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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 13, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may meets the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster to try and get backing for her minority government. lam i am confident, the discussions have been positive. the leader of the dup is adding further discussions with the prime minister around to the agreement. we want to get a conclusion so we can act in the best interests of our country and get on with thejob. interests of our country and get on with the job. the dup delegation is due to arrive in downing street later this morning. inflation rises to its highest rate in four years, pushed up by the cost of holidays abroad as the pound has fallen the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to the senate about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. the european court of human rights will rule on whether doctors treating terminally ill ten—month—old baby charlie gard can turn off his life support.
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almost a year on from the murder of jo cox, her parents speak about what they have gone through as a family. there is a piece missing. to the outside world, we appear strong, olive us, but there are days when it is bad. and bees on her bonnet — a 20,000 strong swarm makes its new home on car in hull. good morning, we're live at downing street, arlene foster and other members of
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the dup will be here at downing street a little later for those crucial talks. crucial for theresa may if she is to form a working government with time pressures very much at the forefront of everybody passed my mind. watching the developments, our assistant political editor norman smith. the timescale is very tight. what is the key objectives... . us through how you see it going injust a key objectives... . us through how you see it going in just a few hours. there will be a deal. the idea that arlene foster will turn up that they will emerge scowling at each other and checking first, that is not a runner. the reason arlene foster is coming here is they know they can put a deal together. the groundwork is done. that deal is
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theresa may's political lifeline. without it, she cannot have a majority at parliament, without that, no government. this is crucial to theresa may if she is to remain prime minister. there will be a deal for these reasons. what sort of deal it will be will be different to david cameron and nick clegg. it will not be a formal coalition. in looser arrangement, wherein the dup will agree to support the conservatives on big, major votes. for example, the budget, the queen ‘s speech. iain duncan smith the cabinet minister was saying he thought it would be an effective way to reach an arrangement. the dup it seems appear keen to let the conservative parties govern. as a result theresa may had to have a discussion with them. i think what you will find is it is not about having an affinity, it is about what, on balance, but the things they most want a conservative party to be in government for.
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and it is clear the kind of arrangement expect we will end up with is what we call supply and confidence, on votes of confidence they will support us, like queen's speech they will support us, on the budget they will support us. but they will keep their own counsel on other things, they may not support us on those things. but the key areas where the votes are important, they by and large will support us. but it won't be a coalition. it will be what we call a confidence and supply agreement. there is a political imperative to doa there is a political imperative to do a deal. there has been a lot of talk between the differences between the dup and the tories. also a lot of synergy. both are pro—brexit. both are opposed tojeremy corbyn, diane abbott, john mcdonnell. they might both the happy to see an easing of mac office 30. the dup have long opposed the bedroom tax or
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means testing benefits for the elderly are doing away with the triple lock on pensions. actually in tory circles, too. the reason the debt badly at the general election was because of its territory. they are willing to ditch it. —— because oui’ —— because of austerity. whenjames brokenshire arrived, he was standing positive for these reasons. discussions are still continuing. the prime minister is seeing arlene foster later on, i am sure we will get more news from that. what will they be talking about today? that is for discussion between them. we will hear from them in the course of the day. the thing to stress is the work that i do as secretary of state for northern ireland is separate. we are very clear on the work that i was doing yesterday afternoon and evening around the devolution
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settlement, and ensuring we get devolved government back. something as a government we hold fast to, ensuring we do our duty to serve northern ireland well. to adhere to our responsibilities under the belfast agreement absolutely is at the core of what we are as a government and will guide all our actions in the future. are you hopeful of reaching a deal with them? i am confident. discussions are positive. the leader of the dup is seeing the prime minister later today for further discussions around the agreement. we will want to see a conclusion we we can get on with acting in the best interests of our country and getting on with the job. in terms of what we were actually see today. we are talking about something immediate, something to get theresa may without her majority, the overall majority,
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through the queen's speech? today is the easy part. this is the simple part. it'll also be lubricated by considerable amount of extra cash being given to northern ireland to stop down the line, inevitably difficulties. even with this agreement, theresa may will only have a majority of around six. david cameron, when he had a conservative majority 17, was beaten over personal independence payments, sunday trading, tax credits. if you are relying on six, that is difficult to ensure stable government. the other problem is because may will be doing arrangements on a day a day by day mrs, that involves wheeling and dealing. that is not her strong point. there will be a deal today, smiles, hunky—dory, extra money, but
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down the line there will be trouble ahead, i think. for down the line there will be trouble ahead, ithink. for now, norman smith, thank you. he will be watching all the comings and goings today. in a few minutes, we will be reflecting on brexit itself and those comments coming out of the eu in terms of what might or might not be discussed and how soon it might be discussed and how soon it might be discussed and how soon it might be discussed in terms of brexit negotiations. we will reflect on that. arlene foster due to arrive in the next hour or two mac. as we wait for the arrival, let us get our vote of the... joining me is is our northern ireland political editor mark devenport. today, any doubt in your mind is that to to be an agreement and positive noises? i definitely think there will be an agreement. the dup
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has it very clear they see the notion ofjeremy corbyn being in number ten is bad. they don't have anywhere else to go. whether the full detail will be signed up today later in the week, we will only see as time goes on. they may still be trying to nail down details. this is a confidence and supply arrangement. i see that as being a rolling negotiation. they say they will back the government on no—confidence motions, —— confidence motions. but still, an issue by issue basis and thatis still, an issue by issue basis and that is subject to negotiation as parliament continues. thought about what that might mean for brexit negotiations. what will be a key demand be around that? the dup campaignfor demand be around that? the dup campaign for brexit. some of their mps were some of the most enthusiastic for brexit. the opposition to the eu was political
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rather than economic. they were keen to ta ke rather than economic. they were keen to take back control of the sovereignty in the uk. in terms of practicalities, they are keen for maximum flexibility on the border, maximum flexibility on the border, maximum access to trade. access to skilled and unskilled labourfor businesses. potentially, they are at the soft end of the brexit spectrum. some things said about the dup recently a re some things said about the dup recently are wrong. some people say they are in favour of staying in the customs union, i do not believe they are. they say they want to cut trade deals with countries around the world. certainly flexibility. thank you, mark. in terms of that whole issue of brexit, we note that michael barnier —— michel barnier has been talking today, the chief
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negotiator, warning them not to waste time with all of this. which he said would be "extraordinarily complex". speaking to the financial times, mr barnier said almost three months had passed since the government had triggered the two—year exit process, but there had been no negotiations so far. our europe correspondent gavin lee is in strasbourg. tell us more about michel barnier‘s comments. he is here in strasbourg at the european parliament meeting with neps all over europe. i sense from this interview, and in newspapers, he is chapping at the bits. he wants to get on with it. he says his team are ready, on the starting block. we hear that brexit
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and inspected. we are ready in various languages, they are saying. the point i get with the interview he has given, it is lengthy. he goes into detail. he is asked what are the consequences? a minority government with the dup on board, does it we can strengthen negotiations? from his point of view, he said hejust negotiations? from his point of view, he said he just one somebody who is, to coin a phrase, stable, and ready to communicate, has the authority as a lever to give that authority. he was asked about a heart or a soft brexit. he said that has no meaning for him. he wants to stick to the timetable. he sees no reason for any more delay. he doesn't believe there is a need for an extension and that talks were finished by march 2019. at the moment, he says they will publish a
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number of papers on eu citizens living in the uk. 3 million of them, 1 million british living in europe. and also the idea of the brexit exit bill. how much britain has to pay. he is waiting for some sense from britain. no details, vague, a white paper, a speech by theresa may anti—written letter. but in terms of specific things britain once, they are still waiting. and a tweet in the last few minutes, we are impatiently waiting for the negotiating position of the uk government. the current uncertainty cannot continue. is that the sense you are picking up on a lot in strasbourg? yes. in fact, just before the tweet, i watched that be sent. this is a man, the leader of the
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liberal party alliance here at the european parliament. somebody very outspoken in terms of how he thinks this will affect the debate. he is at the federalist end of the european union. he is the negotiator, parliamentary negotiator on brexit. he will have a say as well and we will hopefully hear from him shortly. people leaving downing street. priti patel, chris grayling. we will keep you updated on the crucial talks with the dup. uk inflationjumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may, tightening the squeeze on consumers. a weak pound and the rising cost of food and imports have been blamed. let's get more from our business
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correspondent ben thompson. inflation — which measures the rising cost of living — continued to rise last month. prices rose more than forecast, at the fastest pace in four years. prices rose by 2.9% on average — measuring the increase in prices for items we regularly to buy. that's the highest since june 2013 and much higher than the 2.7% that was forecast. all that means more pressure on household incomes because we aren't seeing our wages rise by the same amount. and this is what inflation has been doing over the last year: the bank of england governor mark carney has warned that inflation will keep rising this year before falling back slightly from 2018. so what's gone up and what's come down? well, the ons that compiles these figures measures prices for all sorts of things
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that we spend money on. it says transport costs were up. even though petrol and diesel prices went down — partly because of a fall in oil prices. that rise in inflation is already weighing on the economy. growth slowed in the first three months of this year because we've all reigned back our spending. and there's now a worry that the uncertainty over the election outcome could mean we cut back further. and a reminder there's full details on what a rise in inflation could mean for you, it's on the website. two teenage girls who subjected a 39—year—old woman to a violent ordeal
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that ended in her murder in december 2014 were given life sentences. the girls, who were in care, were 13 and 1a when they attacked angela wrightson in her home in hartlepool. hartlepool council has published two serious case reviews into the murder today. let's cross live to hartlepool where the council is holding a press conference. tell us more about this case. is desperately sad. angela wrightson was at vulnerable, alcoholic woman. she would invite people into her home to have conversation, really? yes, and the two mac owners were vulnerable, too. all three were known to social services. this was a particularly shocking case because of the age of the teenage girls who murdered her, 13 and 1a. it lasted
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hours, a steak with nails, a television set and a shovel were among the things used as weapons. there has been a recommendation within a report. social services say that what they have to do is really analyse the care of adolescence as a result of this because there is a professional tendency to sympathise with the parents if they have behavioural difficulties. they says we have to reassess that now. we have to look because of the behaviour problems. is that because they are living with their parents? what more can we do? the second recommendation, whether or not children should be brought into care earlier. the default position is that it earlier. the default position is thatitis earlier. the default position is that it is best to leave children with their parents unless absolutely impossible. they are saying they
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will carry out audits every six—month to properly assess whether children should be brought into the ca re system children should be brought into the care system earlier. finally, as a result of andrew whites and —— andrea wrightson's murder —— angela wrightson's murder... there is proper information sharing now and a system in place. this is the best way they said they can learn from what happened and improve what's will happen in future. at the time of the trial, people in hartlepool we re of the trial, people in hartlepool were saying the children were picked up were saying the children were picked up by were saying the children were picked up by the police at 4:30am in the morning, they had blood on their close, did the police not recognise that? the other question, they were out until az30am. one child was with her foster carer. the other child out until az30am. one child was with herfoster carer. the other child in a children's home. how could that
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have happened ? a children's home. how could that have happened? why wasn't the alarm raised earlier and could more have been done to prevent angela wrightson's murder. we have learned a little about the child in the children's own. in the report we have seen that she caused disruption and assaulted staff at the children's home. people in hartlepool still wondering if there is more that can be done to monitor the children. finally, angela wrightson's family are asking for angie's law, in effect, vulnerable adults, a law to prevent people going into their home and take advantage of them. she was a known alcoholic in the area and would invite children and adults into her home to drink with them, drink alcohol. herfamily home to drink with them, drink alcohol. her family once a law to prevent that from happening. recommendations there. a desire from the family to protect people like
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angela wrightson in the future. most importantly, we are learning from the serious case reviews that nothing could have been done to prevent her murder. neither young person had a criminal history and no history of any significant assaults on any other individuals, the report says. no suggestion whatsoever of any serious violence and a total shock to everyone. thank you, fiona. theresa may is due to meet dup leader. inflation rises to its highest ratings for years. and jeff sessions is to give evidence to the senate about last year's presidential election and russian
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interference. as the british and irish lions have given a way a penalty late on to lose to highlanders by one point. everton have agreed a £30 million transfer forjordan pickford. it would be the largest dealfor a forjordan pickford. it would be the largest deal for a goalkeeper if signed. and a senior coach working with the bobsleigh scored has been accused of racism amidst claims of a toxic atmosphere in the sport. inquests into the deaths of the london bridge terror attack victims have opened his morning. eight people were killed when three attackers drove into pedestrians and stabbed passers by. our correspondent, tom symonds, is live at southwark crown court. the senior suffolk coroner said this was a terrible time for the families
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of those who died. we had two mac relatives of those who died in court today. he went through the five cases and he went through in harsh details. the australian open air bag from a stab wound in the neck. james, a british man, an entrepreneur, last seen outside a public house, he died of a haemorrhage and stab to the chest. another australian, senior staff nurse at london hospital, died of an insight wound in the chest. sebastien, the french chef, 36, a sta b sebastien, the french chef, 36, a stab wound in the chest. and the 39—year—old analyst for the hsbc bank died from a stab wound in the back. he was someone we have been told attempted to fight back against
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the three attackers on that night. as is normal in these cases, with the police investigation in full flow, the coroner is going to suspend his work until the police are finished. but he promised the families of those who died that they will be given full details of those deaths. once the investigation said concluded. separately, the metropolitan police commissioner has been talking about the responsibility of internet companies and communities in calling out extremists. tell us more about that. mark rowley, metropolitan police assista nt mark rowley, metropolitan police assistant commissioner and the country's senior counterintelligence —— counterterrorism officer. in an article in the times, we have do step in and assure potential attacks and we need communities to be more assertive at calling out extremists and radicalised as amongst us. we
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need internet companies to do more and learn about a attack methodology. make sure that is dealt with. max hill, a legislator, he has been talking and said that that britain has enough terrorism laws to cope with the threat and the challenge that the police and security services now face. he says, in an extreme example, an internet company that will not cooperate with investigations might need to face a penalty. apart from that, he said there is another power for the police and security services to bring terrorists in front of justice. still a debate going on about how best to do with the unprecedented challenges facing the country at the moment. thank you, tom. a woman has been charged
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with murder after a man died following a collision with a tram in manchester. the 30—year—old man died at the scene at manchester victoria station on sunday evening. 31—year—old charrissa loren brown—wellington has been remanded in custody. a brother and sister have been arrested after a man in his 40s was shot dead at a property in slough. reuben gregory, who is in his 70s and his sister, kathleen gregory, are being held on suspicion of murder. the pair are said to have lived in a caravan in woodland near slough for more than 50 years. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on the very latest between the talks between the dup and then propping up the conservative government. the russian opposition politician
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alexei navalny has just spent his first night in jail following a series of anti—corruption demonstrations. he was one of the main organisers but police detained him as he was preparing to leave home. later, he was handed a 30 days prison sentence. our correspondent sarah rainsford is in moscow. what reaction? a tough sentence. after the last protest,... now, he got 30 days. he did not make to the protest. thousands of people dead. the official figure is 5000. organisers believe it was more than that. certainly, a huge number of people detained. the unofficial but reliable figure is more 800 detentions. most of them were not held overnight. harsh tactics by the police, dragging people randomly
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into police vehicles. people here at angry and an angry response to those newspapers who think that the people who organised the protests were trying to steal the holiday, steal the party, a lot of families out celebrating on the central street in moscow. criticism from the newspapers and some commentators saying that the organiser of the protests was irresponsible to call an illegal rally right in the centre of moscow. his supporters said it was a success and rallies in £160 or more in russia. a lot of people fed up more in russia. a lot of people fed up with vladimir putin, corruption at the highest level. these arrests but the international spotlight on russia. a lot of coverage around the world about what is going on. does that puts pressure and moscow? possibly some. certainly, the white
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house issued a statement calling for those detained to be freed quickly. that did actually happen. only around 30 held overnight, including the organiser of the protest. the pressure is about internal politics. whether the kremlin feels that he is building support now. this is important because austerity says he wants to challenge for presidency. the challenge for presidency. the challenge for presidency. the challenge for power. he does not have anything like the support across russia that vladimir putin does, but he wants to get people onto the streets to show he has support and to be registered to run
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for president, that is not guaranteed yet, and showed that there are people who want change here. you might be surprised by either next story. a swam of 20—thousand bees has taken over a car in hull. the local beekeepers association are now trying to lure them away but it's not clear what first attracted them. the owner of the vehicle says her and her family have all been stung. her husband reckons the insects were drawn to the car, because of a bee gees cd in it. now, let's take a look at today's weather. the cloud cover bars the the satellite pictures here showed a best of the sunshine down towards
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the south—east have a glorious scene here in dorset. look at those poppies with the blue skies and clouds. the south will keep the sunshine, turning warm. further north, one or two showers in wales, and scotland and northern ireland. temperatures about 17 to 19 degrees. through this evening, we see the cloud across scotland and northern ireland. still some rain as well. that will continue into wednesday. for northern england, wales, the midlands, some hazy sunshine on wednesday, it will stay dry with blue skies across the south. it will turn warm with 26 or 27 degrees. into the low 20s for england, but 17 and 19 for scotland and northern ireland. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the prime minister theresa may and democratic unionist leader arlene foster are due to begin talks as the conservatives aim to form a minority government, with dup support. inflation rises to its highest rate in four years, up to 2.9%. it has been pushed up by the cost of holidays abroad as the pound has fallen. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to the senate about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. the european court of human rights will rule on whether doctors treating terminally ill ten—month—old baby charlie gard can turn off his life support.
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now for a look at the sport. the british and irish lions have lost their latest tour match in new zealand. they were playing the highlanders in dunedin and it was an entertaining game. in dunedin and it was highlanders scored first — it took just a few minutes for the lions to answer with a try of their own — jonathan joseph spotting the gap to go through. 10—10 at half—time. but, in the second half, the lions pulled away. tommy seymour ran it all the way in after this interception. then captain sam warburton, making his first appearance of the tour, went over to extend the lead to 22—13. but, a try and conversion then this penalty with six minutes left gave the highlanders victory byjust one point. 23-20.
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two more warm—up games before the first test against new zealand a week on saturday. everton have agreed to pay £30 million for sunderland's jordan pickford. it would be a record fee for a british goalkeeper if the england under 21 international signs the deal. pickford was one of very few bright spots in sunderland's season as they finished bottom and were relegated from the premier league. england's world cup winners — the under 20s team— arrived back in britain late last night. they flew into birmingham from south korea where they lifted their country's first trophy at a world tournament since 1966. england, as a nation of footballers and young players. like you say, it is great to have won the tournament and it shows we're pushing on and were chasing to get the top. for me personally, to save the penalty in a world cup final is really what you dream about as a kid.
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for the team and from what we've achieved for the country is amazing. what i hope now is that these players and take this experience and really go on and benefit themselves and as senior team in years to come. and fingers crossed that will be the case. a senior coach working with the country's olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a "toxic atmosphere" in the sport. confidential documents obtained by the bbc show athletes said their concerns were "of the highest order, mentioning bullying, racism, sexism and discrimination." the following month however, they were told no disciplinary action would be taken. britain's six—time paralympic champion david weir will compete in a track event for the final time in next month's anniversary games in london. he will continue road—racing — he won the london marathon for the seventh time in april. injanuary, weir, who won four gold medals at london 2012 and two at beijing 2008, said he would never compete for britain again after an unsuccessful games in rio. it just
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itjust all seemed to collapse at one of the biggest stages of my career. that was in rio. to be honest, i'd try and forget about that week that i had out there, because it was quite depressing" ha rd to because it was quite depressing" hard to take in, that i didn't take away any medal. i wanted to prove that i was still great when i turn up that i was still great when i turn up on the marathon this year. golden state warriors are nba champions again. last year, they lost a 3—1 lead to the cleveland cavaliers celebrations clearly still going on in california, all wearing ski goggles to avoid champagne in their eyes. last year, they lost a 3—1 lead to the cleveland cavaliers and watched as lebronjames took all the glory. this year, the golden state warriors vanquished those memories. they beat the cavs129—120 in game five of the finals for a 4—1 series victory.
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ijust i just try to stay in the moment, the whole series, and i think that worked for me. i remember many times in my career, i looked in the past and looked ahead and stay in the moment. in this series, i stayed in the moment. we did it together, man. still wearing his ski goggles in the press co nfe re nce . still wearing his ski goggles in the press conference. that's all the sport for now. friday marks the first anniversary of the death of labour mpjo cox, who was killed in birstall, outside her constituency surgery. her senseless killing sent shock waves around the world but united the country in grief. a year on and herfamily are determined to continue her legacy. this weekend, on the first anniversary of her death, they're encouraging people to join together with neighbours, friends and their local community at events in her memory. let's hearjo's parents remembering the moment they learnt she'd died. we'd just sat down about five
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minutes, and then the phone rang. and it was dan, one ofjo's aides. and hejust said, jo's been shot, i think. and... that was it. i said, where is she? and wejumped in the car, i remember i wasjumping in the car, and we couldn't get near. and we set off running. and i don't know... i don't know how we managed to get there. into the middle of birstall. and the police were there. they stopped us. somebody says, "jo's been shot"... well, that's bad, to be shot. people are shot and recover, etc, etc. so we didn't know at that time. i think we knew. i think i did. i didn't know. we will always be broken,
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because there's a piece missing. the low times for us are when we turn the television on and see terrorist acts — westminster bridge, manchester — because that's when it brings everything back. for me, the ambulances, the sirens, i'm back there again in birstall. but we still think about the people who have lost loved ones, and we know what they are actually just going through. it must be awful for them. we know what we went through. and unfortunately they don't, as yet. going forward, build on the children, the grandchildren. and supporting one another. we'll continue to do that. because you're right, it won't go away. after one year, it gets better. it doesn't, it won't go away. but we have to be positive. and we are being positive.
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more than one person came up to me after the funeral, and after kim talked in birstall marketplace, and said, "you've got not one but two marvellous daughters. one we saw, jo, on occasions, on the television etc, making speeches. but clearly you've got two". and, you know, we're very proud, because i can't separate the two, and never would. jo cox's family
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talking to our reporter catherine burns. theresa may and president macron of france have agreed proposals, under which social media companies could be fined if they fail to remove extremist material. speaking before talks with mr macron in paris later today, the prime minister said the two leaders were determined that the internet could not be used as a safe space for terrorists. the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, max hill qc, told the bbc tech companies should be pushed to do more — but not at the expense of freedom of communication. the proposal to introduce a penalty for the failure to remove material from the internet is something which, of course, i would review if any solid proposal for legislation on the basis came forward. but to my mind, that is a measure of last resort. what is more important is that we've develop ever greater cooperation between security and intelligence services and tech companies within the confines of the law, to ensure this material never reaches the internet in the first place. imposing a penalty after the fact
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and after the failure to remove the material, that sounds like a last step and i would hope that would not be necessary. so what do you think should be done? i think that moves over the last month, and the last year, for greater awareness of tech companies of the abuse of their platforms by those who wish to proliferate extreme material, is a positive step in the right direction. it seems that there should be meetings here and internationally to try and ensure the tech companies play their part in removing this material as a means of cooperation, rather than a means of coercion. but we must be careful not to do that at the expense of the free communication that the internet represents for billions of people around the world. i am a lawyer who will look at any government proposal coming forward, but we must always maintain the balance between freedom that we all enjoy the necessity to everybody safe. in a moment a summary
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of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may is due to meet the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster shortly to try to get backing for her minority government. multiple failures are uncovered in reports into the torture and murder of a vulnerable woman in hartlepool by two schoolgirls. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, is to give evidence to the senate about alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. these are the top business stories. uk inflationjumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may, tightening the squeeze on consumers. a weak pound and the rising cost of food and imports have been blamed.
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it is the highest rate sincejune 2013 and keeps inflation above the bank of england's 2% target. we'll have more on this shortly. a lucrative part of the city of london's financial trading could be forced to move to continental europe after the uk leaves the eu. the european commission is expected to say later that it wants the eu to regulate the clearing of euro denominated transactions. at the moment nearly $1 billion worth of such trades are done in london every day. and the company behind some of britain's leading tourist attractions such as madame tussauds, legoland and the london eye say visitors numbers are down. merlin entertainments says people have been put off by the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. but, at the same time, says overall business has been in line with expectations, partly because more than 70% of last year's profits were made outside the uk. good morning. inflation — which measures the rising cost of living — continued to rise last month.
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prices rose more than forecast, at the fastest pace in four years. prices rose by 2.9% on average — measuring the increase in prices for items we regularly to buy. in the shops and online. that's the highest since june 2013 and much higher than the 2.7% that was forecast. all that measn more pressure on household incomes because we are not seeing our wages rise by the same amount. and this is what inflation has been doing over the last year: the bank of england governor mark carney has warned that inflation will keep rising this year year before falling back slightly from 2018. so what's gone up and what's come down? well, the ons that compiles these figures measures prices for all sorts of things that we spend money on. electricity prices saw a big jump though alongside costs like furniture and clothing. it says transport costs were up.
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even though petrol and diesel prices went down — partly because of a fall in oil prices. that rise in inflation is already weighing on the economy. growth slowed in the first three months of this year because we've all reigned back our spending. and there's now a worry that the uncertainty over the election outcome could mean we cut back further. sarah hewin is a senior economist from standard chartered bank. good to see you. i've run through the numbers there and it's interesting because we warned it would carry on rising before it falls again. but it means we will feel worse off for a while. that's right. it's likely inflation will rise above 3% over the next few months. with earnings growing only around about 2%, that means a squeeze on earnings, prices are rising faster than wages. we are already seeing the impact, as you
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mentioned, consumerspending, already seeing the impact, as you mentioned, consumer spending, we get in the first quarter. we have had surveys suggesting it will be weaker for may as well. there are some clouds looming over the uk economy. let's look at how they come up with these numbers. it's easy to think this is another statistic, another number we get excited about but doesn't mean much every day. the ons call the basket of goods, measuring everything we buy. they say food prices are going up after the price war is keeping them down, and things like electricity and energy are making a difference to what people pay day to day. that is right. people are reliant, on many of these basic goods. we have seen prices rising over the last few months. some of that impact will start to fade, as you mentioned, oil prices have fallen back over recent months. some of the big jump that we saw in
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petrol prices and transport costs should fade away. a lot of the impact on inflation is coming from the fall in the value of the pound. that is pushing up the cost of imports, and we import a lot, and that pressure is really feeding through to other parts of the economy. in response, the bank of england as expected, prices will start rising? normally come at the bank of england will be raising interest rates with inflation is above its 2% target. but we think they will be unchanged into 2019. because they will be worried about the slowdown in the economy. so the best course of action for now is to do nothing. we will follow that closely. server, it is good to see you. thanks forjoining us. now to gaming as over in la, the games industry is having its annual shindig.
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the electronic entertainment expo, better known as e3 is the industry's chance to lay out its new ideas for the next couple of years. dave lee is there. 15,000 people are going to be at e3 this year. it's the biggest gaming show in the world and for the first time in its 24—year history the general public will be allowed through those doors as well. it could make things a bit more exciting, but it does also pile on the pressure for the big games publishers to do more than ever to impress their loyal fans. microsoft were, as ever first out of the blocks, they announced the xbox one x, a more powerful version of its current console. it will improve the visuals of its games but not much else, and it comes in at $1199 — that's twice the price of the existing model. it's going to be twice the price of a normal xbox. you're going to need a great big tv to really feel the benefit. are enough people going to go for that option to make it worthwhile? well, it's about giving gamers
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choice, and i think you and both know there is a certain customer wants the best in anything, and that's why we designed xbox one x. how many of those customers do you have? i think in the gaming community there is a large section of those customers, but the majority of the people that will come into xbox one will come in through the xbox one s. next, it was time for sony to show its hand. unlike microsoft, no new hardware, as the company has already released a more powerful version of its playstation. instead it focussed on games, the headliner being spider—man. on tuesday, the show floor opens up, and it's here we will see if the new games can start to live up to the hype and continue to fuel this $90 billion industry. here's a look at some other stories. the chief executive of house builder crest nicholson, stephen stone, has told the today programme that he would struggle to run his company without immigrant labourfrom the european union. mr stone said that among home
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builders european immigrants make up 12% of the workforce. british airways is in discussions with capita about outsourcing some of its call centre operations. bbc business correspondent dominic o'connell understands the deal would involve the transfer of two uk call centres to capita — one in newcastle and one in manchester — which employ about 1,400 people. the deal could be controversial because ba has been criticised for aggressively cutting costs over the last few years. and institutional investors are seeking $399m of damages from toshiba over its accounting scandal. in 2015 the japanese technology firm admitted it had
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overstated its profits for the past six years. it led to several of its senior executives stepping down. the firm has been served with 26 complaints over the scandal and faces claims worth $985m. there has been widely expected to be ajune there has been widely expected to be a june rate there has been widely expected to be ajune rate rise but there has been widely expected to be a june rate rise but that may not happen now. merlin entertainments are down, because of the fears of terrorism after the recent attacks. however there profits up and told to be outside the uk. technology shares were down again
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in the us on monday, and asian tech shares have been falling today. we are here at downing street because in the hour or so, we are waiting for arlene foster and the dup delegation with important talks for theresa may. afterfailing to getan for theresa may. afterfailing to get an overall majority in the general election, she really badly needs the help of the dup to form any kind of working majority. the timetable is critical for two reasons. we are but edging up to the queen ‘s speech at sometime in the next week, and the brexit negotiations are due to begin as well. on that note, carwynjones has
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written to theresa may talking about the need for the devolved nations to be engaged with the brexit process. let's talk to him now from cardiff. good morning. what is your key point to theresa may? the hard brexit is dead. we can't have a brexit that is decided by a small group and whitehall. there are four governments in the uk, all of which have a role in the brexit negotiations. in getting the best deal. the government in response has said that the uk focus is on achieving something that works for everybody, that goes without saying as they would say grow like one of those key aims is frictionless trade with the eu? said the government response is working for the benefit of everyone already, that is the point? but they are not listening.
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they don't listen to the meetings we have. michael gove yesterday, for example, cancelled the next two meetings of the environment ministers from across the uk. i understand this morning but they are on the way to us. that is not a good start. we need to ensure that our robert discussions and negotiations and now reining back of the powers of the welsh devolved government. the people of wells decided that they wanted to see greater powers in this place, they do not want soon as di looted or removed. the uk government has failed to address our concerns. “— government has failed to address our concerns. —— di looted we need to decide with agriculture and fisheries, discussing the single market. but they cannot be imposed by westminster, they must be agreed
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across the uk. but the uk government have not grasped that. we are happy to work with them but they have to be agreed and cannot be imposed by one on the other for free. so you don't want a reining back on the powers that you and other devolved administrations have? but is there any suggestion that that is something that would happen? yes, there is. if we look at agricultural fisheries, they'd don't exist in the uk, buta fisheries, they'd don't exist in the uk, but a european or welsh. the powers coming from brussels to wales which is where they should be, they will stop in london for a while. that is not our position and not the position of the scottish government either. we need the powers to come to us as was intended, then we all sit down together and work out a common frame of agriculture, common frame of fisheries, with an agreement. that is the best way to serve britain and to serve the
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union, and to serve the interest in wales and the other nations. the timescale here is very tight. every meeting you talk about, every time you talk about trying to get people ina room, you talk about trying to get people in a room, sit down, discuss that. you may well that the mood music‘ book today, very senior negotiators there expressing enormous frustration saying, the goodness‘ sake, we need to get on with this. time is not anyone‘s side? sake, we need to get on with this. time is not anyone's side? that's true. the uk government date needs to decide what its government is. theresa may went to the government asking for a mandate and did not get it. we need to decide what brexit like. we need to work with the eu government, not listening vaguely to dig devolved government and going off on their own. brexit needs to work for the whole of the uk, not
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just one part of it. to me, that means, we set out our position, we have put all this on paper. we need to be listened to for the good of britain. carwyn jones, thanks for joining us. from cardiff. more to come here from downing street. let‘s catch up with the weather. it's it‘s pretty warned therein downing street. we have sunshine across the united kingdom in parts but there was cloud in the north and west. that cloud is bringing outbreaks of rain and showers. northern ireland and parts of england. the sunshine has been glorious in the south, this is in dorset, look at those cumulus clouds. in southern areas, temperatures up to 23 degrees but further north and west there was more cloud with outbreaks of rain at times. tebbutt is getting to about
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17 and. —— and 19 degrees. goodbye for now. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 12. theresa may meets the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster to try and get backing for her minority government. i am confident, the discussions so far have been positive. the leader of the dup is seeing the prime minister later today for further discussions around the agreement. we want to get conclusions so we can act in the best interests of our country and get on with the job. the dup delegation is due to arrive in downing street later this morning. one of the eu negotiators says
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europe‘s once clarity from downing street about brexit in the next few days. inflation rises to its highest rate in four years, pushed up by the cost of holidays abroad as the pound has fallen. multiple failures are uncovered in reports into the torture and murder of a vulnerable woman in hartlepool by two schoolgirls. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to the senate about alleged russian interference in last year‘s presidential election. almost a year on from the murder of mpjo cox, her parents speak about what they have gone through as a family. we will always be broken. there is a piece missing. to the outside world, we appear strong, all of us, but there are days when it is bad. and bees on the bonnet — a 20,000 strong swarm makes its new home on car in hull. good afternoon.
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we‘re live at downing street, where theresa may is hoping to confirm a deal with the democratic unionist party today and secure her position in government. they are due to arrive soon. with me is our assistant political editor, norman smith. the dup has a hugely strong hand because they are theresa may passed by political lifetime. without them, she does not have a majority and cannot govern. they are critical to her survival as prime minister. for that reason, there is a complete imperative for theresa may to get a
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deal. the very fact that arlene foster is coming here in the next 30 minutes also suggests to me there will be a deal. she would not arrive if everyone was going to leave in acrimony. in some ways, it is a deal thatis acrimony. in some ways, it is a deal that is not going to be so difficult to reach because the dup and the tories are both pro—brexit, both bitterly opposed tojeremy corbyn‘s labour party, so that puts them in the same sort of ballpark. add into that a shed load of cash which probably the dup will insist on in terms of funding for economic regeneration, reconstruction, maybe afume of regeneration, reconstruction, maybe a fume of government contracts and agencies in belfast. that‘s a good thing. they will certainly almost certainly it was some sort of deal. when we heard from james brokenshire the northern ireland secretary this morning, he was standing confident. discussions are still continuing. the prime minister is seeing arlene foster later on, i am sure we will get more news from that. what will they be
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talking about today? that is for discussion between them. we will hear from them in the course of the day. the thing to stress is the work that i do as secretary of state for northern ireland is separate. we are very clear on the work that i was doing yesterday afternoon and evening around the devolution settlement, and ensuring we get devolved government back. something as a government we hold fast to, ensuring we do our duty to serve northern ireland well. to adhere to our responsibilities under the belfast agreement absolutely is at the core of what we are as a government and will guide all our actions in the future. are you hopeful of reaching a deal with them? i am confident. discussions are positive. the leader of the dup is seeing the prime minister later today for further discussions around the agreement. we will want to see a conclusion we we can get on with acting in the best interests of our country and getting on with the job.
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james brokenshire sounding positive. the deal which we expect later on today, this is still short term, isn‘t it? this is about getting to the queen‘s speech which we assume is sometime next week and starting some brexit tops. it is so interesting, you can hear the frustration with people in strasbourg already, can‘t you could like it is short—term. strasbourg already, can‘t you could like it is short-term. the big question is, how stable is this arrangement going to be because it is not a formal coalition like we had with nick clegg and david cameron. it is a day by day, looser arrangement. aside from the big votes, where the dup support on the budget, on the day by day nitty—gritty of business across the road, no guarantee the dup will support you. this means the government have to put their arm around the dup and say, come on, go
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on, you can support us in this. it is more about wheeling and dealing. that is not theresa may‘s strong point. and even with the dup on—board, that only gives her a majority of just six. on—board, that only gives her a majority ofjust six. david cameron had a majority of 17 and yet he had also secrete. he was defeated on personal independence payments, tax credits, sunday trading, syria. he had a majority of 17. and they are not even your party, it becomes more vulnerable. once the dup realise they have their crowbars in and have leverage, what will they demand next? the concern of some is that they will bring the demands up and move into contingent areas. for example, they could say they are not happy about sinn fein... they could
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say they need to look at the future of parades in northern ireland. there is the potential for the of parades in northern ireland. there is the potentialfor the dup, once they have their feet under the table, to demand a lot more. as every cabinet minister left here in the last hour or so, they were asking, i do having to rip up your ma nifesto ? asking, i do having to rip up your manifesto? is that a nod to some domestic issues as well? the dup did not agree with the notion that you should means there‘s the winter fuel allowa nce. should means there‘s the winter fuel allowance. the austerity agenda is increasingly dying. it will take another notch backwards with his deal because the dup have made very clear that they do not agree with a lot of the benefit cuts. they are going to post things like scrapping the triple lock on pensions, opposed to the edge on and so on. what is likely in theresa may‘s favour is that many tory mps agree. one of the
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reason jeremy corbyn that many tory mps agree. one of the reasonjeremy corbyn did well in the general election is because he campaigned against austerity as they we re campaigned against austerity as they were left defending things like taking free school meals away from people. in that sense, the dup are pushing an open door. plenty of tories think they have to stop banging on about austerity. possibly, there will be an agreement on that. but politics is a continually movable thing with issues coming forward at all different times. above all, there is brexit. i suppose the real concern of many in theresa may‘s camp is, will dup and this deal strengthened the hand of those who are beginning to shape up to confront theresa may of the sort of brexit she is doing to negotiate and say to her, you have to forget about banging on about immigration. you have to put the economy first. that is the real battle ahead. very interesting. we will hear much more from you, norman, once we know more from the
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dup. norman smith will follow love with as. the delegation expected year shortly. as we reflect on the frustration here, it is worth telling you what michel barnier, the eu's telling you what michel barnier, the eu‘s chief negotiator, has been saying today. this is what is coming out of strasbourg this morning. he has warned britain not to waste time before beginning of the brexit talks. which he said would be "extraordinarily complex". speaking to the financial times, mr barnier said almost three months had passed since the government had triggered the two—year exit process, but there had been no negotiations so far. the mood is that the negotiations
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have two get underway. for now, back to you. uk inflationjumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may, tightening the squeeze on consumers. a weak pound and the rising cost of food and imports have been blamed. let‘s get more from our business correspondent ben thompson. inflation — which measures the rising cost of living — continued to rise last month. prices rose more than forecast, at the fastest pace in four years. prices rose by 2.9% on average — measuring the increase in prices for items we regularly to buy. that‘s the highest since june 2013 and much higher than the 2.7% that was forecast. all that means more pressure on household incomes because we aren‘t seeing our wages rise by the same amount.
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and this is what inflation has been doing over the last year: the bank of england governor mark carney has warned that inflation will keep rising this year before falling back slightly from 2018. so what‘s gone up and what‘s come down? well, the ons that compiles these figures measures prices for all sorts of things that we spend money on. it says transport costs were up. electricity prices saw a big jump though alongside costs like furniture and clothing. it says transport costs were up. even though petrol and diesel prices went down — partly because of a fall in oil prices. that rise in inflation is already weighing on the economy. growth slowed in the first three months of this year because we‘ve all reigned back our spending.
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and there‘s now a worry that the uncertainty over the election outcome could mean we cut back further. and a reminder there‘s full details on what a rise in inflation could mean for you, it‘s on the website. two teenage girls who subjected a 39—year—old woman to a violent ordeal that ended in her murder in december 2014 were given life sentences. the girls, who were in care, were 13 and 14 when they attacked angela wrightson in her home in hartlepool. a stea k a steak with screws on, a coffee table and a television where some of the weapons used. our north england reporter fiona trott has been following the story for us in hartlepool. .. the serious case reviews were
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carried out. the attackers were very young. the attack lasted hours. all three were known to social services. angela wrightson had problems with alcohol. but it hasn‘t said nothing could be done to prevent the murder. in terms of the serious case reviews, we understand now adolescent and neglect better. and the trauma it creates. we cannot predict how it will manifest itself day—to—day. these issues are beyond professional control. both families received a great deal of support and
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guidance from a consistent and hard—working group of professionals. neithergirl hard—working group of professionals. neither girl had history of violent offe nces neither girl had history of violent offences although they were at times angry, abusive and hostile to those them. considerable evidence olivia and yasmin received abuse and neglect which had an impact on their behaviour. they were taken into care in 2013 and 2014. v—shaped findings in relation to olivia and yasmin which relate to adolescent neglects and adverse impacts young people. whilst these findings are aimed at helping workers to respond to issues ina helping workers to respond to issues in a better way, there is also issues on the essential role of parents and the danger that arises when children experienced neglect.
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when you heard him speaking, he mentioned olivia and yasmin, which are not their real names. we have to protect their identities for legal reasons. the role of parents, he touched upon that. that is something they are now reassessing because what they will say is the default position for social services is to place the children with their families for as long as possible because they do not want to put them in care. but as a result of angela wrightson‘s murder, and identifying these young people have behaviour problems, they will assess cases on a six—month basis. we have also heard that the family want and angela‘s law, they want vulnerable people like her to be protected in the future to stop strangers going into their home. the us attorney general, jeff sessions, will give evidence to a senate committee today about alleged russian interference in last year‘s
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presidential election. mr sessions, who has removed himself from thejustice department‘s investigation into the same issue, is the most senior member of the trump administration to appear before the intelligence committee. our correspondentjane o‘brien is in washington. what is expected ? what is expected? jeff sessions has to a nswer to what is expected? jeff sessions has to answer to mac things arising from james comey‘s testimony last week. less tha n james comey‘s testimony last week. less than one week ago in fact. james comey said that, when he was asked, when he asked jeff sessions to protect him, not to leave him alone with donald trump, mr sessions left no reply. the department of justice says he did advise the department to take care to protect this relationship. senators are going to want to know why mr sessions did not do more. apparently. the other thing gems can
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be said, he implied that there may have been other reasons why he was forced to recuse himself from the russia investigation. senators are going to want to know from jeff sessions what those reasons might be. mr sessions had to reduce himself because he did not reveal, tell senators during his confirmation hearing that he met twice with the russian ambassador. those are the issues that senators are going to want to hear mostly donald trump campaign involvement with russia during the presidential election. what has been the fall out. now there has been counted properly digest james commute‘s testimony? the white house, donald trump says that his testimony vindicated him because it confirms that mr trump himself was not under investigation at the time that james comey was the fbi director. however,
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james coming‘s three hour testimony raised troubling aspects of the relationship between the fbi and the white house and allegations that donald trump tried to make him drop the investigation into his former national security adviser michael flynn. lots of people crying, obstruction of justice. flynn. lots of people crying, obstruction ofjustice. most legal opinion is that it does not quite a man to that, but there is also the fa ct man to that, but there is also the fact that james can be voted necessary to document his conversations because donald trump could not be trusted to tell the truth. these raise disturbing and disquieting allegations about the relationship of the white house to the fbi and the ability of the united states‘ president to tell the truth. theresa may is due to be arlene foster of the dup to try and get backing for her minority government. the rising cost of going on holiday
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abroad due to a weaker pound has helped to push inflation to its highest rate in four years. and multiple failures have been uncovered into reports of the murder and torture of a vulnerable woman in hartlepool by two schoolgirls. the sport. the british and irish lions have lost their latest tour match in new zealand. they were playing highlanders. it was an entertaining game. highlanders scored first but it took the lions only a few minutes to answer with a try. 10—10 at half—time. but, in the second half, the lions pulled away. tommy seymour ran it all the way in after this interception. then captain sam warburton, making his first appearance
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of the tour, went over to extend the lead to 22—13. but, a try and conversion then this penalty with six minutes left gave the highlanders victory byjust one point. 23-20. two more warm—up games before the first test against new zealand a week on saturday. everton have agreed to pay £30 million for sunderland‘s jordan pickford. it would be a record fee for a british goalkeeper if the england under 21 international signs the deal. pickford was one of very few bright spots in sunderland‘s season as they finished bottom and were relegated from the premier league. a senior coach working with great britain cosmic olympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism and complaints about a toxic atmosphere in the sport. confidential documents obtained by the bbc show athletes said their concerns were "of the highest order, mentioning bullying, racism, sexism and discrimination." the following month however, they were told no disciplinary action would be taken. and the six time paralympic champion
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david weir will compete in a track event for the last time. he will continue with road racing. he said he would never compete for britain again after an unsuccessful gains in rio. golden state warriors are nba champions again. celebrations clearly still going on in california, all wearing ski goggles to avoid champagne in their eyes. last year, they lost a 3—1 lead to the cleveland cavaliers and watched as lebronjames took all the glory. this year, the golden state warriors vanquished those memories. they beat the cavs129—120 in game five of the finals for a 4—1 series victory. we are still waiting for the dup
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leader arlene foster to arrive at downing street. she should be here relatively soon. very important talks. we will speak about that with our correspondent in a moment. but let‘s reflect on brexit. that meeting going on in strasbourg we have been talking about. considerable frustration expressed by some of the key players in the brexit negotiations. do is to begin next week. mcilvanney eight express and frustration saying that britain needs to get on with everything. —— michel barnier. article 30 was triggered nearly three months ago and virtually nothing has happened. and the european parliament‘s main man on this waiting to hear what the uk's man on this waiting to hear what the uk‘s position is given the changing
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circumstances. various players from the european union side saying they cannot negotiate with themselves. get on with it. michel barnier talking to newspapers. the chief negotiators saying, ultimately, he does not really care what is going on in the uk in terms of the election but he wa nts to uk in terms of the election but he wants to start as soon as possible. he wants a stable leader who carries authority and does not believe there is any reason to extend the deadline for when britain comes out of the eu, march 2019. we keep hearing, we are ready. as much as you‘d get brexit means brexit in the uk. i
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have just spoken to the eu parliament negotiator. we will hear from him sharply. he said, everybody is waiting. conversely, the shambles in britain after the election is bringing the eu house together. he has seen a com plete eu house together. he has seen a complete transformation. people like emmanuel macron standing up. he was one of the few meps, voices dart as far as he sees it,,
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how long will we be messed around. i also spoke to nigel farage. you were one of the key instigators and meps send that is falling apart. he said it is not his original vision for brexit. more from you and the interview with guy verhofstadt later. in a television interview in berlin, it has been said that britain would be welcomed back into the european union if britain said it no longer wa nted union if britain said it no longer wanted to leave. if britain needs time to reflect on everything given the results of the general election there. interesting comments. we wait for the dup delegation to arrive here at downing street, but there
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was a photocall in the last hour or so, some interesting comments were picked up as well. the future is bright. you might have caught it. it was a selfie. the future is bright, the future is orange. they take on a well—known advert but other devices are available. waiting for the dup to provide here. arrived. chris page is in belfast for us. everyone in stormon is waiting to
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see what comes out of the downing street meeting. pretty obvious the dup were happy about what was happening. journalists gathered in the rate all here, you could hear the rate all here, you could hear the dup party meeting going on in another room and you could hear cheering and stamping feet. they are celebrating their best ever election results in their history and that has put them in an influential position in westminster. plenty of dark about what the dup might get. their priority going to be something economic, perhaps more money for infrastructure, schools, hospitals in northern ireland. tax breaks, not just cold, hard cash. some focus on northern ireland by national agencies tasked with getting more foreign investment into the country. all that quite speculative at the
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moment. no one knows really what is going on. or what will go on when arlene foster steps into number ten and speak to theresa may. the sdlp leader: east with saint, whatever happened to downing street is inextricably linked on the top tier trying to restore the devolved government which collapsed in january. they need something that does not just reflect january. they need something that does notjust reflect the dup‘s political priorities. we think the dup delegation will be arriving shortly. i think we just have time to pause and catch up with the weather prospects. some of us seeing
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one such an especially in southern england. if you showers breaking out. scotland, northern ireland, more cloud around. heavy showers in north—east scotland. overnight, we continue with outbreaks of rain heading northwards across scotland. is there, looking guy. clearer skies across england and wales. some spots in the countryside getting down into single figures. maybe some fog, it won‘t last long in the morning. temperatures higher tomorrow. some spots reaching into the high 20s. scotla nd spots reaching into the high 20s. scotland and northern ireland, again more cloud. some outbreaks of rain but the front moving by. particularly towards western scotland. temperatures have done compared to elsewhere. it will be cooler and fresher across the board by the time we get to thursday. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: the prime minister theresa may and democratic unionist leader arlene foster are to meet in downing street shortly — as the conservatives aim to gain backing for a minority government, with dup support. one of the brightest negotiators has said he is impatient for negotiations to begin. —— brexit negotiators. inflation rises to its highest rate in four years, up to 2.9%. it‘s been pushed up by the cost of holidays abroad as the pound has fallen. a vulnerable alcoholic killed by two teenage girls in hartlepool — a review finds multiple failures by officials. the family of the ten—month—old
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charlie gard will find out later if they can take their court to the european court of human rights. —— ta ke european court of human rights. —— take their case. the european court of human rights will rule later today on whether doctors treating ten—month—old charlie gard can turn off his life support. his parents want to take their son — who is terminally ill with a rare genetic disorder, to the us for experimental treatment. the nurses at the great ormond street hospital organised a surprise picnic for the gard family yesterday, reportedly in a rare break away from the hospital wards and court rooms. last week, the uk supreme court agreed with specialists at great ormond street hospital that he should be allowed to ‘die with dignity‘. our medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. charlie gard cannot see, hear, move, cry or swallow. he is seriously brain damaged and kept alive with a mechanical ventilator. his parents, chris gard and connie yates, have raised £1.3 million through crowdfunding
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for experimental treatment in the united states. we know that even if it doesn‘t work, which i think it will, we know that we have done everything that we can for him. but doctors, including independent experts, say the treatment cannot improve his condition. one concern is that charlie may experience pain but is unable to respond to it. lask week, the uk supreme court said while it had the utmost sympathy for his parents, it was not in charlie‘s interests to subject him to futile treatment that could potentially prolong his suffering. today, a panel of sevenjudges at the european court of human rights in strasbourg will consider written evidence in the case. if they decide to take on the issue, a full hearing will be organised. if not, then the parents‘ legal battle to take their son
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abroad will be over, and from midnight, great ormond street hospital will be free to switch off charlie‘s ventilator and provide only palliative care. fergus walsh, bbc news. more now from downing street, where theresa may is hoping to confirm a deal with the democratic unionist party today and secure her position in government. here is our correspondent in westminster. we are watching all of this. you might not have heard that, norman, but we hope they will be a deal today, the feeling is there will be a deal... there has to be, or hell is going to break loose. if they do not have a deal, theresa may does not have a majority or a government. there is an imperative to nail this down and for theresa
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may to save this afternoon that i have the backing of the dup. we‘re not going into coalition but they will support us on the big votes on the queen ‘s speech, on the budget. the hope will be that will give her enough space to govern. she‘s going to have to chuck all kinds of things out of the manifesto because one of the rules of minority government is you do not want too many votes. votes m ea n you do not want too many votes. votes mean possible problems. you do not want contentious votes. all those bits and pieces in the ma nifesto those bits and pieces in the manifesto which caused all sorts of a rumpus, like social care, that will be quietly put away in a drawer and forgotten about, i think. it‘ll bea and forgotten about, i think. it‘ll be a stripped down government agenda. and even then it does not mean this is going to work. there is a good chance it might not. even with the backing of the dup, it only gives a majority of six. if you are the chief whip you are a worried man. trying to govern with a majority of six is incredibly hard.
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you only need a tutorial mps to say, ido you only need a tutorial mps to say, i do not agree with that, and you are in all kinds of difficulties. —— are in all kinds of difficulties. —— a few conservatives mps. let's talk about the short—term first of all, mark devenport. what are the key things, some of which will have been thrashed out already? we know the chief whip was in belfast over the weekend but what are the key points today? they will look for some kind of tangible benefit, the dup, for their voters back in northern ireland and that means extra resources, whether that is extra funding, help for attracting foreign investment in northern ireland... one particular point on their shopping list has been lowering the rate of corporation tax in northern ireland because businesses in northern ireland are competing with the irish republic and for inward investment with the irish republic we re investment with the irish republic were corporation tax is only 12.5%. well below the uk level. up to now
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the uk garment has said, yes, you can have that lower rate of corporation tax but northern ireland will have the paper that itself by taking a hit to the grant coming from the treasury. i can see some kind of negotiation around that with them saying that you have to lower any price for this, because we are leaving the eu and we did not had to stay in the stipulations. can you do something for us for that? i think there will be a deal because the dup have nowhere else to go. they made it clear thatjeremy have nowhere else to go. they made it clear that jeremy corbyn is u na cce pta ble it clear that jeremy corbyn is unacceptable for them. they may play ha rd unacceptable for them. they may play hard to get about the details. we are edging up, we think, to the queen‘s speech but all the brexit issues we have been discussing here, thatis issues we have been discussing here, that is their strong hand, isn‘t it? all of those indications the queen's speech might be delayed is because you cannot take them for granted in terms of the terms of it. i think they will say they had constructive talks. whether they sign off on all
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final details i am not sure. this is not a coalition. it is a confidence and supply arrangement. what that means to some extent, one figure i was talking to from the dup last night, this could be a rolling negotiation, because it is going to be on issue by issue. as issues come up be on issue by issue. as issues come up in the very tight parliament we are going to have now, what's the company macro might negotiate on that ongoing basis? -- dup might negotiate. we are keeping our eyes on it. one issue further in the future might get ripped up and taken off the manifesto, norman. —— some issues. a lot of things might change. there were a key differences around the winter fuel allowance is, economic social policies. to some extent the guinea are pushing at an open door in the anti—austerity agenda. —— the dup. while it is true they were talking about taking school meals away from some primary
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school meals away from some primary school pupils and the winter fuel allowa nce, school pupils and the winter fuel allowance, that kind of thing, many conservatives mps take the view that thatis conservatives mps take the view that that is why they did not do well in the general election. there is a widespread view that the general public arejust widespread view that the general public are just fatigued with it. if the guinea say, we would like you to drop all these proposed benefit cuts, i think theresa may will say thatis cuts, i think theresa may will say that is fine. —— the dup. she said she accepted responsibility for the social care to buckle. i think there isa social care to buckle. i think there is a recognition that they got on the wrong side of that argument, giving jeremy corbyn all of that room to make large inroads. i think the difficulty will come if the dup down the line decided to up the ante. if they have got the crowbar m, ante. if they have got the crowbar in, then they can really start demanding all sorts of things. the pressure will come on the government about what it is they are prepared to concede. i think in the early
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days, not much of a problem. they can get the ball rolling but when you get into the cut and thrust and the daily hurly—burly of government, all kinds of things can crop up. and the temptation for the smaller party with their feet under the table is to say, we would like to support you on that, but here is something we really wa nt. on that, but here is something we really want. some of them are arriving now. deputy leader of the dup with arlene foster. is there going to be a deal, miss foster? is there going to be a deal? is there going to be a deal? they are staying quiet on the deal front, i think! arlene foster and nigel dodds there. this is the beginning of some very important talks. you would not expect to get anything out of them on the way in! you have got to ask,
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haven‘t you? we were talking about the possibilities further down the line. for now we wait one hour or so perhaps? i think so. and we do think they will have something to say... we would expect that. we know the level of tension. they did not give interviews earlier today. they had a photocall with their new mps in westminster and did not do interviews then. i can't imagine they're not saying anything but i would caution because i'm used to negotiations going past the deadline and on and on. they might say things are going very positively, but there are going very positively, but there are eight few little odds and ends we have to tie down. add a quick thought from both of you in terms brexit. it is very interesting, some of the mood music we are hearing from strasbourg today. clearly expressing huge frustration at how long this is all taking. their role in all of this and the implications... it is huge. because
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although the dup are in favour of brexit, they said they wanted to leave the customs union, there is a view that they might be more amenable to those mps and ministers now saying, we have to think again about brexit, especially in terms of impact on the economy. and whether the dup would be amongst those massing to try and force mrs made to back off some of the top language she has certainly been using, the priority given to immigration, just to push for an arrangement which might not be in the customs union but there might be something similar. associate membership, a reformed membership. they‘re all of ideas in play. there is a tussle about the kind of brexit. and theresa may‘s critics are thinking they are more likely to be on their side than hers. the dup campaign for
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brexit. they are in favour of brexit in political terms inc terms of establishing uk sovereignty. but the land border with the eu, there are potential problems if you are too dogmatic about how you impose controls on the border. they want a pragmatic and flexible brexit which still pragmatic and flexible brexit which st i ll allows pragmatic and flexible brexit which still allows for ease of movement of people and goods across that border. to that extent, i suppose if you wa nt to that extent, i suppose if you want to call it a soft brexit, they would favour it in practice. do not ta ke would favour it in practice. do not take that too far. they still want to withdraw from the customs union and have the uk negotiating trade agreements with other countries and they also want to make sure northern ireland is not treated in a way which would see any kind of internal trade barrier within the uk. mark and norman, for now, thank you. i think you are able to steer with us while the negotiations continue. —— stay with us. as soon as arlene
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foster and nigel dodds emerge we will have more from them. we expect them to say something. i think we can go to belfast now. i am joined from there by sinn fein. i think you are in belfast. i am sorry, you are in westminster! thank you. we have just seen nigel dodds and arlene foster going into ten downing st behind us. what are your thoughts on what lies ahead here? any deal that is made has two come back and be agreed by stormont executive and i think that is keys whatever happens in london will stop all roads lead back to stormont. ——. all roads lead back to stormont. ——. all roads lead back to stormont. it is clear the plaid cymru are against brexit. —— the guinea are against brexit. the unionists —— the dup. we are here to
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meet with the different parties today and put our side of the story. we are clear that we want an anti——— special designated status in the eu. the government consistently, not only in relation to yourselves, but in general today are saying brexit is being negotiated on behalf of the uk as is being negotiated on behalf of the ukasa is being negotiated on behalf of the uk as a whole, it has to work for everybody and suit everybody. it has two not harm the economy, that is a crucial part of that. do you have any confident that is the stance being taken here? i do not. it is quite clear that the majority of the people in the north of ireland wa nted people in the north of ireland wanted to remain in europe. i think thatis wanted to remain in europe. i think that is what we and other party should be bringing here and lobbying the british government in making sure that is the case. we will be arguing that case. ministers will be arguing that case. ministers will be arguing that case and with the mps in westminster they will be arguing
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that case. we do not take our seats but we will work with other parties and we will put our point of view across strongly. any deal ever done here has to be agreed and needs to be agreed by the stormont executive. all roads had —— have to lead back to stormont. 0k. all roads had —— have to lead back to stormont. ok. i all roads had —— have to lead back to stormont. 0k. iwill persist ifi can. it is very noisy here and it is tricky to hear you but i think i got the essence of what you tried to say. maybe i can ask one final question about the role of the dup. we saw them go into downing street. what are your concerns or otherwise about their role in these talks? the fa ct about their role in these talks? the fact that theresa may need them badly if she is going to have any working government. we have more concern for the british government than the tories. we know that they are no friends of ireland and working class people. any deal done can have a detrimental impact. it is clear the british government has to
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be neutral on the good friday agreement when it comes to any arrangement in the north of ireland. it isa arrangement in the north of ireland. it is a big day ahead. we urge caution on all sides to make sure that anything being done is not detrimental to the talks process on going back home in ireland as we speak. it is very clear that michelle o‘neill and arlene foster are going to be working this week to give the stormont executive a chance to get back up and running again. it is clear the gamut in westminster and london will try to undermine that and put anything not neutral to the people of ireland. —— government. thank you very much. we will have more from here and downing street throughout the day and crucially perhaps the next hour or so. we did not know if any timetable specifically has been given. but as soon as arlene foster and nigel dodds emerge from downing street we will hear what they had to say at the end of those talks. more from downing street to come. back to you
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for now, joanna. studio: thank you. the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster has arrived for talks with theresa may in downing street. the rising cost of holidays abroad because of a weakened pound has helped push inflation to its highest rate in four years. multiple failures have been uncovered in reports into the torture and murder ofa reports into the torture and murder of a vulnerable woman in hartlepool by two schoolgirls. a quick look at the markets. the dax is up a little bit. the dax and dowjones and ftse 100 are down. we arejust bit. the dax and dowjones and ftse 100 are down. we are just hearing that a teenage boy has been arrested on suspicion of being in possession ofa on suspicion of being in possession of a firearm after an incident at high lanes school on shankland drive
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in nuneaton. officers responded to a report at quarter past nine this morning that the boy possessed a firearm on the school premises. the police said they responded promptly. the boy was quickly isolated and incident contains to make sure there was no risk to pupils and staff. a shot gun and ammunition were seized. we have just had that through. friday marks the first anniversary of the death of labour mpjo cox, who was killed in birstall, outside her constituency surgery. her senseless killing sent shock waves around the world but united the country in grief. a year on and herfamily are determined to continue her legacy. this weekend, on the first anniversary of her death, they‘re encouraging people to join together with neighbours, friends and their local community at events in her memory. let‘s hearjo‘s parents with their memories of that day. we just sat down about five minutes
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and the phone rang. and it was one of her aides. hejust said, joe has been shot, i think. and that was it. isaid, been shot, i think. and that was it. i said, where is she? wejumped been shot, i think. and that was it. isaid, where is she? wejumped in the car, i rememberjumping in the car, and we could not get near. we set off running. i don‘t know how we ran, how we manage to get there, into the middle of birstall. the police were there. they stopped us. someone says police were there. they stopped us. someone sastoe has been shot... is bad. you are sort of thinking. .. and they recover and so on and so on. we did not know at that time. they recover and so on and so on. we did not know at that timelj they recover and so on and so on. we did not know at that time. i think we knew. i think i did. did not know at that time. i think we knew. ithinki did. idid did not know at that time. i think we knew. ithinki did. i did not know. we will always be broken because there is a piece missing,
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but yes, the long time for us when we turn on the television and see terrorist acts at westminster bridge, manchester. because that is when it brings everything back. for me, the ambulances, the sirens, and back again in birstall. we also think about the people and we have lost loved ones and we know what they are actually going through. it must be awfulfor them. they are actually going through. it must be awful for them. we know what we went through. and unfortunately they do not as yet. going forward, they do not as yet. going forward, the children, grandchildren, and supporting one another, we will continue to do that. it will not go away. after one year it gets better, it doesn't, it will not go away. but we have to be positive and we are being. looking back i
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we have to be positive and we are being. looking back! could have played it differently... one or two more moments, who can tell? more than one person came up to me after the funeral and after in the marketplace and said, you have got not one but two marvellous daughters. one, we saw. and joe on occasions on the television. clearly you have got two. we are very proud because we can't separate the two and never would. the parents of jo cox talking to our reporter, kathryn burns. inquests into the london
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bridge terror attack victims were opened today. three attackers drove into pedestrians on the bridge and stabbed passers—by. tom symons gave us stabbed passers—by. tom symons gave us this update from southwark a short time ago. the senior coroner andrew harris said this was a terrible time for the families of those who died and we did have one or two relatives of those who died in court today. he was considering five out of the eight cases, running through them in the harsh details that coroners courts have to trade in. he said that she was 21, the australian open air, died from a sta b australian open air, died from a stab wound in the neck. james mcmullen, 32, an entrepreneur, last seen at the barrow boy pub, died as a result of a haemorrhage and stabbed to the chest. kirsty boden, born in australia, a senior nurse at a london hospital, died from an
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incised wound in the chest. a french chef, 36 years old, again, a stab wound in the chest. and a 39—year—old analyst for the hsbc bank died as a result of a stab wound in the back. he was somebody that we have been told attempted to fight back against the attackers on that night. as is normal in these cases, with the police investigation in full flow, the coroner will suspend his work until the police have finished. but he promised the families of those who died and they will be given full details of those debts when his investigations conclude. tom, separately the met police assistant commissioner has been talking about the responsibility of internet companies and communities in calling out extremists. what has he been saying? this is mark rowley, a metropolitan police assistant commissioner at the
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senior counterterrorism department. in an article in the times he says we had to step in to disrupt potential attacks and we need communities to be more assertive in calling out extremists and radicalise is among us. he said we need internet companies to do more and he says we need to learn about attack methodology and make sure thatis attack methodology and make sure that is all dealt with. interestingly, max hill, the government review of counterterrorism legislation, has also been talking this morning. he said actually britain has enough terrorism laws to cope with the threat and challenge the police and security services are facing. he saysin security services are facing. he says in an extreme example, an internet company that will not cooperate with investigations might have to face a penalty. but he says apart from that there is enough power for the police and security
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services to bring terrorists in front of justice. still a services to bring terrorists in front ofjustice. still a debate is going on about how best to deal with the unprecedented challenges facing the unprecedented challenges facing the country abdomen. tom symons reporting. in a moment the news that one but first the weather with nick miller. differences abound across the united kingdom this afternoon. some of us has warm sunshine and others fairly thick cloud. this is from scotland, in fife. look at this from scotland, in fife. look at this from bedfordshire. that is where across parts of southern england and south wales we are seeing that sunshine this afternoon getting higher temperatures. scotland and northern ireland and northern england and wales have a fair amount of cloud around. cloud, sunshine, or to deal with —— all to do with high—pressure nick england and wales, warm sunny spells in the next couple of days, or low pressure in scotla nd couple of days, or low pressure in scotland and northern ireland, more cloud and occasionally wet weather and breezy compared with elsewhere.
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that is the case is afternoon with some rain around here. in contrast, across much of southern england and eventually wales, we see more sunshine coming through. we mayjust find an isolated shower developing in part of the midlands and eastern areas of england, very few and far between. some sunny spells coming through the cloud in wales and northern ireland but hardly any in scotla nd northern ireland but hardly any in scotland and northern ireland. some sunny breaks in north east scotland but here are some heavy showers around and elsewhere outbreaks of rain. that continues to move northwards into scotland and elsewhere it will be a mainly dry night. clear skies in england and wales. rural temperatures dipping down into single figures for some and maybe some fog patches, nothing white bread, gone quickly in the morning. plenty of sunshine. some cloud building, especially in northern england, may be an isolated shower in the afternoon but sunny spells in scotland and northern ireland, another system bringing rain, more especially into western and northern scotland. a big
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difference in temperatures from the warm sunshine in england and wales, high 20s for some in south—east england, to scotland and northern ireland, more cloud, temperatures lower than elsewhere. i think some spots will get close to 20 celsius. into wednesday evening, barbecue weather for some of into wednesday evening, barbecue weatherfor some of us. into wednesday evening, barbecue weather for some of us. a lot of dry weather for some of us. a lot of dry weather around but another weather system coming in from the atlantic. again, on thursday, rain or showers in scotland and northern ireland, but also pushing right across england and wales. it will weaken as it does so, some shelves, but more cloud compared with wednesday, temperatures coming down a bit and thursday will be a windy day as well. —— breezy day, as well. what price to keep theresa may in power? we‘ll be getting the latest from our assistant political editor norman smith in downing street. also this lunchtime. inflation hits a nearfour—year high, continuing the squeeze on consumers as prices rise faster than wages. an inquest opens into the deaths of the victims of the london bridge terror attack, and hears five
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of them were stabbed. washington awaits. one of donald trump‘s top advisers, jeff sessions, will testify over claims russia tried to meddle in last november‘s election. and remembering jo. a year after her murderjo cox‘s parents speak for the first time about the death of their daughter.
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