be quite a thin document, would it? yes. the hull ma nifesto, document, would it? yes. the hull manifesto, this great edifice for social reform, which had a lot of good things in it but when huge mistake which was the social care policy, much of that will be jettisoned. look at recent history. david cameron had a majority of 30 and was beaten in the commons again and was beaten in the commons again and again on pip, tax credits, sunday trading, academies station. theresa took over his majority, she got beaten and philip hammond's budget, they had to tear that up. there is not a chance they can get much of a reforming programme in the next five years. overshadowing everything is brexit negotiations due to start a week today. david davis this morning said the single
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market is remaining is off the table. was that a wise thing to say given that over the weekend there seemed a sense that a softer brexit might appeal? it probably was, for this reason. if you look at the commons it is true there is a lot of support across it. laying as members of the single market and in the customs union. but there is a snag. neither of the front benches want their position. jeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell went on tv yesterday to make it very clear that they do not. for labour, europe is not an all—consuming passion as it is the tories. the corbyn, what he wants to do is talk about posterity. he does not want to have a problem with his own party in picking a about europe. it is more likely he will sit back, watch the tories get into trouble and seek to capitalise on their mistakes. that is what labour did when the tories last had a big europe bill and it is probably what they will do again. have you booked
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your summer holiday? if i have, they will do again. have you booked your summer holiday? ifi have, i will have to be ready to cancel it. as will you. thank you. whilst in this country, there is still confusion about brexit there is one place where they know where they stand. that is brussels. our europe correspondent gavin lee is in brussels. it is interesting because the preparatory talks for brexit negotiations have started. in the past hour it has been confirmed to us past hour it has been confirmed to us is that the highest diplomat for theresa may in the eu is now here in brussels. they are sorting out basically the logistics. who is meeting, where, how often, we heard from david davis on the bbc this morning that he though thinks he will be the man for the discussions. i think it is interesting because we will start to get over the next few hours, perhaps few days, a sense of the rhythm of how this will work. we
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have heard theresa may saying she will stick to the targeted date. next monday it is expected that the official talks will start with the eu main negotiator and david davis. i think it is also interesting is the fairly muted european reaction over the weekend. angela merkel, saying she believes what has happened last week on friday should not have much bearing to the start date, the talks can continue. the former swedish prime minister saying that what we're finding in europe is amongst the 27 a greater degree of unity, greater degree of strength and stability, to coin a phrase, and we'll instability which could make theresa may and weaker negotiating partner. to flip through the papers, the european papers, the italy papers is talking about theresa may
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being unstable for brexit. and the online edition saying that could make a possible softer brexit. early european reaction coming in. i wonder what is going on in the bars. forget parliament and the official billiard buildings. are they all laughing? i think possibly a little laughter but more a sense of open mouthed befuddlement. it is a point being made some some of the papers and social media, and yes, the pubs, that europeans right now don't not need to say very much. some arguments being made are that the opposition in the uk may be taking the brexit debate in a different way. the one thing that has been raised to be a few times is how do european leaders see this in terms of undoing brexit? could article 50 and triggered? there is nothing suggesting anything other than they
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suggesting anything other than they suggest it to saddam go through. it is also possible that they could ask to go back in the single market or extend the date of article 50, not ending in march 2019. but it has to go back to the 27, back to the council and we will start again. gavin, thank you. a lot of the focus is now on belfast and the dup. our ireland correspondent chris buckler is in belfast. and any other day this monday was the day storm and it was the day storm at was supposed to get back on track. how is that looking? the talks for that are resuming today. they had been paused for a few weeks of the general election campaign and a lot of people thought another divisive election campaign in northern ireland would help the prospects of an agreement to get storm want back given that it has already been down since power—sharing collapsed injanuary.
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it has been gone for the rest part of six months now and the nationalist party that will be involved so prospective deal between the dup and the conservatives is not going to help at all in fact it will probably make things more difficult. sinn fein in particular have been very critical of the deal and essay it shows that the british government cannot be expected to act as a neutral, impartial broker at these talks. gerry adams, the sinn fein leader, has said there should now be an independent chair though the secretary james brokenshire says he disagrees. he says the british government, the irish government and the impartial civil service are all heavily involved and therefore that is the approach that is needed to bring the parties together and he thinks that is the way things should go. what will be on arlene foster's shopping list? to get ten votes for theresa may secured what will she wa nt theresa may secured what will she want in return? very high up the
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dup's want in return? very high up the dup‘s shopping list will be more money, more investment for the northern ireland economy, infrastructure projects, public services, also they will want a strong voice when it comes to brexit. in particular they want the brook border between northern ireland and the republic which at present is pretty much open, there are no physical signs the border is there, they want things to say as much as possible as an open border in spite of the uk leaving the eu. so the dup did campaign for brexit, they will support the broad thrust of the government's move as the eu kate leaves eu, but they will want some recognition that northern ireland has special circumstances, they will want some flexibility particularly around the border issue. but they will also want to prove their unionist credentials by saying we have something that we have something that makes things better by the hull of the uk, they are better by the hull of the uk, they a re interested better by the hull of the uk, they
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are interested in pensioners, they wa nt to are interested in pensioners, they want to retain a triple lock and they also want them winter fuel allowa nce to they also want them winter fuel allowance to be protected, they don't want it means tested. i think you will see those issues coming into play. if they are talking about wanting more money, they don't want the border to be any stronger, what is sinn fein going to argue with? that is an interesting question and some observers here have said that if the dup managed to get more money for northern ireland and if they manage to formulate something and brexit that will be better and more in line with nationalist demands that more more than ireland's border has to remain as open as possible, what the dup gets from theresa may might be good for all the parties in northern ireland and it might pave the way for them to go back into storm want again. but from sinn fein's point of view there isaac be
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logically opposed to the conservatives and the dup and a number of issues, not just conservatives and the dup and a number of issues, notjust unionism but economic leave the conservatives are too right of centre for them, they stand for anti—austerity and they stand for anti—austerity and they think the dup and the conservative party coming together would become an austerity alliance. the dup would disagree with that, they would say they want the conservatives to be more compassionate. they see themselves as more centrist in economic terms, but sinn fein i think would use the argument that it is too right—wing parties coming together and what sinn fein are all about is more of a left—wing ideology, a left—wing approach to politics and that is the approach to politics and that is the approach they would want to see reflected in a power—sharing saying. i was last few days it has become more complex. and i don't understand it for a moment! we'll hand back to the studio but don't go away for too long because every hour things are
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changing at the moment. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: detectives investigating the london bridge attack have made a further arrest in east london. a 19—year—old man was detained in barking on suspicion of terrorism offences shortly before ten o'clock last night. six other men remain in custody. exit polls following the first round of france's parliamentary election suggest president macron's new centrist party is on course for a landslide victory. projections show la republique en marche and its modem ally look set to win up to a45 of the 577 seats in france's national assembly. the final outcome will be decided in a run—off next sunday. our correspondent hugh schofield is in paris. there were doubts about whether he could deliver this and it looks like he is going to have an overwhelming mandate. yes. once again he has pulled it off. as you say, this
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party didn't even exist to 15 months ago. it was invented over the internet by him and his small group of supporters. and within a year he has turned it into this force which has turned it into this force which has beaten the other parties into the dust. so yes, he has brought it off, and those who doubted and were saying he might win the presidency but would then be hamstrung by the fa ct but would then be hamstrung by the fact that the big parties would continue to dominate parliament, they have been proven wrong. there was a logic to the system, the situations, which she analysed and predicted, and that logic was that when a president is elected the electorate says fair enough let's give you the tools to do what you said you would do, and the electorate does not want to hamstring him, they want to give him an honest chance. so what we have seen is a real landslide in this first round and what looks set to be the biggest change in faces in the
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national assembly in generations. nearly all these candidates, there could be as many as 450, are people who have never been in parliament before, half of them have never been in politics before. it will be renewed national assembly and that does create in this country, for now, an airof does create in this country, for now, an air of optimism and renewal and the feeling that things might change. an extraordinary achievement for emmanuel macron. in terms of the future direction for france at the policies he wants, that the party once, the people have voted for, what will it mean? the big one is the economy. he is a liberal, he wa nts to the economy. he is a liberal, he wants to open up the economy. the big one will be this summer when he tries to, he will, push through the reform of the labour law, what is criticised as being very restrictive
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ways that employers are reluctant to ta ke ways that employers are reluctant to take on labour because they are afraid of being penalised and unable to let things go when things turn hard. that will be pushed through by decree. very quickly, in the coming months. that is what he sees as the mother of all forms. he believes all else will stem from that because it will be an economic shock to the system and will open up the economy giving confidence to employers and will start better, greater things. the big restriction and of course has been that having won the majority he will nonetheless face potential opposition on the street, street opposition, protests being so common. but i think with this huge mandate behind him and with him having laid so clearly his plan to
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do this, there is a possibility that for once these reforms will go through. the russian opposition leader has been arrested according to his wife. she called on protesters to carry on with the planned protest later today. they want to converge in moscow city centre despite warnings that police would take action against them. he had been given permission to hold an anti—corruption permission to hold an anti—corru ption protests at permission to hold an anti—corruption protests at another site but was forced to take plans after what he called attempts by authorities to humiliate protesters. all the latest on the post—election negotiations for you coming up. but now look at the war —— the weather forecast. good morning. quite a bit of cloud around at the moment and this week will be quite changeable. further
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north some showery outbreaks of rain. looking at that cloud, quite a strong wind creating that feature. but equally some sunny spells and this was this morning in cambridgeshire. so there is some sunshine out there especially towards southern parts of the uk. further north some showers around, that gusty wind slowly using during the afternoon. staying cloudy in the north west of scotland. but elsewhere temperatures into the high teens and perhaps the low 20s. through this evening rain clearing for many but more rain moving into northern ireland and scotland and the north of england. but for most some sunny spells developing on tuesday and up to 23 degrees in the south—east. goodbye. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines. the prime minister will face tough questions from her backbenchers in a meeting later today, after the conservatives lost their majority during last week's election. meanwhile mrs may has finalised her cabinet, with michael gove returning as environment secretary. the news comes as conservative mps demand more details about the discussions with the dup over a possible deal to secure support for a minority government. david davis says the government is prepared to walk away from the brexit talks, if the uk gets a bad deal. the brexit secretary insisted negotiations on leaving the european union will begin in a week's time — despite the uncertainty surrounding theresa may's government. the party of the french president, emmanuel macron, is heading for an overwhelming parliamentary majority after the first round of voting for the national assembly. projections suggest the group will win more than two—thirds of the seats in next sunday's second round. let'sjoin
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let's join catherine for a sports update. good morning. we start with football and after a busy weekend of sport. wales manager chris coleman thinks they need to win all four of their remaining world cup qualifiers if they're to make sure of reaching next year's finals. a penalty from aaron ramsey gave them the lead against serbia in belgrade. but the home side levelled, leaving wales four points behind the group leaders. we were looking to win in the last ten minutes and when they equalised, they have to and puffed but we had a few brea kaways and they have to and puffed but we had a few breakaways and it could have been different. but overall a good game, tough game. for us it is a good point. the republic of ireland are second in that group, level on points with serbia — and they're still unbeaten after a 1—all draw with austria in dublin, thanks tojonathan walters' late equaliser. england manager gareth southgate
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says it's up to the clubs now to nurture young talent. for the first time since 1966, an england national football team won a world cup, when everton's dominic calver—lewis gave the under 20s a 1—nil win over venezuela in the final in south korea. goalkeeper freddie woodman made a brilliant penalty save, to make sure they lifted the trophy. obviously ultimately the aim is that those players come through to senior level and a big part of that is for them to get opportunities with their clu bs. them to get opportunities with their clubs. i think they have shown if the under 20s are world champions there are enough players there to fulfil a career in the game without clu bs fulfil a career in the game without clubs looking elsewhere. and some breaking news, a winding up order petition against leyton orient has been dismissed after all the debts we re been dismissed after all the debts were paid. we have more on that later on in the afternoon and
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morning. we will bring you up—to—date on all the news from leyton orient a little bit later. lions captain sam warburton says he may yet miss the first test against new zealand, despite recovering from an ankle injury. warburton returns as skipper for tomorrow's match against highlanders in dunedin — but he feels he needs to string together some good performances before he's back to his best. the lions have three more matches before the opening test onjune the 24th. the last of the champions trophy group matches is underway — sri lanka and pakistan are playing for a place in the semi—finals. sri lanka were put into bat — and they've lost an early wicket. after 9 overs, they're 40 for 1. whoever wins this match will join england, bangladesh and india in the last four. rafael nadal said he thought he'd be fishing on his boat by now, not winning the french open for a record 10th time. he cruised past stan wawrinka in straight sets, to take his 15th major title — he's now won grand slams in his teens, twenties and thirties. he says he is looking forward to
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playing on grass next at queens and then of course wimbledon. lewis hamilton's formula one title challenge is back on track after he won the canadian grand prix. he led from start to finish in montreal to take the chequered flag there for the sixth time — and cut sebastian vettel‘s championship lead to 12 points after he could only finish fourth. i had my first win here ten years ago and to repeat that is incredibly special. i have to thank my team who made this possible, the guys at the factory have worked so hard. there was a familiar sight in leeds — but still a thrilling one — when for the second year in a row, double olympic champion alastair brownlee beat his brotherjonny to victory in the world triathlon series in their home town. he hopes to compete in the mixed relay cup this year. i'm just kind
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of working out how to fit it in at the moment and looking at that. maybe the grand final as well, i might do that. it is nice to be in the position of not having a fixed calendar. i've spent the last ten yea rs calendar. i've spent the last ten years going for world series two olympics. so it is nice to say fancy doing this race, i willjust do it. that is all the sport for now. let's ta ke let's take a look at some of the main developments. the pram and still will need the conservative 1922 committee of backbench mps this afternoon at five o'clock. before that the reshuffled cabinet, seeing the return of michael gove is an environment secretary, will hold its first meeting. david davis has already insisted he intends to begin negotiations on leaving the eu in a week. despite the uncertainty surrounding the theresa may government. he said a conservative
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party leadership contest would be the height of self—indulgence but admitted that the tories would be pulling parts of the manifesto after failing to win an overall majority. tomorrow theresa may is due to meet the dup leader arlene foster in downing street, which arlene foster has said she seeks to get a good dealfor northern has said she seeks to get a good deal for northern ireland when she meets the prime minister. kwasi kwarteng is the conservative mp for spelthorne. not the monday that you had planned and you have a meeting with the prime minister at five o'clock. what do you think the mood is going to be? i have spoken to colleagues and i think there was a feeling of needing to move forward, getting behind the prime minister. she has appointed her cabinet and we need to get going with the business of governing. it was a difficult election, we cannot deny that. difficult is an interesting word. this is not the monday that you plan. i had not really planned
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anything for monday! if you stand for election you never know quite what the result would be. so i really did not have anything planned for this day. but i think we are where we are. the prime minister has got a new cabinet, one thing we must remember is we have 318 mps, more than labour, the snp and the liberal democrats put together. we the only party at the moment that can form a government and that is what we're doing. when you watched the results coming in, where you angry, i mean, we re coming in, where you angry, i mean, were you surprised? and if you're angry, who was the focus of the anger? more surprised than angry perhaps. i saw a lot of colleagues and friends who had fought hard for their constituencies losing their seats and that is always difficult. it isa seats and that is always difficult. it is a very personal experience if you like, when people you know and have worked with and who have given their all lose. that is difficult and that was my main emotion, one of
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sadness that so many good colleagues either lost their seats or failed to get elected. surprised? i was surprised, the polls, they suggested most of them that the conservatives had quite a big lead. and i think many people believe that. that was something that was not unreasonable to believe in. when the prime minister walks into the committee meeting this afternoon at five o'clock, will there be a sense of inner voice of george osborne, a dead woman walking?” inner voice of george osborne, a dead woman walking? i do not think so, ithink dead woman walking? i do not think so, i think george osborne has been quite mischievous. but looking at the numbers in house of commons, 318 mps, just short of a majority, i the prime minister being the head of the government was really the only option. and now it is the only option, that is what we're doing and we will get fully behind her i hope and make sure we can deliver a good government. how much of that is
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because the alternatives are a leadership challenge or another and frankly you need that like a hole in the head. i do not think people want to see yet another election. i think we have to get on with the business of brexit negotiations. and we need a period of stability. so i think theresa may is best placed to offer that. and a nice short queen's speech? i have no idea what will be in that. when you were canvassing and just before the election you will have known what it was that the voters were not happy about in the
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ma nifesto ? manifesto? well let'sjust see what happens next week. i imagine we must accept it is a hung parliament, maybe something in the manifesto will be difficult to get through. maybe something in the manifesto will be difficult to get throughm there anyone in the party who could carry through to the next election? firstly there is not a vacancy. i'm not sure why these reports are coming from. i was not part of that loop if those conversations were taking place. thank you for talking to us. what nicola sturgeon and scottish conservative leader was davidson will be in westminster this afternoon. our correspondent steve godden is in glasgow. two very important meetings. absolutely. first looking at with davidson, she has emerged from this election as an influential figure. has emerged from this election as an influentialfigure. she has taken the conservatives in scotland from a position where they had just one mp toa
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position where they had just one mp to a position where they now have 13. as many people have said those mps have made the difference between theresa may being able to form this minority government or not. the question is how ruth davidson will use that influence after an initial flurry of activity from her, she has kept quite a low profile since the election over the weekend. later today she will meet the prime minister. there was no sign of heard this morning in london as those 13 scottish tory mps met. but we got an indication perhaps of what the thinking is. the scottish secretary david mundell was asked about whether this could mean a push for a softer brexit. he said what they wa nt softer brexit. he said what they want is a good deal with access to the single market and no trade
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barriers. so i think we can expect those kind of things to come up in conversations between ruth davidson and theresa may this afternoon. and what about nicola sturgeon, calling for a cross—party approach to brexit? nicola sturgeon wants to use the opportunity to set up her position on brexit. she said she wa nts a position on brexit. she said she wants a short pause in negotiations to allow a cross four nation approach to be formulated. they say the election was a rejection of the conservative approach to brexit. this hard brexit. and instead we should look at access to the single market and staying within the customs union. that is something that we're going to hear again from nicola sturgeon this afternoon. but also the question for her is that of also the question for her is that of a second independence referendum. she has acknowledged that was a factor in the result for the snp,
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that disappointing result for them. she is promised a period of reflection on what to do next, i think that that will continue while they try to focus on brexit. but the question surrounding a second independence referendum is not going to go away. the approach that they wa nt to ta ke to go away. the approach that they want to take to brexit, they see the election result as a rejection of the hard exit approach that theresa may was taking and instead this softer approach to brexit and pursuing this through this for nation approach, the cross—party approach, maybe the way to go. but they want to keep the focus on brexit. that is now being the only thing on the table as they would put it and keep the emphasis away from
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the other big question for them which is the question of a second independence referendum. so very much making this case and hoping for this pause in negotiations. how practical that is we will see in the coming days. but this is the approach certainly that she is taking. and we will be back in westminster a little later. now the russian opposition leader has been arrested again according to his wife. it comes ahead of a planned protest in moscow. his wife called on demonstrators to go ahead and converged on the city centre despite warnings that police would take action against protesters. and we're hearing that small numbers of protesters have been detained by police as they were leaving a metro station ahead of the rally. that is a report from reuters. let's talk to a report from reuters. let's talk to a reporterfor bbc a report from reuters. let's talk to a reporter for bbc russia. dallas a
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bit more about this arrest. while he isa bit more about this arrest. while he is a famous opposition politician and one of the most famous and most active opponents of president putin. he wants to become a presidential candidate for the presidential elections next year but we do not know if he will be able to do that. he has faced prosecution and he was found guilty but is appealing against the verdict. so if the decision remains in place he will not be allowed but if he manages to fight and override the court ruling, he would be able to. is he a threat to putin? at the moment it seems he's the only opposition leader who manages to consolidate that feeling, that demand for change. and he that figure which unites many russians who are demanding changes in the
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economic situation and social situation in russian. thank you. in a moment a summary of the business news. first an update on the headlines. theresa may is preparing to meet conservative backbenchers for the first time since the party lost its majority of the general election. she is expected to face criticism of her campaign and leadership style. the brexit secretary david davis has insisted he intends to begin the brexit negotiation with the eu next week. he argues the uk needs to pull out of the single market to be able to control its own borders. the party of the french president emanuel macron appears to be heading for an overwhelming parliamentary majority after the first round of voting for the national assembly. these other business headlines. the uncertainty caused by the general election has led
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business confidence to sink "through the floor", according to a lobby group. a snap poll of 700 members of the institute of directors found a "dramatic drop" in confidence following the hung parliament. however, it found there was "no desire" for another election this year. and consumer spending has fallen over a 12—month period for the first time in nearly four years — according to the credit card provider, visa. its research appears to support suggestions that people are reining in their purchases as prices rise and wage growth stalls. the most popular targets for belt—tightening have included transport, clothing and household goods. ratings agency s&p has warned on the outlook for the uk following the election, echoing similar comments by its rival moody's. jean—michel six, s&p's chief economist for europe, the middle east and africa, said the inconclusive result meant that "for the time being, the outlook remains negative". moody's has said that the election result has heightened uncertainty and increased fiscal risks. for the economy the question is what
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happens next. but it seems that there are few answers right now. one of the most pressing issues is brexit economically. negotiations are due to begin in a couple of days. the resolution foundation is holding a brexit conference to find out what business needs next. tost and dell is director of the resolution foundation. —— tost and bell. what do you and your members wa nt to bell. what do you and your members want to see? in seven days the government is meant to start brexit negotiations and amongst all the meetings of the 1922 committee the government will be getting on with preparing for those negotiations. but british business also needs to prepare. and today on the issue of
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migration and how that affects british business, those businesses are not prepared. only half think the migration system post—brexit will look the same as we have now or similar. that is not what the government has been saying and not what we're likely to up with an associate big changed. and business needs to start to prepare for that change. but how do you prepare when no one knows what is going to happen? well that is a good question and we need the government to set out clearly where they want to get to migration, which sectors they think will be able to rely on temporary workers and others to keep migrants coming into the sectors and which will not. because then they need to invest in training up other staff, recruiting british workers or investing in machinery. have we swapped of uncertainty for another because you might say the result of the election is a disaster because
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business does not know what is going to happen. but we did not have any clarity on brexit before the vote last week. that is right, there was that lack of clarity. and vigorous debate i think business confidence of business directors has fallen but more importantly, visa has shown that consumers have begun to rein back expenditure and that is not just because of where britain is going to end up because prices are rising in the shops dragging down living standards and that is the real challenge to the labour market and the economy right now. for now, good to talk to you, thank you. here's some other stories we're looking at today. uber‘s chief executive could be forced to take a leave of absence under changes being considered by the firm. reports say the company's board met on sunday, but hasn't yet released details about mr kalanick's future. other reports also suggest that the company's chief business officer may resign — as soon as today.
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jaguar land rover has made a £25m investment in the minicab—hailing service lyft, according to the times. lyft is raising money to help compete with bigger rival uber. jaguar land rover will have the chance to test driver as well. —— to test driverless vehicles. the stamp trader stanley gibbons, which has been in business since 1856, has put itself up for sale. the company says it has undergone a major reorganisation over the last 18 months and has cut £10 million off its annual costs bill. and the singer taylor swift has made her entire back catalogue available on spotify, bringing to an end a three—year spat with the streaming service. in 2014 the singer took her music off the platform, arguing that artists were not being paid enough royalties. and these are the market numbers.
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all that uncertainty but a busy week for economic data. retail sales figures in the uk, the bank of england rate meeting on thursday. and also the american central bank, it will decide on whether to move interest rates later in the week. so a lot for the market to digests. and of course those brexit negotiations. so the ftse 100 of course those brexit negotiations. so the ftse100 is slightly down and the french market as well. of course and friends were through the process of parliamentary elections. emmanuel macron expected to get a landslide victory in terms of creating that parliament. and of course the challenge for him is to push through those tough reforms to the labour laws in france and also pledges to
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cut thousands and thousands of civil service staff. the french market is keeping a close eye on that. you're up—to—date. in we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. quite changeable week ahead and for many it will be but more in the way of rain. this morning we have seen quite a bit of cloud across the uk. some sunny spells as you can see and this was the scene earlier on in hertfordshire. the is going to continue through the afternoon. further north the cloud continues with some outbreaks of rain in the west of scotland. but for most of us it is dry with some sunshine. this
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afternoon remaining quite cloudy and wide across the west of scotland. temperatures around 14, 15 degrees. but around aberdeenshire on the other side of the mountains, some sunshine and around 17 degrees. some sunshine and around 17 degrees. some sunshine breaking through the cloud in northern ireland, england and wales. temperatures for many getting up wales. temperatures for many getting up into the mid to high teens. but we could reach 20 degrees in the south—east of england. the breeze will gradually ease as well for many during this afternoon. if you suffer from hay fever not a great scene, very high not only today but for the rest of this week. high pollen levels. more rain moving into northern ireland, scotland and northern parts of england and wales overnight. the rain in northern areas is courtesy of a weather front
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which continues to move in throughout the day on tuesday. but high—pressure moving across southern areas keeping things a little bit more settled across southern parts of england and the south of wales. but further north outbreaks of rain. temperatures are little higher than today, around 17, 18 celsius. around 23 degrees in the south east. wednesday warmer still but again north—western areas are little more u nsettled. north—western areas are little more unsettled. most of us again having a dry day with sunny spells. 26 degrees across the south—east of england. further north and west again temperatures around 17, 18 degrees. so more online, you can find out what the weather is like for the week ahead. and i will leave you with that. goodbye. this is bbc news. i am live from
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westminster. these are the top stories at 12. with a week to go from the start of the brexit negotiations theresa may resisted his business as usual despite losing her majority last week's election. downing street says it is still confident of getting a good brexit deal and is sticking to the two—year timetable. brexit secretary david davis says the uk will walk away if not. what happens if we don't get a deal? our argument is, under those circumstances you've got to be willing to walk away, right? you've got to plan for that even if you don't intend it. the prime minister is expected to face tough questions about her leadership style from backbenchers. pa rt leadership style from backbenchers. part of her new cabinet is rallying around her. on to be in part of a team, united behind to rise to reason. being part of a team, united behind teresa. i think she's doing a fantasticjob at the moment. thank you very much. thank you. conservative mps demand more details about discussions with the dup over about discussions with the dup over a possible deal to support a minority government. we will bring you all the latest reaction and analysis from westminster. also this
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hour, president macron's party appears to be on course for a landslide victory in france's parliamentary elections. aviation officials investigate how a chinese plane was forced to make an emergency landing in sydney with a large hole in one of its engines. the leading russian opposition figure is reportedly arrested as he urges his supporters to attend anti—government protests across the country. good afternoon. we are at westminster. theresa may will face tough questions in a few hours' time for them backbench mps after the conservatives lost their majority last week. they are expected to raise concerns about her leadership style a nd raise concerns about her leadership
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style and pressed for more details on talks with the dup. her new cabinet will also meet for the first time after a limited reshuffle. brexit secretary has insisted he intends to begin negotiations on leaving the eu in a week and argued the uk still needed to pull out of the uk still needed to pull out of the single market or it would not be able to control its own borders. he said the government was still prepared to walk away with no deal in the brexit negotiations. we have said from the start we want a free trade area, customs agreement and a deep and special arrangement and every other aspect. and even keir starmer said this is not hard brexit. so that is where we start. it is the same strategic policy. the area of argument will be about what happens if we do not get a deal. under those circumstances we have to be willing to walk away. you have to plan her that even if you do not
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intend it. it is not the central aim it is simply if it does not work out. and that does not change. or we will be doing of, is listening and say if you have better ideas tell me and we will consider them. we are talking to people on the way here. people fed up with politics. let's get up—to—date with our political correspondence. back at the heart of government. back at the heart of government, michael gove's last regular appearances on the street were before theresa may became pm. she sacked her old opponent after the bruising eu referendum campaign. he will now sit alongside borisjohnson. the two men spectacularly fell out over the tory leadership contest last yea r. the foreign secretary has denied having his eye on the top job again, calling for mps to rally around mrs may. jeremy corbyn did not win this election. it is absolutely right that she should go ahead, form a government
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and deliver on the priorities of the people. i will be backing her, absolutely everybody i am talking to will be backing her as well. the reshuffle shows damian green become first secretary of state, effectively mrs may's number two. liz truss has been demoted, taking a job in the treasury. liz truss has been demoted, taking a job in the treasury. other key figures stay where they are including jeremy hunt in health and liam fox in international trade. mrs may will hope the reshuffle, most notable for its lack of changes, will help her reach out to tory mps. she said last night she intends to stay in herjob. i said during the campaign that if re—elected i would intend to serve a full term. what i am doing now is getting on with the immediatejob and i think that is what is important. i think that is what the public would expect. they want to see government providing
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that certainty and stability. but life without a majority in the house of commons will be very different. the pm may have to wave goodbye to some of her policy plans. today she will meet with her own backbenchers, many of whom will be looking for reassurances. she now faces the challenge of starting brexit talks with her authority weekend and her long—term future still in doubt. so it looks like theresa may will have a busy week ahead of her. the prime minister is expected to meet the 1922 committee at five o'clock this afternoon. then tomorrow the new parliament will be sworn in. also tomorrow she is due to meet arlene foster as talks continue between the conservatives and the dup. next monday the queen ‘s speech is due to be presented to parliament. in the past few minutes
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official spokesman has refused to confirm the date of the queen ‘s speech. next monday brexit talks are also due to start. let's go to our assistant political editor in westminster. so queen ‘s speech, there is? ? the westminster. so queen ‘s speech, there is?? the government has yet westminster. so queen ‘s speech, there is? ? the government has yet to nail down the deal with the dup and they will be very wary about is presenting a queen ‘s speech unless they are very confident they can get it through because if they cannot and they are defeated on it that is tantamount to a vote of no—confidence. so obviously they have to nail down this deal with the dup before they say right, we will both queen's speech. they are keeping their options open. but the deal with the dup is going to be difficult. not just deal with the dup is going to be difficult. notjust because we have already seen figures like ruth davidson expressing concern about the attitude of the dup on some social policy areas, but also because of the impact it could potentially have on northern ireland
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politics. if the poor government is seen to be backing one side, ie the dup, when of course they will have to reach a deal with sinn fein. the real concern is the deal here at westminster could jeopardise the future of power—sharing in northern ireland. this is really very high sta kes stuff. ireland. this is really very high stakes stuff. we are already hearing concerns being expressed by the irish government. the other side relates to brexit. we are seeing a huge push back from former remain is trying to pick mrs may's approach to brexit, in particular in relation to the threat of walking away with out any deal. and lastly, there is massive may on her to change her personal style and already we have heard from the chairman of the 1922 committee saying this morning she has two adopted a more collegiate approach. that is what conservative mps will want to hear when she appears this afternoon. she wants to talk to colleagues and hear their views before any deal
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is finalised with the dup. i think it is a very good sign of her recognising the importance of cohesion in the party, the importance of us all working together if we are to make government work in these rather difficult circumstances. i think she understands that we need to work in a very cohesive, collegiate way, and i am delighted she has chosen to come to the committee so soon to start that process of engagement. what will you be telling her about your hopes or your desires for this deal with the dup? the committee is a committee of all conservative mps, we are a broad church, there will be many views expressed. but i think most colleagues accept and understand first that it is essential that we get on with government, and that we therefore offer our support to the prime minister, secondly understand that because of the numbers we have been left with after the election, we can't offer that steady government the reliability,
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and and expectation that we can continue with a steady, reliable government on our own, we need to bring in support from other parties. the obvious place, because they share many of our views and many of the manifesto commitments on key national issues — in particular the negotiations with the eu — the obvious place to work is with the dup. and some people have said it is an odd match given some of the social policy views of some of the dup members — that really isn't an issue because those things won't be included in any agreement. they are devolved matters for northern ireland. it will not change british policy in england, in any way. clearly that will be a crucial
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meeting with a tory backbenchers this afternoon. albeit i'm sure they will all be swearing undying loyalty to mrs may. that is part of the public choreography. in private, however, very mixed views about how long mrs may can actually survive. quite interesting that one of them backed her and what app. and we had an article in the sun this morning from borisjohnson telling collea g u es from borisjohnson telling colleagues to, get a grip and rally behind mrs may for what he called a stunning election results. i think the broad truth is mrjohnson does not want to be implicated in any way, in any moves to unseat theresa may, which is why over the weekend when there were reports he was on manoeuvres, it was texting journalists such as myself to say that was, in quotes, tripe. the truth is if you wield a knife you rarely inherit the crown. that is
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what happened to michael heseltine after he did in mrs thatcher and then was done in himself. i think boris johnson's then was done in himself. i think borisjohnson's position is stand back for now, wait to see how this unfolds and if down the line a va ca ncy unfolds and if down the line a vacancy should emerge, i'm sure he will put himself forward. norman, thank you. all eyes on the dup and what happens next with arlene foster. al corresponded is in belfast. he said he believes the prospect of another election will not help the power—sharing elect. the nationalist parties say the prospective deal between the dup and the conservatives is not going to help at all in fact it will probably make things more difficult. sinn fein in particular have been very critical of the deal and they say it shows the british government can be expected to —— cannot be expected to act as an impartial broker. the sinn fein leader has said there should
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now be an independent chair though james brokenshire said he does not think it should be the approach. he said the british government, the irish government and the head of the northern ireland civil service are all heavily involved and that is the approach that is needed to bring the parties together, and he thinks that is how things should go. what will be on arlene foster's shopping list? to get ten votes secured what will she want to return? very high up the list will be more money, more investment for the economy, perhaps infrastructure projects, more money for public services, also they will wa nt for public services, also they will want a strong voice when it comes to brexit, in particular they want the border between northern ireland and the republic, currently a fairly open border, they wanted to stay as much as possible as an open border in spite of the uk leaving the eu.
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so the dup did campaign for brexit, they will support i think the broad thrust of the government's move as the uk leaves the eu, but they will wa nt the uk leaves the eu, but they will want some recognition that northern ireland has special circumstances, they will want some flexibility, particularly around the border issue. they will also want to prove their unionist credentials by looking for something that they think will enable them to say we have something that makes things better for people across the uk in particular i am told they are interested in pensions, the triple lock being retained, and they also wa nt lock being retained, and they also want the winter fuel allowance not to be means tested. think you'll see thoseissues to be means tested. think you'll see those issues come into play as well. if they are talking about wanting more money, they are saying they do not want the border any stronger, what is sinn fein going to argue with? that is interesting. some observers here have said that if the dup managed to get more money for northern ireland, if they manage to
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formulate something and brexit that will be better and more in line with nationalist demands that northern ireland needs to recognised as being voted for remain, and therefore that border needs to be as open as possible, then yes, what the dup gets from theresa may might be good for all parties in northern ireland and that might actually pave the way for them to go back into storm at again. but from sinn fein's point of view i think they will say they are ideological opposed to the conservatives and the dup on a number of issues, not just conservatives and the dup on a number of issues, notjust unionism, but economic league the conservatives are too right—wing for them. let's speak to the co-leader of the green party, caroline lucas. theresa may is still prime minister and has had a reshuffle, but you are not pleased. one aspect i am certainly not pleased about is the idea of michael gove as environment secretary. it is hard to think of
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someone less qualified. this is a man who tried to stop young people in our schools learning about time it change, you try to take it out of the geography curriculum. he tried to put a levy on renewable energy when it should be on fossil fuels. he has fought against better targets. he thinks in the run—up to brexit that the legislation from brussels should be set fire to.” think it is worrying. a man who is a big hitter and back in the cabinet. but not in the country's good as for the good often reza mayhew is trying to shore up her position and balance out her appointment of damian green who was an ardent remain, with someone like michael gove. this is reshuffle about trying to shore up her precarious position and not about what is best for the country. everyone agrees what is best for the country is going into the negotiations with a plan. how do you
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think the environment issues are going to feature in that?” think the environment issues are going to feature in that? i am deeply worried that the environment side of these negotiations will be com pletely side of these negotiations will be completely marginalised and as you say, a huge amount of our legislation on the crime and comes from brussels and saying you will cut and paste it across in the great repeal bill does not work, because what happens is you do not bring across the enforcement mechanisms, these other things made that legislation enforceable. without that legal architecture you have zombie legislation that is there on the statute book but not helpful in terms of enforcing anything. you have presumably been on the phone talking to colleagues and others, what is the sense of what the next few months will hold? there is an enormous sense of chaos and worse than matt, chaos brought on theresa may by her own hubris. i think she
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needs to recognise she did not get the mandate, the way in which she stands outside downing street pretending nothing has happened fools nobody. she did not get the mandate for the extreme brexit she wa nts. mandate for the extreme brexit she wants. it means we need a pause, we need to get people around a table and work out a way forward that has and work out a way forward that has a greater consensus across the country. most people don't fully understand the term is hard and soft brexit. but with soft brexit we seem to be talking about controls on immigration, freedom of movement, membership of the single market rent. do you believe it would change ifa rent. do you believe it would change if a softer brexit was the next discussion? i think it would certainly change the dynamic and certainly change the dynamic and certainly a brexit that meant we we re certainly a brexit that meant we were still inside the single market, personally i would still like freedom of movement, but at the very least we need to recognise there are four nations of the uk and to voted
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to remain and two voted to leave. she had the opportunity earlier and for a more consensual approach and she chose not to do it. she has now paid the price. let's hope she will soon recognise that and go forward with a better brexit steel and put the national interest ahead of her party into his chest. thank you for joining us. let's see what the view is in europe. joining me is a member of the committee for foreign affairs. what is happening in uk politics? i am astonished and i do not understand it. if you have a comfortable majority and then make a call for elections and lose them and lose your authority, that makes it more difficult for us to find the possibilities for proper negotiations, which we need because the clock is ticking, the 29th of
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march 2019 must be the agreement signed and ratified. you say it makes it more difficult, surely it makes it more difficult, surely it makes it more difficult, surely it makes it easier for europe because they can say you are not ready, all we have a plan, we are sticking to the timetable. it makes it easier for the eu negotiators? no, i fear not. it does not make it easier. it is good to have a strong negotiation partner who has the flexibility to explain at home which compromises are needed. my german is awful but the word sharpened freud, is there any of that about? the damage of brexit we are so high for all of us, if britain loses contact with the
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internal market, it is damaging to all of us. therefore we cannot have that word. we should find a proper result to keep the damage of brexit down. we hope that realism comes to london and we can talk about the conditions for the divorce and for later, for the second agreement which will be the agreement about the future relationship. until now the future relationship. until now the few agreement, but again discussions about the internal market and the customs union, to ensure certain conditions are fulfilled. theresa may has said she is prime minister, what ever deal she comes to in this country in the next few days, means she goes into the negotiations on monday as prime minister. has anything changed? formally, no. we are the ghost ready
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for the negotiations. we are prepared for weeks and hope the british government also comes up to the negotiations with a strategy that makes it possible to go forward. thank you forjoining us. live from berlin. we are just hearing that we understand that the queen ‘s speech will be delayed by a few days. we are being told, the bbc understands the bbc is scheduled for next monday it will be delayed by a few days. that is the latest from westminster. we will bring you more from here of course throughout the afternoon. let's go back tojoanne. thank you very much. we will keep you updated on those two elements. but now let's turn our attention to russia. he has been a russia
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arrested again ahead of a planned protest in moscow. it is under way now. here are the live pictures. you can see somebody being led off to a police van. we have been getting reports of some protesters being arrested. we will stay across these live pictures while we bring in our reporter with bbc russia. we have heard reports of arrests. the opposition leader who had called these protests has himself been arrested. what is your reaction? he has been detained. i guess he might be arrested very soon but at the moment he is detained. as many half his supporters have been. the thing is that he applied for a rally in the centre of moscow and was given a place, a street, but yesterday he
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called for... from the beginning he suggested to organise this rally in the centre of moscow. the state authorities gave him another chance but he decided not to go there but to go to the centre of the city for this unsanctioned rattly. that is the reason so many people are being detained. then i guess there may be even more arrests. last time he took to the streets was the 26th of march and while nearly 1000 people were detained, this is the highest in the modern history of russia. this shows how big the demand for change is in russia and how determined is the state to oppose those opposition medics. he could have gone ahead with a protest that had been agreed without courting this difficulty. there would be questions as to why he decided to shift the location. what is being said about that? there
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is ongoing discussion from yesterday. when he called to change the place and actually to switch from sanctioned rally to unsanctioned rally. he claims meetings and walks and gatherings are part of the constitution and he is not breaking anything. the state authorities have a difference of opinion. but there is a state hold in russia and people, it is a day off, and people arejust in russia and people, it is a day off, and people are just walking along the main street and since it is unsanctioned rally, posters are not allowed. it is hard to differentiate who came here to protest a nd differentiate who came here to protest and support the rally and who is just having a walk. it will be massive and it definitely will attract a lot of media attention. his ambition is to oust putin in the presidential election next year. does he have much chance? it is hard
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to say at the moment. while he was found guilty of a criminal case and according to russian law he is not allowed to run for presidency at the moment. but he is appealing the decision and if he manages to win this court case you might get the chance. he says his strategy is to become such a prominent figure that the authorities will decide it is easier to let him into that race and what happens next we do not know because he is a bright opposition leader who might managed to consolidate the desire for change. thank you. let's go back to westminster. we were just hearing the queen ‘s speech is going to be delayed by a few days while the political situation continues to unfold. let's go back to simon. the bbc understand it is delayed by a few days. very unusual of course,
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unusual circumstances after the last few days. it is scheduled for next monday, the same day as a brexit negotiations were due to start, but our understanding is the queen will be delayed in her trip to the houses of parliament to deliver that speech. the cynics are pointing out already that there is not much that can go in it at this stage. with me is the mail on sunday, respondents and isa is the mail on sunday, respondents and is a broadcaster. let's pick up on that. the prime minister is trying to show that government goes on and then we hear this. indeed. what could possibly go in a queen ‘s speech where we feel that the ma nifesto speech where we feel that the manifesto she has put forward has been roundly rejected, more over we are not sure she can deliver many of the deliverables which are key to it and more over she knows if she hiccups, even if she misses a breast, labour are waiting at the door. you say that. labour's win was
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not a win and her majority was reduced. she is still prime minister. if she gets the deal with the dup business goes on. you would think it won't, but you have a lot of uncomfortable promises in the ma nifesto. of uncomfortable promises in the manifesto. the first is education. who will sit by and really vote to ta ke who will sit by and really vote to take food away from children? don't you think that is the conversation they are having this morning which is why we have this delay announcement? of course. they will be talking about the things she will say in the queen ‘s speech which we won't hear until she is on the floor. we will have a lot of people writing about this on the day and not even many people in the shires, the places that voted and held onto the places that voted and held onto the conservative vote, i'm not sure whether they will support her and the dup. there are a few times you wish you were a fly on the wall in this building, but i suspect one
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will be this afternoon with the 1922 committee and her first appearance in front of all the new and old mps. i have to say i wish i was a fly on the wall everyday. but what i do think is they have taken a lot of criticism over the last few days but we are starting to see the conservative party starting to rise to the occasion if that is possible given the disaster. we are starting to see the tories starting to come together to steady the ship, there was some talk about the 1922 being a bloodbath for theresa may. i don't think we will see that. we have had cabinet ministers bringing round backbench tory mps, explaining it is not the time to cause trouble. frankly, the conservative party believes it hasjust about
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frankly, the conservative party believes it has just about survived a near death experience. they were so a near death experience. they were so close to being in a situation where they could not have formed an alliance with anyone. jeremy corbyn would have been in downing street. now they need to step back, take stock and see if they can steady things. keep calm, carry on, and make arlene foster your best friend. that is the only option. that is one of the reasons why we have had the delay in the queen's speech, a lot of it is having to sit down with the dup, the new effective partners in government, and say what is a cce pta ble government, and say what is acceptable to you ? government, and say what is acceptable to you? what is going to go in there? if we have a slight flavour of what the northern irish women have had to do deal with? issues over abortion, same—sex marriage. everyone has moved on eve ryo ne marriage. everyone has moved on everyone has a gay nephew. everyone has someone who has started down the path of coming out. if theresa may
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makes a deal with the devil and the dup, we may see our politics go back to 1967. this is what we do not want. but if it is simply a financial deal, is that not all right? there isa deal, is that not all right? there is a feeling that they make even bring in the likes of nigel farage. that will not go down will. the difficulty is, people are worried for the first time about politics in this country. we have the disruption, do we not need to let that go to calm things down. the
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reality is the conservatives have an effective majority. as we have seen today, they are not going to try and push through a queen's speech based on the manifesto which would not succeed. the thing you have to also rememberabout succeed. the thing you have to also remember about the succeed. the thing you have to also rememberabout the dup, succeed. the thing you have to also remember about the dup, we're succeed. the thing you have to also rememberabout the dup, we're not having a situation where abortion legislation is overturned. the one thing people are missing in relation to this arrangement, the great irony, because it isjeremy corbyn who is seen to be leading the labour party and the will documented relationship with irish republicans,
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they do not want a situation where they do not want a situation where the asjeremy they do not want a situation where the as jeremy corbyn entering downing street. it is not as if it will do some very hard bargaining, but the social issues you have been mentioning, they are not going to be the red line for them. even if there was, theresa may and the cabinet are not going to let them do that sort of thing. and no talk of brexit. whether we like it or not, we have got into a situation where we have got into a situation where we have got a lot of gay conservatives than you do members of the dup. who is going to be setting clear in the first houses of parliament? thank
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you very much. put a patent on that. we can talk and no to norman smith. her rear is postponing a queen's speech? i cannot recall any tent where one has been delayed. i think this is quite possibly a first. it tells us two things. the ambiguity about what the government is going to put in it. key elements of the ma nifesto to put in it. key elements of the manifesto are having to be taken out. the likes of grammar schools, aduu out. the likes of grammar schools, adult social care, scrapping free school meals. that is no been chucked in the bin. there's also ambiguity about whether the government could even get any of it
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through parliament. that is why the need to absolutely kneeled down the dup. it would be impossible to present one without the support of them. before they can come forward with any queen's speech, the absolutely have to get the dup on board. that seems to be increasingly difficult, not just board. that seems to be increasingly difficult, notjust because of the arguments of the stands of the dup inferior social policies, but the potential impact on a deal with the dup on politics in northern ireland and the availability of the possibility of getting the power—sharing agreement up and running again. that is a belief that any deal with the dup wind mean that
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process. in this climate, the government have clearly decided they need more time. the need believing space not only to decide what they are going to put any queen's speech, but whether they could actually get it through parliament. late next week, it is royal ascot, when the queen tends to be rather busy! this could be delayed even further. no one seems to have a grip on what is going on. we do not even know if the brexit talks are going to start next monday. david davis was even suggesting these could be delayed slightly. everything seems to be up in the ayr. the situation with theresa may, the potential deal with
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the dup anti-queen's speech. we can here know from gerry adams. michelle o'neill isjoining us. we are here to do business. we have had a very good election. this is the magnificent seven. the seven sinn fein members who are elected. we are meeting with the two governments this afternoon. we have commitment and resolve to see these institutions put back in place on the basis they were founded on as
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quickly as possible. if that could be done by this time tomorrow morning, the issues are very clear. they are on the subject of previous agreements. we are looking forward especially to the meeting with the dup. they, too, have had a good election and we congratulate them on that. i know the focus is on what is happening on london and it is very important to say that we do not believe that any agreement between the dup anti—english conservatives would be good for the people here. we do not want anything for its
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affects the process here and that has to be opposed by progressives. there is a huge bonus on the incoming prime minister of ireland to speak directly with the british prime minister to highlight that concern. there needs to be a core equal responsibility on the irish government to ensure that all aspects of these agreements are implemented. it is an interesting time in both british politics and irish politics. the train coming down the track is brexit and we will all need to be match fit to face up to our responsibilities. we need a
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united approach. it will be to the mutual advantage of everyone. can i ask two questions? given the mandate that arlene foster has received, what is the effect on the enquiry which is due to take place? these talks began in march. james is not acceptable. we have the correct view that the british government our players. in terms of whether arlene
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foster should stand to one side, that remains our position. that will come down to the talks we have. that will not be an issue unless we have some sort of deal. we do not want to be too mesmerised by what is happening in great britain. everything will come back to here. is it not also in the interests of sinn fein that a deal is struck?” would hardly call itself a
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coalition, however it manifests itself, that sort of arrangement between the dup anti—english conservatives manageable. or stable. it looks to me like a recipe for chaos. what we are trying to do is get agreement and unity. it is not just for sinn fein. we are representing all the people from this part of the island. we will not time or nose up at a good deal, but we will see what sort of deal is done. if there was an
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agreement in which there would be no fixed border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland, would that be acceptable? we have to see what happens with that. there's one way this could be stopped by sinn fein taking the seats in westminster. is that an option. you are right on your assertion. there is no pressure on sinn fein to fulfil anything but the mandate we we re fulfil anything but the mandate we were given. can the talks proceed? michelle o'neill made it clear
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before the first phase. we will talk with james. our focus before the first phase. we will talk with james. ourfocus is before the first phase. we will talk with james. our focus is talking to all of the parties. we know the issues which are involved. we know that the dup avenue actively and deliberately prevented these issues being resolved over the past decade. there has been bitten noises coming coming from arlene foster at their wit has to be the basis of it.” coming from arlene foster at their wit has to be the basis of it. i do you a deal could be put into the
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mix? we have no problem with whoever leads the dup. but we have to give our assent as to what that would mean to the executive of the office of the first minister. we would not agree to anything until it is in the interests of all parties. speaks irish. we will pull away from a conference.
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we will pull away from a conference. we arejoined by we will pull away from a conference. we are joined by a we will pull away from a conference. we arejoined by a dup member. as we just heard from gerry adams, they would find any deal between theresa may and dup the almost impossible to deal with. but you have the stormont talks which i presume you want to go ahead? what the united kingdom needs is stability. as much as can be achieved. the best avenue for that some sort of accommodation between the conservative and the dup. if we're into negotiations about brexit, that will be for the good of
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northern ireland and for the good of the united kingdom. arlene foster will be going into these discussions with the positive frame of mind to get the best outcome for the hall of the united kingdom. what does that mean? there are two concerns which many people are. first, there is a lot of movement across the border people live on one side and maybe work on the other. their distribution centres on both sides. whatever it may be. we want is open and flexible and arrangement as possible. we don't want people's daily business to be disrupted. but putting that into practice is something that david davis has not
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even resolved. i will not know what the final outcome will be. but we have made it very clear we do not wa nt have made it very clear we do not want any destruction between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom. it is not a question of simply shifting the board are up to the ferry terminals. call me cynical, but if that is resolved, as the other issue cash? if you look at the other issue cash? if you look at the manifesto from the selection and look at things which were put on the table. this was put on the table two
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yea rs table. this was put on the table two years ago when there was the possibility of a hung parliament. that did not happen then. i would do this grade the dup is populist party. it is not happy with the austerity we have seen. we will be looking at the likes of pensions, winter payments, the debenture tax. this is things all areas of concern. —— dementia tax. there are issues around cultural identity, the past, infrastructure, commitment by the dup that northern ireland has a
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global economy. we need to increase employment in the public sector. that requires investment and infrastructure, research and development, university development. there are range of things on the table. so the answer is yes, it is cash. it is all about investment. northern ireland suffered terribly during the troubles. gerry adams endorsed a campaign that decimated the country for 40 years. there are issues in policing and security measures. we are dealing with all the results of that. there is a lot of work to be done, to make the country really competitive. these are the sort of things which might
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strike a chord with people in scotla nd strike a chord with people in scotland and wales. it should be an important discussion, which may be guilty of why the queen's speech has been delayed. thank you very much for joining been delayed. thank you very much forjoining us. as hejust mentioned, the queen's speech, scheduled for next monday, has been delayed. we are not sure if that has ever happened again. as we said, a few days where expected, but it is royal ascot next week, so it may well be the following week. he brexit negotiations are still scheduled for that day. detectives investigating the london
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bridge attack have made another arrest. six other men remain in custody. projections for the parliamentary party suggest that they will get nearly 80% of the seats going to the new party four of macron. i asked them what their reaction was from those who earlier doted his ability? the amazing rise of him through the internet by his supporters and within a year, he has become this
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incredible force and put the political establishment to the dust. he has taken it off. people said he might have won the election but the big parties would hamstrung him in parliament, but that appears not to be the case. the electorate have no given him the tools to do what he said he would do. they want to give him an honest chance. what we have seen is a landslide in the first round and what looks to be the biggest change of face in the national assembly in generations. many of these candidates have never beenin many of these candidates have never been in parliament before. many have never been in any sort of political position before. it will be a
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com pletely position before. it will be a completely new national assembly. that gives an era of optimism and renewal. an extraordinary achievement. in terms of the future direction forfriends achievement. in terms of the future direction for friends and the policies he wants that the people have voted for, for all that mean? the big one is on the economy. he wa nts to the big one is on the economy. he wants to open up the economy. he will push through new labour legislation. he wants to cast are we in which companies are scared to ta ke in which companies are scared to take on labour in case they are penalised. that will change. he
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thinks that everything will stem from that. it will provide an economic shock to the system which will open up the economy and open it up will open up the economy and open it up to businesses and things will rule on from that. the big prediction has been that having won this majority, there is less potential opposition on the street. with this huge mandate and with him laid out his plan to do this and has promised to act very quickly, there isa promised to act very quickly, there is a possibility that, for once, this legislation will actually all go through. 41 people have been arrested in moscow pattern
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anti—government protest. they went ahead after the location was changed. the gunmen said the protest was illegal. the opposition leader changed the location. 41 people have been arrested. a hedgehog which blew up to twice its size has been rescued. it was discovered walking around in circles. it is giving the animal antibiotics before it will be released once again into the wild. the one o'clock news is just coming up.
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the news coming up was that the queen's speech is going to be delayed for a few days. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. quite evaded fortunes over the next few days, depending on whether you are in the north or south of the country. how a pleasure neverfar away from the south. low—pressure pitching north. many areas started the day rather giddy. a lot of cloud across scotland and northern ireland. this morning, we have seen quite a bit of cloud across the uk. some sunny spells, as you can see, and this was the scene earlier
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high temperatures of 20—21dc. further north, the cloud continues, with some outbreaks of rain in the west of scotland. tomorrow, though pics of rain in the north. tending to break up for the show. more than the wii of sunshine for the south. those temperatures also beginning to claim. 23 celsius in parts of the south east. this area of low pressure tries to pollution. it will run into the high
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pressure from the east. that will produce humid temperatures. a filament of sunshine across the south. high pollen levels. temperatures possibly getting up to 26-27dc. temperatures possibly getting up to 26—27dc. there is a chance on wednesday night that there could be some thunderstorms. on thursday, a weather front pitching in from the west and things tunnelling fisher. back to business in westminster — but it's not business as usual. the bbc understands next week's queen's speech will now be delayed. the formal opening of the new parliament, when the government's legislative programme is announced, is expected to be put back by a few days. after losing her parliamentary
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majority on friday, theresa may faces tough questions today when she meets with tory backbenchers. brexit talks are due to begin next week, but scotland's first minister calls for a pause to allow a new four—nation approach to negotiations. business leaders warn of a drop in confidence following the election result — saying political uncertainty could be disastrous for the economy. we will have the latest from westminster. more than 100 protesters arrested across
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