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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 13, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. tough talks at downing street as the prime minister meets with the dup leader to try to reach a deal. the prime minister will host arlene foster to thrash out the terms of her party's backing for the minority government as parliament reconvenes today. good morning. it's tuesday the 13th ofjune. also this morning: taking their case to the european court of human rights, the parents of baby charlie gard seek approval to take him to the us for experimental therapy. more questions over alleged russian interference in the us election as the attorney, generaljeff sessions, gives evidence to the senate. good morning. we're expecting to hear that the cost of living has gone up again, putting more pressure on household finances. i'll have the details shortly.
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good morning. in sport, stuart hogg is out of the lions tour with injury. but sam warburton is back to captain them in their latest warm—up match, they kick off against highlanders later this morning. #ain't #ain‘t nobody loves me better#. from singing superstars to a capella amateurs we take a look behind the scenes of new bbc show, pitch battle. and carol has the weather in just a few minutes when we can find her. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will meet the leader of the democratic unionist party, arlene foster, today, to thrash out the details of a deal that would secure their support for a minority conservative government. opposition parties have criticised the talks, with sinn fein suggesting a deal with the dup would undermine the good friday agreement. meanwhile, with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator
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michel barnier has called on britain not to "waste time." our political correspondent, ben wright, has more. if the arlene foster, said it is a tremendous opportunity to work with the tories. the prime minister knows a deal with the dup is her only way to stay in power. agreement will be reached probably today that suits both parties. a confidence and supply arrangement will give dup support to the tories on things like the budget and the queen's speech. this alliance leaves the government with a vulnerable majority ofjust six. but theresa may now looks more safe in herjob after a meeting with tories yesterday evening. she apologised for the disastrous campaign, declaringi apologised for the disastrous campaign, declaring i got us into this mess and i will get us out of it. we have to be pragmatic about
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what is introduced, how it is introduced. we have to work harder to bring people along with us, both inside the conservative party and beyond. while theresa may tries to rebuild the parliament from a hung parliament, there is a warning from the eu that britain is wasting valuable time negotiating brexit. more than two months have passed since she handed in the notice, but no talks have happened. there is a two—year deadline to hammer out a deal. speaking to the financial times, michel barnier, the eu negotiator, said they needed a negotiating team with a mandate soon because the brexit process would be extraordinarily complex. theresa may is also facing calls from some tory mps and labourto is also facing calls from some tory mps and labour to rethink her brexit plan. exactly the uncertainty she wa nted plan. exactly the uncertainty she wanted the election to stop. ben
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wright, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent, chris mason, is in westminster for us this morning. chris, when can we expect a deal to be announced? you have a piece of paper with you. yes. over the past few weeks i have tried to make it a short time tradition to wave around pieces of paper like the manifestoes. this is goatskin parchment paper. in all of this turmoil, something like this is releva nt? this turmoil, something like this is relevant? well, the queen's speech, the government's programme for government, is set out on this. so when they go into the archive for hundreds of years, it does not deteriorate and can still be read. the twist is you have to commit this three days in advance to dry. there will be some horse—trading with dup
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about what the plan is. that is one of the delayed. the other delayed is this, the parchment paper, meaning the queen's speech is likely to be pushed back by a couple of days we still have not got a date for that. iam still have not got a date for that. i am told no goats are actually used, sacrifice, in the creation of this paper. very good news. i don't wa nt this paper. very good news. i don't want any goat sacrificing at half past six. that was going to be my first question. epic, chris. thank you. i am afraid my goat parchment hasn't dried. what an excuse! we'll be speaking to newly appointed environment secretary, michael gove, shortly after 7am. the european court of human rights will rule later today on whether doctors treating ten—month—old charlie gard can turn off his life support. his parents want to take their son, who is terminally ill with a rare genetic disorder, to the us for experimental treatment. but last week, the uk supreme court agreed with specialists at great ormond street hospital that he should be allowed
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to "die with dignity." our medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. charlie gard cannot see, hear, move, cry, or swallow. he is seriously brain damaged and kept alive with a mechanical ventilator. his parents, chris gaard and connie yates, have raised £i.3 million through crowd funding for experimental treatment in the united states. they say they simply want the best for their son. he hasn't got anything to lose. we know that even if it doesn't work, which i think it will, we know that we have done everything that we can for him. but doctors, including independent experts, say the treatment cannot improve his condition. one concern is that charlie may experience pain, but is unable to respond to it. lask week, the uk supreme court said that while it had the utmost sympathy for his parents, it was not in charlie's interests
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to subject him to futile treatment that could potentially prolong his suffering. today, a panel of sevenjudges at the european court of human rights in strasbourg will consider written evidence in the case. if they decide to take on the issue, a full hearing will be organised. if not, then the parents‘ legal battle to take their son abroad will be over, and from midnight, great ordman street hospital will be free to switch off charlie's ventilator and provide only palliative care. fergus walsh, bbc news. and we will be talking to an expert on ethics on that in half an hour. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to a senate committee today about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr sessions is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the intelligence committee. he'll face questions about meetings
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he may have had with russian officials and the president's firing of fbi chief, james comey. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, has more. senatorjeff sessions! senatorjeff sessions! jeff sessions is the highest ranking member of the donald trump administration to face questions about russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 election. a one—time supporter of donald trump, his relationship with the president has become strained in recent weeks. at one point, he reportedly offered to resign. today, he will face tough questions and may refuse to answer. he will be asked to explain his role in the firing ofjames comey, the fbi chief who gave evidence to the committee last week. if, as the president said, i was fired because of the russian investigation, why was the attorney general involved? jeff sessions recuse himself following reports of meetings he had with the russian ambassador, meeting
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the earlier failed to acknowledge. —— recused. the stakes are high. democrats on the committee will be pressing jeff sessions to clarify all of the statement he made during his confirmation hearing injanuary. he said then that as an adviser to donald trump, he did not discuss this with officials during the election campaign. with the white house engulfed in scandal and much whingeing on today's campaign, donald trump has been meeting with his cabinet. in an unusual move, his most senior officials that the opportunity one by one the lavish praise on the president. a somewhat surreal scene praise on the president. a somewhat surreal scene as praise on the president. a somewhat surreal scene as washington braces itself for yet another day of high drama and political intrigue. peter bowes, bbc news. new guidelines are being issued to ensure sentencing for offences committed against children in england and wales properly reflects the harm suffered by victims. under the plans, abusive or neglectful parents and guardians who try to blame others could face tougher punishments. the russian opposition leader,
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alexei navalny, has beenjailed for thirty days for organising unauthorised public protests. hundreds of people were arrested during a day of anti—corruption demonstrations across russia. mr navalny, who intends to stand for the russian presidency next year, had been due to attend the unauthorised rally in moscow earlier on monday before being arrested. a bbc investigation has discovered 22 facebook acounts belonging to convicted child sex offenders. they breach the company's rules banning them from the website. radio 4's "file on four" programme found the majority were taken down within 48 hours of being reported. people under the age of 30 are being mislead by adverts for protein supplements, according to a group of uk dieticians. the british dietetic association believes thousands of people are using protein powders as a "substitute" for food. the nhs warns people with pre—existing problems are at greater risk of kidney damage. but the european specialist sports nutrition alliance, which represents the industry, says protein supplements allow people to train harder and recover more quickly. it isa
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it is a multibillion—dollar industry. and because of that, many people have been advised to take it, not because we needed, but because there is a fast dollar to be made on it. just because we have a celebrity who lost a bit of weight and put en masse, that does not turn them into an expert suddenly. —— of mass. now you might "bee" surprised by this story this morning. a swam of 20,000 bees has taken over a car in hull. gosh, that was poor. the local beekeepers association say its not clear what has attracted the bees to the vehicle but they're trying to lure them away. the car's owner says she and her family have all been stung but her husband joked its because of the bee gees cd in the car. that is amazing. do you know how to remove bees? you
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need to get some baby bees in a box and the bees swarm to them to protect them. while you are holding the box? i'm sure there is a better way. just phone an expert. actually, carol is around some today. hopefully she is "staying alive."
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get it? we get it, but it isjust not funny. i was going to talk about the all blacks being scared of the lions. i can't, can i? you can. they actually aren't bothered at all. they have been calm and confident. good morning, everybody. should we move on? and the british and irish lions play their latest warm—up match this morning. sam warburton's back to captain the side against highlanders as the lions continue their preparations for the test series against new zealand. england play france in paris tonight and french fans are being asked to sing god save the queen as a mark of respect following the recent terror attacks.
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the tribute echoes two years ago at wembley when england fans sang la marseillaise with their french counterparts just four days after the paris atrocities. a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. england will play pakistan in the semi—final of the champions trophy. pakistan booked their place in the last four after a nervy win in their final group match against sri lanka in cardiff. i mentioned the all blacks. think of the great all black players. the best has to be dan carter. he had an interview this morning in the telegraph. he is getting more optimistic about the lions saying they are over the jetlag. it is looking good. dan carter basically
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says, they are not. he is a lovely man. he is not being too provocative. he is saying they are not skilled enough and don't have the edge. they are overaggressive. he believes the all blacks are just too strong for the side of the lions. it is so important. thank you. will you hang around for the papers? i have won more. keep watching, newcastle fans. over 200 private gardens in london will be opened up to the public this weekend — and this morning carol is at one of them. and at the beer garden. —— bee. you
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are encouraged to have a look at them. they are private gardens, allotments, roof terraces and all of that. our cameraman paul is already in his bee suit. the forecast today is one of patchy rain, mostly in the north and we have an north, south split. assistant rain in the west. dry in the east. patchy rain moving from the west to the east. further south, a bit of cloud around. some of it is low cloud across parts of the midlands but also a fair bit of sunshine across east anglia and heading down through london and generally into the south—east. as we drift south—west, again, advice out. there is some clout particularly
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around the areas adjacent to the irish sea of that we are back into sunshine and patchy rain. a bit more cloud close to the coast. for northern ireland, some showery outbreaks is the day. as we go through the course of the day, northern ireland, northern england and scotland, the rain will turn more patchy in nature as it moves from the west to the east. there will be quite a bit of cloud around today but we will see some of its breakup and in the sunshine, temperatures will respond nicely after the chilly start. it won't be as windy as it was yesterday. temperatures could get up to 22 or 24 temperatures could get up to 22 or 2a in london and then in the north, 19 in aberdeen and in newcastle. through this evening and overnight, a lot of dry weather around and a lot of dry spells. nothing too problematic and we will have some heavy showers for a time across
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northern england and southern scotland. also some showers are ci’oss scotland. also some showers are cross the north—west. temperatures roughly 10— 15 celsius. tomorrow, we will hang on to some showers across the north—west at for many of us, it will be at belter of a day if you like it sunny and warm. temperatures could get up to 26 and 28 around the sea “— could get up to 26 and 28 around the sea —— south—eastern corner but widely 22— 24. for scotland and northern ireland 18— 21. as we move on into thursday, still a lot of dry weather around and still some sunshine but on thursday itself, we have a weather front coming in from the west. that will introduce patchy rain and behind it, fresher conditions. it doesn't mean the temperature will plummet that it will come down from what we have been used to. if you like it warm, tomorrow is the day for you. thank
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you, carols. we are going to do some coffee. —— we are going to do the papers after some coffee. this is made a farce be with you. that is on the front page of the daily mirror with theresa may mocked up as princess leia. the daily express is talking about summer on daily express is talking about summer on the way. the daily mail is doing an investigation into what they call a terrorist fighting deportation and has won £250,000 in legal aid. the quote from theresa may yesterday, "i got us into this mess, i will get us out. austerity
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is over, may tells the tories. apologetic pm and the quote that move was talking about. —— that louise. conservative and labour mps have been holding secret talks on soft brexit. it may take a while for that goat parchment, for the ink on it to drive but there was confusion around that. we will be talking to mr michael gove. mr goat? no, gove! over to the usenet news. stop making me laugh. —— business news. a story
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about which airports have come out worse. three british airports have been rated a month the ten worst in the world. not just been rated a month the ten worst in the world. notjust in europe but in the world. notjust in europe but in the world. notjust in europe but in the world. they are gatwick, manchester and edinburgh. they did an analysis based on the quality of the service, the punctuality. 76 leading international airport, u nfortu nately, we leading international airport, unfortunately, we have three that came unfortunately, we have three that ca m e pretty unfortunately, we have three that came pretty badly. in other news: because i know you are interested in house prices. another story here is all about how much some people will pay for a kennel for their dog. doghouses. that big one is £170,000. 0h, doghouses. that big one is £170,000. oh, come on! i know. that is the price of a house. the fanciest is £170,000. i would price of a house. the fanciest is £170,000. iwould happily live price of a house. the fanciest is £170,000. i would happily live in it myself. you know what would happen? i haven't got a dog. she would just
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think it was too posh. really expensive wedding. this is a £2 billion wedding. chinese consortium interested in buying the club potentially. it has happened before. is mike ashley going to let it go? why a slice of toast helps you strike the best deal. researchers have found if you have eaten plenty of bread, cereal or other carbohydrates, you are less likely to a cce pt carbohydrates, you are less likely to accept a bad deal. why? less grumpy? i can't give you details. don't try and negotiate with me because i haven't eaten toast. now, after the last few days,
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this morning we are calming things down a little — so let's take a breath and relax. with all the early mornings, sleep is one of our favourite subjects here on breakfast. but getting your children off to bed can sometimes prove rather challenging. yet, as the bbc‘s terrific scientific scheme has been finding out, slumber may affect their school work. jayne mccubbin has more. this classroom study is the latest experiment from terrific scientific. the bbc scheme to help bring science to life with real rock solid research. this latest experiment is all about... sleep. in fact, it is the very first scientific study into the impact of the clocks going forward. and what they wanted to find out was... what impact the clocks going forward had on sleep and our concentration. and?
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all: the results are in! but the results are not what they expected. this is how they tested reaction times before and after the clock changed. but also reaction times before and after the lunch break. almost 1,000 children carried out these tests first thing in the morning and again in the afternoon. initially we thought we would look into before and after the clock changed, but really, the surprising finding was that it was the difference between morning and afternoon in the reaction times. they were quicker in the afternoon. it was against our expectations. the data was crunched by academics here at oxford university, and it is so significant it could overturn traditional beliefs about how the school day is mapped out. does it therefore follow that if they are sharper and quicker with their motor skills they are going to be sharper and quicker with their mental skills, that maybe the literacy hour needs to be shifted into the afternoon, and science and maths?
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i think this is a fair assumption. i assume it would, from the findings we have. back in class they are also surprised. mostly the school day is geared up to kids being really sharp in the morning, first thing. so that was a surprise? it was. we schedule all the "difficult" subjects, the ones they have to concentrate on, like maths and literacy and reading and writing in the morning. then in the afternoon we do more practical activities and things like topic work and things like that. so, yes, it was very interesting to see that actually the morning was the worst time for them to do those things. a lot of people have said, haven't they, that children need time to wake up. it is a significant result for the bbc‘s terrific scientific teams, research which could potentially their shape own school day, maybe even change it.
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i would assume you would be more sleeping in the afternoon after lunch. we want to hear your tips on getting your children to sleep. we've had a big reaction already on facebook — so send in your stories and we'll discuss with our expert later this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sarah campbell. an elderly man and his sister have
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been arrested on suspicion of murder. the victim in his 40s was declared dead at the scene just before 3:30am on monday. a man in his 70s and a woman in her 50s have been held following the incident, with police reassuring locals it was an isolated incident. it's likely to be reminiscent of a scene from star wars — the uk's first ever professional drone race will be held tonight at alexandra palace. the high tech, high speed aerial race is being staged as part of london technology week and will see drones raced around the historic entertainment venue at speeds of up to eighty miles per hour. coming here to alexandra palace is important to us. there is a lot of history and it means a lot to londoners. i think it is just the beginning and there are a lot of places we would like to race drones
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the city of london. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in central london , euston road is closed at eversholt street due police incident, you can see those tailbacks there in the middle of your screen — eastbound tailbacks through the euston underpass the a2 is building westbound from eltham towards kidbrooke northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach building from blackwall lane in tulse hill, the a215 norwood road is closed southbound from christchurch road to palace road due water main works with delays at times on the sth circular westbound towards the one way system. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. a lovely bright start this morning. plenty of sunshine and it will stay with us throughout the day. it is dry, fine and settles. you will notice the wind isn't quite as strong as it was yesterday. it has
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fallen light overnight. uv levels are little higher today and a bit more sunshine and round. also, the pollen count are still high. some fair weather cloud developing through the afternoon that the temperature feeling pleasantly warm. 24 celsius the maximum potentially in central london. overnight tonight, the rent... wind remains light. minimum temperatures are somewhere between 14 and 16 celsius. some humid air moving up from the south tomorrow. we have plenty of sunshine. not much in the way of cloud. uv levels, high pollen count but perhaps the pick in temperatures this week maybe 25. it could even sneak a little higher. a cold front moves through on thursday and could introduce a bit of fresh air that high pressure is still in charge. for the remainder of the week, it is still looking settled. still plenty of... temperatures staying around 21- 23 of... temperatures staying around 21— 23 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. photojournalist giles duley suffered life—changing injuries when he stepped on an ied in afghanistan. yet, it's the transformation in the lives of others that has proved the focus of his latest work. he'll be here after 7am. after 9am, we'll meet the amateur cyclist who set out to investigate doping and soon found himself exposing one of the biggest scandals in sport. tunes, tears and amazing a capella.
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we go behind the scenes of the new bbc show that sees choirs compete to be most "on song." all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may will meet with the dup leader, arlene foster, today to thrash out a deal that would see the party prop upa minority conservative government. with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has said britain must not "waste time." he's also urged the government to appoint a negotiating team that is "stable, accountable and with a mandate". we'll be speaking to newly appointed environment secretary, michael gove, in around half an hour's time. he is back on the front bench. the european court of human rights in france is due to rule later on whether the life support of a terminally ill baby boy can be switched off. charlie gard's parents
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want to take him to the us for experimental treatment. but last week the uk supreme court agreed with specialist doctors that he should instead receive palliative care. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to the senate's intelligence committee today over alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr sessions is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the committee. he's expected to face questions about meetings he may have had with russian officials and the president's firing of fbi chief, james comey. new guidelines are being issued to ensure sentencing for offences committed against children in england and wales properly reflects the harm suffered by victims. under the plans, abusive or neglectful parents and guardians who try to blame others could face tougher punishments. a bbc investigation has discovered 22 facebook account belonging to convicted child sex offenders. they breach the company's rules
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banning them from the website. radio 4's "file on four" programme found the majority were taken down within 48 hours of being reported. people under the age of 30 are being mislead by adverts for protein supplements, according to a group of uk dieticians. the british dietetic association believes thousands of people are using protein powders as a "substitute" for food. but the european specialist sports nutrition alliance, which represents the industry, says protein supplements allow people to train harder and recover more quickly. it isa it is a multibillion—dollar industry. and because of that, a lot of people are being advised to take it, not because they needed, but there is a fast buck to be made on it. and just because you have got a celebrity who lost a bit of weight and gained a bit of muscle mass, that does not turn them into an expert. those are wise words. i imagine the
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lions are taking some protein.|j a lwa ys lions are taking some protein.|j always thought we had protein powder you had that and exercise as well. yes. they are saying don't use it as a food supplement. stuart hogg is out of the lions tour with injury. x—rays showed a fracture, after a he ran into team—mate conor—murray‘s elbow. that means it is over. there was a ray of hope. he did not want to think it was over, but you could almost tell something had gone wrong and he knew it. the scot was favourite to start as full—back for the first test against new zealand this weekend. they have another warm—up game later this morning. sam warburton is back to captain them against highlanders as they continue their preparations for the test series. we are bearing the fruits of the
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last three weeks. it has been hard with contact. it will have impacted the first few games. god save the queen will be sold between england and france in respect for the london attack victims. i was at the match at wembley. there was a special occasion. we are grateful to the french for offering this tribute to england as a country. it is nice that the history between us does not come between us at those moments. england's world cup winners,
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the under 20s team, arrived back in britain late last night. there they are! they flew into birmingham from south korea where they lifted their country's first trophy at a world tournament since 1966. the fa are praising the co—operation of clubs in the premier league and football league for letting their young players take part. the feeling of pride is just incredible. i cannot believe it. you cannot believe that feeling was like at the end of the game, at the end of the semi—final, to know we got to a final. and then the whistle saying we actually won it was unbelievable. i will never forget it. it will stay with me for life. what i hope now is these players they take this experience and benefit themselves and our senior team in years to come. fingers crossed that will be the case. new middlesbrough manager garry monk says he's targeting an immediate return to the premier league for the club.
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monkjoins boro after leaving leeds united at the end of last season. it is very difficult for the teams. that shows how competitive and difficult this league is. but this clu b difficult this league is. but this club is equipped and it is ready and determined and there is ambition. we will all try to bounce back. a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. earlier this year, a host of athletes wrote anonymously to the chief executive of the sports governing body — to "share concerns over the behaviour of key performance and management staff". amid confidential documents obtained by the bbc, the athletes told richard parker that their concerns were "of the highest order, mentioning bullying, racism, sexism and discrimination." the following month however, they were told no disciplinary action would be taken. england will take on pakistan for a place in the champions trophy final after the pakistanis beat
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sri lanka yesterday. pakistan only needed 237 to win their final group match but might have thrown their chance away until a late partnership took them into the semi—finals. india will play bangladesh in the other semi. after the champions trophy england will start a t20 series against south africa. they've announced the squad for those three matches, and it includes a first senior call—up for the lancashire batsman liam livingstone. you might remember he came in here and sat on the sofa two years ago while playing with his club side to be at that time, he said this was his dream, this moment was his dream. and now it is happening. two years ago he broke the world record score for a one day match, while playing for his club side. ten month old charlie gard will be kept on life—support until midnight, while judges at the european court of human rights decide whether it should be switched off. his parents want to take their son
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who is terminally ill with a rare genetic disorder to the us for experimental treatment. but specialists say he should be moved to palliative care. let's speak now to emma nottingham, a member of the institute of medical ethics' research committee and lecturer in child law. we have spoken to you. we have spoken to you throughout this case. good morning. what is the latest, what will happen today? today it is really the final straw for the pa rents. really the final straw for the parents. they are seeking the help of the european court of human rights. last thursday, we heard the supreme court were going to refuse permission to appeal. these said it was no arguable case here. they confirmed previous court that may be right decision. now it is being taken outside of ourjurisdiction to strasbourg and is focusing on the
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human rights of the parties to see whether there is any legal argument that can be made to allow charlie's pa rents to that can be made to allow charlie's parents to take him over to the us for the treatment they want him to have. explain if you can, this is such a difficult case. what are they considering? the human rights of charlie? everyone has human rights. we are all protected by the european convention on human rights within our jurisdiction. convention on human rights within ourjurisdiction. that is what can apply to both charlie and the pa rents. apply to both charlie and the parents. what is likely to be looked at isa parents. what is likely to be looked at is a right to private and family life. what is difficult is the pa rents life. what is difficult is the parents have that bright and so does charlie. —— right. the court has to balance which won outweighs the other. we already were told last thursday by lady hale and the supreme court that when you have
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this balancing of human rights between parents and the child, the child's writes should always be given more weight because they are more vulnerable. —— rights. they need people to speak on their behalf. so, it, again, should be like the domestic courts have done, being focused on charlie and his interests, that being at the centre of it. but it does balance with the rights of the parents. that is like what the european court will be looking at today. it has been a long legal process. could this be the end of the legal process today? yes. this could be the end of the legal process for this case. the case has been through all of the uk courts now. so, back in may, we heard the court of appeal decision last week, we had the comment from the supreme court he refused to hear the case.
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and they are now taking this to the european court on human rights, the last legal option. after that, the pa rents last legal option. after that, the parents have exhausted all legal options that can help themis a really important day for that family. absolutely. i know! have asked you before, does it have implications, do you think, wider implications, do you think, wider implications, or not? it could have applications for other cases. but what we have to remember is that every case is dealt with on a case—by—case basis. so, when we are dealing with human life, medical treatment, and particularly children, there needs to be a fairly flexible approach so that each case can be looked at on its own unique fa cts . can be looked at on its own unique facts. so, while this may be something that is looked at in future cases, it is unlikely the
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circumstances will be the same exactly as they are here because charlie's edition is so rare in the circumstances are so rare charlie's edition is so rare in the circumstances are so rare in the funding the parents have received. —— condition. ok to be thank you very much. talking to us again from the institute of political ethics. and we will keep you up—to—date on that. it is quarter to seven. the main stories on tuesday morning. the dup leader, arlene foster, will go to downing street today to reach a deal with the government. it is expected she will seek more investment in northern ireland. and as we have been hearing, parents of the 10—month—old charlie gard will find out today if the european court of human rights will help in their battle to take into the for treatment. —— him to the us for. do you fancy a nose around someone
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else's garden? i love looking at someone else's garden? i love looking at someone else's garden. that is what carol is doing this morning. good morning. you are right as always. i am good morning. you are right as always. iam in good morning. you are right as always. i am in cannes eden park in london. it is fab. it has raised beds, wildflowers, beehives as well. later on we will show you a hidden beehives. it is in the trunk of a tree with a glass panel. you can see what they are up to this morning in there. there are roughly 700,000 of them are 14 queens as well. and they form colonies as well, as we have seen form colonies as well, as we have seen pictures in the news this morning of as well. the forecast is good. sunshine already. temperatures picking up nicely. the forecast is a north— south and east. in the north, cloud and patchy rain. the south, sunny and pleasantly warm. not as windy as yesterday. starting the
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forecast in scotland at nine o'clock. we had some rain. the potential for heavy rain in the west. in the east, it is dry. patchy rain in northern england. further south, some low cloud around. equally, sunshine as well. sunshine across east anglia, kent, southern counties as well. close to the coast, the south—west, the irish sea, it is a little bit more cloudy. inland, brighter skies. patchy sea, it is a little bit more cloudy. inland, brighterskies. patchy rain in north wales as well this morning. the same for northern ireland. through the course of the day, all of that rain will increasingly turn more patchy in nature as it moves from the west in the direction to the east. because it is cloudy, some will not see it and it will be dry. between showers, sunshine. cloud further south. it will break up in
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parts. quite a lot of sunshine to the south. temperatures today up to 24 degrees at best and 19 in newcastle. overnight, we hang on to showers, heavier ones in northern england and southern scotland. like the ones in the north—west of the country. mist and fog patches forming as well, especially in the south—west of england. with temperatures, 10— 15. tomorrow, we hang on to showers in the north—west. for most of the uk, a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine tomorrow. the temperatures will respond quite nicely. temperatures in the south—east, east anglia, 26— 28. widely, 22— 24 with a few exceptions. uv levels tomorrow in particular will be high. pollen
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levels for the next few days will be high - levels for the next few days will be high — very high. thursday, a lot of dry weather once again the study date to be a fair bit of sunshine. a weather front from the west. patchy rain. behind that, fresh conditions. temperatures will not climate. a bit away than it will be through the course of today and tomorrow. back to you. thank you. do they know that you are in their back garden? the owners? they definitely do because they have made me tea already. a couple of key, that will do. thank you, carol. ——a cup of tea. official inflation figures are published later this morning and it could be bad news for households. steph's here with more on this. this is all about the squeeze on households, finances and the fact
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that inflation is going up and wages aren't kinky —— aren't keeping up. the figures that measure the cost of living are published every month by the office for national statistics. they're based on the changing price of a shopping basket of hundreds goods and services that people typically spend their money on. the last figures showed inflation standing at 2.7pc. that was the highest since september 2013. one of the biggest factors for this rise has been the fall in the value of the pound — making it more expensive to buy things abroad. since the vote to leave the eu the pound has fallen nearly 17pc against the euro and 16pc against the dollar. on top of this wages haven't been keeping up — going up only by 2% — which means many people will feel like they have less money. maike currie is from the investment firm, fidelity international. the main thing for this is all about the currency markets at the moment and the fact it is making our
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imports more expensive, isn't it? the weaker pound is the factor here. the weaker pound is the factor here. the uk import a lot of goods. if you go into the supermarket and you are buying fresh fruit and vegetables and look on the packaging, a lot of it is imported. the fact that the currency, the pound, is weaker, the costs are being fed through to the consumer, to people like me and you. because wages aren't going up, it means our real incomes are getting weaker. each month, as it was by, we are getting progressively poorer. why are wages not going up as fast as the rise of the cost of living? since the financial crisis of the last ten years, our earnings have been weak. the problem is because prices have gone up, in the past, we haven't had these massive price rises and we are really feeling the squeeze. companies, there is a lot
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of companies reluctant to invest and push up prices. it doesn't give the worker are lots of bargaining power to negotiate a wage increase. what is interesting with the economics behind things like inflation, when it tends to go up and get past a certain point, the of england put up interest rates to calm down spending but that is unlikely to happen as well, we have heard. the bank of england doesn't want to derail what is already a wonky recovery and now we have this conversation of the prices going up, wages going nowhere and interest rates rock bottom. if you are a borrower, good news. you know your mortgage will stay low. if you are a saver or a retiree relying on something like something that is not guaranteed if you didn't opt for protection against inflation, as time rolls by, you will get less. it really is concerning. that is where you get the squeeze on household
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finances. the pressure is on. what about the long—term picture? is this about the long—term picture? is this a short—term issue, do you think? will it continue? will we see prices going up faster than wages? last week's inconclusive election result hasn't helped. the pound is the barometerfor hasn't helped. the pound is the barometer for uncertainty in the wider economy. the chances of the pound strengthening isn't there and we also see oil prices would affect the price of petrol. oil prices have been weak that they are picking up slowly. inflation isn't going away. we are at 2.7%. there are economists that predict 3%. that is far from their target 2% rate which the bank of england aims for when the economy isn't too hot and cold. it really means that you actually have to get your money to work harder for you. you can't leave it in cash because you are actually losing money. you have got to look towards the stock market or you can, over long—term,
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get some growth in investments. there are risks associated with that, of course as well. thanks for the health warning! from gospel singing to a capella, the battle is on to find the uk's best vocal group. singing superstar chaka khan and choir master, gareth malone, are among the judges for the bbc‘s new talent show, pitch battle. our arts and entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been to take a look backstage. this is pitch battle! head-to-head. explain pitch battle. it is a vocal groups, amazing vocal groups, they read vocal groups from gospel choirs toa read vocal groups from gospel choirs to a cappella, competing, basically, to a cappella, competing, basically, to be crowned the best vocal group. then we spied one of the quiet‘s
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leading studio. just rehearsed in front of this week's guestjudge. leading studio. just rehearsed in front of this week's guest judgelj was emotional. ijust met chaka khan. i haven't met her yet. is she amazing? yes. just being in that room. have you all met her! they are all crying! and after some warm ups... have you done your... and diaphragm, ha, ha, ha. # makes me happy, makes me feel this way. one of chaka khan's best hits. it is the totaljoy! and then our own audience with...
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# chaka khan, chaka khan. first time i have met you and you have a gold band. digger that! # i feel for you, band. digger that! # i feelforyou, i band. digger that! # i feel for you, i think i love you. they think it is an language of angels. it is how angels communicate. ago around the world andi communicate. ago around the world and i feel communicate. ago around the world and ifeel for you, communicate. ago around the world and i feel for you, everyone communicate. ago around the world and ifeel for you, everyone knows the song. pitch battle is based on the song. pitch battle is based on the pitch perfect movies, famous for their roof offers between choirs. a third film in the series will be released later this year. —— riff offs . released later this year. —— riff offs. they were singing throughout history and then people saying less when recorded music came around. then people getting made fun of in tv shows and everybody thinks they
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can't think that we can. like birds, crickets and wales, we are hardwired to sing. hopefully this show will inspire people as well is entertained. being in choirs all their lives for the judges. bello entertained. being in choirs all their lives for thejudges. bello i grew up in a church and then i was ina girlgroup grew up in a church and then i was in a girl group in high school so i actually spent pretty much in yeah. now that i think about it, yeah. this guy is mr choirs.|j now that i think about it, yeah. this guy is mr choirs. i am. thank you for reminding her because nobody has said it for about 15 minutes. thanks for coming. pitch battle commences on saturday. pitch battle is on saturday at 7.30pm on bbc one. you would like anything gareth malone is involved in. i am bad at singing but! malone is involved in. i am bad at singing but i love singing. it looks like a cracker. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sarah campbell.
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a elderly man and his sister have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a man was found shot dead at a property in berkshire. the victim, in his 40s, was declared dead at the scene near the colnbrook bypass in slough, just before 3.30am on monday. the suspects, a man in his 70s and his sister in her 50s are said to have lived in a caravan in secluded woodland near slough for more than 50 years. police have reassured locals this was an isolated incident. it's likely to be reminiscent of a scene from star wars — the uk's first ever professional drone race will be held tonight at alexandra palace. the high tech, high speed aerial race is being staged as part of london technology week and will see drones raced around the historic entertainment venue at speeds of up to eighty miles per hour. coming here to alexandra palace is important to us. it's an iconic venue in london, it has a lot of history and it means
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a lot to londoners. but i think it is just the beginning and there are so many places we would like to race drones in the city of london. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in central london, euston road is closed at eversholt street due due police incident. — eastbound tailbacks through the euston underpass. the a2 is building westbound from eltham towards kidbrooke. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach building from blackwall lane. in tulse hill, the a215 norwood road is closed southbound from christchurch road to palace road due water main works with delays at times on the sth circular westbound towards the one way system. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a lovely bright start this morning. plenty of sunshine and it will stay with us throughout the day. it is dry, fine and settled. you will notice the wind isn't quite as strong as it was yesterday. it has fallen light overnight.
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uv levels a little higher today and a bit more sunshine around. also, the pollen count are still high. some fairweather cloud developing through the afternoon but the temperature feeling pleasantly warm. 24 celsius the maximum potentially in central london. overnight tonight, the wind remains light. you could see a little bit of patchy cloud but lengthy clear spells. minimum temperatures are somewhere between 14 and 16 celsius. some humid air moving up from the south tomorrow. we have plenty of sunshine. not much in the way of cloud. again, uv level‘s high, high pollen count‘s high, but the temperature perhaps the peak in temperatures this week, 24 or 25. we could even sneak a little higher. a cold front moves through on thursday and could introduce some slightly fresher air but high pressure still in charge. for the remainder of the week, it is still looking settled. still plenty of sunny spells as we head through friday and saturday.
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temperatures staying around 21—23 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. tough talks at downing street as the prime minister meets with the dup leader to try to reach a deal. the prime minister will host arlene foster to thrash out the terms of her party's backing for the minority government as parliament reconvenes today. good morning. it's tuesday the 13th ofjune. also this morning: the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard will find out today if they have one last chance to get him experimental treatment in the us as they take the case to the european court
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of human rights. more questions over alleged russian interference in the us election as the attorney, generaljeff sessions, gives evidence to the senate. i'll be looking today at what your rights are when it comes to emergency medical care abroad. good morning. in sport, stuart hogg is out of the lions tour with injury. but sam warburton is back to captain them in their latest warm—up match, they kick off against highlanders later this morning. he's britain's greatest ever wheelchair racing athlete — david weir will be telling us why he's planning to retire from the track. maybe for one race only. and carol has the weather. good morning from london. you're encouraged come down
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to some of the open gardens and hidden gems in london. it is a north— south split. clad in patchy rain in the north, sunnier and pleasa ntly warm rain in the north, sunnier and pleasantly warm in the south. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will meet the leader of the democratic unionist party, arlene foster, today — to thrash out the details of a deal that would secure their support for a minority conservative government. opposition parties have criticised the talks, with sinn fein suggesting a deal with the dup would undermine the good friday agreement. meanwhile, with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has called on britain not to waste time. our political correspondent, ben wright, has more. arlene foster has said it is a tremendous opportunity to work with the tories. the prime minister knows a deal with the dup is her only way to stay in power.
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so an agreement will be reached probably today that suits both parties. a confidence and supply arrangement will provide dup support to the tories on major votes like the budget and the queen's speech. a dup—tory alliance leaves the government with a vulnerable majority of just six. but theresa may now looks safer in herjob after a meeting with tory mps in parliament yesterday evening. she apologised for the disastrous campaign, declaring, i got us into this mess and i will get us out of it. there is a reality that says we have to be pragmatic about what is introduced, how it is introduced. we have to work harder to try to bring people along with us, both inside the conservative party and beyond. while theresa may tries to rebuild a government from the hung parliament, there is a warning from the eu that the uk is wasting valuable time negotiating brexit.
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more than two months have passed since theresa may handed notice, but no talks have happened. there is a 2—year deadline to hammer out a brexit deal. speaking to the financial times, michel barnier, the eu negotiator, said they needed a negotiating team with a mandate soon because the brexit process would be extraordinarily complex. hello, prime minister! theresa may is also facing calls from some tory mps and labourto rethink her brexit plan. exactly the uncertainty she wanted the election to stop. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster for us this morning. chris, when can we expect a deal to be announced? winner the queen's speech has been delayed. but you always have an interesting prop as well.|j delayed. but you always have an interesting prop as well. i was waving around the party manifestoes during the campaign but i traded one form of paper for another.
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during the campaign but i traded one form of paperfor another. this is goatskin parchment paper. the kind of stuff that is used to think on the queen's speech. why does this matter? this kind of paper is used to ensure the queen's speech, when it disappears off to the archives, survives the years of history but the choices, for the into dry, it ta kes a the choices, for the into dry, it takes a while. normally that would not be an issue because after a general election, a queen's speech would be prepared for the parties that could conceivably win but because we are in minority government territory and the conservatives are talking with the democratic unionist party, exactly what their programme for government actually as is still being hammered out and so government sources say thatis out and so government sources say that is one reason why the queen's speech might be delayed. one form of parliamentary archivist raised a sceptical eyebrow about that but the government insists that is one reason among the negotiations as to why the programme for government
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might bea why the programme for government might be a day or two later.|j why the programme for government might be a day or two later. i know you will be watching closely, hang on to the paper. very costly, that paper. we'll be speaking to newly appointed environment secretary, michael gove, shortly. the european court of human rights will rule later today on whether doctors treating ten—month—old charlie gard can turn off his life support. his parents want to take their son, who is terminally ill with a rare genetic disorder, to the us for experimental treatment. but last week, the uk supreme court agreed with specialists at great ormond street hospital that he should be allowed to "die with dignity." our medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. charlie guard is seriously brain—damaged and kept alive the medical incubator. his parents have raised 1.3 million for crown
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funding. —— his parents, chris gaard and connie yates, have raised £1.3 million through crowd funding for experimental treatment in the united states. they say they simply want the best for their son. he hasn't got anything to lose. we know that even if it doesn't work, which i think it will, we know that we have done everything that we can for him. but doctors, including independent experts, say the treatment cannot improve his condition. one concern is that charlie may experience pain, but is unable to respond to it. lask week, the uk supreme court said while it had the utmost sympathy for his parents, it was not in charlie's interests to subject him to futile treatment that could potentially prolong his suffering. today, a panel of sevenjudges at the european court of human rights in strasbourg will consider written evidence in the case. if they decide to take on the issue, a full hearing will be organised. if not, then the parents' legal battle to take their son abroad will be over, and from midnight, great ordman street hospital will be free to switch off
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charlie's ventilator and provide only palliative care. fergus walsh, bbc news. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to a senate committee today about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr sessions is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the intelligence committee. he'll face questions about meetings he may have had with russian officials and the president's firing of fbi chief, james comey. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, has more. senatorjeff sessions! jeff sessions is the highest ranking member of the donald trump administration to face questions about russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 election. a one—time supporter of donald trump, his relationship with the president has become strained in recent weeks. at one point, he reportedly offered to resign. today, he will face tough questions and may refuse to answer. he will be asked to explain his role in the firing ofjames comey, the fbi chief who gave evidence
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to the committee last week. if, as the president said, i was fired because of the russian investigation, why was the attorney general involved? jeff sessions recuse himself following reports of meetings he had with the russian ambassador, meeting the earlier failed to acknowledge. —— recused. the stakes are high. democrats on the committee will be pressing jeff sessions to clarify all of the statement he made during his confirmation hearing in january. he said then that as an adviser to donald trump, he did not discuss this with officials during the election campaign. with the white house engulfed in scandal and much whingeing on today's campaign, donald trump has been meeting with his cabinet. in an unusual move, his most senior officials that the opportunity one by one the lavish praise on the president. a somewhat surreal scene as washington braces
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itself for yet another day of high drama and political intrigue. peter bowes, bbc news. an elderly brother and sister have been arrested after a man in his 40s was shot dead at a property in slough. reuben and kathleen gregory are being held on suspicion of murder. thames valley police say they believe it to be an isolated incident. new guidelines are being issued to ensure sentencing for offences committed against children in england and wales properly reflects the harm suffered by victims. under the plans, abusive or neglectful parents and guardians who try to blame others could face tougher punishments. the russian opposition leader has been jailed the russian opposition leader has beenjailed for the russian opposition leader has been jailed for organising protests. hundreds of people were arrested.
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the opposition leader who intends to stand for the presidency next year, was due to attend a rally in moscow. people under the age of 30 are being mislead by adverts for protein supplements, according to a group of uk dieticians. the british dietetic association believes thousands of people are using protein powders as a "substitute" for food. the nhs warns people with pre—existing problems are at greater risk of kidney damage. but the european specialist sports nutrition alliance, which represents the industry, says protein supplements allow people to train harder and recover more quickly. it is a multibillion—dollar industry. and because of that, many people have been advised to take it, not because we needed, but because there is a fast dollar to be made on it. just because we have a celebrity who lost a bit of weight and put en —— on mass, that does not turn them into an expert suddenly. some bee news. a swarm of 20,000 bees has taken over a car in hull. the local beekeepers association say
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it's not clear what has attracted the bees to the vehicle but they're trying to lure them away. the car's owner says she and her family have all been stung. but her husband joked it's because of the bee gees cd in the car. that is genuinely what he said. he has a sense of humour despite being stung by the bees. the b—52s. sting. honey g. good morning to you. you are watching breakfast. he played a prominent role in the eu leave campaign, but last year — following a long running personality clash with theresa may — the formerjustice secretary, michael gove, was consigned to the commons' backbenches. yet, in this week's cabinet reshuffle he has returned to frontline politics in the role of environment secretary. mr govejoins us now from westminster.
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good morning to you. congratulations. you are back from the sack. how much of a surprise was a dig the call? i was really surprised. i was at home in my constituency enjoying the sunshine when i've got a call inviting me to come in and at first i thought this was the return of donjill —— tom jolly in trigger—happy tv. i was flattered and delighted to be invited to rejoin the government. it's great to be part of theresa may's team and to be able to support the prime minister. are you surprised yourself? many have been asking why. tom watson is suggesting it's been suggested to him, that rupert murdoch was the man who has been lobbying to get you back on the front bench. the thing about tom who is deputy leader of the labour party has a role in initiating political
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mischief, sees rupert murdoch's can find everything. he thinks he picks the england cricket 11 and the first 15 rugby as well is deciding who is on britain's got talent. we think this is part of the course for tom. you're back on the front bench at a time when your party is in perhaps the worst trouble we have seen the conservatives in for some time. the worst trouble we have seen the conservatives in for some timelj think it's important to get the general election in context. the conservatives got 40% or more of the vote. but... just a second. you say that but your leader called an early general election specifically because she wanted an increased mandate to organise brexit talks. she did not get that.|j mandate to organise brexit talks. she did not get that. i was trying to give a balanced approach but you wa nted to give a balanced approach but you wanted to jump to give a balanced approach but you wanted tojump in there. the to give a balanced approach but you wanted to jump in there. the second point is, we underestimated some of
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the reasons behind labour support and it's important that we do two things. one, that we form a government which is capable of carrying through the public‘s wishes, including leaving the european union and we reflect on the fa ct european union and we reflect on the fact that we did not get the majority we wanted to say we need to be listening mode to appreciate what concerns of the public are. given what happened with borisjohnson and you were accused of many of knifing him in the back, what is your relationship with him like? have you spoken? what has been said? boris andi spoken? what has been said? boris and i smoke on the week —— spoke on the weekend. he was kind enough to welcome me back to the cabinet with a very generous tweet and we were chatting in the margins of cabinet and it's great to be back as part of theresa may's team alongside boris and many other talented people.
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had to ask you about the union with the dup. sure you've heard of the concerns of others whether the government can be independent and hold hands with the dup at the same time. bello of course. —— of course. the british government's role is to get devolution back up and running in northern ireland. if we are going to make sure that northern ireland is well governed then we need to make sure there are representatives from all communities and all traditions involved in the assembly. are you a supporter of power—sharing? in 2016 you are asked to defend remarks you made about the good friday agreement saying he wouldn't have negotiated that way.
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had concerned that the time. i think the success of the peace process has shown that they were amply vindicated. thank you for clearing up vindicated. thank you for clearing up that part of it. i want to talk to you about about brexit as well. the government has appointed a negotiating team that is stable and with a mandate. will you say that your party is currently none of those? no. i think your party is currently none of those? no. ithink we your party is currently none of those? no. i think we have very clear mandate. there was a vote last year and 50% of the people voted for us to leave the eu and take control of the borders, laws and trade and money. we have in david davis are supremely accomplished statement but will that be negotiating on our behalf and it is also the case that we need to bear in mind, during this general election, the labour party was running on a platform that was
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making it clear to voters that they wa nted making it clear to voters that they wanted to leave the eu as well. the front—page headline today, tories and labour hold talks on a soft brexit. you are in favour of a hard brexit, aren't you? i reject the term soft and hard brexit because i'm never really sure what a mean. surely, you are the man to tell us. isaid in surely, you are the man to tell us. i said in the past that hard brexit isa i said in the past that hard brexit is a term that is invented by people who want to make our decision to free ourselves from the eu seem like some sort of punishment. whatever sort of brexit is being decided, are you talking to the labour party about this? i talk to politicians from every party to make sure we get the right approach. during the referendum campaign i worked with labour politicians and now, of course, i've been on the brexit panel with hilary benn and others.
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—— of course i talk to others. panel with hilary benn and others. -- of course i talk to others. there area -- of course i talk to others. there are a lot of issues to talk about this morning that you are now the environment secretary. i see you are smiling on the point being risen that you are the worst person to be appointed to thatjob. that you are the worst person to be appointed to that job. one of the things i will say is, when it comes to climate change, before i was ever an mp and indeed before david cameron became leader of the conservative party and put the environment at the heart. he was arguing that we need to do more to deal with the problem of man—made climate change. in a speech that i gave at 2014 to the conservative environment network, i made clear it is the conservatives's instinct to make sure we can pass onto the next generation a better world to the one we inherited and a part of that is to make sure arryn environment is an enhanced. your new role, may we see
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if running through fields of wheat at some stage? the more people that enjoy the british countryside and the great outdoors, the better. i'm sure that will cement your relationship with the prime minister, michael gove, thank you. over 200 normally private gardens will be open to the public in london this weekend. carol has a sneak preview of one of them. you are correct, lew. it used to be derelict here. with the help of around 400 volunteers or so, it has been made into a beautiful garden. a lot of the plants have been planted to encourage bees and increase pollination. if you are sitting having breakfast this morning, a fruit for example, chances are these have been in fault. same with coffee and chocolate, if you are lucky enough to have chocolate for
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brea kfast. enough to have chocolate for breakfast. the weather is nice. we have blue skies with a gentle breeze. you can probably hear the birds singing in the background. there is a north — south split this morning. we have patchy rain in the north and sunnier, warmer conditions further south. nine o'clock this morning across scotland, some heavy rain in the west. the east is largely dry. the same front producing the rain in scotland is producing the rain in scotland is producing patchy rain across northern england. as we head south, there is a bitter cloud around but there is a bitter cloud around but there are some holes in it. there is sunshine. particularly so as you head down towards east anglia, london and the south coast. as we drift further west, again, a lot of dry weather. variable amounts of cloud. a bit more cloud to areas
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adjacent to the irish sea but as the move inland, we see more breaks in that. southwest london, bright breaks. wales, a lot of cloud for you this morning and patchy rain in the far north, as indeed, northern ireland. through the day, the rain in the north will increasingly turn a shower reacted drift east. because of the nature of the showers, by the afternoon, not all of us will be seeing this and in between, there will be sunshine. as we come further south, more sunshine, particularly around the bristol channel and the english channel coastlines. temperatures up to about 24 celsius today at best but we are looking at higher temperatures north than were yesterday. 18 and 19. through this evening and overnight, while there will be some cloud —— clear skies, there will be lighter showers across there will be lighter showers across the north—west. some patchy mist and fog forming around south—west england as well and temperatures in the range of10— england as well and temperatures in the range of 10— 15. not particularly cold. tomorrow, we start of the showers across the north—west but for most of us tomorrow, it will be dry and sunny and it will be warm or indeed hot. temperatures in parts of the south—east could hit 28 celsius
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tomorrow but generally, we are looking at 22— 24 with a few exceptions in the high teens. as we head on into thursday, a lot of dry weather but we have a weather front coming in from the west that will introduce some patchy rain and fresher conditions behind it. that doesn't mean the temperature will plummet but at the temperatures will bea plummet but at the temperatures will be a little bit lower in the west than they have been. lower in the east as well part from east anglia and kent when we could hit 26. for the next few days, it is worth mentioning the uv levels and the pollen levels are both high or very high across most of the uk. it really does look gorgeous day, carol. paddy resisted both rise breeze? i would have picked a few. —— how do you resist the rise —— raspberries. the vote generalist giles dooley
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became part of the story when he suffered life changing injuries in assignments in afghanistan. —— giles duley. he lost both legs and an arm after stepping on an ied in 2011 — undergoing 18 months of rehabilitation and more than 30 operations. but he eventually managed to return to work, this time to follow the refugee crisis across the middle east and europe. giles duleyjoins us now. the story you tell is an amazing one and we will show the pictures in next few minutes. your own story is incredible. i don't see it as incredible. i don't see it as incredible. i don't see it as incredible. i was injured in afghanistan, as you mention, six yea rs afghanistan, as you mention, six years ago. i spent a year in hospital a year after i thought i would never walk again. all that timei would never walk again. all that time ijust had one dream and that was to return to being a
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photographer. we will come to your photographs which are extraordinary. you have been determined that you adapt rather than things add up into you. from day one when people said you. from day one when people said you won't walk or work, i was ready planning how i would return. i knew that, the places i worked like south sudan, it is a different environment —— difficult environment. i needed to adapt to things, i didn't want things adapting to me. i was tried work out how to use the old camera that i always have. in this project, he visited people that you seen before. how have they changed? after i got injured, that difficult time was the time i had come out. it wasn't the time i was in bed. nobody rang me for work, wasn't the time i was in bed. nobody rang me forwork, i wasn't the time i was in bed. nobody rang me for work, i sat there for a year. i was close to giving up hope
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and then i got the opportunity to document some of syria's most vulnerable refugees. some with disabilities, elderly people, families. two families, a woman who was paralysed by a sniper and a young girl living with spina bifida. those families trusted me to tell their stories. those are the people that trusted me when nobody else called me for work. everything i am able to do now with my work, i am thankfulfor them able to do now with my work, i am thankful for them and they were the one seagate me my life back. tell us about the journey you have been on. —— those are the ones who gave me my life back. some of your photographs have joined life back. some of your photographs havejoined in them like life back. some of your photographs have joined in them like this one for example and others are deeply depressing, like the beaches in lesbos. tell us about it. the un -- unhcr said to go out there and do what i do. i knew i would have to
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document what was happening in the islands of greece. the journey through the balkans and through to germany. i was in tears. i've never seen germany. i was in tears. i've never seen anything like it. i've covered the effects of conflict over a decade but to stand there and see thousands and thousands of people risking their life to expect walk was the most devastating thing —— escape. when you think about what you have personally been through and the year in hospital and the month of rehab and the operations, what did yourfamily of rehab and the operations, what did your family say when you told them you are going back into a similar sort of environment? my family is amazingly supportive but also they have to put up with me. my whole life. when i was flown back to the uk they had been told i wasn't going to make it. it didn't seem like i had a lot of chance. i had a lot of internal injuries. as they wheeled me into hospital, i was tried to say something and my sister
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saw me struggling and they took the ventilator off and she thought i was going to say that i love turbot i saidi going to say that i love turbot i said i want to be a photographer still. --i said i want to be a photographer still. ——i love her, but i said. these pictures particularly of young boys and men that you have taken and the pain in their eyes is something that you can only really describe in a photograph. portraits are my love, my passion. i really wanted to take portraits of people. it is a very personal moment taking a portrait. they think those pictures are exactly that. they reflect a 4—5 yea rs of exactly that. they reflect a 4—5 years of people seeing conflict in their rise. really powerful photography. thank you for coming back in. —— an avo eyes —— in their
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rise. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sarah campbell. a elderly man and his sister have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a man was found shot dead at a property in berkshire. the victim, in his 40s, was declared dead at the scene near the colnbrook bypass in slough, just before 3.30am on monday. the suspects, a man in his 70s and his sister in her 50s are said to have lived in a caravan in secluded woodland near slough for more than 50 years. police have reassured locals this was an isolated incident. it's likely to be reminiscent of a scene from star wars — the uk's first ever professional drone race will be held tonight at alexandra palace. the high tech, high speed aerial race is being staged as part of london technology week and will see drones raced around the historic entertainment venue at speeds of up to eighty miles per hour. coming here to alexandra palace
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is important to us. it's an iconic venue in london, it has a lot of history and it means a lot to londoners. but i think it is just the beginning and there are so many places we would like to race drones in the city of london. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in central london, euston road is down to two lanes eastbound at eversholt street due abandoned bus in the right filter lane. tailbacks continue in both directions after an earlier closure with eastbound queues through the euston underpass onto the marylebone road and westbound heavy traffic from king's cross. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach building from blackwall lane. in tulse hill, the a215 norwood road is closed southbound from christchurch road to palace road due water main works with delays at times on the sth circular westbound towards the one way system. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a lovely bright start this morning. plenty of sunshine and it will stay with us throughout the day. it is dry, fine and settled.
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you will notice the wind isn't quite as strong as it was yesterday. it has fallen light overnight. uv levels a little higher today and a bit more sunshine around. also, the pollen count are still high. some fairweather cloud developing through the afternoon but the temperature feeling pleasantly warm. 24 celsius the maximum potentially in central london. overnight tonight, the wind remains light. you could see a little bit of patchy cloud but lengthy clear spells. minimum temperatures are somewhere between 14 and 16 celsius. some humid air moving up from the south tomorrow. we have plenty of sunshine. not much in the way of cloud. again, uv level‘s high, high pollen count‘s high, but the temperature perhaps the peak in temperatures this week, 24 or 25. we could even sneak a little higher. a cold front moves through on thursday and could introduce some slightly fresher air but high pressure still in charge. for the remainder of the week, it is still looking settled. still plenty of sunny spells as we head through friday and saturday. temperatures staying around 21—23 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello this is breakfast. first, our main story. theresa may will meet the leader of the democratic unionist party, arlene foster, today — to thrash out the details of a deal that would secure their support for a minority conservative government. opposition parties have criticised the talks, and with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has called on britain not to waste time and appoint a team with a mandate.
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michael gove told this programme the government listened to the public is necessary. it's important part of this general election that we do to make things. but we form a government which is capable of carrying through the public‘s wishes including leaving the european union and we reflect on the fact that we didn't get that majority that we wa nted didn't get that majority that we wanted and we need to be properly and listening mode to appreciate what the public‘s concerns are. the european court of human rights will rule later today on whether doctors treating ten—month—old charlie gard can turn off his life support. his parents want to take their son, who is terminally ill with a rare genetic disorder, to the us for experimental treatment. but last week, the uk supreme court agreed with specialists that he should be allowed to receive palliative care.
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the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to a senate committee today about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr sessions is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the intelligence committee. he'll face questions about meetings he may have had with russian officials and the president's firing of fbi chief, james comey. an elderly brother and sister have been arrested after a man in his 40s was shot dead at a property in slough. reuben and kathleen gregory are being held on suspicion of murder. thames valley police say they believe it to be an isolated incident. new guidelines are being issued to ensure sentencing for offences committed against children in england and wales properly reflects the harm suffered by victims. under the plans, abusive or neglectful parents and guardians who try to blame others could face tougher punishments. people under the age of 30 are being mislead by adverts for protein supplements, according to a group of uk dieticians. the british dietetic association believes thousands of people are using protein powders as a "substitute" for food. the nhs warns people
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with pre—existing problems are at greater risk of kidney damage. that speak from a lifelong that speak from a but the european specialist sports nutrition alliance, which represents the industry, says protein supplements allow this people to train harder and recover more quickly. carol is in somebody‘s garden with lots of bras breeze. there were lots of bras breeze. a bit of bras prepacked. imagine pulling back your curtains and there is carol in your garden. they made a cup of tea already. she is welcome everywhere she goes. similar sort of level. and the british and irish lions play their latest warm—up match this morning. sam warburton's back to captain the side against highlanders jared payne plays instead in the
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latest warmup game in around one hours time against the highlanders. sam warburton is also back in the starting lineup. we have gone hard with the lads fitness wise, contact wires. with the travel, that would have had an impact on the first couple of games but we are ready for the test match. england play france in paris tonight and french fans are being asked to sing god save the queen as a mark of respect following the recent terror attacks. the tribute echoes two years ago at wembley when england fans sang la marseillaise with their french counterparts just four days after the paris atrocities. theresa may and the french president will go to the game which is england's last of the season. i was at the match at wembley and there was a special occasion and we are very grateful to the french for
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offering this tribute to england as a country. it's nice that the history between us does not come between us at those moments. england's winners, the under 20s, arrived back last night. they had lifted england's first trophy at a world tournament since 1966. a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. confidential documents show athletes said that concerns were of the highest order, mentioning bullying, racism and sexism and discrimination. but they were told no disciplinary action would be taken. england will play pakistan in the semi—final of the champions trophy. pakistan booked their place in the last four after a nervy win in their final group match against sri lanka in cardiff. how about this for a cd? six
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paralympic gold medals, six world titles and seven london marathon wins. we are talking about david weir. very average career. you've done all right so far. you've done 0k. done all right so far. you've done ok. david, we will talk to in a moment because you have some news to tell us about the first, let's remind everybody, of some of your greatest moments. david weir has managed to win three gold medals and now he is in front. it isa gold medals and now he is in front. it is a fourth gold medal for david weir. victory is going to come for david
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weir. anti— roars again. he beat the defending champion. what a win for david weir. there have been some high points and some low points but you are here this morning with great news for all the people who have followed you for all those years because they can see you on the track. one more time?|j because they can see you on the track. one more time? i have got the opportunity to race at the anniversary games on the ninth of july, british athletics asked me if i would say farewell to the british
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crowd at the anniversary games and i jumped at the chance and i could not really say no. the fans have been great, not just really say no. the fans have been great, notjust in the marathon but at the paralympics and twitty 12. at the paralympics and twitty12. 80,000 people screaming my name every day and notjust in the finals but in the morning sessions as well so but in the morning sessions as well soi but in the morning sessions as well so ijumped at the chance and i couldn't say no. it will be my last ever track race. you are going to continue on the road? yes. after that victory, probably my best win ever. it gave me a lot of confidence to carry on the road. the racing around the world with all the different marathons. i enjoy that, the comfort on the road and i enjoy the comfort on the road and i enjoy the carry on. you touched on rio.
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but well—publicised fallout with british athletics. has that been healed? they british athletics. has that been healed ? they approached british athletics. has that been healed? they approached two. the relationship was always great with british athletics, it was just one person who was working for them but that's in the past. ijust want to move on. an opportunity to race in this fantastic stadium and say farewell. it's a great opportunity to say goodbye to a british crowd. it's going to be a great day as well. great for fans to come and see some great racing. do you think you might return as a coach? on the day, i asked british athletics, it not actually a race but i've got some of my academy members racing with me. it's a good opportunity to experience the atmosphere. i don't
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know how many it's going to hold the day that about 60,000 people. huge crowds. if i could just have them racing with me, that opportunity to that experience. how are you feeling now because you had a difficult time after rio. he talked about how you've struggled to be motivated, you've struggled to be motivated, you are depressed at the time. are you are depressed at the time. are you on the road to recovery? every day is a different day that i channelled all my negative energy into training and i think that's how i won into training and i think that's how iwon ina —— into training and i think that's how i won in a —— the london marathon. every day is a new day. i will start to feel a lot better. getting up and going training when you feel like that can be an issue but you found that can be an issue but you found that can be an issue but you found that can make the difference. that can be an issue but you found that can make the differencem made a massive difference for me to
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get up and train and put all the negative energy into one thing and that was training. just concentrating on one race. for years... so much to do. exactly. for the london marathon, i could focus on the marathon and not worry about the world championships untiljuly. i've got to go to switzerland to get a qualifying standard soap had the opportunity to channel everything into one race. you said it was your best ever marathon. we are surprised when so well? a couple of weeks before, i did the paris marathon and that was a good opportunity for me to see what standard i was out. i went under one hours 30 and not many athletes have done that. it was good conditions. it can be a lot of confidence going into london with only two weeks to go but leading up to that week, i felt positive.
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everything was going right. everything was going right. everything fell into place. i knew of the day had a great opportunity to win but marcel, who has won major marathons and the medals in rio, he was the one to beat. in my gameplan on the day was following whatever he did. did you? david, thank you so much. see you at the university games as well. if you've ever had a fancy nosing ,is if you've ever had a fancy nosing carol is in one of the private gardens in london that will be open to the public. we are talking about these. what have you got hidden in the tree? a small colony of thieves. how many
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are in there? —— bees. they are very busy. there are a few of them. we have some new comb they have been building. busy as bees.|j have some new comb they have been building. busy as bees. i had jokes planned and you've just ruined them. people can come down and learn about them? yes, we can discuss more about bees. we are doing some cocktails seek and plant some food for bees. today produce the honey here? killam
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we haven't got honey this year that we haven't got honey this year that we will hopefully get that in the next month or so. the sun is out, the skies are blue. it is cloudy with patchy rain in the south, sunny and warm. in scotland, a bit more rain in the west. some of that will be heavy this morning. the same weather front producing the rain in scotla nd weather front producing the rain in scotland is producing patchy rain across the area. a lot of dry weather around and a lot of clout. until we come down to the south. we have sunshine already across pits of east anglia. —— cloud. talking off
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the coast, the area adjacent to the irish sea, you will have more cloud. inland, a cloudy start with patchy rain in the north and we have patchy rain in the north and we have patchy rain across northern ireland this morning. all of that patchy rain through the course of the date will tend to turn more showery in nature as it moves from the west to the east. as is the nature of showers, not all of us will see them. in between the showers, some brighter brea ks between the showers, some brighter breaks with sunny intervals. the best of the sunshine today will be the further south you travel, particularly the bristol channel and the english channel coastlines. temperatures today 24— 25. aberdeen, newcastle, around 19. through the afternoon at overnight, some showers. lighter showers across north—west scotland. some clearer skies and also some patchy mist and fog across south—west england. at a
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bridge arranged tonight around 10— 15 celsius. —— temperature of range. any fog will disburse. it is dry, sunny and warm any fog will disburse. it is dry, sunny and warm or any fog will disburse. it is dry, sunny and warm or hot depending on where you are. there will be still some showers across the north—west. temperature wise, widely 22— 24. we will see exceptions. the uv will also be high tomorrow and the next few days, pollen levels will be or very high. a weather front coming into the west will introduce patchy rain and fresher conditions following on behind it. it would be cold but just not following on behind it. it would be cold butjust not as hot. bg, carroll. it looks lovely there.
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don't be worried if you just turned on the television, it's time to breathe and relax. now, after the last few days, this morning we are calming things down a little — so let's take a breath and relax. with all the early mornings, sleep is one of our favourite subjects here on breakfast. but getting your children off to sleep can sometimes prove rather challenging. yet, as the bbc‘s terrific scientific scheme has been finding out, slumber may affect their school work. jayne mccubbin has more. this classroom study is the latest experiment from... all: terrific scientific! the bbc scheme to help bring science to life with real rock solid research. this latest experiment is all about... sleep. in fact, it is the very first scientific study into the impact of the clocks going forward. and what they wanted to find out was... what impact the clocks going forward had on sleep and our concentration. and? all: the results are in!
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but the results are not what they expected. this is how they tested reaction times before and after the clock changed. but also reaction times before and after the lunch break. almost 1,000 children carried out these tests first thing in the morning and again in the afternoon. initially we thought we would look into before and after the clock changed, but really, the surprising finding was that it was the difference between morning and afternoon in the reaction times. they were quicker in the afternoon. it was against our expectations. the data was crunched by academics here at oxford university, and it is so significant it could overturn traditional beliefs about how the school day is mapped out. back in class they are also surprised. mostly the school day is geared up to kids being really sharp in the morning, first thing. so that was a surprise? it was.
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we schedule all the "difficult" subjects, the ones they have to concentrate on, like maths and literacy and reading and writing in the morning. then in the afternoon we do more practical activities and things like topic work and things like that. so, yes, it was very interesting to see that actually the morning was the worst time for them to do those things. it is a significant result for the bbc‘s terrific scientific teams, research which could potentially their shape own school day, maybe even improve. we will talk more about sleep in about one hour. steph has advice. it is the hot water bottle? take it
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with me everywhere, it's quite comforting. i cuddle up with it. little fluffy hot water bottle. too much information? we are talking about holiday insurance. what happens if you need medical treatment when you are abroad? it seems many of us are confused by the subject. this is all about what happens if you need medical treatment while you're abroad. you might have heard about the european health insurance card (ehic). it's free and it means you can get access to state provided medical help for any injury or condition that needs urgent treatment, in any country within the eu. but, there's lots of confusion about it, as we found out when we asked people heading on holiday. healthcare if you hurt yourself or if you fall over. s as far as i understand it, it's the same level of coverage as you get in the nhs. you can get free health in the eu, isn't it? no idea. no clue.
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kate stinchcombe—gillies is an independent travel expert what is it and what does it do? ehic gives you access to this date —— state funded emergency care in the single market. plus switzerland. when you say state medical care what, what is it actually mean? when you say state medical care what, what is it actually mean7m means that you have access at the same as it native of that country. ifa same as it native of that country. if a native has to pay for access to agpor if a native has to pay for access to a gp or pay for a prescription or pay for a certain type of treatment and you will have to pay as well. but the ehic gives you access to
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that care at the same level as they do and the right to get treatment without claiming on your travel insurance as well. i would imagine that there is hit hugely between countries. france is an example, you do have to pay but you can claim the money back. there are patient share programmes in place whereby the country that you are in determined what that patient share is and you can claim the difference between what you pay and what a determined the patient share to be. it is country by country. what is it mean in terms of your insurance because a lot of people say well, i have the ehic, therefore i don't need travel insurance. you do, you do. the actually complement each other quite nicely. yes, you need a ehic and yes, you should carry it with you. yes, you also need travel insurance. there are some insurers out there
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that will require you to have ehic and if you also need to claim on your travel insurance because of something that has happened while you were away, they will waive the access you were away, they will waive the a ccess o n you were away, they will waive the access on your insurance policy because they can say that you have used a ehic. their ehic gives you access to, things like an ongoing medical condition and unique treatment while you were away or if you are pregnant and it gives you access to normal maternity care. the insurance policy gives you access to repatriation. ehic, if you had a seat —— skiing accident, for example, it is classed as a private healthcare not state funded.“ example, it is classed as a private healthcare not state funded. if i injured myself on holiday, is the first instance, try your ehic card and see where it gets you? absolutely. prove that you have got it and show it and if you can't prove that you have one, there is a
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number that you can call and say well, this is me and this is my nhs number. it is a really good thing to have with you stored on your phone just as proof that you are a uk resident. great advice. lovely to see you. so many people getting in touch with us to talk about the interview with a photographer. i can only tell you what my eyes see, photographs from the refugee crisis. an amazing account of his travels. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: can you sew on a button and would you take on the challenge of mending your own clothes? well apparently more than half of us admit to lacking basic needle skills. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sarah campbell.
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a elderly man and his sister have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a man was found shot dead at a property in berkshire. the victim, in his 40s, was declared dead at the scene near the colnbrook bypass in slough, just before 3.30am on monday. the suspects, a man in his 70s and his sister in her 50s are said to have lived in a caravan in secluded woodland near slough for more than 50 years. police have reassured locals this was an isolated incident. it's likely to be reminiscent of a scene from star wars — the uk's first ever professional drone race will be held tonight at alexandra palace. the high tech, high speed aerial race is being staged as part of london technology week and will see drones raced around the historic entertainment venue at speeds of up to eighty miles per hour. coming here to alexandra palace
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is important to us. it's an iconic venue in london, it has a lot of history and it means a lot to londoners. but i think it is just the beginning and there are so many places we would like to race drones in the city of london. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in central london, euston road is down to two lanes eastbound at eversholt street due abandoned bus in the right filter lane. tailbacks continue in both directions after an earlier closure with eastbound queues through the euston underpass onto the marylebone road and westbound heavy traffic from king's cross. in cranford the a312 is down to two lanes southbound on the north side of the roundabout at j3 m4 heston due accident with congestion to the ossie garvin rbt and the a4020 uxbridge road lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella.
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good morning. it's a lovely bright start this morning. plenty of sunshine and it will stay with us throughout the day. it is dry, fine and settled. you will notice the wind isn't quite as strong as it was yesterday. it has fallen light overnight. uv levels a little higher today and a bit more sunshine around. also, the pollen count are still high. some fairweather cloud developing through the afternoon but the temperature feeling pleasantly warm. 24 celsius the maximum potentially in central london. overnight tonight, the wind remains light. you could see a little bit of patchy cloud but lengthy clear spells. minimum temperatures are somewhere between 14 and 16 celsius. some humid air moving up from the south tomorrow. we have plenty of sunshine. not much in the way of cloud. again, uv level‘s high, high pollen count‘s high, but the temperature perhaps the peak in temperatures this week, 24 or 25. we could even sneak a little higher. a cold front moves through on thursday and could introduce some slightly fresher air but high
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pressure still in charge. for the remainder of the week, it is still looking settled. still plenty of sunny spells as we head through friday and saturday. temperatures staying around 21—23 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. tough talks at downing street as the prime minister meets with the dup leader to try to reach a deal. theresa may will host arlene foster to thrash out the terms of her party's backing for the minority government, as parliament reconvenes today. as she apologiseds to backbench mps, michael gove told breakfast that the party must learn lessons. we didn't get the majority we wanted, so we
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need to be in listening mode to appreciate what the public concerns are. a very good morning to you, tuesday the 13th of june, a very good morning to you, tuesday the 13th ofjune, eight if they have ene last chance , ~ ~ ~ ~ , ~ treatment in the us, as they take the case to the european court of human rights. more questions over alleged russian interference in the us election, as the attorney general, jeff sessions, gives evidence to the senate. good morning. there's been a big rise in the number of official complaints about payday loans. i'll be taking a look at why. in sport, stuart hogg is out of the lions tour with injury. but sam warburton is back to captain them in their latest warm—up match. they kick off against highlanders later this morning. # ain't nobody that marat... #
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from amateur to singing sensations, we ta ke from amateur to singing sensations, we take a look behind the scenes of the new show pitch battle. and carol has the weather from a beautiful garden. yes, we are looking at a beehive with 30,000 bees, this is a hotel for the bee likes to be by himself. it will be dry today, the forecast for southern areas is sunny and warm, in the northmoor cloud and patchy rain, a little bit cooler, more details in 15 minutes. right then, good morning, just gone eight o'clock. theresa may will meet the leader of the democratic unionist party, arlene foster, today to thrash out the details of a deal that would secure their support for a minority
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conservative government. opposition parties have criticised the talks, with sinn fein suggesting a deal with the dup would undermine the good friday agreement. meanwhile, with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has called on britain not to waste time. our political correspondent ben wright has more. dup leader arlene foster said it is a tremendous opportunity to work with the tories. theresa may knows a deal with the dup is her only way to stay in power. so an agreement will be reached, probably today, that suits both parties. a confidence and supply arrangement will provide dup support to the tories on major votes like the budget and the queen's speech. the alliance leaves the government with a vulnerable majority of just six. but theresa may now looks safer in herjob after a meeting with tory mps yesterday evening.
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she apologised for the disastrous campaign, declaring i got us into this mess and i will get us out of it. there is a reality that is we have to be pragmatic about what is introduced, we have got to work harder to try to bring people along with us, both inside the conservative party and beyond. and while theresa may tries to rebuild the government from a hung parliament, a warning from the eu that the uk is wasting valuable time negotiating brexit. more than two months have passed since theresa may handed in notice, but no talks have happened, and there is a two year deadline to hammer out a brexit deal. speaking to the financial times, eu chief negotiator michel barnier said the uk needed to appoint a negotiated team with a mandate soon because the process would be extraordinarily complex.
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theresa may is also facing calls from some tory mps and labour to rethink her brexit plan — exactly the uncertainty she wanted the election to stop. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. still so many questions to be answered. chris mason is in westminster, we know that there are talks going on, when we likely to see a deal? we have been out tonight hearing from new members of the cabinet as well. yes, big, important discussions this morning about the stability of the government, there could not be bigger talks at westminster than that, the democratic unionist party to the prime minister to try to come to this arrangement, and meanwhile new mps are arriving here at westminster, chewing over the election results, and when you speak to conservative mps, there is privately quite a lot of gallows humour, one saying yesterday, well, that was a good decision, wasn't
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it?! anotherjoking that they never, ever, ever want to see another general election, and when there is one, the voting age should be 40 plus, a jokey reference to the idea that it looks like a lot of younger people turned out, and that was significant in boosting labour's support. the view from the top table, we can hearfrom a man who has just rejoined it, table, we can hearfrom a man who hasjust rejoined it, michael gove. i think we underestimated some of the reasons behind labour's support, and it is important that we do two things, one, that we form a government which is capable of carrying through the public's wishes, including leaving the eu, and at the same time we reflect on the fact that we didn't get that majority that we wanted, and therefore we won't to be in listening mode to properly appreciate what the public concerns are. the watchword is humble, that is what conservative mps wanted to hear from the is what conservative mps wanted to hearfrom the prime minister when she addressed them here at westminster last night, and as you
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could hear from michael westminster last night, and as you could hearfrom michael gove, it is the sense that conservative mps wa nts to the sense that conservative mps wants to articulate when they are making the case that they should be able to continue governing, despite calling that general election with the hope of a whopping great majority and coming back after it without one at all. 0k, without one at all. ok, chris, we will be with you throughout... well, throughout the coming weeks, to be honest with you, thank you very much. the european court of human rights will rule later today on whether doctors treating ten—month—old charlie gard can turn off his life support. his parents want to take their son, who is terminally ill with a rare genetic disorder, to the us for experimental treatment. but last week, the uk supreme court agreed with specialists at great ormond street hospital that he should be allowed to die with dignity. our medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. charlie gard cannot see, hear, move, cry or swallow. he is seriously brain damaged and kept alive with a mechanical ventilator. his parents, chris gard and connie yates, have raised £1.3 million through crowdfunding for experimental treatment
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in the united states. they say they simply want the best for their son. he hasn't got anything to lose. we know that even if it doesn't work, which i think it will, we know that we have done everything that we can for him. but doctors, including independent experts, say the treatment cannot improve his condition. one concern is that charlie may experience pain but is unable to respond to it. lask week, the uk supreme court said while it had the utmost sympathy for his parents, it was not in charlie's interests to subject him to futile treatment that could potentially prolong his suffering. today, a panel of sevenjudges at the european court of human rights in strasbourg will consider written evidence in the case. if they decide to take on the issue, a full hearing will be organised. if not, then the parents' legal battle to take their son abroad will be over, and from midnight,
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great ormond street hospital will be free to switch off charlie's ventilator and provide only palliative care. fergus walsh, bbc news. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to a senate committee today about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr sessions is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the intelligence committee. he'll face questions about meetings he may have had with russian officials and the president's firing of fbi chiefjames comey. our north america correspondent peter bowes has more. senatorjeff sessions! jeff sessions is the highest ranking member of the donald trump administration to face questions about russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 election. a one—time supporter of donald trump, his relationship with the president has become strained in recent weeks. at one point, he reportedly offered to resign.
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today, he will face tough questions and may refuse to answer. he will be asked to explain his role in the firing ofjames comey, the fbi chief who gave evidence to the committee last week. if, as the president said, i was fired because of the russian investigation, why was the attorney general involved? jeff sessions recused himself, following reports of meetings he had with the russian ambassador, meetings he had earlier failed to acknowledge. the stakes are high. democrats on the committee will be pressing jeff sessions to clarify the statement he made during his confirmation hearing injanuary. he said then that, as an adviser to donald trump, he did not communicate
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with russian officials during the election campaign. with the white house engulfed in scandal, donald trump has been meeting with his cabinet. in an unusual move, his most senior officials took the opportunity one by one to lavish praise on the president. a somewhat surreal scene as washington braces itself for yet another day of high drama and political intrigue. peter bowes, bbc news. an elderly brother and sister have been arrested after a man in his 40s was shot dead at a property in slough. reuben and kathleen gregory are being held on suspicion of murder. thames valley police say they believe it to be an isolated incident. new guidelines are being issued to ensure sentencing for offences committed against children in england and wales properly reflect the harm suffered by victims. under the plans, abusive or neglectful parents and guardians who try to blame others could face tougher punishments. people under the age of 30 are being mislead by adverts for protein supplements, according to a group of uk dieticians. the british dietetic association
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believes thousands of people are using protein powders as a substitute for food. but the european specialist sports nutrition alliance, which represents the industry, says protein supplements allow people to train harder and recover more quickly. it's a multi—billion dollar industry, and because of that a lot of people are being advised to take it. not because we need it, but because there is a fast buck to be made upon it, and just because you've got a celebrity who may have lost a little bit of weight and or gained a bit of muscle mass, this doesn't suddenly turn them into an expert. and we have got a bit of bee news, a swarm of 20,000 bees has taken over a car in hull. the local beekeepers' association of trying to lure them away, but it is not clear what attracted them. the owner of the vehicle say that she and her family have all been stung. their husbands
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said that it was because he had a bee gees cd in the car! it is 12 minutes past eight, you are watching bbc breakfast. last week's election delivered the most diverse house of commons ever. let's have a look at the breakdown. there are now 45 mps who openly define themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. that's an increase of 40% on 2015. the highest ever number of ethnic minority mps were elected at 52, an increase of 11 from last time around. and a record 208 women were voted in on thursday, but they still make up only 32% of the total number of mps. chris mason is in westminster for us this morning, and he'sjoined by two newly elected mps. and, chris, they're preparing to start their first full day in office, aren't they? absolutely, good morning to you. i guess we have all had the experience ofjob interviews and biting our
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fingernails and getting very nervous, but we don't actually have to do it in public in the way that mps do when they are parliamentary candidates, and then the whole business of becoming an mp, doing all of that in public, sometimes a long way from home, and added twist ina new long way from home, and added twist in a newjob. let me introduce you to two new mps, sarahjones, labour and pay for croydon central, and the new conservative mp for angus on the east coast of scotland. i will ask you each in turn, yourfirst impressions of the job? well, i mean, extraordinary to describe, really, because there are lots of different elements to it. one is the slightly surreal thing of being taken into the chamber, sitting on the green benches, thinking, goodness me, this is real! and the other is the very real elements of the role in the constituency, where we had a drive—by shooting when i was elected, i had to talk to the
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borough commander, i was involved in the response, the very real problems of the people that you are representing. on the one hand, you have got this slightly archaic sort of, you know, ceremonial side that you see on the television. on the other side, all these things you wa nt other side, all these things you want to get done in the constituency straightaway. your reflections? very similar, that balance between westminster, what happens here, getting your head around the processes and structures, incredibly new to all of us, but also you want to get started working in your constituency straightaway, that is what you were elected to do, and thatis what you were elected to do, and that is what i certainly campaigned for, being a local representative, so for, being a local representative, so getting your head around everything at westminster and also getting stuck in in your constituency. i guess the oddity of both coming to a building that's very familiar and yet well, full of, i've worked here for nearly ten years and i still get
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lost in that building, full of a maze of corridors and all the archaic procedures as well?” maze of corridors and all the archaic procedures as well? i was talking to an mp the other day and he has been here for 30 years and he still gets lost! it is a little bit ofa still gets lost! it is a little bit of a minefield here, but it's really exciting. it's wonderful to be part of the westminster parliament and it's just an honour to of the westminster parliament and it'sjust an honour to represent, i was born and brought up in westminster. i guess for you in particular, for a lot of mps, is the challenge that you have got a job in two different places at opposite ends of the uk and that comes with a challenge for your life outside of work as well? it was a quick turn around from early on friday morning when i got elected and i was down here by sunday evening so it was a turn around. the resignation went in on friday and starting the newjob yesterday. so, it's all very exciting. a little bit of a whirlwind, but just a exciting. a little bit of a whirlwind, butjust a very exciting place to be. so have you got used to
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the letters m and p after your name? no, my children are trying to get their head around it. my son said, "have you got a trophy?" no, ijust get to be an mp and it's very humbling and it's super exciting. coming in, you probably had the same yesterday seeing all these wonderful women mps, just giving me massive hugs and just being welcoming and supportive. i think it's probably a very different environment from what it was many years ago, but you definitely feel welcomed and given the support you need. are children any better behaved now that mum is any better behaved now that mum is an mp? no! laughter 0h laughter oh well. thank you both. i really appreciate your time. congratulations. welcome to westminster. it is worth reflecting on this that after the inevitably controversial and colourful nature ofan controversial and colourful nature of an election campaign where there is big arguments, you get friendship thatis
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is big arguments, you get friendship that is exist across party divides here at westminster because i guess toa here at westminster because i guess to a greater or lesser extent eve ryo ne to a greater or lesser extent everyone here is in the business of governing or aspiring to govern and having an argument about how that is best done and so, yeah, after an election, you do see friendships develop across the party divides. very interesting. chris, thank you very much. thank you to our two new mps for chatting to us. it's 8.18am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the dup leader, arlene foster is due at downing street today. the parents of ten—month—old charlie gard will find out today if the european court of human rights will help in their battle to take him to the us for treatment. over 200 normally private gardens in london will be open to the public this weekend and this morning carol is at one of them. we saw the car in bull covered in
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bees. hopefully you won't be under attack this morning, carol.” bees. hopefully you won't be under attack this morning, carol. i hope so attack this morning, carol. i hope so too, dan. good morning to you. i'm in bee urban and behind me, there are 13 hives. we saw another one earlier which is behind glass. there are 700,000 bees here and 14 queen bees and all around there are neck tear—friendly plants being grown to encourage the bees to come in and pollinate and you can see some around me now. we've got raised beds and some lovely wildflowers and if you come down this weekend, you will be given seeds to plant. you will be able to taste some honey and taste the beer that's made from honey and it's all part of the open garden squares weekend which is taking place in london. there are 27 boroughs involved and 230 gardens you might not otherwise have access to, and they will be open for you to explore. the weather is glorious. the temperatures picked up nicely,
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but we have a north/south split. so starting in scotland at 9am, some heavy rain in the west. drier in the east, but still a fair bit of cloud. for northern england there is patchy rain and further south, still cloud, but the cloud breaking here and there with sunshine coming through. in east anglia, in towards the midlands and the south coast, we are looking at that sunshine as we have here in london. again, as we drift further west, we are looking at a lot of dry weather and variable amounts of cloud and sunny spells, but in areas adjacent to the irish sea, we are looking at a wee bit more cloud and the cloud extending through much of wales, producing some patchy light rain across the north wales and we've got patchy light rain across northern ireland. through the course of the day, the patchy light rain we have in the west will tend to turn more showery in nature as it moves eastwards. the very nature of showers means not all
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of us will see it and in between there will be bright spells or sunny spells. but the lion's share of the sunshine will be further south particularly around the bristol channel areas and also the english channel areas and also the english channel areas. now temperatures today up to 24, 25 celsius, maybe 26 celsius in the south, but we are looking at 19s and 20s as we push further north for many parts of the uk. as we head through the evening and overnight, there will be a spell of heavy showers across northern england and southern scotland. lighter showers across north—west scotla nd lighter showers across north—west scotland and under clear skies, we will see patchy mist and fog form across south—west england. the temperature range tonight, ten to 15 celsius. so not particularly cold. so tomorrow we start off with the showers in the north—west, but for the rest of us, it's going to be dry, sunny and warm or hot depending on where you are. temperatures will reach 22 to 24 celsius. there will bea reach 22 to 24 celsius. there will be a few exceptions in the high teens, but in the south east and east anglia because your we could
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see highs between 26 and 28. uv levels tomorrow will be high. we are looking at a uv level of eight and we will have high or very high pollen levels, not just we will have high or very high pollen levels, notjust for tomorrow, but for the rest of the week. on thursday, a lot of dry weather and sunshine, but a weather front coming into the west will produce patchy rain and fresher conditions following behind, not turning cold, just temperatures not as high as they are going to be dan and lou. lovely. thank you very much indeed. thank you. i want to go and join carol. i want to go and have a stroll. i will be there at 11.30am! fabulous. see you later, thank you. she is in bad mood most of the time, carol. right! she is never in a bad mood! there was a big rise in the number of people making complaints
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about payday loans last year. steph can tell us more. these are the financial from the financial ombudsman who is the person that you go to when your bank is giving you grief. they collate the figures and tell us what people have been the most upset about and what's interesting is how many people complained about payday loa ns. people complained about payday loans. there was 10,000 people making official complaints and that's ten times to the previous year and that's despite seeing changes to payday loans, but biggest thing we complain to the financial ombudsman is ppi. they deal with thousands of complaints about ppi. every single one of us had the phone call, the text messages, have you claimed ppi? it's still going on and still the banks are setting aside loads of money for it as well, but yeah, those are the things we complain about most is to do with
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payday loans and pp! insurance. ok. we're very good moaners. you are this morning, you're a right grump. i've got a bad back, steph. it's very difficult for me. from gospel singing to acapella, the battle is on to find the uk's best vocal group. singing superstar chaka khan and choir master, gareth malone, are among the judges for the bbc‘s new talent show, pitch battle. our arts and entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been to take a look backstage. announcer: this is pitch battle! show choirs going head—to—head, hosted by mel giedroyc, who gave us a behind—the—scenes tour. # someday somebody‘s gonna make you want to # turn around and say goodbye.# explain pitch battle. it is vocal groups, amazing vocal groups, very varied vocal groups from from gospel choirs to a competing, basically, to be crowned the best vocal group
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of pitch battle. then we spied one of the choirs leaving the studio. they had just rehearsed in front of this week's guestjudge. i was emotional. ijust met chaka khan and hugged her. you've met chaka khan! i haven't met her yet. is she amazing? yes, just being in her...in that room, i'm... is she very nice? she's lovely, absolutely lovely. yeah. have you all met chaka? you're all crying! they're all crying. these are chaka tears! it was amazing, her little face came through the middle and i was just like... makes crying noise. and after some warm ups... have you done your... singing. and then some, yeah. and diaphragm. hah, hah, hah, hah. one of chaka khan's biggest hits... # ain't nobody loves me better. # makes me happy, makes me feel this way. it's the joy of singing, isn't it, this is what we're about.
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yeah. it's the total joy! you look like carol vorderman! and then our own audience with... # chaka khan, chaka khan, chaka khan. chaka khan, you have not disappointed. first time i've ever met you and you've got a gold fan. dig that. yes, i have a gold fan. # i feel for you, i think i love you. what power does singing have? i call it the language of the angels. that's how angels communicate, i think. i mean, i can go anywhere in the world and sing, like, i feel for you or ain't nobody and they know the song even though they don't know what they're saying, you know? and that's a beautiful and a powerful thing. # i like the way you work it.# pitch battle is based on the pitch perfect movies, famous for their riff offs between choirs. a third film in the series will be released later this year and their musical director is on board here. they was singing all the way throughout human history and then
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once recorded music came along, people sang less, and then all of a sudden you get people being made fun of on tv shows and now everybody thinks they can't sing but we can! like birds and crickets and whales, we are hardwired to sing. so hopefully this show will not only entertain people but inspire them to sing themselves and join a group. and the two permanentjudges have been in choirs all their lives. yeah, i grew up in a choir in church and then i was in a girl group in high school so i actually spent pretty much, yeah, it's been a long time! she's well qualified. now that i think about it, yeah. this guy is mr choir. i know. he says it all the time! thank you for reminding her because nobody's said it for about 15 minutes. so, that's great, thanks for coming. pitch battle commences on saturday. pitch battle is on saturday at 7.30pm on bbc one. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. for most of us, pretty cloudy, the good news is it will turn warmer over the next few days, particularly on wednesday, mostly dry conditions with light winds. more breeds
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further north and west, weather fronts here this morning bringing outbreaks of rain, a few showers into northern parts of england and wales. for the channel islands through the south—west and south—east england, sunny spells this afternoon, temperatures getting to about 22 or 23 degrees. a bit more cloud further north, some bright spells, still a few showers, particularly over the pennines, northern ireland, much of scotland as well. might see a bit of brightness affecting aberdeenshire, but even in the cloud and rain, temperatures getting to 16 or 17 degrees. through this evening and a night, much of the rain will clear away, clear spells across southern areas, allowing for patchy mist and fog to develop into the early hours of wednesday morning, with a bit more rain affecting the far north—west. this is coming from an area of low pressure, but high pressure is stopping much of that rain getting in, and with that high
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pressure, warm air is coming from the south. that will make it an increasingly humid on wednesday as well, so quite a muggy field. hazy sunshine for northern areas, a bit of rain towards the far north—west of rain towards the far north—west of scotla nd of rain towards the far north—west of scotland and northern ireland, but dry with sunshine for most of us. temperatures, 17—19 in the north—west, but down to the south—east, 22—26, even up to 28 degrees. that could trigger a few thunderstorms through wednesday night, but into thursday, fresh air coming in from the west on this weather front will bring a few showers throughout thursday, temperatures dropping a touch, bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. overhaul at uber. the taxi app looks set for a major sha keup after an investigation accuses it of serious failings. live from london, that's our top
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story on tuesday 13thjune. uber boss travis kalanick is under fire for a corporate culture embroiled in a series of scandals. we will have the details. also in the programme, the australian casino group crown says 18 of its workers have been arrested in china, charged with promoting gambling. and ahead of uk inflation data,
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