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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 12, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy live from westminster. these are the top stories at four. the bbc understands the queen's speech, in which the government sets out its plans, is to be delayed by a few days. theresa may meets her newly reshuffled cabinet, ahead of a difficult meeting with conservative backbenchers the brexit secretary, david davis, has admitted there may be a slight delay to the negotiations on leaving the eu which were due to start next monday. what happens if we don't get a deal? we have to be willing to walk away, you've got to plan for that even if you've got to plan for that even if you don't intend it. i'm reeta chakrabarti the other top stories this afternoon. hundreds of protestors are arrested across russia as they defy the authorities by taking to the streets — opposition leader, alexei navalny is among them. it was a peaceful protest and this is how it's ending with dozens of
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people being drag aid way by riot police. a lucky escape for passengers on this china eastern airlines plane it makes an emergency landing after taking off with a large hole in one of its engines. the duchess of cambridge visits kings college hospital to meet staff and patients affected by the london bridge attacks. ged away by riot police. the queen's speech next monday is now expected to be delayed by a few days amid the turmoil caused by the election result. theresa may is insisting that it's back to business in westminster, despite losing her commons majority and this afternoon she's expected to face tough questions from her backbenchers about her leadership style. there's also some unease about the possible pact with northern ireland's democratic unionists.
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our political correspondent chris mason reports from westminster. one after another this morning, the question for cabinet ministers was this... is theresa may's time up? one after another, her senior ministers rallied to her side. theresa may will continue as an excellent prime minister. first the home secretary then the brexit secretary said leadership talk was... the height of self—indulgence. the british people have given us an instruction, a result we wouldn't have chosen ourselves but they have given us an instruction and it is ourjob to get on with the work of government, to organise arrangements so we can do business with the house of commons and run the country. she is very good at that. and the foreign secretary borisjohnson said it was time to get a grip. this afternoon, mrs may will meet conservative mps to explain herself. i think it is a very good sign of theresa may recognising the importance of cohesion
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in the party, the importance of us all working together, if we are going to make government work in these rather difficult circumstances. i don't think there's any appetite in the country for a new general election and i don't think there is any demand amongst my colleagues for a leadership election either. theresa may wanted to return here with a majority that proved she could be the dominating political figure of her age. instead, she is diminished, bruised and weakened. she called the election with the explicit intention of turbo—charging her authority. instead, it is acting as a wheel clamp on her future. and so, after a turbulent few years, labour are upbeat. we are just going to make sure we hold their feet to the fire. so where we can, for example, on the queen's speech, we will be trying to ensure we hold them to account, where there are things we profoundly disagree with them on, where we think we will be able to defeat them,
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we will put out amendments and do our best to keep harrying them. the queen's speech, where the government sets out its programme, was due to happen next monday but we understand will now be delayed by a few days. like never before, theresa may will be reliant on others to prop her up. the votes of northern ireland's democratic unionists in the commons and the support of ambitious colleagues, like boris johnson. politics, with its twists and turns, has yet again proven its capacity to leave us all out of breath. word coming through from stormont where the dup are involved in the talks to try to re—establish a government in stormont. we are hearing that arlene foster, the head, has described as positive engagement her discussions with the conservatives about a possible deal
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which would retain theresa may's majority in parliament. she's gone and said there is discussions continuing and we'll hear from arlene foster later on. she's been holding a news conference with the dup in stormont. david davis said there may be a delay on the talks. we have heard the queen's postponed the queen's speech. mep meps are heading for strasbourg to discuss the way forward. eleanor garnier contains some flash photography. brexit! the vote to leave the eu almost a year ago, but the debate on exactly how we exit the terms and the priorities, has been reopened, just days before brexit negotiations begin. some tory mps are demanding theresa may has a rethink. and in scotland, where the conservatives there had their best election result for more than 30 years, are promising to pile on the pressure.
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we will be looking to make sure that our influence is felt. we played a significant part in ensuring there is a conservative minority government after this general election, with the fantastic result in scotland, winning all those seats, getting the second in the popular vote and putting our vote up so significantly. a manifesto to see us through brexit and beyond. theresa may had wanted a much bigger mandate from voters for her vision of brexit, to take britain out of the single market, have control over eu migration to the uk and to get new free—trade deals with the eu and other countries. but, left without a majority, she is facing calls for compromise. this isn't new. just before christmas, the scottish government put together a pan—uk compromise document, to put independence to one side, to look at the document, remaining members of the single market. that is what we need to get behind.
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it is perfectly possible to stay within the single market, to keep all the benefits of that and it is possible to have a degree of management of migration, if that's a central issue, countries like switzerland do it, so that is the kind of compromise you should be looking at. buoyed by their relative success, labour stand in a rare moment of unity and are adding to mrs may's problems. for her to get through any legislation relating to brexit, never mind a vote on the deal, she will need a degree of cross—party support, simply getting the dup support is not going to be enough. but the government maintains its brexit strategy has not changed and is sticking to its tactics, insisting no deal is still better than a bad deal. you have got to plan for that, even if you don't intend it. it is not the central aim, it is simply what we will go for if it doesn't work out. that's it, and that doesn't change. what we will be doing, of course, as i have said through the last ten months,
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is listening to all the contributors and say if you have better ideas, tell me and we will consider them. for many britons, brexit was about taking back control but now it is mrs may who has been left without the control. nevertheless, those around her are holding their nerve, insisting it will go ahead as planned. theresa may might still be in power, but she is no longer pulling the strings. all the while, brussels is waiting to negotiate, and the two—year clock is ticking. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. i'm joined now by the conservative mp chris philp, who sat on the previous treasury select committee and who voted to remain. we are looking ahead to monday and supposedly the start of the negotiations. trade‘s slipped by in terms of discussions so far. are you still confident that this country will benefit from that discussion?”
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hope that it will. i hope that when we sit down with our european partners we can negotiate a sensible free trade deal, including passporting rights for the city of london. of course it's a negotiation and the outcome depends on what our opposite numbers decide to do. it serves oui’ opposite numbers decide to do. it serves our interests clearly to keep trading with europe but also their interests and, if they were to be difficult and unreasonable in those negotiations, clearly it would damage their own industries, the german car manufacturing industry where the largest export market, the large french wine industry, we are their second largest export market. soi their second largest export market. so i hope everyone will be sensible and the good free trade deal welcome back reached —— can be reached. and the good free trade deal welcome back reached -- can be reached. you are talking about staying in the single market? no, i'm talking about a free trade deal which is different. staying in the single market would be quite difficult, at least on the current terms. if you look at norway, as a mod elled of a country not in the european, they have to accept all the regular gration from the eu and the
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jurisdiction to have ecc —— modelled. they have to accept free movement of people and budget conditions. if those are the terms, i think it's quite difficult to see how we could sign up to that. if the terms change, we'd think about it. assuming they don't change, what we need and should aim for is a comprehensive free trade deal. you are expressing a view which i haven't heard all day, one of optimism. given the turmoil of the last few days, how do you sense this country moving forward ? last few days, how do you sense this country moving forward? i'm an optimist by nature, i think you have to be in life. a good free trade dealing serves the european interest and ours, and a is the point that we have to communicate, notjust to the european commission, but the european commission, but the european people as well. it would be very wrong if the european commission in trying to defend the european union as a political project end up damaging jobs and destroying jobs in germany and france and italy. the message needs to be heard by 2t france and italy. the message needs
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to be heard by 2 t people of europe, as well as by the european commission. this is a conversation we'd be having had there been a tory majority in the election last week, there wasn't. there are still some hurdles before the talks are even going to get under way. you are going to get under way. you are going to get under way. you are going to that meeting with theresa may today, what are you expecting to hear or to say to her? i think i'm expecting to hear the prime minister acknowledge that the campaign did not go as expected or as it should, so not go as expected or as it should, so i'm certainly expecting to see some acknowledgement of that. she's already apologised last friday to the colleague who is, cludd no fault of their own lost their seats. i'm expecting to hear that message again. i'm also expecting to hear conservative mps uniting around the prime minister because we do need to face these very difficult and important negotiations united and strong and talking to colleagues in the tearoom and around westminster since arriving back here from croydon a few hours ago, i am seeing that unity and support. the knives are firmly in the box, are they? i'm
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not sure they were ever out. what needs to come first is not party or individual interest, it's the national interest. what will serve the national interest is a strong united team here in westminster batting for britain, making sure we get the most out of these negotiations. the last thing we need at this difficult juncture negotiations. the last thing we need at this difficultjuncture is anything like a leadership election oi’ anything like a leadership election or general election or any kind of disloyalty. good of you to join disloyalty. good of you tojoin us, thank disloyalty. good of you to join us, thank you very much for coming in. maybe we'll talk to you after the meeting. we'd love to be a fly on the wall at that one! thank you very much. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at the houses of parliament for us now. more than two hours that meeting, which is a lot longer than usual, but i guess they had rare a lot to
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talk about. theresa may is going to go to speak to backbench mps, the chairman of the 1922 committee of backbenchers joins chairman of the 1922 committee of backbenchersjoins me now, graham brady. what is the mood like? a few mps are back today, what are they saying to you? conservative colleagues are disappointed that we have come back without an overall majority, we hoped for a different result. we hoped to come back with a strong, clear majority and that hasn't happened. i think overwhelmingly the mood is positive, it's about recognising that we have to work with the numbers that the electorate's given us, and we need to work together to make sure that we can offer a resilient government that can offer the responsible leadership the country needs. that can offer the responsible leadership the country needsm does mean compromise though doesn't it when you don't get a majority, whether it's a compromise or coalition or some kind of arrangement, that means you are going to have to water down proposals? inevitably if we don't have a majority for the manifesto,
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there will be significant changes andl there will be significant changes and i think that the reality of this parliament inevitably will be one of a great deal of consultation, a lot of work trying to build alliances, probably even on individual aspects of legislation to try to pull in support from people in other parties. that might not all together bea parties. that might not all together be a bad thing. theresa may is due to speak to mps in the last hour. what would you like to hear from her? i think it's important that the prime minister recognises that things haven't gone as they should have. recognises that the campaign wasn't as food as it should have been. but also, i think you can balance that with a recognition that we did get the conservative vote, we got a vote share of 43%, the highest since 1983 and of course it was a sufficient share of the votes to deliver a landslide majority for tony blair in 1997 sand 2001. so we
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need to look carefully at what went wrong, a large part of that i think was the labour party's vote going up, ratherthan was the labour party's vote going up, rather than the conservative party failing to improve its vote share. but crucially i think this meeting is an opportunity to start setting the scene for the way that we are going to work together as a party in the coming years in a parliament that doesn't have an overall government majority. i think it's very welcome that theresa may asked me to bring the meeting forward to today so that we could have some discussions about the likely confidence and supply arrangement with the dup before the deal's been concluded. i think it's very important she begins this parliament with a real demonstration that we are going to be more collegiate, work more together, have
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more discussions together. and does she have to take some personal responsibility for that campaign and can she survive the full term of this parliament? of course the leader of the party has to take some responsibility for the campaign and i'm sure that she will. can she survive? she can survive for as long as she has the support of the majority in parliament. what we are see seeking to deliver at the moment is a steady arrangement, not a coalition, but something looser than that, but which will guarantee the necessary supports should there bea the necessary supports should there be a confidence vote, the necessary support for a queen's speech and the necessary support to get vital budget measures through. so yes, i think we can do it, it's going to be a very difficult thing and it will ta ke a very difficult thing and it will take a lot of hard work. do you think some would like her to go?” don't detect that the public wants another general election or that my colleagues would like to serve up to
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the british public another big dose of uncertainty by plunging into a leadership election. so no, i don't detect any moves in that direction at all. thank you very much indeed. theresa may will be heading to the house of commons to speak to her mps in the next hour. we also know that the queen's speech is likely to be delayed while they sort out that kind of arrangement with the dup and work out exactly what is going to be in their programme for government. we arejust hearing, we are just hearing, that while we have been reporting that the queen's speech may well be delayed on monday, they are still hoping it may ta ke monday, they are still hoping it may take place at some stage next week. no day has been set. it's likely that there will be a deal between the dup and the tories tomorrow. that is according to sources that we are hearing from. that is obviously dependent on how the talks go. in the last few minutes, the dup leader
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arlene foster has been speak. she's been talking along with her colleague nigel dodds at stormont where talks are still under way to try and resume the power sharing at stormont. let's hearfrom her now. we have had a meeting with the sinn fein leadership this afternoon and again we reiterated that we want devolution back up and running again as quickly as possible. of course the dup's always been a devolution asa the dup's always been a devolution as a party, we believe in devolution and we believe it's the right system of government here in northern ireland for the people of northern ireland. of course we want devolution back up and running to deal with health, education and bringing more and betterjobs to northern ireland and to deal with the infrastructure of our country. so we had a good, constructive workmanlike meeting and we will continue the talks later on this week. this evening, i'll be meeting with the secretary of state for
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northern ireland. i'm hoping also to meet with the department of foreign affa i rs meet with the department of foreign affairs minister charlie flanagan as well and then later on this week eu hope also to meet with the new taoiseach in dublin. reporter: some people are suggesting that tory dup arrangements in london isa that tory dup arrangements in london is a breach of the good friday agreement... (inaudible) what is your response? the fundamental of the good friday agreement is the fa ct the good friday agreement is the fact that it's for the people of northern ireland to decide on whether they wish to remain within the united kingdom. it's known as the united kingdom. it's known as the principle of consent. the principle of consent underlines everything that's there in the good friday agreement which means, of course, that we are a full member of the united kingdom. as such, of course, the parliamentarians would wish to play as full a role as they possibly can in our national parliament, just as some in sinn fein would like to play a role in
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the irish parliament. i think this isa the irish parliament. i think this is a tremendous opportunity, not just for this party but for northern ireland in terms of the nation and we are very much looking forward to playing our part in that. nigel, do you want to say anything about that? on that point, i think vest very important to say that the criticisms ofjames important to say that the criticisms of james brokenshire and important to say that the criticisms ofjames brokenshire and the role of her majesty's government are long—standing on the part of sinn fein, they've already criticised them as not being impartial prior to them as not being impartial prior to the general election. so that's nothing new. but the point that arlene's made there is very, very important — are sinn fein now going to rule out taking any position in any future government in the irish republic because that would be a breach of the good friday agreement — they should be asked that — the people of the irish republic would be very, very interested, as would other members of the other political parties to know before they fight the next general election in the irish republic whether or not the
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sinn fein are going to rule themselves out of government on the basis that it's a breach of the good friday agreement because if that's what they say about us, then it applies to them equally. reporter: how would you assess the mood in the discussions with sinn fein because it's your first chance to meet with them since the elections. secondly, what are the issues and discussions that you wouldth you want to raise with the taoiseach later this week? in terms of the second point, we'll want to congratulation the new taoiseach and wish him well in his role. we'll wa nt to wish him well in his role. we'll want to ensure that the relationship we had with the last taoiseach continues and we'll want to talk about issues such as brexit. of course we recognise it's a fundamental issue for both jurisdictions moving forward and we'll want to work together. that's all been my view. last november in dublin i talked about the triangular relationship between london belfast and dublin, that's still firmly my view that if we want to make this
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work for britain, we need to work together to make it work and we'll talk about those issues. reporter: (inaudible) the discussions were very businesslike and constructive. i think we made it very, very clear to sinn fein that we want devolution up and running. we believe it's absolutely imperative for the benefit of northern ireland we have a locally elected assembly and executive operating in the best interests of the people of northern ireland. that is the first choice for the dup. we didn't bring down the assembly, we didn't bring down the assembly, we didn't bring down the assembly, we didn't bring down the executive and we are not holding it up again. i sense that sinn fein want to see that happen as well, let us hope that happen as well, let us hope that that is the case. reporter: how close are you to finding out about the deal with the conservatives? we are continuing
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discussions and i'm looking forward to going over to london this evening to going over to london this evening to meet with my parliamentary team which thankfully has increased since i last met with my parliamentary tea m i last met with my parliamentary team and we'll be meeting with the prime minister as well. reporter: (inaudible) way of restoring devolution here? why would it? we want devolution back and running. we believe it's the best form of government in terms of the people of northern ireland the deal with the issues like health, education, jobs, infrastructure, all the things we talked about in the last assembly election. we believe that that is the best way forward. we are here today talking to the other parties and look forward to engaging later on in the week. what i would just add, those that are concerned about decisions being taken concerned about decisions being ta ken elsewhere and concerned about decisions being taken elsewhere and what's happening elsewhere, i would have thought that that would have been a strong incentive for them actually to get power back into the hands of locally elected politicians here at stormont. if things are devolved and
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they're being operated by locally elected politicians, then it's a matter for locally elected politicians and it can't be decided anywhere else. if you decide not to allow power to come back, you are handing it over to others. that's the choice sinn fein have to make. reporter: andy davis, channel 4 news. if your northern ireland plan document which is obviously 2015 resulted in a hung house of parliament, you had 45 priorities, looking at them this morning, those deals with republicans, protectionist (inaudible) members of the armed forces could be given protected status. do you anticipate any of those issues being raised with theresa may? you know what, we are not going to negotiate over the airwaves of our esteemed colleagues in front of us, but what i will say is this — we are going into these talks with the national interest at heart, the union is our guiding
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star. we believe in the union, we believe in national stable government and that will be what will be at the forefront of our mind going into the talks again tomorrow. those issues, as nigel has said, which are devolved, should be dealt with by the devolved administration here in northern ireland. but if others decide that they're not coming back into the devolved administration here in northern ireland, those issues will have to be dealt with at westminster. it's really for sinn fein to decide where they want the powers to lie. thank you very much. business-like and constructive is how nigel dodds discussed the talks with the conservatives. a positive engagement is how arlene foster called them. you have got talks to restore power sharing in northern ireland going on at the same time as the talks to try to keep theresa may's majority working here at westminster. james
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brokenshire said as far as the stormont talks are concerned, that is final and immovable and he said the reintroduction of direct rule from westminster is on the cards if that does not happen. two twin tracks of discussion there, both crucial to the next few days here in the uk. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon says she believes the idea ofa sturgeon says she believes the idea of a hard brexit is now deed in the water. she's in westminster due to meet the prime minister later along with the conservative leader of scotland, ruth davidson. the approach that the government was taking to hard brexit i think is deadin taking to hard brexit i think is dead in the water and cannot stand. i'm calling today for a process that is opened up to include more voices, all parties and all four nations of the uk and an approach that has continued membership of the single market at its heart. the prime minister's got to recognise she asked for a strengthened mandate for asked for a strengthened mandate for
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a hard brexit and voters across the uk refused to give her that and she cannes simply carry on as if nothing's changed. nicola sturgeon there on parliament square. in the next half hour, mps will be arriving, backbenchers, for that meeting with theresa may scheduled to get under way at 5. the 1922 committee — said to be a lively meeting in prospect — more from there later on. back to you, reeta. more than 200 people have been arrested in russia, as protestors defy the authorities by holding demonstrations against corruption. they've been organised by the leading russian opposition figure, alexei navalny, who has called on protestors to gather at rallies across the country. he too was detained ahead of the moscow protest, latest reports from there say pepper spray is being used against ; here's daniela relph. latest reports from there say pepper spray is being used against
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p rotesto rs. certainly, there are still huge numbers of protestors pouring into central moscow, and there has been large numbers of riot police coming in the last hours, as well. we had a lot of shouts from just behind me, which is the beginning of this section of the main street down from the kremlin. there are hundreds of thousands of people there who have been trying to walk down the main street to express their protest, to voice their anger, and their frustration at the corruption in russia, and the government, and the authorities. there have been a lot of people arrested, we have seen several ourselves. the reports are dozens of people here in moscow being detained by police. we just saw one truck taking people away a moment ago. you can see more police coming in now. this is national russia day, then
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the protesters turned out in huge numbers, saying they were here to make their voices heard against corruption, shouting against the authorities, but it was a peaceful protest a nd authorities, but it was a peaceful protest and this is how it's ending, with dozens of people being dragged away by riot police. time foran time for an update on the weather now. essentially it's a fairly quiet week of weather, nothing too dramatic but there are big contrasts in the country. the north will often see a lot of cloud with outbreaks of rain. it was cloudy in north yorkshire earlier on. the south had the best of the breaks in the cloud. through the evening and tonight, where we had sunny spells in the south and east, it will turn chilly, especially out in the countryside. but for northern ireland, parts of wales and north—west england and scotla nd wales and north—west england and scotland as well, we'll see more
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cloud, outbreaks of rain splashing m, cloud, outbreaks of rain splashing in, most of it light and patchy but there will be the odd heavy burst. that will peter out tomorrow, breaking up into showers. further south again the cloud breaking up to give good spells of sunshine. a lot of sunshine for the english channel coast and the channel islands and temperatures beginning to nudge up as well. plenty of divided fortunes for the rest of the week. rain at times in the north, often breezy, further south mainly dry with sunshine. for the middle and the end of the week, it will be particularly humid. hello. this is bbc news with reeta chakra barti. the headlines at a.30pm: in the past few minutes the bbc has learnt that the queen's speech could still go ahead next monday, despite earlier indications that it was going to be delayed. the ceremony sets out the governments legislative programme. government's legislative programme. the prime minister's re—shuffled
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cabinet has met for the first time since the general election. later today mrs may will face tough questions from a committee of her backbenchers. the brexit secretary, david davis, has said there may be a slight delay to the negotiations on leaving the eu which were also due to start next monday. mr davis insisted the talks would still take place next week and that the government would stick to its plan to leave the single market. russian opposition leader alexei navalny has been detained at home ahead of a planned but unauthorised protest in moscow, his wife says. the news comes as thousands of his supporters heeded to his call to protest against corruption. there have been over 100 arrests. the duchess of cambridge has praised the members of the emergency services who attended to victims of the london bridge terror attack. she visited king's college hospital in south london and spoke to several patients who are still being treated. now, just before we go to the sport,
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the first secretary of state, the new first secretary of state, damian green, confirmed that there could be a delay to the queen's speech while a delay to the queen's speech while a deal is sought with the dup. he says obviously until we have that, we can't agree the final details of the queen's speech. clearly, a certain amount of confusion as to when it is going to go ahead. damian green is confirming that there could bea green is confirming that there could be a delay while those talks with the dup are going on. right, let's getan the dup are going on. right, let's get an update on the sport now and go over to hugh in the sports centre. good afternoon. the former defender david unsworth has praised the everton players who featured in england's under—20 world cup final win. unsworth now coaches the everton under—23 squad and says they've proved they are worthy of more regular first team football in the premier league. the majority of them have been in this club since they were about ten
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or 11 this club since they were about ten or11 and this club since they were about ten or 11 and they have come up the ra nks or 11 and they have come up the ranks together. so they are a really tight—knit group. they are very, very talented, but they are humble as well. they are desperate to be a pa rt as well. they are desperate to be a part of what's going on at this football club. it is important that our young players represent their countries and experience different challenges away from the club as well. we're not just challenges away from the club as well. we're notjust trying to produce top footballers on the pitch, off the pitch as well, it's important that they buy into everything that we do here. all these players are humble players. they're great lads. and obviously with bright futures. what they have given themselves a great platform to be successful. no other team, no other england team has ever done what they have done and achieved so they've given themselves the exposure to get opportunities in the first team and then all our lads who have been involved have already played in our first team and when they have had that opportunity, you know and when they get more opportunities, they've got to take them. you've got this let them fly
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and you've got to see whether they're good and you've got to see whether they‘ re good enough and you've got to see whether they're good enough and any top manager now in the premier league you know has to be very brave when you're talking about pitching in a young player. knowing when the time is right. so, what we need to do is keep these boys in the system as long as we can because it's getting more difficult every year for them to come through. england striker harry kane will keep the captain's armband for tomorrow night's friendly against france. kane was made skipper for the world cup qualifier against scotland on saturday, scoring a stoppage—time equaliser in their 2—2 draw. leyton orient have survived after a winding—up petition against them was dismissed. owner francesco becchetti had been given until today to settle with his creditors or sell the club and a lawyer told the court that the relevant debts had been paid. orient will be playing in the national league next season after finishing bottom of league two in may. pakistan will need to score 237 to reach the last four of the champions trophy after bowling sri lanka out in what's the last
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of the group matches. whoever wins this match will join england, bangladesh and india in the semi—finals. currently pakistan are 113—11. well, after the champions trophy england will start a twenty20 series against south africa. they've announced the squad for those three matches and it includes a first senior call—up for the lancashire batsman liam livingstone. in 2015, he broke the world record for the highest individual score in a one—day match, he scored 350 off 138 balls for his local club side. with just 12 days to go now until the first test against new zealand, lions captain sam warburton still believes that he may not play despite recovering from an ankle injury. warburton returns as skipper for tomorrow's match against highlanders in dunedin, but he feels he needs to string together some good performances before he's back to his best. the lions have three more matches before the opening test against the all blacks and coach andy farrell believes they are improving.
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we're bearing the fruits of the last three weeks. we've gone hard with the lads fitness wise, contact wise, we have been taking a lot out of their legs and with the travel etcetera. that would have had an impact, but we're ready to battle ha rd impact, but we're ready to battle hard and fight for a test match. we're still ramping it up intensity wise and contact wise because we have got to get up to break neck speed for the next test. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. we willjoin simon at westminster. hugh, thank you very much. there is confusion at westminster. i'm confused about what is going on. let's go to vicki young who is outside the houses of parliament. now, this is queen's speech delayed or isn't it? do you know, we don't know, simon! ithink or isn't it? do you know, we don't know, simon! i think the point is there is confusion and that is because the situation we are in is that theresa may cannot have the
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queen's speech until she knows she has a working majority in the house of commons and she could get that through a vote. so as we know they are in talks with the democratic unionist party. those talks are on going and! unionist party. those talks are on going and i think it's all dependant on what stage those talks are at. so originally, earlierthis on what stage those talks are at. so originally, earlier this morning, bbc learnt that it was going to be delayed probably and wouldn't happen next monday. now, someone has said from downing street, i'm not sure it is downing street, a source has said that they think could it could well happen, but since then damian green has come out after that cabinet meeting and suggested that there might bea meeting and suggested that there might be a delay to the queen's speech. so, at the moment, i would say that there is confusion in westminster! about what the status is of the queen's speech. i'm glad it's not just me. we have been hearing from arlene foster and nigel dodds and she rather gave the impression that the talks were certainly not going to be sorted out by today or perhaps tomorrow, but would take several days? i suppose that's the issue. so there is the broad if you like
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desire to help the conservatives and help them stay in government. so thatis help them stay in government. so that is where they would say they would support a budget or they would support a confidence vote because it's in the end it's a no confidence vote that could bring down theresa may as prime minister and bring down the government. so, you could have the government. so, you could have the broad agreement that that would happen, but then you've got the separate issue of what exactly the dup want in response to that? what are they going to get for that support? so if you look at the queen's speech, there is no point the conservatives putting things in their queen's speech, their programme for government that they simply have no chance of getting through the house of commons of the that's more complicated. if you think about the things that were in, proposals on social care, there was a lot on brexit. now, the two sides may agree on some, but not all of the brexit proposals for example. there is things about pensions, about the winter fuel allowance and about the winter fuel allowance and about how generous the pension is. all those kind of things will have
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to be talked about and that's not going to be done very quickly. you remember last time this happened in 2010, it was a full coalition, so the liberal democrats went to full coalition with the conservatives, but in that circumstance, the liberal democrats had done a lot of preptry work on that. they thought it might be coming and they had what they wanted and they had the things that they wanted, they had their red lines all ready. this time, this has come more out of the blue for people. so they are starting from scratch if you like and it's all about that, it's about how long these talks are going to take. could it be done and dusted tomorrow? if it be done and dusted tomorrow? if it was, then i'm sure the queen's speech maybe could go ahead next monday, but if there are problems then they can't guarantee that, there is the issue which is not a trivial matter, but the queen needs to know, of course, what the dates are. she has a busy diary so it's not that easy to reschedule these things. you imagine what the queen's speech events are like, it's a big deal and doing that at the last minute and changing it at the last minute and changing it at the last minute is pretty complicated and the
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week of royal ascot! vicki, thank you very much. so we will have plenty from the 1925 committee meeting. reeta chakrabarti. an investigation has begun into an incident that forced a plane to land. the airbus a 38 #3 30 managed to land scaefl and there were no reporteded injuries. richard galpin reports. the plane, which was due to fly to shanghai, back down on the tarmac at sydney airport after a mid—air emergency. and this was the problem. part of the left engine ripped away, leaving a gaping hole. for the passengers, everything had been normal until suddenly
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about an hour into the flight, it became clear there was a major problem. it took off like normal and then all of a sudden some of our friends that were with us smelt burning. we didn't think anything of it really but all of a sudden it got really loud. i heard the noise and i'm not sure what is the noise, but the cabin crew went out and they were very, like, they told us too fasten our seat belts and tried to calm us down. but we were actually very panicked because we had no idea what was happening. it was a little shocking. i couldn't really tell what it was a first but then i realised there was a hole in the engine. so what could have caused such serious damage to the engine? the plane is an airbus a330, like this one. it has rolls—royce engines, and the company says it will help with the investigation, which is likely to look at all potential factors, including maintenance records, and whether some kind of object got inside the engine. and, meanwhile, there are reports that this kind of engine damage
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on the china eastern airlines plane has also occurred on other aircraft. many children are confused about where their food comes from, according to a new poll. in a survey of more than five thousand children between the ages of five and 16, some thought cheese comes from plants, tomatoes grow underground, and nearly a fifth of the very youngest thought fish fingers were made from chicken. andy moore has the details. the poll for healthy eating week threw up some surprising results. around a quarter of all children thought strawberryjam could be included as one of their five a day portions of fruit and veg. around 11% of teenagers said that fruit pastilles would count. there was quite a bit of confusion about where food came from. something reflected in the responses of these youngsters. do you know what fish fingers are made of?
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chicken. fish. dead fish. fish. fish and breadcrumbs. tomatoes, where do you get those? you get them... from the shop. ground. trees. tomato plants. do you know where cheese comes from? no idea. no. not sure. it's made out of milk. just under a quarter of five to seven—year—olds in the survey thought that prawns were plants and a fifth believed that chips were made from animals. the managing director of the british nutrition foundation said that schools and families could and should work together to educate children about making healthier choices. damian green has been speaking after
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this afternoon's cabinet meeting. let's hear what he has been saying. well, we're still performing the programme for government. we're in talks with the democratic unionist party to see the deal that we can put together and i'm optimistic that will happen, but obviously until we have that, we can't agree the final details of the queen's speech so as soon as we've agreed that deal then we will be able when the queen's speech will be. can you confirm it won't be next monday? well, i can't confirm anything yet until we know the final details of the agreement, but we know that those talks are going well and also we know at this very important time we want to produce a substantial queen's speech, there is a huge amount of work to get on with and notjust the brexit negotiations, that start next week, but many of the other
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challenges that face us and we're determined to make a queen's speech to fulfil the prime minister's ambition to have a country that works for everyone. what do you say to the suggestion because you will be forming a government with the help of the dup that you're no longer an honest and impartial broker in northern ireland? well, previous labour governments have tried to do deals with the dup, gordon brown tried in 2010, the dup are another democratically elected party, the same way that the liberal democrats were when we went into coalition with them in 2010 so i think any idea that this deal that we have, the agreement that we want to make with them, is in anyway illegitimate is democratically wrong. it will be a end to the conservative mantra that no deal is better than a bad deal because the dup won't accept a hard border in ireland. well, it's too early to say what the details of the agreement
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will be. we're determined to get the best possible deal for britain in the brexit talks. that's the most urgent task facing the new government of the that's why we're so keen and that's why we have had a cabinet meeting this afternoon where there is complete unanimity. i'm sure throughout the conservative parliamentary party as well there is overwheming support for let's get on with it. let's get on with the job, there are serious issues facing britain. let's get on with them. the fa ct britain. let's get on with them. the fact that you can't say whether there will be a queen's speech suggests there isn't much stability and potentially this government is unsustainable? the details of the queen's speech, the substance of the queen's speech, the substance of the queen's speech, the substance of the queen's speech is what matters. it has been known for some days that we are seeking an agreement with the democratic unionist party. that will provide the stability and parliamentary votes that will allow us parliamentary votes that will allow us to do the many important things we need do, notjust in the queen's speech, the legislation there, but beyond that in governing the country that allow us to meet the challenges
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that allow us to meet the challenges that face britain and loy us to get the best brexit deal for great britain and allow us to make this a country that works for everyone. that's what is important in the long—term. that's what is important in the long-term. damian green, thank you very much. so that's the fu first minister of state, damian green, saying that the queen's speech maybe delayed. some confusion this afternoon, of course, we had learnt that it was going to be delayed and then it appeared it might be back on track and now damian green saying again it may well be delayed. let's take you to downing street. right now, because we're expecting the prime minister to come out of that door imminently. shejust to come out of that door imminently. she just held her first new cabinet meeting and an extremely long meeting and an extremely long meeting it was today. it went on for two hours and ten minutes. much londoner than usual. they had a great deal to talk about and she will be leaving downing street in order to go to a highly trailed and highly important meeting with her backbenchers, the 1922 committee it's called and that is likely to be
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a sober and possibly a difficult meeting for the prime minister. anyway, once she comes out, we'll go back. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first the headlines on bbc news: the queen's speech — in which sets the government sets out its news policies — could still go ahead on monday, the bbc has learnt. this is despite earlier indications that it was going to be delayed. the brexit secretary, david davis, has admitted there may be a slight delay to the negotiations on leaving the eu which were due to start next monday. the party of the french president, emmanuel macron, appears to be heading for an overwhelming parliamentary majority after the first round of voting for the national assembly. straight back to downing street because we are expecting to see the prime minister emerge from that door
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after a long meeting with her new cabinet and she will be heading to westminster, just a shortjourney down the road to meet with her backbenchers in the 1922 committee. that, somebody else coming out, obviously, but we are expecting her to come out imminently. she had a very long meeting of the cabinet this afternoon. two hours and ten minutes with her new cabinet. and there she comes. one or two shouted questions at the prime minister, but she didn't pause to respond. so she is now being taken to the palace of westminster in order to
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speak to her new backbenchers and the difficult meeting that's likely to be. hello. i'mjamie i'm jamie robertson. now a look at how the markets in europe have ended the trading session. the markets now — they seem to be about as confused about what is going on as the rest of us. one survey by the institute of directors has recorded a massive collapse in confidence in the last few days since the election among business leaders. however the stock market has barely moved today. away from the uk, there is a sell—off going on in technology stocks which started in the us on friday. the nasdaq index which is full of tech stocks like apple and facebook and so on fell almost 3% on friday and is down almost 1% today. the pound was a casuality
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following the election falling 2% against the dollar. that fall has continued today, but at a slower rate. all the same it is the lowest against the euro that it has been in seven months. as for the ftse index, the surprising this is that it has been relatively unaffected. some technology stocks felt the chill wind blowing in from the us, but mining companies have done well on the back of a weak pound. remember they make their money largely in dollars which for the average british company, are becoming very valuable. let's get detailed analysis from james bevan, chief investment officer at ccla investment management. james, i mean, the kind of reports we're getting from business, the reactions we're getting from the election, all should point to the ftse, or the london market, really falling quite sharply. actually, it has been fairly quiet? the ftse is made up of global companies and people are looking at it from a global prospective about where they would like to investment they
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therefore look at the likes of unilever and say the pound makes it cheaper, let's have more of that and that's holding up prices well. what about the other indexes which reflect more of the domestic companies, how is britain inc doing? there is major confusion as to what lies ahead. there is a expectation if the pound continues to weaken that will be good for all companies that will be good for all companies that export. however, the longer the uncertainty persists about what the route map will be towards a brexit resolution and a final terms of the way forward, the more markets are going to become worried. you members of thejuried going to become worried. you members of the juried there about sterling. we have seen this sharp fall, pretty sharp fall, 2% or 3%. if that goes on, you say it's good for company's exports, but imports may become more expensive? we should xhpt higher inflation. that's not such good news for living standards and therefore, we shouldn't be overly optimistic
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about the outlook for retailers. we shouldn't be overly optimistic about the outlook for retailersm case we start getting too myopic, we should be look the over the atlantic about what is happening with technology stocks. why are they getting nervous about them? the rot started last week when apple announced that the new generation of iphones is going to have a slower processor and people are saying well, actually apple, we don't think that a slower processor is acceptable, therefore, we're not going to buy your phones and apple took a big hit and that led to commentators and analysts to say the price we are expected to pay are high and therefore, we shouldn't be prepared to take the valuations on trust. maybe we need to mark prices down in order to be buying at a more co mforta ble down in order to be buying at a more comfortable level. the matter ket is having a shake of the tree to see where investors want to come in. james, good to talk to you, thank you very much. james bevan there. a last look at the markets.
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surprisingly quiet. london stock markets being resilient. the wea kness markets being resilient. the weakness of the pound has boosted as james was saying a lot of the international stocks. that's business. i will have more tomorrow. see you then. the duchess of cambridge has visited hospital today. donald and their son baron on the
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streets of washington dc celebrating president trump's inauguration. but since that january weekend, melani and baron have been living at trump tower. the first lady insisted she wouldn't be relocating to the white house until their son had finished the school year. now after nearly five months of living apart, melania trump announced that she and baron had finally moved into the white house. looking forward to the memories we'll make in our new home, hashtag moving day. a decision to stay in new york raised many an abrow. the washington post reported it as unpress didn'ted and described the decision as flouting the most basic of all first lady traditions. the huge costs of maintaining kurt at trump tower was an issue with the
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taxpayer forking out $145,000 a day. melania trump stayed out of sight during her husband's presidential campaign has been a fairly absent first lady. she did join the president on his first foreign trip which led to a series of headlines about their relationship. there was the flick away of his hand and the brush off in rome. now, that she is joining him in walk tomorrow mornings there will be more pressure on her to take a more hands on approach to her role, emulating her predecessor, michelle obama who took on causes including childhood obesity and support for girls education. no doubt, there will be a key eye on what the first lady does next. now the weather. good afternoon to you. big contrasts in our weather through the rest of this week. divided fortunes depending on where you are across the country. northern and western areas seeing rain at tiles, but not
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all the time. there will be humid weather. but northern areas had a lot of cloud and showers. further south, that's where we had the best of the sunshine. as we go through this evening, the southern and indeed some eastern areas where we had sunny skies by day will have clear skies. it will turn chilly particularly away from the towns and cities, for northern ireland and north wales and western scotland, it will turn cloudy. there will be outbreaks of rain and some of that rain maybe on the heavy side. so, by 8am, the journey to work, the channel islands, the south coast of england already enjoying a lot of sunshine and that's where we will see the best of the sub shine through the day tomorrow. come further north and into the mid—land and north wales, cloud and rain. much of northern ireland and scotla nd much of northern ireland and scotland and still the odd heavy burst at this stage, but as we go on through the day, that wet weather will tend to ease off a little bit. it will break up into showers as
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well. there could be the odd heavy shower across scotland and indeed northern ireland through into the afternoon. further south, northern ireland through into the afternoon. furthersouth, largely dry. some spells of sunshine developing particularly for the far south of wales and the south coast of england and those temperatures beginning to creep up a little bit as well. 23 celsius in london. and that sets the theme for the middle pa rt that sets the theme for the middle part of the week because this area of low pressure is going to try to squeeze its way in from the atlantic, but it will run up against the resistance of high pressure and that's going to force this warm air to push its way up from the south. warm airand also to push its way up from the south. warm air and also humid air. across england and wales on wednesday, we are expect ago lot of sunshine, strong sunshine, high uv levels and high pollen levels, feeling warm as well. northern ireland, scotland, here more cloud. some splashes of rain and it won't be as warm. so we are looking at 17 celsius in abdaob, contrast that with 26 celsius or 27 celsius in london. now where we have the warmth and humidity across the south east, there is the chance that we could see the odd thunderstorm dancing its way through during
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wednesday night and into thursday. then a change from the west, a weather front, a band then a change from the west, a weatherfront, a band of rain sweeping in and behind that fresher airforthe sweeping in and behind that fresher airfor the end of the sweeping in and behind that fresher air for the end of the week. still contrasts though. northern ireland areas of the country seeing outbreaks of rain at times. still the potential for breezy weather. humidity returning for the end of the week. you can check the weather details for where you are on website. there is more on the news channel throughout the rest of the day. today at five — we're at westminster where the queen's speech, setting out the new government's legislative programme, could be delayed. it was due to take place a week today , but ministers deny that speculation about the date is evidence that the government in in chaos. we wa nt we want to produce a substantial speech, there a lot of work to get on with. notjust brexit talks that occur next week but many other challenges face us.
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the prime minister is still seeking a deal to support her minority government, the democratic unionists say they're still talking. we've had a positive engagement with the conservative party. those discussions continue, and i'm looking forward to going to london to meet with my parliamentary team. mrs may assembled her new cabinet this morning, and right now she's meeting all conservative mps at westminster.

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