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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 13, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's tuesday, it's nine o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. the law no deal, theresa may will meet the leader of the dup to broker a will to help her stay on in number ten. —— deal or no deal. a will to help her stay on in number ten. -- deal or no deal. theresa may tells the party there will be no backtracking on gay rights, despite the deal with the dup, but could it signal an end to austerity and a shift on brexit? with mps returning to the commons today, we've gathered together a group of you — those people who pay their wages — to tell politicians what you want from them in theirjob. integrity, i think integrity is key, we wa nt integrity, i think integrity is key, we want somebody that will have the same persona in their public life as they do in their private lie. sir menzies have an inability to answer questions directly, and it is really simple. —— some mps. questions directly, and it is really
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simple. -- some mps. serving as an mp is simple. -- some mps. serving as an mpisa simple. -- some mps. serving as an mp is a privilege, not a right. almost a year since jo mp is a privilege, not a right. almost a year sincejo cox was murdered, her parents tell us how much they miss her. we will always be broken, because there is a piece missing. to the outside, while we do appear strong, all of us, there is a lot of days when they are bad, it is bad. we'll talk to jo cox's sister and husband before 11. and this programme has learned that another group which represents sexual abuse survivors is pulling out of the government's sex abuse inquiry, accusing theresa may of failing to protect survivors. we will hear from them before ten. hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until 11.
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throughout the morning, the latest breaking news and developing stories. a little later, we'll hear warnings that people trying to bulk up with protein bars and shakes are being misled by adverts. if you use them, get in touch — use #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today, theresa may will meet arlene foster to thrash out the details of a deal to support a minority, government. opposition parties criticised the talks, sinn fein suggesting the deal would undermine the good friday peace agreement. with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu chief negotiator michel barnier has called on britain not to waste time. a medical correspondent ben wright has more. —— political
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correspondent ben wright has more. dup leader arlene foster said it is a tremendous opportunity to work with the tories. theresa may knows a deal with the dup is her only way to stay in power. so an agreement will be reached, probably today, that suits both parties. a confidence—and—supply arrangement will provide dup support to the tories on major votes like the budget and the queen's speech. the alliance leaves the government with a vulnerable majority ofjust six. but theresa may now looks safer in herjob after a meeting with tory mps yesterday evening. she apologised for the disastrous campaign, declaring, "i got us into this mess and i will get us out of it." there is a reality that is we have to be pragmatic about what is introduced, we have got to work harder to try to bring people along with us, both inside the conservative party and beyond. and while theresa may tries to rebuild the government from a hung parliament, a warning from the eu
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that the uk is wasting valuable time negotiating brexit. more than two months have passed since theresa may handed in the uk's notice, but no talks have happened, and there is a two—year deadline to hammer out a brexit deal. speaking to the financial times, eu chief negotiator michel barnier said the uk needed to appoint a negotiated team with a mandate soon because the process would be extraordinarily complex. theresa may is also facing calls from some tory mps and labour to rethink her brexit plan — exactly the uncertainty she wanted the election to stop. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. we can talk to norman smith, who is in downing street, where politicians are arriving for a cabinet meeting, but tell us what we can expect from this deal to be brokered between
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arlene foster and theresa may. well, the deal is basically mrs may's political lifeline to survival, because without it she does not have a majority in the commons, and she cannot govern, so a majority in the commons, and she cannot govern, so she absolutely has to have this deal. i think it is almost certain she will get it, otherwise arlene foster probably would not be coming here. so we can expect they'd heal, and part of it will be a simple transaction, money for votes, arlene foster will want cash for investment, schools, hospitals, maybe a few international conferences, maybe government contracts, big sporting events in northern ireland, to show that she is getting something for northern ireland out of the deal. but the interesting part of the arrangement is what is not going to be spelt out, and that is the implications for austerity and brexit. on austerity, the dup have always opposed many of the austerity measures introduced by this and the
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previous governments. they still oppose things like the bedroom tax, getting rid of the triple lock on pensions, means testing benefits for the elderly, so the expectation is mrs may will have to drop large chunks of austerity. that is not as difficult as it sounds, because tories believe that one of the reasons mr corbyn did so well is because he kept banging on about austerity. so to some extent she is pushing at an open door. the more complex and difficult area is on brexit, because those ministers and mps who want to shift mrs may away from her approach on brexit, and instead to focus on the economy and the impact on the economy of brexit, believe that the dup will be on board, because of their concerns about what might happen if there is some sort of hard border between northern and southern ireland. so there is a view that perhaps the dup could help tilt the argument now
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raging again over brexit against mrs may. thank you for the moment, norman smith, at downing street. joanna has the rest of the morning's news. a brother and sister have been arrested after a man in his 40s was shot dead at a property in slough. reuben and kathleen gregory are being held on suspicion of murder. the pairare said the pair are said to have lived in a ca rava n the pair are said to have lived in a caravan near woodland in slough for more than 50 years. a bbc investigation has discovered 22 facebook accounts belonging to convicted child sex offenders. they breach the company's rules banning them from the website. radio 4's file on a programme found most of the accounts were taken down within 48 hours of being reported, while six were referred to police to investigate. the european court of human rights and france will rule later whether the live support of a yale baby boy in london can be switched off. charlie gard's parents want to take
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him to the us for treatment. the uk supreme court agreed with specialist doctors that he should instead received palliative care. a group representing abuse survivors has told this programme that it is quitting the government's independent inquiry into child sexual abuse. the white flowers campaign has said it blames theresa may — who set up the inquiry when she was home secretary — for failing to deliverjustice. the group, which represents more than a hundred survivors, said it had lost faith in the inquiry and accused it of not being truly independent. the jury in the trial of the us entertainer bill cosby, who's appearing on sex assault charges, will return to court later having failed to reach a verdict last night. the 79—year—old is accused of assaulting a woman at his home in philadelphia 13 years ago. the cosby show star denies the allegations and says the relationship was consensual. a woman has been charged with murder after a man died following a collision with a tram in manchester. the 30—year—old man died at the scene at manchester victoria station on sunday evening. 31—year—old charrissa loren brown—wellington
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has been remanded in custody. new guidelines are being introduced to ensure that sentences for offences committed against children in england and wales properly reflect the arm suffered by victims. those who try to blame others could face tougher punishments. the pa rents of face tougher punishments. the parents of murdered mpjo cox told this programme they will always be broken after their daughter's death. friday marks a year since the labour mp was killed outside a constituency surgery. mp was killed outside a constituency surgery. this weekend, herfamily is encouraging people to join with friends and neighbours for a series of community events being held in her memory. we will talk to her husband brendan and sister kim at around half past ten. bev on facebook says my heart goes out to jo's family for their loss
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and the way she was murdered, but life goes on. she is in a better place, let her rest in peace. on facebook, a very sad loss, jason on facebook, a very sad loss, jason on facebook says, what a beautiful womanjo facebook says, what a beautiful woman jo cox was. facebook says, what a beautiful womanjo cox was. alex, if parliament was made up of people likejo cox, what an amazing society we would be living in. thank you very much for those. let me bring you breaking news from germany, it is being reported by a french news agency, several people have been wounded after shots were fired at a railway station near munich. one person has been detained, according to police, several people have been injured, a female police officer was badly wounded. munich police have just tweeted, authorities say a handgun was found during a police operation at a station in munich, although it is not thought to be terrorist related. several people injured after shots were fired at a
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railway station near munich, one person detained, it is not thought to be terrorism related, we are being told. clearly, we will bring you more as soon being told. clearly, we will bring you more as soon as we have being told. clearly, we will bring you more as soon as we have it. 11 minutes past nine, we will talk to voters in the next few minutes about what they want from mps, who returned to work today, who returned to the commons after that election. so much as happened in the last few days, hasn't it? but they are going to draw up a sort of manifesto of what they would like from mps as they come back to work, get in touch with your own views. ok, let's bring you a bit of sport. and british bobsleigh is the latest sport to have its coaches come under scrutiny. what's been going on? yes, a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism. and there have been a number of complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. earlier this year, a host of athletes wrote anonymously to the chief executive of the sport's governing body, richard parker,
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to share concerns over the behaviour of key performance and management staff. one athlete alleged they had experienced racism several times from a senior coach, and that the coach referred to black people as lazy and had "a blatant dislike towards people of colour". in favour of caucasian males on the performance programme and a racial stigma against black drivers. another complainant said, "sexist comments are regular, there have been claims of racist remarks which all get ignored, "the culture is one of fear, athletes are literally terrified of putting a foot wrong," and there was "dictatorship within the management". despite this, just a month later, the people complaining were told no disciplinary action would be taken. so certainly want to watch in great british bobsleigh. and theresa may might a chance to go to the football tonight? yes, theresa may and emmanuel macron will be at the stade de france in paris, i imagine they will get time
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to talk politics, but quite a significant fixture — just a friendly between england and france, but the significance is that french fa ns but the significance is that french fans have been as to sing god save the queen in solidarity with britain after the terror attacks in manchester and london. the tribute echoes a couple of years ago when british fans, english fans at wembley were asked to sing la marseillaise alongside the french fans, just four days after those atrocities in paris, so it kind of return fixture, if you like, four french fans at the stade de france. this were being's last game of the season, just a friendly against france, kick—off is at a de—clutter night. and england's younger football is back with their world cup. yes, they flew back late last night from south korea, the first world cup win since 1966, this is them arriving back, manager mark simpson said it was too soon to claim they are the next generation of golden players. gareth southgate has said
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it is to over the clubs to nurture this young talent, and it will be interesting to see what happens to them next, because a lot of these players you may not have heard of, but they are signed to big clubs, and i think gareth southgate means that they all need a regular first—team pitch time with their clu bs first—team pitch time with their clubs so that they continue to develop and improve, improve future england squads. and the worry is that, in chasing success, clubs will spend a lot of money on expensive foreign players, and that this home—grown, world cup winning talent will spend much of next season on the bench. thank you very much, katherine, more from her during the morning. it is nearly quarter past nine this tuesday morning, and the most powerful woman in britain meet the prime minister in downing street today. a little bit of laughter from our voters! arlene foster of the democratic unionist party, a small political party from northern ireland with just ten mps, arrives to see what theresa may can offer her in exchange for the dup's support
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because theresa may's conservatives didn't win a majority in the last week's election, mrs may needs those ten dup mps to stay on in government. let's speak now to the former conservative party leader and former work and pensions secretary iain duncan smith. good morning. do you feel any kind of affinity with the dup? can i say one thing, the football match with france. i was at the england match andi france. i was at the england match and i think it is wholly fitting and when i met french people they were very moved that the fans had sung the french anthem. my question was do you feel any kind of affinity with the dup? well, in the sense that the conservative party is the majority party, but hasn't got a overall majority. the dup, it seems, appear, and are keen to let the
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conservative party govern and as a result of that theresa may has to have a discussion with them. i think what you will find it is not about having an affinity, it is about what on balance are the things that they most want, the conservatives to be in government for and it's clear that the kind of arrangement i expect we'll end up with will be what they call a supply and confidence. that's to say on votes of confidence they will support us. on things like the queen's speech, they'll support us. on things like they'll support us. on things like the budget they will support us, but they will keep their own counsel on other things and they may not support us on other things, but the key areas where the votes are important, they by and large will back us. but it won't be a coalition, it will be a confidence and supply agreement. as long as they do back you on those big votes, it's ok with you, is it, that some of their mps it's ok with you, is it, that some of theirmps are it's ok with you, is it, that some of their mps are repulsed by gay people, don't believe in same—sex marriage and don't believe in climate change and don't believe women who have been raped should have adorations? a large number of
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theseissues have adorations? a large number of these issues are devolved issues, but it's not going to change anything. theresa may made it clear on these areas where the conservative party is settled and clear, the dup will have no influence over our views. we'll also a nyway influence over our views. we'll also anyway on those issues have a much broader consensual cross party arrangement so broader consensual cross party arrangement so we broader consensual cross party arrangement so we wouldn't need the dup on those issues, you know, i voted for gay marriage. i'm not going toe trenching on that one is nor is the conservative party. this will be an agreement, it is not about what their beliefs are, it is about what their beliefs are, it is about key areas of government where they believe the conservative party needs to deliver to keep the country sta ble needs to deliver to keep the country stable and that's it. will voters get to see the terms of this deal?” don't think they will be that complex, but i'm sure they will be clear and open. i would certainly wa nt clear and open. i would certainly want them to be that because it's clear that understand that what we won't have got involved in is any complex arrangement. now, there is, and going to be issues around investment in northern ireland, but those are issues anyway that would have to be tackled as this is an area that is of very high priority
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to restabilise after the troubles and to make sure that the people there get good work and jobs and getting businesses there. that sort of stuff is just something that was in the plans. it is worth bearing in mind that as i understand gordon brown was busy trying to do deal with them in 2010 as well. so these kind of mathematical things are part of parliament. and it seems that the political price to pay for doing that deal from political price to pay for doing that dealfrom a political price to pay for doing that deal from a conservative point of view, it will mean an end to austerity which some conservative backbenchers will welcome because the dup don't support your measures on austerity and mrs may's and your vision of brexit will have to go? well, let's deal with the austerity thing. look, there were lots and lots of issues and many of us, remember i resigned over a year ago because i disagreed with george osborne's direction of tral and i have asked us to re—think whole areas of where we are. the length of time that we are asking public
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serva nts time that we are asking public servants and others to put up with reduced flattened salaries has been an issue for me and many other people and we would like to see that revisited. this isn'tjust an issue to do with the dup. what the election told us the election was too early and we should have had time to resolve those issues, but, on one side, there is a genuine discussion about that and i think there are key issues around education and stuff that we need to resolve. on the side of the brexit side, actually the dup are very clear that they support theresa may's original position which is no, thet want control of the bofrders, money and laws. there will be no entry into the single market and they're keen not to be in the customs union. but they are opposed to her mantra of no deal is better than a bad deal. they're not actually opposed that. i promise you that this will become clear the dup supports what her position is at time of the election and the majority of the conservative party believes this is a settled issue. so
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any idea... well ruth davidson doesn't. not every single mp from scotla nd doesn't. not every single mp from scotland necessarily follows her line. the point is the party overall is settled. what we want, obviously is settled. what we want, obviously is to engage and discuss these matters with people, but in essence those negotiations are due to start very, very shortly, ie next week and the can conservative government needs to get on and make sure that they now start talking to our european allies and friends about how we arrange to have the benefits as the labour party stood on the same manifesto, they stood on a ma nifesto same manifesto, they stood on a manifesto which said no to the single market. no to customs union and control of our borders. so the majority of the british people had in front of them two parties that constituted the majority of the votes that stood on very similar ma nifestoes votes that stood on very similar manifestoes on brexit. but it's not settled, is it? you must acknowledge from the lack of a majority and bass of people like ruth davidson, perhaps you think she's flexing her
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muscles too much, the question of your brexit vision has been reopened whether you like it or not? i'm not overly bothered about that. the truth is we're going into negotiations and in negotiations different elements will cold out i think that the conservative party, people in cabinet, who may well seem to think that they're going to start reopening this, the answer is i wouldn't try and re—open this before you start the negotiations because all you'll get is what we don't want is another argument and row going on in the governing party. what we need, we had a settled position. we had agreed that position before we went into the last election. the labour party to save their votes in those areas where there were strong leavers who voted labour in the past they adopted almost exactly the same position, you heard john mcdonnell and jeremy corbyn saying in terms over the weekend we will not be in the single market. they do not intend to be in the customs union, but they want the benefits of having a good trade deal and good arrangements for access and that's
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what the conservative negotiators want. so in a sense, what you've got isa want. so in a sense, what you've got is a minority of people who just trying to prise this open again, it shouldn't be opened and we should just get on with it and try and get the best deal we can which helps preserve jobs the best deal we can which helps preservejobs and the best deal we can which helps preserve jobs and get good trade deals. iain duncan smith. iain duncan smith willjoin hundreds of other mps as they return to parliament for the first time since the election on thursday, an election which not only produced a result which virtually no one was expecting, but also showed yet more evidence of a country which is divided, with many who feel let down by traditional politics and politicians, and who aren't happy with the way many conduct themselves. so what lessons can be learned from the campaign, and what does it tell us about how the country wants our politicians to behave? we've brought together a group of voters here in the studio to chew the fat with two new mps and two with just a little more experience. and we're going to try and draw up our audience manifesto or code of conduct for how they want our politicians to handle themselves. bambos charalambous
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is the new labour mp for enfield southgate. christine jardine, the new lib dem mp for edinburgh west. john baron, conservative mp for basildon and billericay since 2001. ben bradshaw, the labour mp in exeter since 1997. ican i can barely remember that year! welcome everybody. we've got voters as well. let me ask, not the politicians, our voters first of all. what word would you use to describe politicians right now? shady. disindisingeneralous. dishonest. i'll come back with one word! laughter i have more than one word. no, give
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mea i have more than one word. no, give me a some if you can't contain it to one. in need of one. yeah, i strongly believe they're divided. you can see that throughout their parties, notjust in the conservative party, but also in the labour party. too divided. what about you ? labour party. too divided. what about you? i would say unavailable. unavailable definitely. meaning, what you can't get access to them? they don't come across that way. they don't come across that way. they come across from a come across as if they're from a completely different world. how do you react to those adjectives? i think it's understandable that people would think that way after some of the things that happened in british politics over the past few years. i'm not at all surprised. i think we have to work to reassure people that we're not all duplicitous or shady and try to be more united in the way that we look at things?”
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and try to be more united in the way that we look at things? i think we need to regain the trust of the public. easier said than done? it is hard, but you get a and great opportunity as a new mp to build that trust with your electorate. we need to go out there and make sure we are need to go out there and make sure we are listening to people and that we are we are listening to people and that we are truly representing them. ben bradshaw, you have been an mp for a long time. you will have heard these adjectives before, is it disheartening that people are still saying this? it is a bit. i won a tory seat in 1997, i have a 16,000 majority, i haven't achieved that by not being available and your advice to the new mps and to long—standing mps was the right one. make yourself available. jo cox was a fantastic role model about what an mp could be like and should be like. she made herself very available and lost her life for doing that and certainly it's a model that good mps and the vast majority of mps are in this because they want to serve their constituents and their country. the vast majority of mps go into
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politics for the right reason because the concept of public service, they want to serve the public. and i think the vast majority do a decentjob at that, but there is this disconnect which we need to try and repair and mend and all! we need to try and repair and mend and all i would say is look at your own individual mp because what is interesting in this debate is when you talk to constituents, you get a different view of their local mp than you do of the concept generally. the nature of this conversation, it is broadly generalised, you appreciate that, but mel, you will have heard politicians say look, we are in it for the right motive, so why do you still have such a bad feeling about them, that their reputation is so poor? well, i don't have a totally bad feeling, but i think there is not enough leadership coming from politicians. when we face brexit, we will need more than political management. we need people who can articulate a political vision and who can answer the question of what sort of nation do we want to be? instead we get politicians who are
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concerned or seemingly only with the next five year election cycle, so i think we need to do better on leadership. that's a very, very good point. i think one of the things we need to do more is set out why we wa nt need to do more is set out why we want a good deal. the prospect of opportunity that's there and paint reasons for actually negotiating that good deal and being positive andl that good deal and being positive and i think that's one thing perhaps we and i think that's one thing perhaps we take away as conservatives from the general election is that we didn't perhaps talk enough about sunnier uplands, the positive reasons for voting and what sort of country we want to live in and there isa country we want to live in and there is a lot to be said. david? i don't know, ijust get the feeling that brexit and the recent elections has really exposed politicians to the public about, you know, this is all just grabbing power, you know look at the dup and people doing deals with each other and it's very dirty. a lot of the time i feel that politicians, i did a lot of campaigning over the years and a lot of time! campaigning over the years and a lot of time i find that it's difficult to get politicians support for certain things that we know we need
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to happen in society and i think they need to be working together across parties, especially when it comes to brexit because both parties are not really obviously... that's going to have to happen now. there is no alternative. theresa may's destructive hard brexit is dead. it's over. everything has changed. we have got to work across party and that's what the public are asking us to do by delivering this election result. i agree and we have ant opportunity to have a much more open approach to brexit and i was disappointed in what iain duncan smith said because he seemed to take the opposite approach which was the argument is closed. well, i would argue that the actual election result shows that the argument is not closed. that people rejected theresa may's very hard brexit approach and they want a more open approach and they want a more open approach with as ben says other ideas coming in, talk across the parties. gather support from a much broader approach. in parliamentary
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practicalities there will have to be parliamentary consensus because things will get voted down and no progress will be made? yes, there are discussions going on about how we can rescue our are discussions going on about how we can rescue our country from this disastrous destructive brexit which theresa may set her mind on for no apparent reason. she interpreted the referendum ina apparent reason. she interpreted the referendum in a particular way which the public rejected. having been a remainor herself. taking it slightly back from brexit because we could actually be talking brexit the whole of this time. i said i wanted politicians to recognise that it was a privilege and my comment actually came, it wasn't what i was going to say originally, it came from an interview with the chair of the backbench 1922 interview with the chair of the backbench1922 committee last night on the news where he said and i'm not quoting verbatim, but he said something on the lines of there are lessons to be learnt the soundbite
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that has more bite than vibe, one of the things we're going to have to think about is why so many people, some of them must be intelligent, voted labour! and ijust, you know, my handsjust went like this. you found that rather patronising. i found that patronising and i found that rude. people, however much integrity you have, you've got to watch your tongues and what you say because we pay your wages. if you could deliver a demand to politicians going back to work today, what do you want from them?” wa nt today, what do you want from them?” want to feel as the viewer doing the job you are supposed to be doing, representing me, representing my neighbours, and all my friends and all my family and all the people i am evergoing to all my family and all the people i am ever going to know, you are representing us, so i have to have some affinity with you, and even if we some affinity with you, and even if we do come from different backgrounds, i have to feel
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confident that you are representing me— confident that you are representing me — not... i don't want to feel as though you are from a completely different world, i don't get what you are saying, i don't understand what you're saying, how does that affect me, literally, that is what we affect me, literally, that is what we want to know. the uk referendum isa we want to know. the uk referendum is a classic example of the mps ignoring the population. how do you work that out? because they try to turnit work that out? because they try to turn it into a political battle, when in fact it was a vote by the population to decide how they wanted the country to go forward in the future. and what we should be doing now, because the europeans are our friends, what we should be doing now is forming a commission comprised of both parties, all parties in parliament, and members of the public, so that they can all go together and negotiate with our friends in europe. 0k. and that way we will see more honest and genuine.
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one, john. just briefly, part of the unfortunate thing of just one, john. just briefly, part of the unfortunate thing ofjust watching pmqs is that there is too much of a risk of seeing politics through the prism of pmqs. what i would like to say is that there is much more co—operation across the parties than is generally realised. for example, lam chairof is generally realised. for example, i am chair of the all—party parliamentary group on cancer, which brings politicians from across the political divide together, questioning the government of the day, whatever their colour. so there is more co—operation than people realise. so why play those particular roles during pmqs? some of us do not shout... plenty of your collea g u es of us do not shout... plenty of your colleagues do. governments have to be brought to account, and you have to ask difficult questions, and you get direct answers back. but the bottom line is we should remember there is a lot of co—operation, and there is a lot of co—operation, and there needs to be, and i think people are right in the sense that when it comes to brexit, we are
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going to have to carry people with us on going to have to carry people with us on this issue. i have never understood what the difference was the between hard and soft brexit, it isa the between hard and soft brexit, it is a question of getting the best possible deal, and there seems to be an enormous amount of conformity between labour on the conservatives with regards to what we want from the eu negotiations. ok. you do see the eu negotiations. ok. you do see the parties coming together. we are not having the brexit conversation ain! not having the brexit conversation again! so what are our top three or top five? put them in order, what do you reckon? integrity, definitely. so including honesty in that. transparency, that sort of thing. passion with respect. is that number two, is that as high up as it should be? theresa may sounded like a robot
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during hercampaign... be? theresa may sounded like a robot during her campaign... what else, as well as integrity? what else is important? empathy is a big one, the ability to put yourself in another person's shoes, a boss will tell someone person's shoes, a boss will tell someone what to do, a leader will show them. mps need to be leading in compassion, forgiveness, respect, in showing people those values. so how shall we describe that, affinity, empathy? yeah? well, iam really interested that is number two, that says a lot, particularly perhaps because of recent weeks. what else are we going for? clarity. you asking a lot of there, sharon! clarity? you mean you don't understand the phrase brexit means brexit? i don't understand a word they say! if someone asks me a
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question, i want the answer, not the same mantra over and over again?m clarity and directness when they go to press conferences, they know what they are going to say, regardless of they are going to say, regardless of the question. we have two experienced politicians and two new politicians, why is it so hard to a nswer politicians, why is it so hard to answer questions directly? if i and so answer questions directly? if i and so directly, it means a damning headline, is that what is going on? -- if headline, is that what is going on? --if| headline, is that what is going on? —— if i answer directly. headline, is that what is going on? -- ifi answer directly. i try headline, is that what is going on? -- if i answer directly. i try to a nswer -- if i answer directly. i try to answer directly, i am sure collea g u es answer directly, i am sure colleagues here do as well, and there is a danger you generalise across all mp5. there is a danger you generalise across all mps. you have made that point. we decide to do this job as best we can. i have a reputation for
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speaking my mind, but there is a difference between being in government and in opposition, i am much more free as an opposition backbencher to say whatever i like! isn't that the problem with party politics? you have to toe the party line, i would love to be in politics, but i could not do that. it is like being in a club, if you come to an agreement in the organisation, you stick to it. if you are going to have a united organisational club, you have to stick to the line. there are ways of answering questions which sounded less evasive than some ministers do it, and you can think of your most and least favourite politicians for and least favourite politicians for and swing questions, but there is a different with collective responsibility and having that freedom. so clarity and directness? directness and clarity? any preference? no? excuse my writing. clarity and directness... right, is that it? no, i think
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clarity and directness... right, is that it? no, ithink four clarity and directness... right, is that it? no, i think four has to be humility, i would that it? no, i think four has to be humility, iwould put that it? no, i think four has to be humility, i would put it much higher up. ok, humility. there is such a peeling of we are up here, you are down there, and as you said in your intro, we pay your wages, you are only there because we put an x in the box, so recognised us. yeah? are we happy with our top four? what is wrong with passengers” we happy with our top four? what is wrong with passengers i love a bit of passion, believe me! make its numberfive! of passion, believe me! make its number five! ok, passion! ok... passion. sorry! right, mps, your reaction? i 10096 passion. sorry! right, mps, your reaction? i100% agree passion. sorry! right, mps, your reaction? i 100% agree with passion. sorry! right, mps, your reaction? i 10096 agree with that, i think humility, the area eyelid in i
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represent, someone think humility, the area eyelid in i represent, someone i get the train in the morning, people speak to me. —— the area i live in, i represent. so to be accountable, you have to respect other people, they put their trust in me, i have to respect that. christian, what about you as a new mp? formerly a special adviser, you have been around a bit. i don't mean that in the way... you know what i mean, you are experienced!” that in the way... you know what i mean, you are experienced! i think those points are all be enough, and one of the problem is that politicians have is that somehow they have managed as a group, not individuals, to portray this image to the public that we don't have personal lives, we don't have families, that we don't actually worry about paying the mortgage ourselves. and i think we need to be more open about the fact that we have lives you are normal people, shaka! shark horror!”
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have lives you are normal people, shaka! shark horror! i had personal issues during the campaign, a bereavement, and we got a lot of support. people see you in pmqs, arguing and fighting, and forget that we colleagues and we'll have the same problems. that happened with jo cox, the same problems. that happened withjo cox, to see the whole house come together, they realised she was a really good mp. and beyond that, as the people we represent, i think we are very as the people we represent, i think we are very bad at being open and speaking clearly and honestly about our lives. all right. are you two happy to sign up to this list? i am sure you already exhibit some of those characteristics!” sure you already exhibit some of those characteristics! i think, for me, absolutely. one that is missing ifi me, absolutely. one that is missing if i can dare give advice to our new collea g u es if i can dare give advice to our new colleagues who have won marginal seats from another party, very hard work — you need to put the hard work
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in. i agree with all of those, integrity, empathy is very important, we always have to design our policies as best we can to help those more vulnerable at the bottom end of the pay scale and all the re st of end of the pay scale and all the rest of it, and employed, one nation politics, if you like, whichever side of the house. but humility is very important. we have, number four. i'm just addressing the list, because it is important that mps, politics says, we are going to listen, we might have got this wrong, we are listen, we might have got this wrong, we are going to think about it again. that is carrying people along. i will make a deal with you, victoria, if we do more of that, the immediate needs to be more tolerant when it comes to accusing us of not knowing where we are going. that is there point, but there are u—turns and there are u—turns! —— a fair point. but you are generalising across the media, as we have been generalising, so right back at you!
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very last word. it might sound odd from a liberal democrat, but one of the things that had most impact on a generation, helping the labour party, the night before he died, john smith talked about how the labour party were asking for the opportunity to serve, and more politicians need to take that sort of approach. it is, as carol said, about service. excellent point, i am defending colleagues here — the vast majority, we must member, go for the right reason, and they believe in public service. what message would you give to those who are not following those values? you are saying the right things but the reality is... there is no room for you in politics, and by and large they do get found out on both sides of the house. we are going to ask the mps to sign up to your code of conduct, if that is right, and if you come across colleagues today, if you come across colleagues today, if you wouldn't mind mentioning it, it would be useful. thank you very much for coming on the programme, we
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appreciate it. we mentioned jo cox a couple of times, one of those politicians that most people think stuck by that code of conduct. on 16th june last year, the labour mp was murdered outside her constituency in birstall, yorkshire. it was a crime that horrified the country but united people in grief and condemnation. in the days, weeks and months that followed, jo cox's friends and family pledged to continue her legacy, rather than let it be overshadowed by what happened. in the run—up to the first anniversary of her death, her sister kim leadbeater and herfamily have invited our reporter catherine burns to their home for the first time to share their private memories ofjo. we'll never be fully repaired, if you like, because there's always a piece of us missing. i'm not in denial. i think there must be a difference between denial and disbelief. i can't believe it's happened. cannot believe it's happened.
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and jo's children have got so much of her and brendan in them. that's a great legacy, i mean, we love that. when i have the darkest and the difficult moments, i just think, right, she would not want you to lose it. she would not want you to give in to the anger and to the upset and to the hatred. so you have to just keep going. so this is batley. yes, this is the wonderful town of batley. and this is where it is, yeah. she wanted to be at the heart of the constituency, and this is where she decided to base herself. so still now one year on, there's still the jo cox mp sign on the door. yes, yes, it's hard to know what to do
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in this sort of situation. is it worse to have it there or better to have it there, you know? i keep saying to myself, if i get through to the end ofjuly with my health and my sanity, i've done well. and then i really don't know what comes after that. i can't go back to normal, because that normal life doesn't exist, you know. my life had my sister in it. kim leadbeater has spent this year trying to build a legacy for her sister, jo cox. i still miss the sound of her coming down the drive. i still think... her parents have generally avoided the limelight, but they've agreed to talk to us. this is their first interview on national tv. what were you doing when you got that call? we'd just sat down about five minutes, and then the phone rang. and it was dan, one ofjo's aides.
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and hejust said, "jo's been shot, i think." and... that was it. i said, "where is she?" and wejumped in the car, i remember i wasjumping in the car, and we couldn't get near. and we set off running. and i don't know... i don't know how we managed to get there. into the middle of birstall. and the police were there. they stopped us. somebody says, "jo's been shot"... well, that's bad, to be shot. people are shot and recover, etc, etc. so we didn't know at that time. i think we knew. i think i did. i didn't know. but you see these things on the television where the doctor, in this case it was a police inspector, comes into the room and he has to tell you.
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and we know. in fact, he doesn't have to tell you. you can see by his expression. and he said, "i'm sorry to say she didn't make it". i think that the difficult thing, it's the permanence of what's happened. actually, this is it now. that's very, very difficult to understand. and it's about creating a new level of normality for us as a family. one of the things that kim said afterwards was, "ourfamily is broken now but we will mend over time". how are you mending? we will always be broken, because there's a piece missing. but, yeah, i think to the outside world we do appear strong. all of us. but there's a lot of days when the bad is bad. the long times for us are when we turn the television on and see terrorist acts — westminster bridge, manchester — because that's when it brings everything back.
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for me, the ambulances, the sirens, i'm back there again in birstall. but we still think about the people who have lost loved ones, and we know what they are actually just going through. it must be awful for them. we know what we went through. and unfortunately they don't, as yet. going forward, build on the children, the grandchildren. and supporting one another. we'll continue to do that. because you're right, it won't go away. after one year, it gets better. it doesn't, it won't go away. but we have to be positive. and jo's children have got so much of her and brendan in them. that's a great legacy
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and we love that. jo, she loved them to bits, absolutely loved them. and that's the most upsetting thing, from my point of view. she's not seen them grow up. it was, for you especially, afterjo was murdered, lejla and cuillin came up, and you found it really difficult, didn't you? because it was just like seeing jo. just like seeing her. obviously this year you've all been part of the campaign to protectjo's legacy. but the public face of it has really been kim. how do you feel about the work she's done? more than one person came up to me after the funeral, and after kim talked in birstall marketplace, and said, "you've got not one, but two marvellous daughters. one we saw, jo, on occasions, on the television etc, making speeches. but clearly, you've got two".
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and, you know, we're very proud, because i can't separate the two, and never would. so this is not what you'd expect your average mp to be like, is it? no, no, absolutely. but this wasjo, just very relaxed, very comfortable, and just embracing the situation she was in. and that beautiful wedding picture. that is absolutely stunning, isn't it? oh, is this the karaoke? yeah, that's the birthday karaoke with the elaine paige and barbara dickson, i know him so well, which was our party piece when we were kids. and it was re—enacted for my birthday last year. badly. # i could have made it differently #. we were really close, like all growing up
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throughout childhood we were really, really close. there is two years age difference between us, and i am younger, although nobody believed it becausejo looked so young. we just had a really close relationship, and we neverfell out. we always looked after each other. # but in the end he needs a lit more security. . # it wasn't aboutjo cox mp, it was actually joanne leadbeater, who was my sister. literally sort of within days ofjo been killed, things just started to arrive, and the house was just full of flowers. and that was the classic, line, i never met your sister, but ijust had to do something, ijust had to say something. me and mum and dad when we're out and about and stuff, we go to the supermarket, and we've met people, and theyjust end up crying, devastated.
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grown men, absolutely devastated. and then you end up comforting then. and then you end up comforting them. maybe that has detracted from my personal grief, which will come eventually. but it has certainly provided comfort and support. at the same time we saw that public outpouring of grief, this was your personal tragedy as well. how did you manage to balance those two things? there was a lot of ourjo. and, you know, people who knewjo through politics, people who knewjo suddenly claimed her. and initially i found that a bit, hang on a minute, she's myjo, you know. she's my mum and dad'sjo, and she's brendan'sjo, really. but then actually you think how lovely it is that so many people wanted her to be theirjo. so you can't possibly be cross about that. has it hit yet that she isn't coming back? i know exactly what happened. i've got those facts, but i don't think i've got them on a deep emotional level yet, and that worries me, because when that happens it's difficult to know what will happen. but i'm not in denial.
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i think there must be a difference between denial and disbelief. i can't believe it's happened. i cannot believe it's happened. but i know it has. how have you coped with that? i've got closer than ever to mum and dad. which again is heartbreaking at times, when you think, you know, i'm their only child now. and i have guilt associated with that as well, because when the phone rings and it would always be, "oh, it's your daughter". "oh, which one?" like that's, you know, that's gone forever now. and i find that very hard. it was supposed byjo's birthday less than a week after she died. her husband, brendan, spoke in london's trafalgar square. we try to remember not how cruelly she has been taken from us, but how unbelievably lucky we were to have her in our lives for so long. thank you. and let me start by saying thank you to everybody for attending today. and kim gave a speech in batley.
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my sister... applause. thank you. my sister would want her murder to mobilise people, to get on with things. to try to make a positive difference. and that's exactly what kim has spent the last 12 months doing, trying to create something positive from jo's death. she's worked on causes close to her heart, everything from tackling loneliness to getting communities to work more closely together. but in many ways, she's put her own life on hold. so this is where you had your big speech? yes, the big tribute tojo. the big tribute on the 22nd ofjune. because i'm a very private person, what i tend to be able to seem to do isjust go into this mode of having a job to do and then doing it, and then the fallout for me is often when i get home.
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so i end up really drained, really tired, and that's when i tend to get more upset. you've spoken a lot today about sort ofjo's legacy, but there's also your life — you, kim, and what's next for you. i don't know what i'll do, i don't what i'll do. but i think, you know, the platform that we've been given, for the worst possible reasons, my instinct is to try and create something positive out of that by using it in a good way, but i've no idea what shape that takes. very moving. we'll be talking tojo cox's husband, brendan, later in the programme. and kim, jo's sister. these messages from you. scott says, "this is a heartbreaking interview with jo cox's parents." kirsty says, "i'm crying overjo cox's incredible pa rents. " crying overjo cox's incredible parents." kevin cook tweets to say,
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"ivm parents." kevin cook tweets to say, "i'm 52 years of age today and i've done a run in memory ofjo cox and sponsored an afc croydon football game in her memory " on our manifesto or code of conduct, whatever you'd like to call the rules that voters came up for politicians as they return to the house of commons today after the general election, mel says, "integrity, honesty, humility. your panel is spot on today. this is what we wa nt panel is spot on today. this is what we want from our politicians." the singer katy perry has apologised for "appropriating black and asian culture" in her past music videos. in a recent interview, the singer admitted that she is guilty of cultural appropriation and benefits from what she calls white privilege. she's been speaking to promote her latest album, witness . i've made several mistakes and having a hard conversation with one of my empowered angels about what does it mean? can can't i wear my
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hair that way? what is the history behind wearing the hair that way? and she told me about the power in plaque women's hair and how beautiful it is and the struggle. and i listened and i heard and i didn't know and i will never understand some of those things because of who i am. i will never understand. bbc radio1 newsbeat‘s music reporter stve holden is here with me. just fill us in a little bit more about what she has been criticised for and why about what she has been criticised forand why in about what she has been criticised for and why in the past? katie perry isa for and why in the past? katie perry is a loud pop star. she is full of colour and costumes and that's what has got her into trouble in the past. two specific occasions. a couple of years ago she sang a song called unconditionally and she was accused of racism. secondly, she did accused of racism. secondly, she did a music video called this is how we do. she was wearing corn rows and
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eating watermelon and criticised for appropriating black culture and both times she was criticised and she never really apologised and just said, "i didn't know what i was doing. i'm just a said, "i didn't know what i was doing. i'mjusta pop said, "i didn't know what i was doing. i'm just a pop star. said, "i didn't know what i was doing. i'mjusta pop star. i i'm just loud." that's how she dealt with any criticism ? just loud." that's how she dealt with any criticism? so the last four days she spent her time in an apartment in america to promote this new album and she has been addressing lots of issues that she has been crit sided for in the past. this cultural appropriation issue is one specifically because in the past she said, "i didn't know i was doing anything wrong. it was up to my friends to tell me this is why you shouldn't be wearing corn rows because you're using black culture for your own gain." there are other issues that she has been dealing with. the feud with taylor swift which is the stuff of entertainment journalists, we love it. sum it up
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ina line. journalists, we love it. sum it up in a line. tell us why they have been feuding. taylor swift, katie perry took a couple of taylor swift dancers. took them? from a tour. they were on tour and katie perry took them in the middle of taylor swift's tourment it is probably what teenage girls fight about and since then they have not spoken o an friday katie perry released her new album and taylor swift had taken all of her music off spotify and decided taylor swift that friday was the best day to put her music on spotify thereby taking the wind out of katie perry's sails and katie perry tried to bury the hatchet with taylor swift and said we are both strong women in the music industry and she isa women in the music industry and she is a great songwriter, it feels clinical and cold. a bit like
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promoting your new album? well, exactly. she spent four days talking about something that's getting her headlines. it is nice to her address it. because in the past she almost stuck her head in the sand with it and finally she hit it head—on. thank you very much, steve. steve, holden. now the weather. here is simon. we have got sunshine. if you're living in the eastern and southern areas, you have got blue skies. that was the scene in norfolk. for many of us, it is grey skies and a dreary start to the day in shropshire. more rain towards northern ireland and into scotland. the best of the sunshine is across eastern and southern parts of england and that's where temperatures will get up to 22 or 23 celsius, but even further north, 17 celsius to 19 celsius. a bit more rain will come into
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northern ireland and scotland overnight, but elsewhere, it will be dry. there could be one or two patches of fog developing in the far southment but for wednesday, it's going to get warmer for most of us. there will be some rain across northern ireland into scotland as well. but for most of us, hazy sunshine, maximum temperatures 27 celsius perhaps in the south east. even in the far north and west despite the cloudier skies and rain, still here temperatures rather pleasa nt still here temperatures rather pleasant at 17 or 18 celsius. hello, it's tuesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. our top story — will they reach a deal? theresa may meets the northern irish dup leader today, as they try and broker a deal to help the prime minister to stay on in number ten. we will take a look at their anti—abortion stance and speak to those affected by the current legislation. and with parliament reconvening this afternoon, we've been hearing from members of the public what they want from their mps. there is not enough leadership from
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politicians. i have to feel confident you are representing me. you have got to watch what you say, because we pay your wages. this is the code of conduct that you have drawn up, integrity, honesty, empathy, clarity and directness, humility passion! we will be asking all mps to sign up to it. also on the programme, almost a year since labour mp jo cox was murdered her family speak about the hole that she's left, and the community reaction to what happened. that was the classic line, i never met your sister, but i had to do something. my mum and dad, they have met people, they just something. my mum and dad, they have met people, theyjust end up crying, grown men absolutely devastated, and you end up comforting them. maybe
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that has attracted from my personal grief, which will come eventually. that is jo's grief, which will come eventually. that isjo's sister kim, we will talk to her and jo's husband before 11. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may will meet with the dup leader, arlene foster, today to thrash out a deal that would see the party prop up a minority conservative government. with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has said britain must not waste time. he's also urged the government to appoint a negotiating team that is stable, accountable and with a mandate. the new environment secretary, michael gove, said he wasn't worried about the timetable. we have to make sure we have the right team in place, a queen's speech that outlines our sense of direction, and whether a day here
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there, that doesn't matter to me. what matters is making sure we have the right approach, and the prime minister has outlined the right approach. we need to make sure that we arrive at these talks in very good order, and one of the ways we can do so is by having the maximum amount of support for the strategy theresa may has outlined, which is the right approach. inflation unexpectedly jumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may. consumer prices increased by 2.9% compared with a year earlier. it's the biggest increase since june 2013, according to the office for national statistics. it said one of the main reasons for the rise was the cost of foreign package holidays for british tourists. in germany, a policewoman has been seriously wounded after shots were fired at a railway station near munich. it's understood she was injured when a man grabbed her gun. two bystanders were also hurt. police say the man has now been arrested, and that it was not a terrorist incident. a group representing abuse survivors has told this programme that it is quitting
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the government's independent inquiry into child sexual abuse. the whiteflowers campaign has said it blames theresa may, who set up the inquiry when she was home secretary, for failing to deliverjustice. the group, which represents more than a hundred survivors, said it had lost faith in the inquiry and accused it of not being truly independent. brother and sister have been arrested after a man in his 40s was shot dead at a property in slough. they are being held on suspicion of murder. they are said to have lived ina caravan murder. they are said to have lived in a caravan in woodland near slough for more than 50 years. the parents of the murdered mp jo cox have told this programme that they "will always be broken" after their daughter's death. friday will mark a year since the labour mp was killed outside her constituency surgery in west yorkshire. this weekend, her family is encouraging people to join with friends and neighbours for the great get together, a series of community events
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being held injo's memory. and we'll be talking tojo's husband brendan and sister kim ataround 10:30. this tweet from catherine, incredibly moving film with the family ofjo cox. chuck tweets you can see where jo family ofjo cox. chuck tweets you can see wherejo cox got her decency, humanity and integrity from, what an amazing family. this e—mailfrom bill, from, what an amazing family. this e—mail from bill, how from, what an amazing family. this e—mailfrom bill, how brave of from, what an amazing family. this e—mail from bill, how brave of the family to speak, it has brought me to tears, and my beloved wife passed away 16 years ago, you never forget. and this tweet from toby, a truly moving feature onjo cox, i think it should permanently be posted on iplayer. she gave her life to our democracy. do get in touch with us throughout the morning, use #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. right, let's bring you the latest sport with katherine. some live sport to start this hour.
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the british and irish lions are playing their fourth match on their tour of new zealand. they're playing the highlanders in dunedin, and it's been an entertaining game. highlanders scored first waisake noholo crashing over, injuring courtney lawes in the process. butjust a few minutes later, the lions answered with a try of their own, jonathan joseph spotting the gap to go through. and in the second half, tommy seymour ran it all the way in after this interception. sam warburton has scored his first of the tour, and there has been another for highlanders, tries galore in dunedin, it is 20—22, lionsjust galore in dunedin, it is 20—22, lions just leading, galore in dunedin, it is 20—22, lionsjust leading, 20 minutes left to go there. a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. confidential documents obtained by the bbc show athletes said their concerns were "of the highest order, mentioning bullying, racism, sexism and discrimination." the following month, however, they were told no disciplinary action would be taken. england's footballers play france in a friendly in paris tonight. joe hart will be rested, with tom heaton and jack butland
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sharing goal—keeping duties. french fans have been asked to join in with god save the queen as a mark of respect following the terror attacks. prime minister theresa may and president emmanuel macron will also attend. i was at the match at wembley and, you know, a very special occasion, and we are very grateful to the french for offering this tribute to england as a country, so it is nice that the history between us doesn't come between us at those moments. and england's world cup winners, the under—205 team, arrived back in britain late last night. they flew into birmingham from south korea, where they lifted their country's first trophy at a world tournament since 1966. england, as a nation of footballers, young players, is changing, so i think, like you say, it is a big
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thing to have won the tournament, and it shows we are pushing on and chasing to get to the top. for me personally, to save a penalty in a world cup final, it is what you dream about as a kid. but for the team, and for what we have achieved, for the country, it is amazing.” hope that these players, they take this experience and really go on and benefit themselves and benefit our senior team in years to come, and fingers crossed that will be the case. britain's six—time paralympic champion david weir will compete in a track event for the final time in next month's anniversary games in london. he will continue road—racing. he won the london marathon for the seventh time in april. injanuary, weir, who won four gold medals at london 2012 and two at beijing 2008, said he would never compete for britain again after an unsuccessful games in rio. and you will be able to hear our interview with david weir on the bbc news channel throughout the day, but
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thatis news channel throughout the day, but that is all the sport for now. back to you, victoria. good morning! "i got us into this mess and i'll get us out of it." theresa may's words to her own mps yesterday, reportedly showing some of the humility they'd wanted from her. journalists weren't invited to the meeting. it took place behind closed doors. but several mps have reported the following as taking place. the prime minister told her tory mps she'll remain leader for as long as they wanted her to. she pledged that the party would help colleagues who lost their seats, some of whom are in financial difficulties, and when talking about concerns that government policy could be affected by the dup's views on gay rights, she reportedly said, "lgb...what‘s the rest of it?" in relation to the acronym lgbt — lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. the dup is the northern irish party the pm needs to to a deal with to stay on in government. let's talk now to two mps who were at the meeting, oliver letwin, who's the conservative mp for west dorset, geoffrey clifton—brown, the
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conservative mp for the cotswolds, and an executive member of the 1922 committee, which is the group of conservative mps theresa may may with yesterday, and in a moment, we'll speak to lord andrew turnbull, who was a top civil servant under three different prime ministers and is now a cross—bench peer. welcome, all of you, thank you very much for talking to us. oliver letwin, how many times did theresa may apologise to you for throwing away the conservative majority in that election? not many! how many? once, twice? i genuinely have no idea! the meeting was not about that. the meeting was about a pretty unanimous view across the whole room of support for what she was doing, and for the need to carry on, and i thought what was really remarkable was the degree of unanimity. how many times did she apologise?”
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don't think... i can't honestly remember, but as oliver said, that is not really the issue. but did she apologise? i am just interested. is not really the issue. but did she apologise? i amjust interested. she apologise? i amjust interested. she apologise to colleagues who lost their seats, she was humble about that. but as oliver says, there was a remarkable degree of unanimity around the room, as do supporting her. sure. issue going to apologise to voters for calling an election that she did not need to that has cost £130 million? well, she felt that she needed her own mandate to negotiate these brexit talks. that was a view at the time. with hindsight, she might have taken a different view. but we are where we are, and we have to go on governing the country with the parliamentary arithmetic that we have. oliver letwin, your conservative colleague heidi elin said she saw a very humble woman in mrs may. do you think the rest of the country is going to see her humble side at some
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point? i would not describe her as humble, as you said, she apologised, she let us in on the feelings that she let us in on the feelings that she had about what had happened, but i don't think it is a question of humble or otherwise. i think it is a question of her ability at a time when our country faces significant challenges to manage the economy soundly and come of all of this in a good condition. that is what matters to our fellow citizens, not the political bits and bobs, what happens to the country. i think what cheapis happens to the country. i think what cheap is weighed and all of us of is that she is capable of doing that, and that is where we need to be. —— i think what she persuaded all of us of. so she has two years to see through the negotiations, then she hands over to whoever head of the next general election? it depends on a numberof next general election? it depends on a number of factors, how the
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relationship with the dup works out, andl relationship with the dup works out, and i think it depends on the conservative party itself. if the conservative party itself. if the conservative party itself starts going to war with one another, then the period will be shorter rather than longer. but what you can say is that she's not going to fight the next general election as leader of the conservative party? well, we don't know that yet. i think it is far too soon to say that. you think she could? far too soon to say that. you think she could ? with far too soon to say that. you think she could? with that majority? she could, it depends how the thing works out. if the brexit negotiation we nt works out. if the brexit negotiation went incredibly well and she was crowned as having done an incredibly good deal, i think you might find that the holes and tuition would change. i entirely agree about that, victoria, you will recognise the slogan that a week is a long time in politics. two years, 104 weeks, is a very long time in politics, and none of us have the slightest idea what will happen. the important thing is to focus on those years, getting to
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a successful conclusion on brexit, and then the whole nation will be in and then the whole nation will be in a different position. do you agree with your colleague that she could be in charge for less than two yea rs, be in charge for less than two years, depending on what happens? prime ministers are in charge on the basis of delivering for the country, iam basis of delivering for the country, i am confident she will deliver, and i'm confident she will be in charge throughout that period, and i think it is altogether likely she will fight the next election as well. but we ta ke fight the next election as well. but we take that step—by—step, we have to lock in the dup, deliver on brexit and the economy, regain the confidence of electors, many of whom voted for us, many of whom did not, and that is what politics is about. lord turnbull, formerly a top civil servant and three prime ministers, you have called for theresa may to stand aside — that would not help britain's brexit negotiations. well, i don't think this coalition can la st i don't think this coalition can last five years. you haven't even
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given it a day! i did not say how soon, there is a difference between when she goes and makes it clear that she is going to go, the ed miliband time table — i think we will find that this coalition needs to be settled in, get past the queen's speech to demonstrate that it can win votes, and then people will look at what it can achieve. its problem is that it will be, apart from the brexit negotiators, a near do nothing parliament. it has no strength to take any of the measures that it wants to take, and that will be incredibly frustrating. i don't think she can be the person who fights the next election. the precedents, we have had three elections which were inconclusive, 1951, 1964 and 1974, and then another election shortly thereafter. in each case, the election thereafter was won by the side that had the momentum.
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although labour didn't get more seats they definitely had the momentum. so that's the danger. do the conservatives want to fight that election with someone who was a very poor cam pamerand election with someone who was a very poor cam pamer and handled election with someone who was a very poor cam pamerand handled it election with someone who was a very poor cam pamer and handled it so badly or do they want someone new? if they want someone new they have got to get that person in, in time for them to settle in, establish some record and when you start working you find this change needs to be made before two years. there is another precedent here which is in 2010 when as you know i was arbli involved in negotiating an agreement with the liberal democrats, but lots of other people told me and people reported in the press that this couldn't possibly last. it lasted the whole course of the parliament. that government achieved a great deal and david cameron went on to
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wina deal and david cameron went on to win a general election with an outright majority thereafter. so there are conflicting precedents here and actually, i don't think that the conservative party or those who are commenting on these matters should be focussing on the question of election victory or otherwise in 2022. this nation faces an obsolutely critical juncture 2022. this nation faces an obsolutely criticaljuncture in its whole history and who we should be focussing on is getting through that and doing the next two years successfully for all of us and that, i think, that came out of the meeting of the 1922 the conservative party in parliament, wherever else, is focussed on delivering a good brexit outcome and a sound economy as the background to that in the nation's interests and that's what we should be doing. what you're papering over oliver is the massive division in view within the conservative party. this is where the biggest fault line of politics is. do they want a hard brexit which
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prioritises control over the movement of people or do they want a brexit which prioritises trade? until you've settled that, i don't see until you've settled that, i don't see how you can get to a successful budget negotiation. whilst you're here briefly, voters have been drawing up on our programme today a code of conduct for mps as mps go back to westminster after the election. the voters have suggested these five points on how they'd like mps to behave. number one, integrity, number two, empathy, number three, clarity and directness and four humility, number five passion. is there any you would disagree. you raised your eyebrows at passion, jeffrey clifton—brown?‘ politician always has got to have passion and the two really important things is next week we start the complicated brexit negotiations. the most important event of this country since the second world war and the conservative party will unite around theresa may because the alternative ofjeremy corbyn is much worse to
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every conservative member of parliament and that's why they'll unite. thank you all. thank you very much. thank you for coming on the programme. joims brokenshire says he's confident a deal between the conservatives and the dup will be reached today. he has been speaking to the bbc in the past half an hour. i'm sure that will be a matter of discussion for them and i'm sure we will have more details during the course of the day, but the thing to stress is that the work that i do as secretary of state for northern ireland is separate. that we are very clear on the work that i was doing yesterday afternoon and evening around the devolution settle m e nts evening around the devolution settlements and ensuring that we get devolved government back and that is something that as a government we hold fast to on ensuring that our duties to serve northern ireland well, to adhere to our
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responsibilities under the belfast agreement, absolutely is at the core of what we are as a government, and will certainly guide our actions into the future. inaudible well,ual‘ confident. i think the discussions thus far have been positive, but the leader of the dup is seeing the prime minister later today for further discussions around the agreement. we want to see conclusions so that we can get on with acting in the best interests of our country and actually getting on with thejob. james brokenshire. still to come: the sister and husband ofjo cox will be joining us to reflect on her life and legacy almost a year after she was murdered. as they try and continue her legacy. theresa may has failed to protect survivors of historical child sex abuse, that's according to another group which this morning is exclusively announcing on this programme that it's quitting the government's independent inquiry.
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the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse in england and wales was set—up by theresa may during her time as home secretary. it aimed to investigate claims of sexual abuse against local authorities, religious organisations, the armed forces and public and private institutions and to "expose failures and learn the lessons" from the past. but it has been dogged by controversy with many key victims groups quitting saying they've lost faith in it and accusing the inquiry of not being truly independent. now, another group which represents more than 100 survivors, has told this programme that they share the same concerns. let's talk now to phil frampton from the survivors of organised and institutional abuse, part of the white flowers campaign. they have withdrawn from the inquiry. thank you for talking to us. good morning, victoria. tell us why you're withdrawing? for three yea rs, why you're withdrawing? for three years, white why you're withdrawing? for three yea rs, white flowers why you're withdrawing? for three years, white flowers and thousands
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of survivors have fought for justice on this inquiry and we just don't believe anymore that it's aim is to deliver justice. it's believe anymore that it's aim is to deliverjustice. it's aim is to be investigative, it looks more like a report writing exercise now, but when it was set—up, we stood by this inquiry for three years. we've been critical, but we pointed out at the beginning that it was riddled with conflicts of interest and when you've got conflicts of interest and you're looking at one of the darkest episodes in british history then, people with conflicts of interest will never shine the torch into the dark corners because they're too frightened that they will find themselves or their friends there and that's really what we found. first of all, the home office were put in charge. prior to 1970, the home office had responsibility for all of london's children's homes plus the hundreds of children's homes, approved schools and so forth across the country and yet initially
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they were actually kept out of the abuse before 1970, was kept out. the home office is also responsible for the police. it's one of the failing institutions in relation to child abuse so far as many survivors are concerned yet they are at the heart of the inquiry. their secondments are running the inquiry now. it beggars belief and at the same time, they have put as the shirley oaks survivors pointed out, they put an executive social worker in charge of the inquiry, they may have good interests, but also conflicts of interests, but also conflicts of interests there in the sense that they are the people who again, many of those social workers, who survivors believe failed them. so you simply don't trust it hence your withdrawal but then how do you find out, how do you get to the bottom of alleged historical abuse in all these institutions? this inquiry is
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not to get to the bottom of that alleged abuse. that's the issue. we don't feel it's, that its job. it's almost like a paper exercise now, studying reports. so what do you wa nt studying reports. so what do you want then? well, what we want is a truly investigative inquiry. what we needed was a truly investigative inquiry. so are you saying scrap this and start again? no, it can be, it's up to the inquiry to decide, but there are other ways of doing it rather than using this inquiry. this inquiry, many survivors still have some hope in and i, you know, ifeel for them really, but it's a question of the inquiry could change itself overnight, if theresa may wanted, but sadly, i think theresa may's shown she is more interested in her own personal appearance than she is in how in substance, in real substance. theresa may said this inquiry would have, that survivors would be at the heart of this inquiry and the truth is survivors
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are on the very margins of this inquiry. our representatives went to a seminar, an official seminar of the inquiry and we're told to sit at the inquiry and we're told to sit at the back and to keep quiet and handed post—it notes and told if we wa nt to handed post—it notes and told if we want to ask a question then we should write them on there and let professorjay answer if she has got time. how is that survivors being at the heart of an inquiry? we obviously asked the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse inquiry for an interview. they said no, but in a statement told us, "whilst we regret the decision by survivors of organised institutional abuse to withdraw from the inquiry, we acknowledge their decision and would like to reassure all victims and survivors that the important work of the inquiry including the accountability and reparations investigation that soia were part of, continues. the inquiry would welcome them back should they decide they wish to engage with us again." cani can ijust can i just say a lot of survivors,
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thousands of survivors have put huge emotional capital into this inquiry over the last three years. the core participants may have to wait three orfour participants may have to wait three or four years participants may have to wait three orfour years time. not being able to move on unless they can get support from the inquiry, but the inquiry has said this they will not give that support until those cases go to, are considered and therefore, it could be four years more. survivors are dropping out of the inquiry at the moment because they can't afford to leave their lives and their emotions on hold. that, for me, is callous and cruel. it's callous, cruel and incompetent if you're running a serious inquiry over such psychological issues. ok, thank you very much, phil. thank you, phil frampton from the survivors of organised and institutional abuse. still to come: the sister
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and husband ofjo cox will be joining us to reflect on her life and legacy almost a year after she was killed. with the news, here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom. theresa may is meeting with the dup leader, arlene foster, today to thrash out a deal that would see the party prop up a minority conservative government. with brexit talks due to begin in less than a week, the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has said britain must not waste time. he's also urged the government to appoint a negotiating team that is stable, accountable and with a mandate. inflation unexpectedly jumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may. consumer prices increased by 2.9% compared with a year earlier, it is the biggest increase since june 2013,according to the office for national statistics. it said one of the main reasons
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for the rise was the cost of foreign package holidays for british tourists. the european court of human rights will rule on whether doctors treating charlie gard can turn off his life support. last week the uk's supreme court agreed with specialist doctors that he should receive palliative care instead. a woman has been charged with murder, after a man was hit by a tram in manchester. emergency crews were called to victoria station on sunday evening, but were unable to save him. charrissa loren brown—wellington, who is 31, will appear before magistrates‘ later. that's a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. here is the sport with catherine. highlanders have snatched a win over the british and irish lions in the last few minutes. the lions gave away a penalty with just six minutes left on the clock and that was enough to put the south island side just one point ahead, a lead they held onto
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until the final whistle. a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints of a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. england's footballers play france in a friendly in paris tonight. french fans are expected to join in with god save the queen as a mark of respect following the terror attacks. prime minister theresa may and president emmanuel macron will also attend. britain's six—time paralympic champion david weir will compete in a track event for the final time in next month's anniversary games in london. he will continue road—racing. he won the london marathon for the seventh time in april. that's all the sport. back to you victoria. thank you very much. friday marks the first anniversary of the death of labour mpjo cox, who was killed in birstall, outside her constituency surgery. her senseless killing sent shockwaves around the world but united the country in grief. a year on, and herfamily are determined to continue her legacy.
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this weekend, on the first anniversary of her death, they're encouraging people to join together with neighbours, friends and their local community at events in her memory. in a moment, we'll speak tojo's husband brendan and hersister, kim leadbeater, but first let's hearjo's parents remembering the moment they learnt she'd died. we'd just sat down about five minutes, and then the phone rang. and it was dan, one ofjo's aides. and hejust said, jo's been shot, i think. and... that was it. i said, "where is she?" and wejumped in the car, i remember i wasjumping in the car, and we couldn't get near. and we set off running. and i don't know... i don't know how we managed to get there. into the middle of birstall. and the police were there. they stopped us.
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somebody says, "jo's been shot"... well, that's bad, to be shot. people are shot and recover, et cetera, et cetera. so we didn't know at that time. i think we knew. i think i did. i didn't know. but you see these things on the television where the doctor, in this case it was a police inspector, comes into the room and he has to tell you. and we know. in fact, he doesn't have to tell you. you can see by his expression. and he said, "i'm sorry to say she didn't make it." we will always be broken, because there's a piece missing. the low times for us are when we turn the television on and see terrorist acts — westminster bridge, manchester — because that's when it brings everything back. for me, the ambulances, the sirens, i'm back there again in birstall. but we also think about the people
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who have lost loved ones, and we know what they are actuallyjust going through. it must be awful for them. we know what we went through. and unfortunately they don't, as yet. going forward, build on the children, the grandchildren. and supporting one another. we'll continue to do that. because you're right, it won't go away. after one year, it gets better. it doesn't, it won't go away. but we have to be positive. # looking back, i could have played differently... # more than one person
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came up to me after the funeral, and after kim talked in birstall marketplace, and said, "you've got not one but two marvellous daughters." "one we saw, jo, on occasions, on the television et cetera, making speeches. " "but clearly you've got two". and, you know, we're very proud, because i can't separate the two and never would. talking to us now are kim ledbeater and brendan cox, jo's husband. kim, jo's sister. hello. hi. how are you? i found it very hard to watch that film. kim, how are you? ok, i
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think we are tired, extremely busy, but we at to demand that we will get through the next couple of weeks, as jo would want us two. not to say it will not be very difficult at times, but we will get there. you talk in the book, brendan, you talk about the book, brendan, you talk about thejo the book, brendan, you talk about the jo that you knew. the book, brendan, you talk about thejo that you knew. i want you both to tell our audience what she was like, because they will not know that much about. yeah, you can see it in some of that footage, huge energy and enthusiasm, zest for life. she threw herself everything from campaigning to being a mum, to being part of our community, and she just, yeah, as well as that energy, she had an empathy, i know it is on the board! but i talked about it before, and just that sends of ability to feel how people are feeling and empathise with people,
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whether you were an older person who hadn't seen anybody for a week, who lived in her constituency, or a family from syria fleeing the conflict there, that supreme ability to empathise and that energy which, for me, which summarises her. jo was an extremely positive person, she had values that, you know, we can probably all learn from, but if you see my parents speaking, we are glad to have full people. we are not going to be beaten, we always trying to find the positive and good in things. jo saw the good in everything and everyone, and you will struggle to find anyone who did not like it. you might disagree and debate, fine, but i don't think i've ever met anybody who didn't like. and she was also very annoying! she was not perfect! everyone is a bit annoying at some point. she was late for everything, forget everybody's birthdays! unbelievably forgetful.
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whenjo andl birthdays! unbelievably forgetful. whenjo and i were getting engaged, one of the stories i tell in the book, we went on a cycling holiday, and she forgot her bike. a cycling holiday, how do you forget your bike?! so incredibly annoying, but looking back now, those things are, you know, what made her her. she wasn't a saint, she wasn't perfect, but she was somebody, as we have said, that had this positivity, empathy, a zest for life. even when she was forgetting her bike, that shone through. let me read you a couple of messages, so many of these, these are representative of all of them. kim says, my heartfelt love to brendan, kim and alljo's family, such a heartbreaking loss, what a beautiful legacy family, such a heartbreaking loss, what a beautiful legacho left, her passing is not in vain, i have ordered your book, big love to you all. sophia says, jo cox was an
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inspiration in life and in death, thank you, jo, despite the dark, horrid early days, your mission lives on, thank you for giving us hope. i don't know if you take comfort in kind words from strangers, do you? absolutely, it is one of the things that has got us through. for me and mum and dad, the support that has been shown, not just from people we know, but total strangers across the country and across the world, because even if you didn't knowjo, you could see what she stood for, so you might not miss ona what she stood for, so you might not miss on a personal level in the way we do, but you will see what a loss it is, someone who had those values, so it is, someone who had those values, so that support has been, yeah, phenomenal. and for often when you go through a loss, you feel very isolated, because everyone else's lives take on as normal. and with
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this, they could see that other people were feeling the pain that they were feeling, not the same size or scale intensity, but i remember, on the way to the funeral, in the car, cuillin turned to me, thousands of people and, throwing flowers, and cuillin said i know that people love money, but i didn't know this many people did. —— loved mummy. so that compassion, and it is more important, because you can imagine, if this happens at such a formative stage of your life, your view of life and our country could end up being very dark, but they don't have that at all, because of that compassion and kindness, they are only inform six, but they have a very optimistic and enthusiastic view of life. that is testament to you, isn't it? brendan has been
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amazing, his priority has been the children since then, the way that they are coping, notjust coping, thriving, that is down to how he has done hisjob. thriving, that is down to how he has done his job. notjust me, jo and i often talked about how the first three years were critical for kids in terms of the way their brains develop, the way they get their sense of cells, so they have a hell ofa sense of cells, so they have a hell of a lot ofjo in them, and the thing that has got me through is the family, incredibly close family, both onjo's side and the mine, and then the community. and that is, for us, such a big part ofjo's politics, she wasn't an ideological politician who got her politics from textbooks. she got her politics particularly from her home life in batley, from her grandad, who was a postman in batley, and the sense that she got from him of how important it was to know your neighbours, and how much she valued that. so that became a big part of
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her life and her politics, but now, this morning, i had to get up early to do an interview, and very kindly the neighbours through the tips... they put them on the boat! they are as happy as larry, and that is hugely valuable. you both mentioned community, but there is the global community, but there is the global community, you have had contact from people all over the world, including president obama. yeah! and gordon brown, who she used to work for, saying, is it all right if president obama gives you a call? i was speaking to gordon, and he said, yeah,is speaking to gordon, and he said, yeah, is it ok if he gets in touch, andi yeah, is it ok if he gets in touch, and i thought he might send a card or something, which i thought was incredible. and my phone rang and it was the weirdest, like out of a bad american film, when they say, can we transfer you to air force one?
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really? i thought it was maybe taking the make. but it would have beena taking the make. but it would have been a strange time to do it. he invited us to go over and see him, which was an incredible experience, and amazing for the kids, even though they were then three and five. they got a hell of a lot from it, and cuillin is obsessed with history, i'd tell you about the second world war, which i don't know and have about! i had been telling him about the history of america, what little i know about it, and the first thing he said when he got into the room was, i thought the british burned the white house down, the most embarrassing thing you could possibly say! the president said it was much better now that they had rebuilt it. so he was thankful! tim, you can't bring jo back, what can you can't bring jo back, what can you do? i think, for me, accepting that we cannot change what has happened. whilst it is buried, that
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is the only way to move forward so three things i want to do. that whilst it is very difficult. i want to scoop the kids up in love, make sure they know how amazing the mum was, how much she loved them, that is the top priority. second thing is, remember how lucky we were to havejo, is, remember how lucky we were to have jo, and is, remember how lucky we were to havejo, and i was so lucky, we were friends first and foremost, and we will always have those memories. the third thing is to create some kind of legacy, which brendan is doing amazingly, and i would like to be pa rt amazingly, and i would like to be part of that. i don't now how that would work in the future, but what resonates with me is thatjo should have been alive for at least another 40 yea rs, have been alive for at least another 40 years, and the work she would have done in that 40 years, what you would have achieved to do things, andi would have achieved to do things, and i feel would have achieved to do things, and ifeel a would have achieved to do things, and i feel a bit would have achieved to do things, and ifeel a bit of would have achieved to do things, and i feel a bit of a would have achieved to do things, and ifeel a bit of a moral duty would have achieved to do things, and i feel a bit of a moral duty to do something positive and help
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people, likejo would have done. thank you both very much, thank you for talking to us. the book is out today, it is called jo cox: more in common. all the profits are going to the foundation which is taking forward her work. this weekend is the great get together, which we have been putting together for what feels like a long time now excited isa simple feels like a long time now excited is a simple idea, asking people to get together with their neighbours, share food, celebrate all the things we share food, celebrate all the things we have in common. jo talked about that a lot, the killing was designed to divide us, and we think the best possible response is a weekend to bring the country back together again, which we do need. and you have got your address at the ready! get together and have a good weekend. thank you both, thank you. a court ruling is due this month in northern ireland over the strict abortion laws there. campaigners say the result has been made all the more significant by the likely conservative—dup deal. unlike the rest of the uk, abortion is illegal in almost all circumstances in northern ireland.
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campaigners hope the ruling will be a step towards changing the law so women can have abortions in cases of rape, incest or fatal foetal abnormality. catrin nye reports from belfast. hi. i'm sarah. nice to meet you. come on in. thank you. this is my mum,jane. come on in. thank you. this is my mum, jane. hi jane. nice come on in. thank you. this is my mum,jane. hijane. nice to come on in. thank you. this is my mum, jane. hijane. nice to meet you. it was just a few weeks after sarah yeates‘ wedding that she found out she was pregnant. it was all planned and she was delighted. everyone talked about the 3d scan and we wanted to see the baby in 3d. it was private. it wasn't at our hospital. they put the baby on the
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scroon. feet, legs, oh you're having a wee girl the when she got to the ba by‘s a wee girl the when she got to the baby's head, a wee girl the when she got to the ba by‘s head, there a wee girl the when she got to the baby's head, there was nothing from above the ba by‘s baby's head, there was nothing from above the baby's eyes basically. there was no skull or brain formation. sarah's baby had a condition which occurs in six in every 10,000 births. there is no treatment. and babies with it die before they're born or shortly after birth. this is your scan that you got? yes, the skull wasn't formed. there was nothing above that. it should be round and it's not. so the baby wasn't going to be able to survive as soon baby wasn't going to be able to survive as soon as baby wasn't going to be able to survive as soon as the baby was cut from me, when the umbilical cord was cut that's when the baby would have passed away. when i realised what, the baby wasn't going to survive and how bad the condition was, i thought that i couldn't continue on for nine months and people asking me when you
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we re months and people asking me when you were due, was your nursery set—up? did you know what you were having? i just did not have the baby at the end of it, ijust felt like i couldn't go through with that. we said we wanted a medical termination and that's what it is. and they said sorry, we can't help you and we were absolutely shocked. we were like, what do you mean you can't help? they said, sorry, but with the law here, we can't help you. you would have to go across the water. unlike the rest of the uk, abortion is illegal here in northern ireland in almost all circumstances. that meant that at 21 weeks pregnant sarah had to travel to london to have her abortion. it is that experience that means she is involved in this court case. halfs the experience like? making that journey, going case. halfs the experience like? making thatjourney, going all that way? awful. i should have been at home with my family round me, my friends supporting me. sarah started
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herfight in friends supporting me. sarah started her fight in court with the judicial review two years ago. in 2015, the northern ireland human rights commission brought the case to extend the grounds for abortion. the judge in the case ruled that women, who were victims of rape or incest, and in cases of foetal abnormality should be allowed abortions, but the ruling was appealed and campaigners are awaiting for a decision from the appeal court. sarah is being backed by amnesty international. well nrm's laws date back to 1861 and unlike in the rest of the uk the 1967 act doesn't apply in northern ireland. so it means that with the exception of where a woman's life and her long—term physical and mental health are at risk, abortion is illegal in every other circumstance. so, our laws force women who have been ramd, they force girls who are victims of
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incest to travel to access abortion services. amnesty say the likely conservative dup deal makes this case even more important. they say that northern ireland's politicians, particularly the dup, have failed to deliver abortion reform and that's why they have to take the fight to court. what's the result you're looking for from this court case? with this case specifically we want the court to find that our laws, not only breach a woman's right to privacy, but our laws aamount to cruel and degrading treatment and are discriminatory against women in this part of the uk because if sarah and women in those circumstances lived in another part of the uk, they would have been able to access abortion lawfully, but here, our law treats women like sarah as a criminal. we shouldn't have been in that situation. we should have been at home with our medicals and in our hospital. nobody knows when this is going to happen. it could happen
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again. i have a sister and female cousins, girls, women, constantly contacting us... abortion is such a sensitive issue here and there are many opponents to amnesty to sarah. those who don't want to see any extension to the circumstances in which abortion is legal. and so have involved themselves in this court case. i'm off to see antiabortion group. they're case. i'm off to see antiabortion group. they‘ re called case. i'm off to see antiabortion group. they're called precious life. they are set—up outside the university here. hi, nice to meet you. you too. is this your team? this lucy is the chair of the queen's pro life society. she organises the outreach here every week. you get a really good reception. i believe that every life
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deserves to be protected, you know, both women and children and i don't think you can sort of rank the value ofa human think you can sort of rank the value of a human life based on anything. if someone has a disability or based on the circumstances of conception i think you have to protect everybody. this case in the court is about women who have been raped. or have been subject to incest or where the baby will never live outside of pregnancy or will die as soon as it's born. we would argue as a third party intervener in that particular case that every child should be protected in law, policy and practise and that the law here should not be changed. while a child in the womb, that child alive and kicking. that child is a human being and that child deserves to be protected. so you think even if the mother doesn't want to carry it, she should have to? to murder a child in the womb is always wrong and that's what happens through an abortion. they know you're there, that's
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probably why. so do you have any sympathy with the pro—lifers? they're sympathy with the pro—lifers? they‘ re unbelievably passionate about this and they, through their eyes, that baby, that unborn baby is just the same as you or i?” appreciate that this is an issue that people have strong feelings on, but where i draw the line is when people force that opinion on other women. you know, this is an issue for each individual woman and her doctor. it's no one else's business. it's a private matter. what is it like for you, listening to the stories of the women that come to you? it's enormously difficult. i'm obviously speaking to these women in my amnesty capacity, but as a woman myself i can't imagine what it's like for these women in these circumstances to be told that your pregnancy isn't viable or to be a victim of rape, to be a child who is a victim of incest, and to be told
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by doctors here, we can't help you. imean by doctors here, we can't help you. i mean abortion is not only a healthcare and i mean abortion is not only a healthca re and human i mean abortion is not only a healthcare and human rights issue, but there is an economic dimension, women who have money will be able to circum haven't the law here because they can travelment women who live in poverty, don't in 2015 the bbc polled the northern irish public on this issue. 84% of people asked said abortion should be available in cases of rape. 67% said it should be in cases of abnormality. precious life dispute the findings. 84% of people in northern ireland said in cases of rape... has everybody in northern ireland been asked? no. when you do polls, you don't ask everyone. while we are looking at the results, a member of the public sta rts the results, a member of the public starts ripping up their leaflets. she isjust doing starts ripping up their leaflets. she is just doing that for attention. i think you're spreading these. it's upsetting my son seeing
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these. it's upsetting my son seeing these images. do you think that you have the right to do this to other people walking past? do you think it isa people walking past? do you think it is a woman's right to make this decision and not you and your (bleep) absurd religious ideas? don't you think a woman has the right to choose? well, i think you've answered our question and you're in favour of abortion. (bleep) god bless that wee child. there is plenty of anger directed at the stall, but some also want to hear their arguments. circumstances and it is necessary. in what circumstances? if the girl was raped or sexually abused or what do you call it, incest? is it the child's fault? no, it's not the child's fault... right, ok. it's not the girl's fault either. why should we punish the child? i know what you're saying. i haven't thought about it that way. there you gallon. yeah. do
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you usually have people who are more in favour of your message? well, a variety of different views and view points, but i mean that's basically for your eyes only that set—up there. we don't have the problem at all with. .. there. we don't have the problem at all with... you there. we don't have the problem at all with. .. you have there. we don't have the problem at all with... you have different opinions. it is a very emotional issue, isn't it? it's not really. it's quite black and white. what i'm saying, it's wrong. for a lot of people, it's not wrong, you know? you know that might be their opinion in this day and abling, but they're blind to it and it's important that they are informed and that's what we're here to do. how old is he? two—and—a—half. we're here to do. how old is he? two-and-a-half. sarah now has two children. jacob and ten week old aoife. you've got a good play area here.
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how did what affect your pregnancies with these two? well, i was, well, we we re with these two? well, i was, well, we were so nervous of with these two? well, i was, well, we were so nervous of it happening again. we were told if we had one, we would have a higher chance of having another. have you had any abuse personally? yes. not only attacking me for what i'm trying to do, but they have seen pictures on facebook of my son and then they we re facebook of my son and then they were starting to say about ugly redheads and all this sort of stuff. it's just ridiculous. redheads and all this sort of stuff. it'sjust ridiculous. it's redheads and all this sort of stuff. it's just ridiculous. it's so awful. what do you want to see from this court case? well, politicians failed to help us and women like me so we're hoping that we'll get the help through the court. if they ruled in your favour, would that feel like something of a victory like a step,
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something of a victory like a step, some sort of change? it's bitter sweet. that's the best way of putting it. it would be a relief, but as i say, it would be mixed. very mixed. because... well, as a family, we would have been against termination and abortion because like many people, we're very naive and very ill informed quite frankly and very ill informed quite frankly and we had never ever thought that a termination would have been needed on medical grounds and one thing we've learnt from this journey is we don'tjudge anyone we've learnt from this journey is we don't judge anyone until you we've learnt from this journey is we don'tjudge anyone until you walk in their shoes because you just don't know how you'd react. sarah and her mum want abortion to be legal in cases like her‘s, cases of foetal arnormality. amnesty is looking for com plete arnormality. amnesty is looking for complete discriminalisation. there is any amount of families who there
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have who have been confronted with the reality of our law. it is illegal in almost every circumstance. even if you get a victory in this case, it is likely to be challenged again. it's 2017. our laws date back to 1861. it's unacceptable that our politicians have not grappled with this issue and legislated for change. change is long overdue and it is coming. we will continue to follow developments in the case on this programme. thank you for your help compiling the mps charter. we asked you how you would like them to behave. there is your list. number one, integrity. two, empathy, three clarity and directness, four, humility. five, passion. we're going to send it to
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all the new mps over the coming days and weeks. on the programme tomorrow — snooker legend ronnie o'sullivan. thank you for your company today. have a good day. bye—bye. good morning. we've got some mixed fortunes across the uk at the moment. for many of us, it's rather cloudy, but there is sunshine out there. look at this scene in wiltshire. some lovely blue skies. it's turning warm across the south today, but further north, grey skies. rain ladened clouds across scotland. we will continue to see hours across scotland and northern ireland for the remainder of today. a few showers perhaps in wales and the midlands. but further south, that's where the best of the sunshine and that's where temperatures will get up to 23 celsius. further north, despite the
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cloud and the rain, 17 to 19 celsius. overnight tonight, there could be patchy fog developing in southern areas. more rain to come across scotland and northern ireland. that will continue into wednesday as well. a bit more of a breeze developing throughout the day, but for the most of england and wales, a drier day on wednesday, sunshine, but turning very warm. temperatures 27 celsius in the capital. further north and west though, again despite the cloud and the rain, temperatures getting up into the high teens. bye—bye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may meets the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster
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to try and get backing for her minority government. iam i am confident, the discussions have been positive. the leader of the dup is adding further discussions with the prime minister around to the agreement. we want to get a conclusion so we can act in the best interests of our country and get on with thejob. interests of our country and get on with the job. the dup delegation is due to arrive in downing street later this morning. inflation rises to its highest rate in four years, pushed up by the cost of holidays abroad as the pound has fallen the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to the senate about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election.

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