Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 15, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

3:00 pm
people are asking us. rightly, the people are asking us. our responsibility is as a parliament, the process we are about to deliver, delivers on that and does not lead people frustrated. rosie. would it be possible for you to send us would it be possible for you to send us the advice and requests that are being made of local authorities, in terms of what they are asking local authorities to do so that we know that as well? thank you for making that as well? thank you for making that point because i should have said we have a role in our own constituencies to work alongside and sometimes challenge those who within the system of accountability we have got to make sure they are doing the job they have. they need to feedback to us some of the questions and anxieties and operational problems they may have. obviously there are governed that systems to do that, but we know from our own experiences that we can get into the weeds and
3:01 pm
ask the questions. i would hope that the parliamentarians across all the parties will do that on behalf of their constituents but also make sure that that is fed back into the government through formal processes of questions and statements but also perhaps informally as well, writing to me oran perhaps informally as well, writing to me or an added bonus is to make sure we are as informed as possible about what is actually happening on the ground. you know that it is sometimes quite hard to know. just specifically in terms of the whole issue around resources, can ijust be absolutely clear and reiterate what nick has said, we will be working with the local authority and the government will guarantee that every single family from grenfell cat macro house will be rehoused in a local area. that is a clear assurance which i hope our colleagues is useful. that is a
3:02 pm
positive note on which to end. that isa positive note on which to end. that is a significant commitment, as you know. so we have been watching a special meeting at westminster to discuss that fire at rental tower. we heard from the fire minister, nick hurd, who told mps that the fire was a national tragedy. at the end there, the housing minister, alex sharma, has said that the government had made a commitment that every single family affected by this tragedy will be re—housed in their local area. jeremy corbyn also saying that they should be a statement to the house after the queens speech next wednesday. there was a promise also
3:03 pm
that no stone would be an turned and that no stone would be an turned and that housing challenge for rehousing those involved in this disaster will be discussed later this afternoon. let us return to the scene of the fire and ben brown is there for us. we are close to what is left of g re nfell tower. we are close to what is left of grenfell tower. you can possibly see that the fire brigade are still training their hoses on the lower pa rt training their hoses on the lower part of the building. we were seeing just a few minutes ago flames still coming out of one floor of the building. they have been telling us that flames are still flaring up from time to time. they have specially trained dogs in there in the higherfloors, specially trained dogs in there in the higher floors, trying specially trained dogs in there in the higherfloors, trying to specially trained dogs in there in the higher floors, trying to search for... well, they don't think there are going to be any more survivors,
3:04 pm
but they are looking for bodies on the higher reaches of the building. currently the death toll is standing at 17, but the emergency services have told us that will rise. 37 people are currently in hospital and i7 people are currently in hospital and 17 of those are still in critical care, according to the emergency services. the prime minister was here earlier, meeting some of the emergency services, and so too was jeremy corbyn, who said that the truth must come out. richard lister has this report. the smoke—blackened ruin was still smouldering this morning. it took more than 2a hours to get the blaze under control. small pockets were alight in areas that were too dangerous to reach. there are bodies too, nobody knows how many. finding them is a challenge. this will be a very slow and painstaking process. this is a large building. there will be a large amount of building work required internally, structures will need to be built to ensure the floors are safe.
3:05 pm
before we do that, we are going to utilise some specialist dog teams that we have, in conjunction with the metropolitan police, that will go through the building and surrounding area looking for identification of people. the search could take weeks, and police say the number of dead is expected to rise — but how much still isn't clear. our absolute priority for all of us is about identifying and locating those people who are still missing, and it would be wrong of me to give a number that is not accurate. one person has been reported 46 times that they believe to be missing. but how did this happen? the cause of the fire still has not been formally identified. understanding why it spread so fast could take weeks, months, and for local people who saw the disaster unfold, grief is turning to anger. if you had seen that building go up, like i saw it from my back window, you would have no doubt
3:06 pm
it was not fit for purpose. someone made a catastrophic error. we are grieving, but there is public anger underneath, and we want to see someone held accountable. i feel angry that i saw people dying in front of my eyes. i saw kids and women, and kids this age hanging from windows with teddies. that angered me, and nobody could help them. that really angered me. this wall has become a reflection of a community confused and upset. some have left messages for loved ones, and others are thanking the emergency services. the queen said her thoughts and prayers are with the families who have lost loved ones in the grenfell tower fire. the prime minister went to see the site for herself this morning.
3:07 pm
she praised the work of emergency teams and the response from the local community. after returning to downing street, she said the government would take action. right now, people want answers, and it is absolutely right, and i am today ordering a full public inquiry into this disaster. we need to know what happened, we need to have an explanation of this. we owe that to the families, the people who have lost loved ones, friends and the homes in which they lived. the area around the tower is littered with these burnt remnants of the building's cladding. survivors will want to know why it was so flammable and why their concerns were not taken more seriously. it was obvious at the time, when i worked here in 2015, that the tenants were very aware of multiple problems with the building including potential fire—safety problems,
3:08 pm
and i worked with that community — the tenant management just didn't listen to them. the contractor did not listen to the tenants' concerns. as fires continued in parts of the building today, those responsible for grenfell tower insisted it complied with all the relevant building codes and regulations, but it stands as a monument to a fire—protection policy that clearly failed in the most devastating way. with me now is dr reverend graham tomlin, the bishop of kensington. thank you forjoining us. your thoughts now? our thoughts are with the families in this area who coming to terms with some really quite dreadful news. families were still worried about those on missing. we
3:09 pm
are thinking about emergency services. i had been there near the site, talking to some of the ambulance and fire services and the things they are going through as well. the judges things they are going through as well. thejudges in this things they are going through as well. the judges in this area are doing everything they can to support people locally, provide whatever they can, and the whole community is coming together to provide that. the churches are being fantastic in offering that help. we have been here yesterday and today, and it is an area where there is only people from different backgrounds, different cultures, different religions, but there is the feeling that everyone is pulling together? that is right. there is that god—givenjim that is right. there is that god—given jim allister you that is right. there is that god—givenjim allister you that comes out of these moments, which is drawn up by tragedies like this. you could see that at one of ourjudges last night, there were some from just about every nation in the world, every belligerent, wanting to do something they could to help. they are enabling that exhibition of
3:10 pm
compassion to take place. that is the good news to come out of this tragedy. as you were saying, there area tragedy. as you were saying, there are a lot of people who still don't know what has happened to the love bonds, theirfriends, their know what has happened to the love bonds, their friends, their family. we has built into some of them who are still incredibly distressed because they don't know. are still incredibly distressed because they don't knowlj are still incredibly distressed because they don't know. i have been doing the same today. i went to one of thejudges doing the same today. i went to one of the judges locally where there are families waiting, heartbreaking stories ofjordan are families waiting, heartbreaking stories of jordan who are families waiting, heartbreaking stories ofjordan who were lost on the way out of the building, wondering if they are still alive and so on. we try to bring some comfort. there is not a lot you can say to people in that situation, but we try to pray with them and remind them there is something bigger, something more than tragedy and the tragedy does not have the last word. there is the hope of re—building lights and that is what we're to bring in here. there is generosity and compassion but also, to be honest, a lot of anger, isn't he?|j think honest, a lot of anger, isn't he?” think there is. there is a lot of frustration here about stories of
3:11 pm
the tower and the accommodation, the housing in this area has been an issue for some time. i think it is too early to try to find causes. we we re too early to try to find causes. we were speaking yesterday to the officer who has the responsibility for finding officer who has the responsibility forfinding out officer who has the responsibility for finding out what was happening here. he said to have bestowed with a blank piece of paper and do not try to blame anyone at this time, try to blame anyone at this time, try not to find the causes. that will come out in time, and there will come out in time, and there will be questions to be art, but this is the day were the happy try and look after those who are suffering and we ask the questions in time. we appreciate your time. thank you so much. there is a wall of condolence for m essa 9 es there is a wall of condolence for messages for those who have lost their lives, those who are injured and those who are missing. a lot of m essa 9 es and those who are missing. a lot of m essa g es of and those who are missing. a lot of
3:12 pm
messages of passion and grief but also messages of anger about what happened here. let's go to our correspondent who is at the wall of condolence. that is absolutely right. this wall of remembrance, all wall of condolence has been growing all the time. they have been adding more panels to this wall, and they have a lot of people coming here throughout the day. you see some of them writing messages as we speak. a lot of them are of course in memory of those who have been killed. rest in peaceis those who have been killed. rest in peace is obviously written many times on this wall already. also we are seeing more of these posters for the missing, and this is for mariem elgwahry, who has not been seen since 2:30am, when the fire broke out. someone has written on top of it, which has been added recently, saying she did not deserve this. as you are saying, there is anger in
3:13 pm
the community here. a lot of community spirit and people coming together, this is part of it but if you look here, there is an angry response, jailed those responsible. people are angry, questioning whether the fire regulations were in place seeing as the fire spread so quickly which has led to this loss of life. we are on bbc now, on the news channel. you have been here a long time, you are a student and an artist, you have been doing a lot of the artwork on the wall here, but also writing a lot of that edges. what is your feeling about what has happened, what are you trying to express gresham good afternoon.” wa nt to express gresham good afternoon.” want to give respect to the firefighters, police and abbey and
3:14 pm
services for their hard work and dedication. obviously it has been stressful for the last two months, the london attacks and in manchester. the firefighters and police have been 2a hours a day, seven days a week, trying to save people and ta ken seven days a week, trying to save people and taken to hospitals. my respects and thanks to them. what do you really want to get across, what are you trying to convey? we want a nswe rs , are you trying to convey? we want answers, why is it in 2017 that this is happening? why is it we haven't got special equipment? we have these scientists making and inventing new things, why can't they make something which can stop a fire. i have seen it in america, they had
3:15 pm
something which they threw a duet and inferno and stopped the smoke. why is it that firefighters cannot do that? i am angry because when the firefighters came, this woman was on the 20th floor, i don't do if she was out or not, but my heart goes out to her. you don't know what has happened to her? i don't. she was on the 20th floor. the hosepipes could not go past the 20th floor. i'm frustrated, white couldn't firefighters have longer ones? why was there no water around the area? why did it take so long? thank you. obviously be expected people to come here and leave those messages. back to you. thank you very much indeed. the labour mp for hammersmith, andy slaughter, joins me from westminster.
3:16 pm
i know you're leader, jeremy corbyn, has called for an enquiry and the prime minister has now announced an enquiry. are you pleased about that question we are pleased that there will be an enquiry, although we do not know the details were so they ta ke not know the details were so they take a longtime. not know the details were so they take a long time. we have to have some answers to some questions that are very pressing, particularly the issue of how this fire spread and turned what could have been a containable fire, as fires occur every day including in tower blocks, into something which has become a national tragedy, with so many people killed and injured, and hundreds of people put out of their homes. and we know there are potentially thousands of tower blocks similar to grenfell tower
3:17 pm
around the united kingdom, a lot in london obviously, many nearby, but there are thousands around the country. so it is important to learn whatever lessons need to be learned pretty quickly. as you say, a public enquiry can take quite along pretty quickly. as you say, a public enquiry can take quite a longtime to come up with results will stop the can't have a situation that we had after the last fire with a number of fatalities, which is in 2009, where it took four years for coroner ‘s recommendations. 2009, where it took four years for coroner 's recommendations. then those have not been implemented. we must speed up the enquiry process. there are a number of questions, how was this caused? what was happening on that particular site, given that residents had raised many concerns about fire safety? and also questions about tower block safety. people will not have that reassurance. we have to answer these
3:18 pm
questions about existing tower blocks. it will take some time because the firefighters are still opposing the building down, we have still seen flames shooting out. with the best will in the world, it will ta ke the best will in the world, it will take time to find answers. we can have some... we do need that sense of urgency. we can have some provisional findings. of urgency. we can have some provisionalfindings. there of urgency. we can have some provisional findings. there were issues around sprinklers, could it have stopped the fire spreading? do the cladding lead to the accelerated spread? in this country, a first world country where we have huge expertise in these areas, it is frankly unacceptable that we are still not in lamenting the lessons of that fire eight years ago and other fires.
3:19 pm
thank you very much indeed. that is andy slaughter, the mp for hammersmith. we have been coming across people here all day who are very distressed and in floods of tears, looking for friends and loved ones and relatives who are still unaccounted for, many people going round with photographs of loved ones, appealing for any information about them. tulip muzumdar reports on the desperate search for the missing, and again a warning that viewers may find this distressing. this hospital in paddington is looking after 11 patients, three of them in critical care, mostly suffering with smoke inhalation. this person is visiting herfriend's daughter, who is extremely unwell. she is not in a good condition, because she is in icu. she cannot talk. how are you? how is the community?”
3:20 pm
don't know what to say, i'm really stressed, really disappointed. i couldn't believe what happened to them, i only saw them yesterday. it was like a dream. many families desperately searching for loved ones have come here since wednesday morning, but as the hours passed, the search becomes more agonising with the realisation that at this stage they are unlikely to get the news they so badly work for. this man is desperate. he was separated from his 12—year—old daughter jessica during the fire and is still going from hospital to hospital to try to find her. i was at home. i was downstairs with a friend. the fire started, and i tried to go upstairs and the firefighters were already there, and they would not allow me to go up. she was out of the flat at 1:30am. she was making her way
3:21 pm
down with some people. her phone cut off. we do not know. i think she was on the stairs. hopefully, someone has seen her in hospital. this isjessica. her friends are also trying to understand what has happened. i have a friend called jessica. she is still missing. it is horrible for me to hear that they are missing or dead or in hospital or something. so many are still missing, the young and old. ali yawarjafari is still missing.
3:22 pm
mary mendy is also missing. mo tuccu had gone to break that ramadan fast, he is still missing. the search and the anguish continues for so many families, as others here at hospitals across london fight for their lives. the latest information we have is that 37 people are still in hospital. they were taken to six different london hospitals, and 17 are still in critical care at the moment. let's go live now to our health correspondent, smitha mundasad, who is at st mary's hospital. what is the latest picture there? this hospital is the closest major hospital to where the incident happened, and is currently treating the greatest number of casualties.
3:23 pm
from what we know, 11 patients are being treated here, and three are in critical care. staff here are actually on their third major incident in as many months. this time around, they are looking very closely for anyone who has trouble breathing because, after smoke inhalation, the smoke can irritate the lungs, the windpipe and cause swelling, making it difficult to breathe. for anyone they are worried about, they may have put them into a medically induced coma on critical ca re medically induced coma on critical care and given them an artificial way to breathe, to rest their lungs until they recover. there are other things that the staff they will be looking out for, cyanide poisoning, because home furnishings if left burning can lead to do this. there is the antidote in this hospital, as there is in the other major trauma centres around london. carbon monoxide will also be another
3:24 pm
concern. there are some staff here who have now dealt with three major incidents, working on all of them, and we spoke to some of them earlier. we also spoke to staff who had been personally affected and to know people in the tower. one hobby that before work she went and dropped off clothes to this person, to try and help. of course, across the hospitals in london, the staff are working hard to try and give some of the survivors a fighting chance. thank you very much. we will talk about one of the residents who managed to escape when the fire broke out. lillian, i think you the fire broke out. lillian, i think you were on the fire broke out. lillian, i think you were on the tenth floor. tell us, when the fire broke out, what did you do? before i realised the
3:25 pm
fire had broken out, ijust smelt smoke. i was out of the house and wa nted smoke. i was out of the house and wanted to see what was going on. as soon as i was out, that is when ever thing we'd crazy. i could not go back inside. it wasjust a few minutes after the fire started. you we re minutes after the fire started. you were to sleep? no, i wasn't. that is obviously a blessing. you realised you could smell smoke, is that what alerted you? i thought some thing was burning in the kitchen, but there was nothing burning there. i looked out of the window and i saw smoke. i wanted to check what was going on. i thought i could help somebody. i went and checked, and i don't what happened after that. the advice to residents was to stay inside. stay inside, lock your doors and put towels or whatever to stop the smoke from coming in. you decided to ignore that? why did you ta ke decided to ignore that? why did you take that decision? you were right to ignore it, but why did you? i
3:26 pm
truthfully don't know why i ignored that. you knew that was the advice, that. you knew that was the advice, that you should stay in your home. thank goodness you did. when he ran down the stairs from the tenth floor, what was it like? it was fine. there wasn't any urgency or anything happening. it was fine. that was really just a few minutes after the fire first started. yes. you were on the tenth floor, you had neighbours you you are worried about? i'm worried about my neighbours because i did not see any of them, not even one of them. if you are listening to me now, 72, 73, 74 you are listening to me now, 72, 73, 7a and 75, please get in touch because i have not heard from them at all. there are four flats per floor? six. so all of your
3:27 pm
neighbours, you don't know what has happened? no, i haven't heard from them. there have been some residents who had complained about what was going on at grenfell tower, and worried about the fire situation there. were you aware of the complaints? yes, i was definitely aware of that because a gentleman used to come knocking on saturday or sunday and say, we're worried about fire, we're worried about hazardous conditions here, are you willing to put your name down and we will talk to the council about it. and i did put my name about it, but i don't what happened. and then there were pipes as well which were just built at the door, my door specifically, i don't know about the others will stop the council wrote a letter and told us, i think it is the gas company or something who had put those pipes outside the door. they said it was dangerous because if a
3:28 pm
fire broke out, you know... how angry were you that there were these worries and yet still they hold tower block went up in flames so quickly? i don't know, i really don't know what to feel. i am sad. maybe the angle, after. at the moment, ijust feel sad maybe the angle, after. at the moment, i just feel sad for the lives lost. thank goodness you escaped and thank you so much for your time. thank you. you are obviously homeless now, do you have anywhere to sleep? the council are ranging fora anywhere to sleep? the council are ranging for a temporary accommodation but yesterday i that the different's place who was hard enough to help me for the night. the council had been in touch, you have some to sleep tonight? they will get in touch to tell me where to go, but they haven't yet. you can stay with your friend the night again
3:29 pm
they haven't yet. you can stay with yourfriend the night again if they haven't yet. you can stay with your friend the night again if you have two ? your friend the night again if you have two? i could, buti your friend the night again if you have two? i could, but i wouldn't wa nt have two? i could, but i wouldn't want to. thank you. joining me now is niall rowan, the chief operations officer at the association for specialist fire protection. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. so many questions about what happened here. can you shed any light at all on this terrible disaster? it isa it is a terrible disaster and a number of issues need to be investigated. salient points have come out, the performance of the cladding, i saw a video from a passer—by which showed very rapid fast fire spreading across the building, incredibly rapid, and that needs to be investigated. there is a case for investigating the
3:30 pm
protection measures in the building designed to compartmentalised the building intoa designed to compartmentalised the building into a shoe box arrangement whereby the one hour stay put fire strategy comes from. there are things to issue there and also to the role because if this building was built now, it would have sprinklers in it. is that right? any building like this construct it now would automatically have sprinklers? the recommendation in the statutory guidance recommends sprinklers but i must add that, while that is a very good thing, both the active fire protection measures, sprinklers and alarms, and the passive ones, compartment nation, may be bypassed by the performance of the cladding. the sprinklers and the fire protection are mainly on the inside of the building. to look at fire
3:31 pm
inside the building. if fire goes up outside the building, it can bypass it but that would be my primary area of scrutiny, as it were. people like yourself, an expert in this field, have been staggered that a 2k story tower block in this day and age, 2017, can just be consumed tower block in this day and age, 2017, canjust be consumed in tower block in this day and age, 2017, can just be consumed in this inferno so quickly and with such terrible loss of life. how surprised are you by what happened here? the type of construction, the cladding, has been the subject of a number of fires, a lot of fires worldwide. if you google tower cladding fires, you will find hundreds of images, many in the middle east, where they have a lot of skyscrapers. it takes a longtime. fire is a numbers game. most buildings never catch fire so if you're fire protection is
3:32 pm
measures are ok, you're building never catch fire and like if your roof is leaking, you will find that the first time it rains. it's a numbers game fulford in dubai, they have lots of tower blocks with the cladding, so they've had a lot of fires. now we are starting to see some here. that's a very interesting to hear what you are saying that. it certainly has had deadly consequences, this fire. the death toll has risen to 17 but that is likely to rise and a number of people are still unaccounted for. much more coverage from here in west london but first we are going to pause briefly and take a look at the weather. good afternoon. good spells of sunshine across the uk. this is the view in north wales. the bigger
3:33 pm
picture sees this line of cloud work its way east today. it introduces some slightly fresh air across the uk but we have a good scattering of showers coming in for scotland and northern ireland with temperatures around 20, in aberdeen, 2a in the south—eastern corner but not as warm as it was yesterday. this evening, some showers in the west of england and northern ireland but whereas guys, and northern ireland but whereas guys, and not quite as warm as it was last night. we are seeing temperatures down by three degrees. 12-13 with temperatures down by three degrees. 12—13 with a lot of dry weather. it will turn out to be at north and west split. there will be some rain in northern england. elsewhere, warmer, low 20s in aberdeen, and 2a in the south—eastern corner. hello.
3:34 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines. the london tower block fire. the death toll has risen to 17 but police warn that number may rise. many people are still missing. specialist fire crews are assessing the building and using dogs to search the flats but they say they there is no hope of finding anyone else alive. my my firefighters were desperate to rescue people and we committed crew after crew into a very dangerous, hot difficult situation. the faces of some of some of those
3:35 pm
still unaccounted for, young and old, many of which were trapped on the upper floors of the building. jessica, she is still missing, she was on the news, and it is horrible for me to hear they are missing or they are dead or they are in hospital or something. questions circulate about the cause of the fire with some attention falling on the cladding around the building. the prime minister orders a full public inquiry. let's catch up with the sport. many thanks indeed. the 117th us open is under way. before the second major of the year all the talk centred around the length of the rough at the wisconsin course, which had prompted complaints from some of the players. let's look at the early leaderboard.
3:36 pm
rickie fowler is out in front at the moment in the lead on three under through five. the chasing pack, rory mcilroy goes out, the world number two, just after 8pm. dustinjohnson teed off a short while ago and is looking to win back to back us opens. what has he made of the course? it's a typical us open venue and the fact you have to hit the fairway, you can't play in this rough, so they do give us a bit more room here which is nice, but obviously, with the weather conditions we've had in the last few days, the course will be soft. it will play long. i like the golf course, though, ithink will play long. i like the golf course, though, i think it's great. to cricket now. bangladesh have set india a target of 265 to reach
3:37 pm
cricket‘s champions trophy final. batting first, they looked on course to set the holders a huge target to chase, before dropping late wickets. india are currently 99—1. patrick gearey is at edgbaston. and, patrick, bangladesh wil be a little disappointed that score wasn't higher? i think they certainly will. a glimmer of hope now they have got darwan. bangladesh will feel they should of got well over 300. it was beautiful sunshine, both batsmen looked good. it looked like they we re looked good. it looked like they were scoring for fun but things can change so quickly. the echoes of doubt that rippled through the bangladeshi batting order for the one batsmen followed another fulford no one could get any momentum going so no one could get any momentum going so that total of 264—7 wasn't what it might have been and india started
3:38 pm
well with darwan. with a lot more batting to come, you feel they are in control of this match and bangladesh will have to do something pretty spectacular to get back into it. indian know if they can get to the final on sunday, it will be against pakistan at the oval, what a contest that promises to be. still a bit of cricket to play but india are well in control. thank you very much. owen farrell faces an anxious wait to see if he'll be fit for the british and irish lions' first test against new zealand in nine days' time. the england fly half is out of saturday's match against the maori all blacks in rotorua. he was named on the bench, withjonny sexton starting at number ten, but has been forced to pull out with a quad strain. flanker peter o'mahony, captains the side, with tour skipper sam warburton on the bench. maro itoje starts in what is an otherwise, unchanged forward pack from the one that beat the crusaders last saturday. warren gatland says he's going to keep the all blacks guessing,
3:39 pm
ahead of their first test next weekend. he was good coming off the bench the other day and the combination of ten and 12 was pretty seamless. johnny knows his last two games were not his best games of rugby. and the first game against the barbarians, he was down in confidence but he's got his mojo back at the moment. so we wa nt got his mojo back at the moment. so we want to give him a start against the maoris. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. john, thank you very much. let's talk to our main story, the situation after that tragic blaze in west london. we can return to ben brown who was by the grenfell tower. we're in the shadow of grenfell tower and occasionally we seen
3:40 pm
fla mes tower and occasionally we seen flames flaring up now and then in lower pa rt flames flaring up now and then in lower part of the building, so the fire brigade are from time to time hosing parts of the building down. they have sent in specialist teams, and reached the top floor, but they are obviously still searching the higherfloors full are obviously still searching the higher floors full forbidden to believe there will be any survivors now, and they are looking for people who are missing inside the block force of the current death toll is 17. we have come across a lot of people around here who are very distressed i have to say, in floods of tears because they are looking for loved ones, friends, relatives who are still missing, and accounted for and we spoke to natasha green is a little bit early on, who is desperately looking for a 12—year—old girl, the friend of her daughter. i'm worried aboutjessica. this is my daughter's school friend, and a friend basically that we know in the area. and she got separated from her mum in the panic in the early hours of the morning. and obviously, as you can imagine, as her mother, she is frantic. she was told that she was at hospital. she went to hospital,
3:41 pm
only to find it was the same name but wrong girl, and we're just devastated. and so frantically looking for her. so if anyone, anyone knows her whereabouts, please do inform, please tell the correct numbers. and you've got that poster printed, you're going around pinning that up to walls and notice boards? yeah, we're giving it to anyone and everyone we can think of and obviously trying to use the media as well to just get her face out there, because her motherjust needs to find her daughter. and she's 12 years old, jessica, and a friend of your daughter's, you were saying. yes, a school friend of my daughter's, who has also been looking and going on social media and getting the word out there. and they're going round with their friends as well and trying to do as much as they can to just help give any news and information that we can. and there are so many people in the same position as you, worried about other people, who are still missing. we just don't know what's happened to them. exactly, still unaccounted for. obviously, the mass panic, the smoke. i could see the smoke from my
3:42 pm
window, and i'm not as close, but the thickness of the smoke is enough to engulf anyone. people's vision, and everyonejust got separated from their loved ones. it's just a frantic search that you cannot believe in this day and age are still happening. and we are angry. i'm not going to lie. the locals are angry. this could have been prevented. lives didn't need to be lost. and they are lost. the people are looking for their children and it's so unfair. it's really unfair! this shouldn't have happened. it's 2017. it's not fair. this is notting hill! and it's just devastating. it really is. i'm sorry. why do you feel it did happen? do you have any idea? because people cut corners. they cut corners. they were told and they didn't do anything, because they're not going to listen to residents. because they're not of a certain class or they haven't got enough money. and they were ignored. and this is the devastating result. people have had to lose their lives so they can listen. it's not fair.
3:43 pm
so there is anger here and there is grief and there is anxiety. there is also extraordinary generosity — people giving so much, donating so much. we emptied out the supermarkets yesterday. we made four trips up and down. we even phoned the major supermarkets like tesco's and sainsbury‘s and asked them to donate stuff, which they kindly did. so the residents and the locals, even people coming from different areas. there was a woman i met from croydon that came down with her child to donate stuff. and we're so grateful. because the community spirit has been outstanding, it really has. so for that, out of these tragic circumstances, the unity of people is just amazing. natasha green talking to me early on highlighting the mix of emotions here. the generosity, the compassion we have seen in the last 24—hour but also that raw grief and anxiety and
3:44 pm
anger as well. the commission of the london fire brigade has been painted boot of the fire brigade, 200 firefighters who were on the scene so firefighters who were on the scene so quickly when the blaze broke out at grenfell tower behind me and who risked their lives going inside the building, climbing the stairs, trying to rescue people fulford they rescued 65 people, risking their lives to save the lives of other people. london fire brigade's chief dany cotton has heaped praise on herfirefighters. hero! look at that. i hope everyone gets out safely too. early on in the fire, my firefighters tried to reach some of the higher floors. i spoke to a crew before i left who had been to the 20th floor looking for people. we specifically targeted flats where we were getting calls, where we knew where people were. as the commissioner
3:45 pm
of the london fire brigade, it was a very stressful and difficult time. i was looking at a building engulfed in fire, i knew members of the public were still trapped yet i was committing hundreds of firefighters to a building which to a lot of people looked terribly unsafe. my firefighters were desperate to get in there and desperate to rescue people. crew after crew were sent into a very dangerous, very hot and difficult situation because we have a passion to do as much as we could to rescue the people in there. it was a very challenging, very difficult and very traumatic event for everyone involved. we had minor injuries yesterday. up to nine of my firefighters suffered minor burns, some heat exhaustion due to the intensity in the building and hard work. some obvious slips and trips over debris falling everywhere. i am more concerned longer term about the mental impact on the people who were here because it was an unprecedented event and people saw and heard things on a scale we had never seen before.
3:46 pm
going forward, one of my main concerns is the mental health and well— being of my firefighters and doing trauma and care counselling for them. the words of london's fire brigade chief, dany cotton. yesterday, through the day we saw them coming out as their shift ended absolutely exhausted, but they really did do an incredible job and we we re really did do an incredible job and we were hearing from one of the other fire commanders about how dark and intensely hot it is when you go into a fire like that. let alone a 24 into a fire like that. let alone a 2a story building that is a blaze. all these firefighters have extraordinary training and that kicked in but nothing could prepare them for what they saw in this building behind us. that is the latest from here in the shadow of g re nfell tower. latest from here in the shadow of grenfell tower. back to the studio. thanks, much more from you later. the prime minister is meeting
3:47 pm
the main northern ireland parties at downing street this afternoon. sinn fein the ulster unionists, alliance and the sdlp will hold separate meetings with theresa may. the pm held talks with the dup earlier this week about a deal to support a minority conservative government. let's get more from our correspondent gary o'donoghue who's at downing street. what progress has been made, if any? these are a series of one—on—one eye lateral meetings the prime minister is having with the storm onto parties and we've seen two of them already come out from those meetings, talking about the kinds of things they were trying to impress upon the prime minister as they tried to get this deal done to get power—sharing back on track by the 29th, the deadline imposed by the government. the first act was my long from the cross community alliance party. she said there is a lot of concern about transparency
3:48 pm
and in particular about the kind of neutrality the government can bring to this, given the deal they are proposing to do with a dup. of course she sought to give as a reassurance on the issue of neutrality but we have to be practical about these things. in reality, the government is here simply because the dup allow it to be so. there are consequences for them if they were to remove those key votes, but nevertheless, the government i'm afraid is in a weakened position prior to what it was before now and clearly, more dependent on the dup than it has ever been in the past and it opens up ever been in the past and it opens up issues about neutrality. so she is expressing some concern and talking about the time it's taken to get things done and expressing a lot of doubt and worry about that. shortly after she came out, we saw the ulster unionist party talking in particular about their concern about
3:49 pm
side deals. deals the government might do with individual parties, not just the might do with individual parties, notjust the big deal on confidence and supply, with a dup, but deals donein and supply, with a dup, but deals done in the past with sinn fein, to get a power sharing done and back on course. they say it's a lot of impetus to get this thing done, but respect works two ways. i have to respect works two ways. i have to respect those people in northern ireland who are waiting for hospital appointments and education to continue while the power—sharing agreement is not in place, so a lot of pressure to get this deal done, but no sign that there is any firm movement forward at this stage. gary, we will either therefore now. thank you. in a moment, the business news but first the headlines here on bbc news. 17 people are now confirmed dead from the fire that swept through a west london tower block. dozens of others are still missing. firefighters reach the top floors but say there is no hope
3:50 pm
of finding anyone else alive. but with many people still unaccounted for, the desperate search for friends and relatives continues. good afternoon. i am jamie robertson with the business news. no change in uk interest rates still at 0.25%. the bank of england's rate setting committee voted on it a few hours ago. three others 8—member monetary policy committee voted to increase rates because of rising inflation. uk inflation is at a nearfour—year high of 2.9%, much higher than the mpc‘s target rate of 2%. the cost of borrowing has gone up again, as expected,
3:51 pm
the us fed raised its main interest rate by a quarter of one percent as it sees more signs the economy is strengthening. and it signalled rates would likely go up once more this year. retail sales were up 0.9% in may, compared to the same time last year. that's pretty slow growth. sales have only been that sluggish once in the last four years. the ons says the slowdown was in large part caused by rising prices. the majority vote at the bank of england was only just the majority vote at the bank of england was onlyjust because three of the 8—member monetary policy committee voted to increase rates in the face of rising inflation, just three of them. uk rates were slashed at the height of the financial crisis in 2008 down to half of 1% and then cut again to a quarter of 196 and then cut again to a quarter of 1% after the vote to leave the eu. so many suggest now the only way for interest rates to go was up amidst all the uncertainty of brexit. rates
3:52 pm
staying at a quarter of 1% really for the moment is inevitable. yes, no great surprise today in the bank ‘s decision to keep things on hold for now. the bank is in a holding pattern of the moment as with the world of politics fulford the economy right now is set by uncertainty fools we don't know what's going on in terms of brexit and the signs were getting through in terms of things like spending, retail sales, suggest the economy is starting to slow somewhat so the bank has taken the decision the moment to say, yes, rates are very low and inflation is above target, but any action to increase rates just now would choke off some demand in the economy and slow things down further and risk tipping us into a spiral where we have rising unemployment and create more problems for ourselves. european union law to abolish
3:53 pm
roaming charges for people using mobile phones abroad comes into force today. the new rules mean that people travelling within the eu will be able to call, text and browse the internet on mobile devices at the same price they pay at home. commission said the end of roaming charges is one of the greatest su ccesses charges is one of the greatest successes of the eu. there is no more additional charges in the eu and you entirely right, these little things caught people out, consumers using heavy data, on great value packages, could be suffering from out of bundle charges if they are using too much. it's basically a cap on the amount of data you can access ? on the amount of data you can access? yes, to move forward from the historic cap we have, but it's been replaced by this free usage
3:54 pm
policy which enables us to utilise as much as we do domestically but some bundles outside of those, you're able to charge a significant amount of money. the important thing to remember is look at the tariff you got at the moment and whether or not the country you are travelling is included. we are doing a big piece of work looking at these different tariffs, making sure people go above and beyond. countries have been having huge charges, the usa, new zealand, australia, and those providers offer those at no extra charge are being signed out. philip hammond the chancellor of the exchequer has cancelled his annual speech to the elite of british business at the mansion house out of respect for the victims of the grenfell house fire. in it he had been expected to make it clear he wants jobs and the economy to be the first consideration of brexit. shares in furniture chain dfs have
3:55 pm
slumped 22% after it issued a profit warning. the company blamed the general election for contributing to a sharp fall in demand in the second half of its financial year. it said it had seen "significant declines in store footfall" since march. more losses this time. wine retailer majestic has reported a £1.5 million loss in theirfull year results as they reach the end of a turnaround programme. but says revenues were up 11%. it says it can weather uncertain economic times. the markets. sharp falls. the ftse is down 78 but the big fall is on the 250. it is much more of a smaller domestic fund, and they've had one of the biggest falls this year. worries about higher interest rates. there are worries they could be in the pipeline sooner rather than later. the european markets are also putting the dax
3:56 pm
down at 1%. the dowjones looking shaky. the nasdaq, those technology stocks last week, beginning to teeter. the fall seems to be continuing. that is the business news. jamie, thanks very much. time now for a look at the weather. a pretty decent afternoon. a good deal of sunshine. maybe not for all, as we'll see on the satellite sequence. as we'll see on the satellite sequence. this is what happened so far today. a week front, band of cloud moving from west to east. behind it, slightly fresher air coming in from the atlantic. temperature is not quite high as yesterday. still pleasantly warm but scattered showers in the north and west. they will keep going over the next few hours, drifting to the north of england but generally speaking, western scotland will see the most of the rain overnight. the
3:57 pm
odd shower in the south. not as warm as it was this morning tomorrow morning, but still around 12—13. that is macro—ii degrees down on what we sought this morning. a fresher night. and a bright start to the day for much of england. west and wales could see rain. warming up quickly. four. the cloud could be enough to produce early showers. maybe a bit of rain early on across the north of scotla nd of rain early on across the north of scotland up towards orkney, as well. as we go through the day, it will turn into a north—south split. western scotland, a focal point for most of friday's rain. the sunshine further south. light wind, as well. the london area, 24. up to 21 in belfast. not far away from that in
3:58 pm
aberdeen. some rain through aberdeenshire for a time on friday evening but the western side of scotla nd evening but the western side of scotland sees most of the rain, stronger wind, to. dawn, scotland sees most of the rain, strongerwind, to. dawn, saturday, scotland sees most of the rain, stronger wind, to. dawn, saturday, a warm night once again with many places, 15—16d. a warm start to the weekend and will be a very warm weekend and will be a very warm weekend for the vast majority. the wind is beginning to come in from a long way south from the azores, so that going to warm things up. the fresh air is to the north of this weather front which will bring rain and a breeze to western scotland and it may start grave for parts of england and wales by the afternoon it is broken cloud, sunny spells and the warmth will be widespread. 28 in the warmth will be widespread. 28 in the south—eastern corner 82 in fahrenheit. warmer than that on sunday. 29—30 in the south—eastern corner. warmth widespread into eastern scotland and northern ireland, andi eastern scotland and northern ireland, and i think it will go to 30 degrees on monday in the south—eastern corner. light wind and
3:59 pm
will feel pretty hot and humid. not quite so warm further north, but we are infor quite so warm further north, but we are in for several pretty hot days and some quite warm nights as well. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown, live at the scene of the tower block fire in west london. the headlines at 4pm. the emergency services have confirmed that the death toll has risen to 17, but the police are warning that that number may rise will stop many people are still missing. specialist teams are now trying to make the tower safe so they can search for the missing. my my firefighters were desperate to get in there and rescue people. we committed crew after crew into a very dangerous, hot and difficult situation. the faces of some of some of those still unaccounted for, young and old — many of whom were trapped
4:00 pm
on the upper floors of the building.

14 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on