Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 13, 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm BST

3:00 pm
as many of us are of that speaker. as many of us are of that opinion, say i. the ayes have it. laughter colleagues, before i take the chair as speaker—elect colleagues, before i take the chair as spea ker—elect i colleagues, before i take the chair as speaker—elect i wish first to thank the house for the honour that it is again bestowed upon me. i am aware that it is the greatest honour it can give to any of its members. i pray that i shalljustify its continuing confidence and i propose to do all within my power to preserve and to cherish its best traditions. i want, preserve and to cherish its best traditions. iwant, if preserve and to cherish its best traditions. i want, if i preserve and to cherish its best traditions. iwant, if i may, preserve and to cherish its best traditions. i want, if i may, just
3:01 pm
to say two other things. first, and yes it's a repetition but i think it's a justified repetition, isn't it's a justified repetition, isn't it marvellous to see the right honourable and learned gentleman the memberfor honourable and learned gentleman the member for rushcliffe as father of the house and back here in rude health. secondly, in welcoming the presence of all colleagues today and congratulating all those in all parties who have been re—elected, i hope experienced members will understand if i pay particular tribute to the, i believe, 87 members newly elected for the first time. whatever else you have done or will do in the course of your
3:02 pm
careers, there will be no greater honour than that which you have just attained as an elected member of parliament. i am sure each and eve ryo ne parliament. i am sure each and everyone of you will be very conscious of your responsibility to your constituents. rest assured, the speaker will look out for you and be very keen, sooner speaker will look out for you and be very keen, sooner rather than later, and more frequently, rather than less frequently, to hearfrom and more frequently, rather than less frequently, to hear from you. mrspeaker—elect, oh... laughter that's not the prime minister's
3:03 pm
fault, i gave her the nod! the prime minister. i was going to say mr speaker—elect to all those who are now members, you see you speaker—elect to all those who are now members, you see you can speaker—elect to all those who are now members, you see you can be in this house for 20 years and still not always know the protocol but there we are. on behalf of the whole house, may i congratulate you on your re—election. at least someone got a landslide. laughter and may i also congratulate you on becoming the first speaker since the second world war to be re—elected three times. in your tenure so far you have been a great champion of backbenchers, ensuring that every member of this house has the opportunity to speak and to be heard in representing the people they serve. this is such an important pa rt serve. this is such an important part of the way our democracy is
3:04 pm
upheld in this house and i know you will continue in this vital role in the future, just as you have in the past. let me also thank my right honourable friend the member for rushcliffe for assuming the chair for this election and let me welcome his return as father of the house. he has, as you and others have said, had a long and distinguished career in his service to his constituents and to this country and if i may say to him it is very good to see him back here where he belongs. but it may not surprise him that i intend to be difficult today. and break with tradition. by not only welcoming him as the father of the house, but also welcoming the returning mother of the house. the right honourable member for camberwell and peckham has been a great advocate for increasing the number of women in parliament and i am sure she willjoin me in celebrating the fact there are now
3:05 pm
more women mps than ever before. and as we welcome new members on all sides of the house, we should also celebrate the fact that we now have a record number of mps celebrate the fact that we now have a record number of mp5 from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, including the first ever female sikh mp. we also have more disabled mps and more lgbt mps and i hope that together we will continue to build on the progress we have made in previous parliaments to fight against discrimination in all its forms and to make our politics more representative of all the people we serve. for a while there is further to go, if there is one outcome for this election we can all welcome, it is surely this — that today we have the most diverse and most representative parliament in our history. mr speaker—elect, representative parliament in our history. mr spea ker—elect, i representative parliament in our history. mr speaker—elect, i know that members across the house will also want to pay tribute to their predecessors. we will all miss
3:06 pm
former members, not returned to this house. but we welcome our new colleagues. being a member of this house is a great privilege that requires dedication and often personal sacrifice. and everyone in this chamber does it because they wa nt to this chamber does it because they want to serve the public. whatever the result, general elections are, above all, an exercise in democracy and our values. the very democracy and our values. the very democracy and values that the recent terror attacks sought to undermine. this is the first opportunity that parliament has had to reflect on the despicable terrorist attacks in manchester and at london bridge. i am sure members on all sides will wa nt to am sure members on all sides will want tojoin am sure members on all sides will want to join me am sure members on all sides will want tojoin me in sending our deepest condolences to the families and loved ones of all those who lost their lives in the attacks. i know their lives in the attacks. i know the house will also want to express admiration for the extra ordinary work of all our police and emergency services whose courage and speed of
3:07 pm
response saved many lives. as we begin this new parliament, it is clear that our country faces some of the greatest challenges of our time. the challenge of keeping our nation safe, including by defeating the perverted ideology of islamist extremism, the challenge of securing the best possible brexit deal and delivering the will of the british people in taking the u kipping out of the european union, and the challenge of spreading opportunity and prosperity to every part of our united kingdom so that no one and no community is left behind. in meeting these challenges what we have seen from the election is that there are parts of our country that remain divided, divided between young and old, rich and poor, those for whom the future offers a sense of opportunity and those for whom it brings worry and concern. some people blame politics for these divisions. 0r say there is too much politics. but politics can be an incredible force for good, conducted in the right way it can be how we resolve our differences, how we deal
3:08 pm
with injustices and how we take, not shirk, big decisions. it's not a lwa ys shirk, big decisions. it's not always glamorous or exciting. but at its best, the duty we share as politicians to serve others in confronting these challenges is a truly noble calling for us all and the test for all of us is whether we choose to reflect divisions or help the country overcome them. so let us choose in this parliament to conduct ourselves in a mannerfitting choose in this parliament to conduct ourselves in a manner fitting to this moment, to debate, to disagree, but in doing so we recognise — to recognise we all want to see a britain that is stronger, fairer and safe and secure for our children and grandchildren. and that our shared values, interests and ambitions can and must bring us together. as we face difficult challenges ahead, let us come face difficult challenges ahead, let us come together in a spirit of national unity to keep our country safe and build a stronger, fairer and more prosperous future for eve ryo ne and more prosperous future for everyone in every part of our united kingdom. thank you. i call the
3:09 pm
leader of the opposition. mrspeaker, thank you very much, i follow the prime minister in the remarks she made about the importance of the work we all have to do in this parliament. and i will come back to that in a moment. firstly, i want to congratulate the honourable member for rushcliffe on becoming father of the house. he seemed to me to be a very well established mp when i entered the house 3a years ago. and i have never quite forgotten the image of the memberfor quite forgotten the image of the member for rushcliffe in the tearoom wearing hush puppies eating bacon sandwiches drinking super strength lager and carrying a cigar while taking a debate — taking a break from a debate on healthy living. laughter he has had a very long and distinguished career in this house. and this year with a speech in the brexit debate during which he
3:10 pm
lamented that his party opposite had become mildly anti—immigrant. how new a development that might be is open to debate but sorry to note it's also, to put it generously, at best mildly anti—worker, anti—disabled people, anti—pensioner and anti—young person, as well, sorry to be divisive here today. it's all right, it's all right. mrspeaker, it is customary on these occasions to congratulate the returning prime minister and i absolutely do so. i congratulate her on returning and i am sure she will agree with me that democracy is a wondrous thing and can throw up some very unexpected results. and i am sure... and i am sure we all look forward to welcoming the queen's speech, just as soon as the coalition of chaos has been negotiated. and, just let the house know and the
3:11 pm
rest of the nation know, that if that's not possible, the labour party stands ready to offer strong and stable leadership in the national interest. i want to warmly welcome all new members to this house. there is, as you have said and others have said, no greater honour than being elected here. it is an amazing day when you first come and take your seat here. the honour of representing your constituents and taking decisions that will help people's lives, that's why we are elected here, to represent those that have put us here, to try and make their lives better. and you quite rightly pointed out, as did the prime minister, we now have over 200 women mps, more than ever before in the history of this parliament. i think thatis history of this parliament. i think that is an excellent thing and i join the prime minister in congratulating my friend the member for camberwell and peckham in all she has done to promote women in
3:12 pm
parliament and women's careers in general. this weekend marked the anniversary of the election of four black mps to the house of commons 30 yea rs black mps to the house of commons 30 years ago. the first black mps black mps to the house of commons 30 years ago. the first black mp5 for more than 60 years in this british parliament. in particular, iwelcome my right honourable friends the members for hackney north and stoke newington and leicester east. those we re newington and leicester east. those were two of the four who were elected in 1987, who are now members of the most diverse house of commons ever, they paved the way and i have to say they've put up with an awful lot by being pioneers in taking their seats in 1987. it is vitalfor our democracy that all voices are heard and represented. there can be no better speaker than new the 30 yea rs i have no better speaker than new the 30 years i have been here, because you have always ensured that back bench voices are heard and the way that you have presided over our chamber at all times, the good, the bad and
3:13 pm
the tragic and the difficult, particularly the way in which you presided over this chamber after the horrors of what happened on westminster bridge, when those horrors came almost to the door of parliament. whilst parliament is obviously not been in session for the past few weeks, we also commemorate the awfulness of what happened in manchester as well as what happened on london bridge. we have to stand together as communities strong, united against those that would seek to divide and destroy the democracy that we have in our society. and i congratulate you on the way in which you have conducted yourself and the inclusive debates that you have made sure backbenchers are fully involved with over the years that you have been speaker. we have two things in common, at least two things in common, at least two things in common, mrspeaker. firstly, which is divisive, our love for arsenal football club. i realise that would bring that sort of comment. i can cope. it's all right. secondly, we
3:14 pm
both came to this place having been local councillors. i think serving communities on local authorities is very important and i am delighted at the number of former councillors or serving councillors who were elected to this house on thursday night because they also bring a very special expertise and knowledge to this house. we have to speak up for our constituents and that is why we are here and i know you will make sure those voices are heard. i want to thank you for your role as speaker in facilitating exhibitions in this house, i took part in one on the commemorating the end of the slave trade. and many receptions you have held for charities in the speaker's house, have held for charities in the spea ker‘s house, but have held for charities in the speaker's house, but also the way in which you have travelled around the country reaching out and spreading the whole idea of democracy in schools and colleges, not necessarily famous, not necessarily well—known, but you have reached out to people in a way that had never been done before and we should all been done before and we should all
3:15 pm
be very grateful to you for that. you are not going to be troubled by party politics any more. because you are in the chair. but it is in the great tradition of democracy and you stand in that tradition of a speaker standing upfor stand in that tradition of a speaker standing up for democracy. in your house there is a commemoration to many other speakers. your job house there is a commemoration to many other speakers. yourjob and hisjob was to many other speakers. yourjob and his job was to protect democracy and rise above party debate. ijust hope now we can have that real debate in the future. when those benches opposite might be in a position to ta ke opposite might be in a position to take part in those debates. we look forward to this parliament, however short it might be, that we can be the voice for change in our society, because more people, particularly young people than ever before, took pa rt young people than ever before, took part in this recent general election. they took part because they wanted to see things done differently in our society. they wa nted differently in our society. they wanted our parliament to represent them and deliver change for them.
3:16 pm
and i am looking forward to this parliament like no other parliament ever before, to challenge and hopefully bring about that change. thank you, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker. thank you. mrstuart hosie. and also to pay tribute to the emergency services. it's right that we do that as our democratic process was affected twice in a short campaign. cani was affected twice in a short campaign. can i also say that we will miss many of those who have lost their seats from all parts of the house. while we welcome all of the house. while we welcome all of the new members from all the parties, there are some big beasts who have gone and i suspect we will miss them all sooner, rather than later. may i also agree with the prime minister on one other thing she said, the politics are not
3:17 pm
divisive. i think that's important. whether we take a different view on the constitution, on brexit, on social policy, on tax and spend, these are simply the different opinions of political opponents, not enemies, and if we can reflect a little more respect across all the parties, that would do this house and politics a great deal of good. may i congratulate you, mr speaker, we in the snp have always seen you asa we in the snp have always seen you as a champion, ensuring that all of the voices across and indeed within the voices across and indeed within the parties are properly heard. indeed, ican the parties are properly heard. indeed, i can also say having sat and worked with you on the house of commons commission, you have also shown yourself to be incredibly diligent with an attention to detail in the way this building and house and commons is run with the chamber and commons is run with the chamber andi and commons is run with the chamber and i am sure those whojoin and commons is run with the chamber and i am sure those who join you and commons is run with the chamber and i am sure those whojoin you in the commission in this parliament will find exactly the same thing. in congratulating you and we do, may i
3:18 pm
make one final comment, the leader of the opposition has referred to a coalition which is as yet undefined and a programme for government which appears to be as yet unwritten. given there is no absolute majority in this house, we are in for interesting times, so with my congratulations, may i wish you all the very best of luck. laughter thank you, mrtim farron. many can congratulations to you. may i associate myself with the remarks made by the speaker's so far, especially in the light of the outrage that is took place both in manchester and in london during the general election campaign. they were outrages that were meant to divide us outrages that were meant to divide us and our outrages that were meant to divide us and our response outrages that were meant to divide us and our response is to be united, to show love and respect, immense gratitude to those who came to our aid, those who came to help those
3:19 pm
who were stricken, those who keep us safe and as we were attacked in this place a few months earlier and saw the death of keith palmer, we are reminded in the most utterly visceral way how safe our police and our security services keep us and to whom we are immensely grateful. may i also associate myself with the remarks made, generous remarks and correctly so about the members for camberwell and peckham and indeed for rushcliffe. and also with the remarks made earlier by the right honourable member for chesham. she did make one mistake, we nearly got rid of all the wigs, there are 12 us now, that's a 50% increase. thank you very much! i am here all week! actually, if you are... congratulations on your re—election, which is of course utterly
3:20 pm
well—deserved. you have the privilege of serving and presiding over one of the most interesting parliaments in recent years. i think you are the first speaker, certainly in modern times, to preside over not just one but now two balanced parliaments and we have to do something about the chaos, the chaos and the absolute instability caused by the first—past—the—post electoral system. we have every right to expect and every confidence that you will continue with characteristic good grace and humour to preside over this place. you are known for your fairness and willingness to ensure that voices right across this place, from the — from every corner of the uk and every party are heard. iam sure of the uk and every party are heard. i am sure my colleagues returned here in greater numbers will look forward to speaking up very clearly forward to speaking up very clearly for their constituents, particularly as we embark on critical brexit negotiations. after this recent divisive period it will be our
3:21 pm
intention to seek unity in the national interest and common purpose across this house and where we disagree with other parties, to seek to disagree well and with grace. we shall also speak out in favour of restored investment in schools, health and social care and our police force, believing that a parliament that does not invest in those public services is no servant of its people. 0nce those public services is no servant of its people. once again, many congratulations from me and all my colleagues. thank you, mrnigel dodds. thank you, mrspeaker. mayi begin by congratulating you, sir, on your re—election and i wish you very, very well indeed for the post that you now reoccupy. you have a lwa ys that you now reoccupy. you have always been very, very acidious in ensuring that those with smaller parties, the regional parties, and those with little influence in this house have had their voice heard.
3:22 pm
cani house have had their voice heard. can i also say that i wish, i hope that in future, while some things may have changed, it is good that you remain in place and that some things haven't changed. we look forward to this parliament and i wa nt to forward to this parliament and i want to commiser rate with all those members on all sides of the house who have failed to be re—elected or who have failed to be re—elected or who have failed to be re—elected or who have left us and congratulate all members of all parties who have joined us. i want to particularly pay tribute to those members from northern ireland, from other parties, who have not been re—elected. i want to thank them for their service and we bear a heavy responsibility now in this house along with the independent member as the only representatives from northern ireland and we intend to carry out that responsibility very, very carefully indeed. we hope, of course, for the restoration as soon as possible of our locally devolved
3:23 pm
assembly and executive in northern ireland where everybody can play a pa rt ireland where everybody can play a part in the government of northern ireland. so we have interesting times ahead. i look forward to playing a full role in the proceedings of this parliament over the course of the next five years andi the course of the next five years and i wish you well in your office during that time. mrhywel williams. may i begin by associating myself and my party with the prime minister's remarks and the remarks of others about the outrages in manchester and london. these sorts of horrible acts have absolutely no place in our democracy and we all join together to condemn them. you will forgive me if i begin byjust welcoming my new honourable friend. the good people will be represented bya the good people will be represented by a plaid cymru member again and we look forward to his contributions. i would of course like to congratulate
3:24 pm
both you and the father of the house. i am sure honourable and right honourable members on both sides of the house look forward to the right honourable memberfor the insightful, knowledgeable and confident interventions during what is likely to be one of the most lively and most important parliaments of recent years. not least, of course, because the matter mainly before us in this place, the matter of the uk's place in europe, has been one of the central political concerns for so long, we look forward to his contributions. i also congratulate you and hope that you will continue in your positive attitude towards the workings of this place, to the modernisation of that working, to the rights of backbenchers and lastly, to the fair treatment you always provided for the smaller parties. caroline lucas. cani the smaller parties. caroline lucas. can i associate myself and my party with the comments made by the prime
3:25 pm
minister and others about those atrocities in manchester and london bridge and our hearts go out to all those affected by them. i am delighted to congratulate you on your well—deserved re—election. when your well—deserved re—election. when you were last re—elected in may 2015 you were last re—elected in may 2015 you said you would like to be immortalised on your tombstone as the backbencher‘s champion. as a member of this house with perhaps the least chance of ever becoming a frontbencher, i think i can say that you have that ambition safely in the bag. but can i also say that you are a champion of the smaller parties in this house and we are very grateful for that, as well as a pioneer when it comes to the urgent issue of parliamentary reform and that is much appreciated as well. i would like to congratulate the right honourable member for rushcliffe on becoming father of the house, to echo the very well said words about the right honourable memberfor camberwell and peckham on her role when it comes to being the mother of
3:26 pm
the house and in particular her role in getting more women elected. and in doing so i would like to echo the comments of others about the pleasure we have in seeing now a record number of women being represented in this place, at the same time as noting 32% still remain some way off 50%. slow progress is better than no progress. but we still think there is some way to go. who knows, perhaps we will not have to wait a full five years before having a chance to improve on that 32% of this house being women and our rating of being the 38th in the world when it comes to women in this place. i look forward to improvements in diversity right across this house. thank you. we come now to the adjournment. the whip to move. i beg to move this house do now adjourn until tomorrow at 2. 40pm. the question is that this house do now adjourn until
3:27 pm
tomorrow at 2. 40pm. as many of that opinion say aye. to the contrary no. independenting the ayes have it. —— i think the ayes have it. 0rder, order! . so the first formal session of parliament there, but the formalities, as you will have gathered, essentially to welcome the father of the house, and, crucially, to elect the speaker in this case reelect the speaker, because john bercow is speaker for the third time. kenneth clarke is father of the house because he is the longest serving mp in the house, very nearly his 47 years in the commons. we are here in downing street because fundamentally we have been following
3:28 pm
talks between theresa may and the dup. arlene foster and nigel dodds arrived here about 12. 30. we thought we would get a resolution perhaps today. but theresa may had to leave those talks because she had to leave those talks because she had to ta ke to leave those talks because she had to take part in proceedings there. there may be a few more talks to come. let's get an assessment of what has happened so far. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page joins me from belfast. a couple of comments, arlene foster has been tweeting, bring us up to date with what the dup is saying. yes, well, the dup left through the back door of downing street, we believe. then nigel dodds appeared in the house of commonsjust there nigel dodds appeared in the house of commons just there a few minutes ago for the speaker's commons just there a few minutes ago for the spea ker‘s re—election. commons just there a few minutes ago for the speaker's re—election. but arlene foster, the dup leader, who went in through the front door of downing street with nigel dodds, has tweeted that the talks are basically making good progress and they hope to bring them to a successful
3:29 pm
conclusion soon and sources have been telling us that they do expect a deal to be done tomorrow or perhaps thursday. so perhaps final detailsjust being ironed out. anybody who has covered many negotiationsle, certainly here involving the dup over years, have known sometimes it comes down to detail and when we are expecting an agreement things get pushed back a little more. but there was never really a ny little more. but there was never really any doubt a deal would be done between the dup and the conservative party. the alternative for the dup would have been potentiallyjeremy corbyn in downing street and the dup have always been very, very critical ofjeremy corbyn's leadership of the labour party, particularly past links with republicans and his stance on security issues. so, certainly common ground to suggest a deal between the dup and the conservatives was likely. nigel dodds not giving very much away there, noting the dup, their ten mps and the independent are now the only northern ireland representatives on the green benches in the house of
3:30 pm
commons because the other mp5 elected from northern ireland are all from sinn fein and they don't ta ke all from sinn fein and they don't take their seats. so nigel dodds said that meant that the northern ireland mps had all the more responsibility and he said they would carry out those responsibilities carefully. not really alluding directly to the deal with the conservatives. he did say that the dup would play a full role in this parliament and interesting times lay thank you very much. much more from here in downing street. we wait to see what more might emerge. whether a few more details come out about what was discussed and we will be talking to key politicians about their view on these talks between theresa may and the dup. theresa may has a prearranged visit in paris tonight. she has to go and have meetings and dinner with emmanuel macron. that was organised the election so the talks can't continue into tonight because theresa may has obgakess in paris, but we'll have more from here in the next little
3:31 pm
while. let's pause and catch up with the weather prospects. nick miller has the details. good afternoon sunny skies in downing street and grey skies in stormont. 0utbreaks downing street and grey skies in stormont. 0utbrea ks of downing street and grey skies in stormont. outbreaks of rain affecting scotland. the rest of the uk though, overnight looking dry. clea rest skies uk though, overnight looking dry. clearest skies as you can see in england and wales. so here this is where the temperatures will be lower away from the town and city centres. a few rural spots into single figures. for the most part it is a sunny start for england and wales. there will be a few breaks in the cloud. many of us will stay dry. for england and wales although some patchy cloud will develop, there maybe an isolated shower. most will stay dry and there will be plenty of warm sunny spells. areas around the london area could see 20 celsius. with that cloud into scotland and
3:32 pm
northern ireland and more breeze and temperatures held down a bit. some spots may get close to around 20 celsius. with the warmth and the sunshine for england and wales, the relatively high, very high in places uv levels and very high pollen in places too. that's it for now. this is bbc news. arlene foster has held talks with theresa may in downing street on a deal to support a conservative minority government. the bbc understands there are no outstanding issues left and the deal is largely agreed. the former prime ministerjohn major warns of the consequences of a deal saying the fragile peace process in northern ireland is at risk. the
3:33 pm
european parliament brexit negotiator tells the bbc that the eu is inpatient for brexit talks to begin. new and returning mps are back in parliament for the first time since the election. john bercow has been re—elected speaker of the house of commons and was dragged to his perch above the commons. let's catch up with the sports news and katherine downes. good afternoon. the british and irish lions lost another warm up game in new zealand. 23—22 to the highlanders club side. so their preparations for the first test against the all blacks have been hit by injury. for the lions another chance to leave everything on the pitch, but they do so with the news that stewart hogg has been ruled out of the rest of the tour through injury
3:34 pm
and in the highlanders they saw a side with tricks, power and all blacks. after trading penalties he eyed another gap. this time firmly in his hands. the lions on the back foot and to add insult to injury, an injury for courtney laws. jonathan joseph scored to ease nerves before tommy seymour jumped at joseph scored to ease nerves before tommy seymourjumped at the chance to ta ke tommy seymourjumped at the chance to take the lion's share of the scoreline. with tries coming at a premium on this tour, suddenly the opportunities were starting to come. captain sam warburton first and then the highlanders scored. so it came down to to kicks. banks made no mistake with his to take the lead before daily had the chance to win it with this effort, just short of vic ve. —— victory. vic ve. -- victory. the guys are disappointed that we put ouf in position 22—13 to control that game and win it and the unfortunate thing
3:35 pm
is we probably shot ourselves in the foot haven't we with some turnovers and some penalties towards the end of the game and have allowed them the opportunity to sneak it from us. cricket and england are set to drop joyson roy for tomorrow's game against pakistan in cardiff. roy just made 51 runs. he did not bat in tuesday's net session with jonny ba i rstow. tuesday's net session with jonny bairstow. there is a chance there will be a change. we can't announce the team until tomorrow. we're looking to put out our strongest team. for the last two years we've built towards this tournament and we wa nt to built towards this tournament and we want to win this tournament or get to the final. and part and parcel of thatis to the final. and part and parcel of that is picking guys who we feel are in our best 11. everton have agreed to pay £30
3:36 pm
million for sunderland's jordan pickford. pickford was one of few bright spots in sunderland's season as they finished bottom and they we re as they finished bottom and they were relegated from the premier league. cristiano ronaldo has been accused of tax evasion. he is alleged to have used off—shore companies to avoid paying nearly £13 million in tax. anton gresman signed a contract with atletico madrid. he is tied to the spanish side until 2022. he is due to play against england in a friendly in paris tonight. a senior coach working with great britain's 0lympic bobsleigh squad has been accused of racism amid multiple complaints over a toxic atmosphere in the sport. athletes mentioned bullying, racism and discrimination. the bobsleigh
3:37 pm
association say they have conducted association say they have conducted a review. i don't have a history of mental health problems, but it got to the point where i was experiencing what i could only describe as bouts of anxiety and depressive episodes every single day. i just had depressive episodes every single day. ijust had for someone that loves my training, i love training every day, i love my sport, ijust really didn't want to be there. i didn't want to be doing sport. i was kind of sometimes i had my fingers crossed that i would sustain some injury that would put me in a category where i couldn't slide. it was that bad. that's all the sport for now. now, it is back to jane in downing street. yes, and we are here because we're monitoring those talks between theresa may and the dup. there was a break in proceedings though because this afternoon was also the formal
3:38 pm
resumption of parliament, a few for mallities that have to be gone through in the light of the general election. chief among those, the election. chief among those, the election or re—election as it turned out to be of the speaker, john bercow is the speaker again for this next session of parliament. his third term of office as speaker and after that, after he accepted that post, we heard comments from both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, both managing to raise a laugh at various points and theresa may congratulating john bercow because nobody opposed him for that position of speaker and theresa may did make the house of commons laugh when she said, "well, at least somebody got a landslide." it is said, "well, at least somebody got a landslide. " it is clear said, "well, at least somebody got a landslide." it is clear that our country faces some of the greatest challenges of our time. the challenges of our time. the challenge of keeping our nation safe including by defeating the perverted
3:39 pm
ideology of islamist extremism. the challenge of securing the best possible brexit deal and delivering the will of the british people in taking the united kingdom out of the european union. and the challenge of spreading opportunity and prosperity to every pa rt spreading opportunity and prosperity to every part of our united kingdom so that no one and no community is left behind. in meeting these challenges what we have seen from the election is that there are parts of our country that remain divided, divided between young and old, rich and poor, those for whom the future offers a sense of opportunity and for those whom it brings worry and concern, some people blame politics orsay concern, some people blame politics or say there is too much politics, but politics will be an incredible force for good. conducted in the right way, it can be how we resolve our differences, how we deal with injustices and how we take, not shirk the big decisions. it's not a lwa ys shirk the big decisions. it's not always glamorous or exciting, but at its best the duty we share as politicians to serve others in couldn't fronting the challenges is a truly noble calling for us all.
3:40 pm
the prime minister, talking about some of the challenges ahead in this parliament of let's hear as well from the labour leader, jeremy corbyn. mr speaker, it is customary on these occasions to gran grad late the returning prime minister and i absolutely do so and i congratulate her on returning and i'm sure she will agree with me that democracy is a wondrous thing and can throw up some very a wondrous thing and can throw up some very unexpected results! laughter and i'm sure we all look forward to welcoming the queen's speech just as soon as the coalition of chaos has been negotiated! mr speaker, ijust let been negotiated! mr speaker, i just let the been negotiated! mr speaker, ijust let the house know and the rest of the nation know that if that's not possible, the labour party stands ready to offer strong and stable leadership! in the national interests.
3:41 pm
i want to warmly welcome mr speaker all new members to this house. there is, as you have said and others have said, no greater honour than being elected here and it is an amazing day when you first come and take your seat here. the honour of representing your constituents and taking decision that is will help people's lives, that's why we're elected here. to represent those who put us here to try and make their lives better. jeremy corbyn in the commons. well, in terms of the talks that have been going on here today with the dup there has been a very, very interesting intervention from the former leader of the conservative party, former prime minister, sir john major. he gave a lengthy interview to the world at 0ne john major. he gave a lengthy interview to the world at one on radio 4 interview to the world at one on radio4and interview to the world at one on radio 4 and expressed considerable disquiet about those talks. this, a man, of course, who was key, a key
3:42 pm
figure in the good friday agreement and expressed a lot of concerns about what it means to do any form of deal with the democratic unionist party. let's hear a little of that radio interview. i am concerned about the deal. i am wary about it. iam about the deal. i am wary about it. i am dubious about it, both for peace process reasons, but also for other reasons as well. that said, all my life i have been a conservative. i very much want mrs may to succeed as prime minister and to stay as prime minister. and i understand why she wishes to shore up understand why she wishes to shore up her parliamentary position. that is entirely understandable and i sympathise, but, but, my main concern certainly is the peace process. a fundamental part of that peace process is that the uk government needs to be impartial between all the competing interests in northern ireland. the good friday agreement says the power of the
3:43 pm
sovereign government should be exercised with impartiality? that's entirely right. and that was always the intention right from the start of the negotiations and the danger is that however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal at westminster with one of the northern ireland parties. and you never know in what unpredictable way events will turn out and we cannot know if that impartiality is going to be crucial at some stage in the future. if the government do form a deal with the dup, andi government do form a deal with the dup, and i can see that they well might feel that they have to, then it is doubly important, trebly important to consult on brexit widely both in and out of parliament. i think if that were a joint announcement with any deal with the dup i think it would be very helpful because people would see that there isn't going to be disproportionate pressure from one pa rt disproportionate pressure from one part of the united kingdom, but the
3:44 pm
government really are going to consult with other parliamentary parties, with business and with others who have a direct interest in it. i think we have to recognise that the election changed, if not everything, a very great deal. and the government are going to have to respond to that. the views of the 48% cannot be brushed aside as some of the more rigorous hard—line brexiteers wish. the former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, speaking on radio 4 at lunch time. we'll have more from here at the top of the hour. for now, back to you. jane, thank you very much indeed. two other news now. the european court of human rights will rule later on whether doctors treating ten—month—old old charlie gard can turn off his life support. it would be against the wishes of his pa rents, be against the wishes of his parents, who want to take their son to the united states for experimental treatment for a rare genetic disorder. last week, the
3:45 pm
uk's supreme court agreed with specialists at great 0rmond street hospital that he should be allowed to die with dignity. fergus walsh reports. charlie gard cannot see, hear, move, cry or swallow. he is seriously brain damaged and kept alive with a mechanical ventilator. his parents, chris gard and connie yates, have raised £1.3 million through crowdfunding for experimental treatment in the united states. they say they simply want the best for their son. he hasn't got anything to lose. we know that even if it doesn't work, which i think it will, we know that we have done everything that we can for him. but doctors, including independent experts, say the treatment cannot improve his condition. 0ne concern is that charlie may experience pain but is unable to respond to it. last week, the uk supreme court said while it had the utmost sympathy for his parents, it was not in charlie's interests to subject him to futile treatment which might simply
3:46 pm
prolong his suffering. today, a panel of sevenjudges at the european court of human rights in strasbourg will consider written evidence in the case. if they decide to take on the issue, a full hearing will be organised. if not, then the parents' legal battle to take their son abroad will be over, and from midnight, great 0rmond street hospital will be free to switch off charlie's ventilator and provide only palliative care. s in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc news: the dup leader has met the prime minister for talks on supporting a conservative
3:47 pm
minority government — the bbc understands there are no outstanding issues left and the deal is largely agreed. former prime ministerjohn major warns of the consequences of a deal saying the fragile peace process in northern ireland is at risk. as the uncertainty continues, parliament returns and reelects its speaker. i'm rachel horne. uk inflationjumped to its highest level in nearly four years in may, tightening the squeeze on consumers. the rising cost of foreign package holidays and imported computer games pushed the uk inflation rate up to 2.9% last month from 2.7% in april. euro clearing is worth billions of pounds to london's financial sector, but later today the european commission will announce new regulations. they could call for euro clearing transactions to move from london to the continent if such dealings pose a risk to eu financial stability. nearly $1 billion worth of such trades are done in london every day, supporting thousands of jobs. and the company behind some of britain's leading tourist
3:48 pm
attractions such as madame tussauds, legoland and the london eye say visitors numbers are down. merlin entertainments says people have been put off by the recent terror attacks in manchester and london. we start with inflation which measures the rising cost of living as it continued to rise last month. in fact prices rose more than forecast, at their fastest pace forfour years. prices were up 2.9% on average, measuring the increase in prices for items we regularly buy. that's the highest increase sincejune 2013 and higher than the 2.7% that was forecast. now, that means more pressure on household incomes because wage growth isn't keeping up. and this is what inflation has been doing over the last year. the bank of england governor mark carney has warned that inflation will keep rising this year before falling back slightly from 2018. so what's gone up and what's come down?
3:49 pm
well, the 0ns, which compiles these figures measures prices for all sorts of things. so they say electricity prices saw a big jump, alongside costs like furniture and clothing. and transport costs were up, even though petrol and diesel prices went down, partly because of a fall in oil prices. now, that rise in inflation is already weighing on the economy. growth slowed in the first three months of this year because we've all reigned back our spending. and there's now a worry that the uncertainty over the election outcome could mean we cut back further. now to the housing market. there have been signs that the housing market is cooling and on friday after the election results, shares in housebuilders fell sharply. we're always saying the markets hate uncertainty but the housing market in particular hates political uncertainty. here to tell us why is sarah mcmonagle, federation of master builders.
3:50 pm
thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. so tell us what is it that house builders don't like about political uncertainty? well, i think, house building and construction is particularly vulnerable to dips in consumer confidence and due to the political uncertainty we may see now that homeowners are less likely to commission some building projects for example extensions or loft conversions. they may decide to sit on their hands and wait to see how the political situation unfolds and that's not good for the construction sector given that construction accou nts sector given that construction accounts for 7% of gdp, that's not good for the wider economy. we just good for the wider economy. wejust mentioned good for the wider economy. we just mentioned the inflation figures, inflation up 2.9% in may. is that something that would add concern for you? it does add concern. that's on top of problems seen since the depression of the pound since the referendum last
3:51 pm
summer. that's going to make construction projects more expensive and it might dampen demand in terms of consumers and homeowners commissioning projects. sarah, a ha rd commissioning projects. sarah, a hard brexit or a soft brexit? what do you at the federation of master builders want and how do you define it? well, the biggest concern for the construction sector in terms of brexit is immigration. we were pointed towards a hard brexit and the silver lining of the situation is that we may now see a softer brexit. so, what that means is that we might see the government more open to the needs of business as we negotiate our exit from the eu. hopefully we won't have the tap turned off too quickly in terms of migrant workers. we are very reliant on migrant workers in the construction sector. almost half of all construction workers in london are from the eu. so, if we turn off that tap, that could pose real problems for delivering the government's housing and infrastructure targets. thank you
3:52 pm
very much for your time this afternoon. high inflation, you might think the bank of england would want to bring down the inflation. 0ne bank of england would want to bring down the inflation. one thing they could do is raise interest rates. an increase in interest rates would help sterling back stronger. so some a nalysts help sterling back stronger. so some analysts think we might see that. we will hear from the bank of england on thursday. however, a lot of people are saying we're getting the wrong type of inflation. it is being driven by consumer spending so to increase rates will only damage consumer spending. increase rates will only damage consumerspending. merlin increase rates will only damage consumer spending. merlin warning of visitor numbers falling to their attractions because of terror attacks. the share price is down over 2.5%. i'll be back with a round—up of the business news in an
3:53 pm
hour. back to you both. inquests have opened and been adjourned into the victims of the terror attack. three attackers drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge and stabbed people in nearby borough market. they were young and they had come from around the world to make their lives. a coroner will have to decide how they came to be murdered by three men with knives on a warm summer's night. ki rsty kirsty boden was 28, another australian victim, a staff nurse at a london hospital. she died from a
3:54 pm
chest wound. ignacio miralles was 39. he died stabbed in the back. the families we re stabbed in the back. the families were in court. the coroner will consider in detail the causes of all eight deaths. the police investigation is in full flow. and the coroner, as is normal in these cases, said that he would suspend his inquiry until the police had finished. but he said the families of the victims would be given full details about how their loved ones died. britain's most senior counter—terrorism officer today made a further call for help in dealing with the threat. assistant
3:55 pm
commissioner mark rowley told the time: in the wake of the three attacks the government is considering further powers to force them to take action. to my mind, that's a measure of last resort. what is more important is that we develop ever greater co—operation between security and intelligence services and tech companies within the confines of the law to ensure that this material never reaches the internet in the first place. traders hope to re-open borough market tomorrow. a show of defiance against the men who brought terror here. you will see more from downing street in the next hour. before that, we will take a check on the weather forecast and hear from nick miller. yes, there is warm sunshine to be had for some, but by no means for
3:56 pm
all. it's cloudy out there. this weather watcher picture from belfast may show you the cloud, but it shows you too. gorgeous looking, but here isa you too. gorgeous looking, but here is a bit of blue sky to balance things out in essex. you can see on the satellite picture where most of the satellite picture where most of the sunshine has been, you can see where most of the cloud has been and the thickest cloud is this zone here where we have been getting showers and outbreaks of rain courtesy of this weather front. if you are close to low pressure, you're unsettled. close to high pressure, you're settled and tomorrow, more warmth and sunshine for england and wales. this is the picture going into this evening. 0utbreaks this is the picture going into this evening. outbreaks of rain affecting parts of scotland, spreading northwards. elsewhere, it is looking dry. the clearest skies overnight, here for england and wales. so here temperatures will be lower than this in rural spots into single figures. maybe the odd fog patch. into tomorrow though, it means plenty of sunshine to begin the day for england and wales, patchy cloud building, maybe an isolated shower, most will be dry. scotland and northern ireland, although you have
3:57 pm
more cloud around, compared with england and wales, actually still a lot of dry weather to be found. here is how it looks at apm. and with the sunshine temperatures respond. yes, a little bit cooler. well inland you're into the 20s. so it really will be pleasant, but bear in mind high uv will be pleasant, but bear in mind high uv in the sunshine, high to high uv in the sunshine, high to high pollen. both of those are lower for scotland and northern ireland with the cloud, but sunny spells. a few outbreaks of rain fringing the far north—west of scotland. more breeze compared with elsewhere, but you can see whatever the temperature, there is a lot of fine weather to be had tomorrow evening. then looking to thursday though and the big picture, another weather system moving through initially with outbreaks of rain spreading through scotla nd outbreaks of rain spreading through scotland and then this weather front has to go through. it turns showery, but there will be showers and quite a breeze moving through scotland and northern ireland and one or two heading through england and wales, but palestinianing and you'll miss them. there will be a fair amount of sunshine, but it will be a breezier and fresher day and compared with
3:58 pm
wednesday, temperatures will be down a few degrees, clearly, some warmth to be had. still a good deal of sunshine away from patchy cloud and the showers. friday, another weather system brushing the north—west of the uk with cloud and outbreaks of rain. the best of any sunshine to the south—east. we have a north—west, south—east split in the weather. going into the weekend, even going into next week, and that brings a big variety of weather across the uk and there is more about that in our week ahead video which is available online. this is bbc news. i'mjane hill live in downing street where talks have taken place between the leader of the democratic unionist party and the prime minister. we understand the parties are finalising a deal to prop up theresa may's minority
3:59 pm
conservative government. but former prime ministerjohn major warns of the consequences of a deal, saying the ‘fragile' peace process in northern ireland is at risk. i am concerned about the deal. i am wary about it i am dubious about it both for peace process reasons but also for other reasons as well. as the uncertainty continues, mps return to parliament to re—elect the speaker and reflect on the election.
4:00 pm

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on