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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 16, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. anger over the london tower block fire. the only thing keeping me going at the moment is anger and adrenaline and i will keep going on anger and adrenaline for as long as ican, anger and adrenaline for as long as i can, because frankly i would not like to sit down and contemplate. pictures emerge of the inside of the building. 17 are known to have died, more than 60 people are being named in the media as dead or missing. as the search of the burned out tower continues, police launch a criminal inquiry into the fire. good morning, it's friday 16thjune. also this morning: a second soldier dies following an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. good morning. a big boost for small
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business. hsbc promises £10 billion infunding for business. hsbc promises £10 billion in funding for small firms, but what difference will it really make? i will speak to the boss later. in sport, england's paul casey is the pick of the european challengers at the us open. a first round of six under par sees him just a shot off the leader rickie fowler at golf‘s second major of the year. and sarah has the weather. thatin that in about ten minutes. first, our main story: police are warning they may never be able to identify some of those who died in the fire at grenfell tower in west london on tuesday night. 17 bodies have been found so far, but the number of fatalities is expected to rise significantly. andy moore reports. the first victim of the fire to be officially named is mohammed alhajali, assyrian refugee who came to britain for a better life. his brother was led to safety by
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firefighters but in the chaos and confusion bahama got left behind. firefighters but in the chaos and confusion bahama got left behindli called confusion bahama got left behind.” called and said, where are you? he said he was on flat. i said, why didn't you come? he said no one got me outside. i thought they took him outside with me! they didn't. some of those trapped in the blaze did survive. we now know this man is a partially blind grandfather in his 70s. his family say he is in intensive care suffering from serious smoke inhalation. they have thanked the bravery of the firefighters who risked their lives to get him out. he was finally rescued 11 hours after the blaze started. there is anger in the community, directed at almost anyone in the community. sadiq khan saw it for himself when he went to visit. how many children died and what are you going to do about it? police say they have now started criminal
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investigation. that's not to say there was a crime committed, but they will investigate to establish whether there was one. police voiced the hope that the final number of casualties will be below 100. they admit that some victims may never be identified. meanwhile, tens of thousands of people in tower blocks around the country are wondering if their homes are safe. these three tower blocks in luton are due to be refurbished with new cladding. the local council is now doublechecking to make sure it will be safe. 0ne resident said there had been plenty of fires before but they were never a big problem. just contained in one flat because it is all concrete. as $0011 flat because it is all concrete. as 50011 as you flat because it is all concrete. as soon as you put cladding on the outside you have a fire source that will engulf the whole lot. the leader of the local council said they thought about installing a sprinkle a system in the tower when it was renovated last year, but he said there was no collective view
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among residents in favour of it. 0ur correspondent has been following this throughout the morning. you saw when the tower was engulfed in fla mes when the tower was engulfed in fla m es to when the tower was engulfed in flames to where it is now. what's the latest? the latest is that the death toll has gone up to 17. as you say, that's the official death toll. we know there were six bodies found around the base of the building and there's another 11 bodies still in there's another 11 bodies still in the tower block that haven't been recovered. 0n the tower block that haven't been recovered. on top of that we have the list of the dead. probably something more than 60. some of the national newspapers say it's a figure of more than 60. the bbc understands from talking to relatives and people searching for news about people on facebook, we've got a list of something like 60 names. there might be other people
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on named on top of that. you can understand the reluctance of the emergency services, the police and fire, to give precise numbers, but certainly they have warned that the death toll is likely to rise significantly. it's just a terribly difficult task to locate and remove bodies from that tower block behind me, likea bodies from that tower block behind me, like a giant black tombstone. we heard yesterday that some parts of the building are too dangerous to reach. firefighters can get up the central concrete core but when they get to the top floor is the structure is not safe so they can't go in and they might be able to use drones to examine the outside of the building, there might be able to use specially trained dogs to go in, but at the moment the building is too dangerous for those firefighters to go in. they said it would be a long and complex operation to locate and remove the bodies. as we heard,
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police say there may be victims that will never be identified. thanks very much. we will be speaking to a forensic fire investigator later in the programme, discussing some of those points. political parties are coming under increasing pressure to explain why more steps weren't taken to prevent the grenfell tower block disaster. it comes as the prime minister has called for a judge—led public inquiry into what happened. 0ur political correspondent chris masonjoins us from our london newsroom now. alongside some of these practical questions which are merging, there isa questions which are merging, there is a growing sense of anger amongst that community. i wonder, how is that community. i wonder, how is that being reflected by political leaders? good morning. there's a real sense at westminster of that sense of anger and how it has to be dealt with. and answers have to be provided. the prime minister in announcing that public enquiry yesterday are hoping that comes with
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a vehicle forfinding yesterday are hoping that comes with a vehicle for finding those answers, which she will be aware and the residents will be very soon as well that that is unlikely to provide the immediate and quick answers, the very nature of public enquiries is that they take time. i think there will be calls for some sort of interim report as soon as possible to try to adjust some of those concerns as quickly as can be achieved. yesterday we saw political leaders heading down to the scene. we sawjeremy corbyn meeting friends and relatives, we saw him hugging one woman who was looking for someone who was missing. the prime minister went as well, although it was a pretty quick visit, described asa was a pretty quick visit, described as a private visit. she met emergency services and some charities but none of the local people. there has been some criticism of her for that. people. there has been some criticism of herfor that. my understanding is the calculation was made that it was a difficult situation for the prime minister. they were concerned about getting her away and the security detail she
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would have with her if she was roaming in amongst the crowd. as i say, there has been some criticism. anyone in a position of authority, perhaps entirely understandably now, is facing the rafah, the anger, of local people. —— the wrath. sadiq khan was facing that last night. government has announced a scheme to make sure lots of extra funding goes in the direction of the local council. but they are very conscience that a new and fragile government here is having to deal with the tragedy, with the right financial at logistical, practical and emotional response. thanks for the moment. british security officials say they believe hackers in north korea were behind the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. the attack led to delays in operations and treatment for patients. the hackers are thought to have been attempting to make money, but did not predict the extent to which the computer virus would spread. the group believed to be behind the attack is lazarus, the same group thought to have targeted sony pictures in 2014.
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a second soldier has died after being wounded in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. two other soldiers were injured at castlemartin ranges on wednesday. tomos morgan reports. the flags are half mast at pembrokeshire after the tragic events of wednesday afternoon, which resulted in the deaths of two servicemen. it is still unclear exactly what happened, but the bbc understands that four members from the royal tank regiment were gravely injured in an incident involving the ammunition and other challenger to tank. three soldiers were taken to hospital in south wales, with one being taken hospital in south wales, with one being ta ken directly hospital in south wales, with one being taken directly to the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham, which has a dedicated wing for treating injured service personnel. yesterday afternoon, the ministry of defence announced that one soldier had died in hospital and late last night the minister of defence,
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people and their trend confirmed the death of a second emperor of the team. the open range is 1—off the lead two ranges in the uk where armed units can carry out direct fire training. the mod, police and the health and safety executive are investigating and a temporary ban on tanklike firing has been put in place. there were more than 100 attempted, failed all successful terrorist attacks in the uk last year, —— eu last year, more than half of which we re last year, more than half of which were in the uk. a report published by europol says the majority of attacks in the uk involved irish republicans. the archbishop of canterbury will speak at a service of hope at southwark cathedral today in honour of first—responders, families and survivors of the london bridge attack. eight people were killed when three attackers drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge and then launched a knife attack
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at borough market just under two weeks ago. a new poll has revealed a widespread lack of knowledge about where significant moments in england's history took place. a campaign has been launched to raise awareness of the sites which have helped shape the nation. colin paterson has more. geneva, switzerland. home to the most common answer when people in england ask, where was the atom first split? but it was here in manchester that the scientific breakthrough was made in 1917. this new research suggests that only one in ten people know that and it is farfrom in ten people know that and it is far from the only common mistake about england's most impressive achievements and inventions. when it comes to wear the first trainers we re comes to wear the first trainers were made, three times more people think it was in the usa than know the truth. it was in bolton, lancashire. jw foster and sons
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created them in the 18905 and later became reebok. and the majority of people believe that bungee jumping originated in australia or new zealand, when in fact it all started in bristol with elite from the clifton suspension bridge back in 1979. historic england hopes the new campaign will fill the gaps in people's knowledge and more people will be aware of the country's greatest achievements, like the fact that pencil wa5 greatest achievements, like the fact that pencil was invented in cumbria. there was a lot in that i didn't know. i know. it's ridiculous! the gulf this weekends, they build up the gulf this weekends, they build up to so excitement —— golf. a fascinating conte5t because of the way the top six in the world really 5truggled on this monster of a course. the rough? yes. 0ne the rough? yes. one of the oldest trophies in
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golf, it's just the yes. one of the oldest trophies in golf, it'sjust the usa yes. one of the oldest trophies in golf, it's just the usa trophy. yes. one of the oldest trophies in golf, it'sjust the usa trophy. the lady on the top represents victory. paul casey might fancy his chances of lifting that on sunday. casey says he's ecstatic with the way he's playing so far at the us open, and is breathing down the neck of the first round leader, american rickie fowler, who's seven under par. while none of the world's top six were able to cope on the longest course in us open history, casey says he loves it here and is just one shot off the lead at erin hills. everton have madejordan pickford the most expensive british goalkeeper in history. he's joined the club on a deal that could be worth £30 million, despite not even making his international debut yet. a dominant nine wicket win over bangladesh has put india into the final of the icc champions trophy. the defending champions will play england's conquerors pakistan in the final. and top seed johanna konta's impressive start to the grass court 5eason continued with a straight
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forward win in the second round of the nottingham open. she beat yanina wickmayer in straight sets. that's it for now but i've got a couple of papers for you in a few second5. we will take you through some of the front pages fir5t. there's obviously only one story dominating this morning. the front page of the guardian. how a fire anger growing amid claim5 guardian. how a fire anger growing amid claims the building was un5afe. reports coming from elsewhere in the world, the us, germany, about the specifics of the cladding used at g re nfell tower. specifics of the cladding used at grenfell tower. this particular material has been banned in other countrie5. material has been banned in other countries. we will pick up on some of those issues with fire and safety experts late in the programme. one word that is also very clear, especially when speaking to residents, anger. we've got reports of the mayor of london, sadiq khan, being confronted by locals and he acknowledged their anger when he visited the scene. anger about
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safety, anger about what happens next. the daily mail. three key questions. why were the families told to stay in theirflats? why were the families told to stay in their flats? that was the advice and guidance given to them. and how many more tinderbox houses are there? various accusations at various parties as to who is to blame for the lack of safety measures. this headline is simply "criminal." it says profit matters more than safety for the government. it says there could be more than 100 dead. but the official death toll, we have to say, is 17. we have been talking to people and looking at the
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lists of the missing. there is no confirmed number other than 17, but it is expected to rise. sport for something else. that is where we are today. there is no escaping that. often, newspapers are desperately filled without. —— win sport brings people together. the other contenders. i love how sportsmen motivate themselves. tommy fleetwood from southport, he meditates ten minutes a day. i have played with him. he is very calm. there is no anger on the golf course. he is two off the lead. and fowler puts religious messages on his golf
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balls. they inspire him as he goes along. farrell is a doubt for the first test next weekend for the lions. he is not even on the bench. he is trying to prove he can be fit for the first test. he is so crucial. there is still time to get better. thank you. and now for the weather. what is happening? it has been warm again. will it last? absolutely. it will get hotter towards the weekend. temperatures on the rise. this morning, a fresh start than it has been. not as hot and muggy as recently. this is the view this morning in sussex. a5 and muggy as recently. this is the view this morning in sussex. as we go through the day, another warm day to come to be spells of sunshine. it will be dry for most of us. not everywhere. cloud in the north—west. that will bring patchy rain for
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northern ireland and parts of northern england. later on, it will be in scotland. elsewhere, dry weather into the afternoon. spells of sunshine breaking through the cloud. the afternoon. four o'clock. rain in the west of scotland. in the east of scotland, more warm and bright. northern ireland, brightening up in the afternoon. 21 degrees. sunshine to the east of the pennines. drizzle lingering in the likes of cumbria. south in england and wales, sunny spells. not wall—to—wall sunshine. a decent day. temperatures in the mid—205. high levels of uv at the moment, especially in the south—west of england and southern england today. if you suffer from hay fever, very high pollen levels at the moment, especially in england and wales. three this evening, losing most of the wet weather from the west of scotland. most places looking dry
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with light winds. warm air from the south once again. a muggy and sticky night. temperatures between 13 and 17. the weekend. drawing in warm air from further south. 44 degrees across parts of southern spain. that will go north, leaving temperatures in the uk reaching 30 degrees, even more possibly. saturday, high pressure staying in charge. fronts sitting at the far north—west. saturday, breezy and damp conditions in the north—west of scotland. elsewhere, eastern scotland, eastern parts of northern ireland, sunshine developing. further south in england and wales, plenty of sunshine. temperatures, 27— 28 during saturday. fair weather cloud building in the afternoon. sunday. even warmer. likely to see fairly
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widely those temperatures in the mid— height 205. 30 degrees in several spots. call in the far north—west without breaks of rain. it looks like the heat holds on into the new working week. 30 degrees for monday, perhaps cooler into tuesday. and now it is back to you. thank you. the tragedies and disasters of the last few months have really highlighted the skill and dedication of our doctors, nurses and emergency services. and a bbc two documentary crew got to see at first hand how teams dealt with the westminster terror attack. cameras had unprecedented, behind—the—scenes, access to the victims and medical staff at st mary's hospital in london. our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, reports. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. we are here to review vacancies and retention. ok. how many vacancies have the moment is
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blue 699. a routine meeting at st mary is in london. it was the day of the westminster attack. it would be nice to see... the assessment unit... we are on standby for a major incident at westminster bridge. we are on standby for a major incident at westminster bridge? do you have any details? 50 so far. this is believed to be the first time cameras have captured emergency contingency plans of emergency contingency plans of emergency is unfolding in a hospital. we will wait for further information. just a few miles away, this was the scene, a policeman
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stabbed to death outside parliament. pedestrians were mowed down by a car on westminster bridge. a number of the injured were french schoolchildren. wright st mary's was one of the major hospitals receiving the injured and six people who died, including the attacker, kelly massoud —— khalid massoud. the first to arrive was a french schoolboy. he is 16 years old. he was hit by a moving vehicle head—on. is 16 years old. he was hit by a moving vehicle head-on. what is this one? his school friend arrives in accident and emergency. he has a massive head wound. this 18-year-old has lost a dangerous amount of blood
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from his severe scalp wound. he is taken for immediate life—saving surgery. a5 taken for immediate life—saving surgery. as the police investigation got under way, and arrests were made, the injured continued to recover in hospital. eventually, the two french teenagers, best friends, we re two french teenagers, best friends, were reunited. painful memories for so many of the victims caught up in the horror of the attack. sophie hutchinson, bbc
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news. that is absolutely remarkable footage caught at such a dramatic time that we will all remember. so many tributes coming into the emergency services after the events of the past two months. we will be speaking to a firefighter later on in connection to the most recent incident in west london. that is coming up later. wimbledon isjust around the corner. if that is not enough to get you picking up a tennis racquet, holly hamilton might be able to give you another one. it is all about fitness good morning. that is right. we obviously know that playing any type of sport, tennis, hockey, rugby, it will keep you fit. this is now the largest study of its kind looking specifically at the benefits of tennis. i am out of breath. i can
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tell you it definitely keeps you fit. we are looking at long—term health. does it help keep away diabetes, heart disease, lower cholesterol? scientists say yes, it does. there have been interesting results. we will have some testimony later on. i will look a little bit at my serve. for now, it is a little bit questionable. now for the local news. good morning from bbc london news. a vigil has been held last night for the victims of the grenfell tower block disaster. crowds gathered outside the notting hill methodist church to pay their respects and observe a minute's silence. candles were placed alongside floral tributes and posters appealing for help to find those still missing. 17 people are known to have died but dozens are still unaccounted for. the prime minister is facing
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criticism for not meeting residents when she visited the scene of the fire yesterday. theresa may met members of the emergency services during a private visit. the former conservative cabinet minister, michael portillo, accused her of not using her humanity and wanting an entirely controlled situation. but the defence minister, tobias ellwood, suggested there were some security concerns. meanwhile, a rally is being organised in westminster at 6am this evening to call forjustice for those caught up in the fire. borough market is preparing for its first weekend of trade since the london bridge terror attack. the iconic south london market had been closed since third june, but reopened on wednesday following a minute's silence for the eight people who died. yesterday prince harry visited the area and described the strength of the community "magic." its managing director said it was good to be back. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. )a good service on all tube lines at the moment. on the roads, the usual problems around the blackwall tunnel with slow traffic on the a102 northbound from blackwall lane. you can see that to the right of your screen there. and on the a13, the westbound entry slip road for the m25junction 30 is closed due to a broken down car transporter. let's have a check on the weather now. it is set to be a nice weekend in terms of the weather. good morning. hot weather to come in the next few days, especially for the weekend. sunday looks like the pick of the temperatures. today, still very warm. sunny spells. it looks like it will stay dry as well. a further dark cloud building really through the day. plenty of breaks to allow the day. plenty of breaks to allow the sunshine. watch out for the high
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uv levels and pollen count. 2a today. through the evening, cloud breaking up. clear spells overnight. looking dry. very warm. 17 degrees. that is after a fresh start this morning. tomorrow, again, lots of sunshine around. the weekend looks like it will be dry. temperatures tomorrow getting up to the high 205. sunday, we could be seeing 30 degrees celsius. it will be a warm day indeed. and that continues into the beginning of the week. it is not going to become unsettled until tuesday. you can see the temperatures gradually rising over the next few days. it looks like a warm start in the next week as well. i will be back soon. back to the brea kfast sofa. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
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munchetty. more than 60 people who are believed to be dead or missing or are unnaccounted for following the fire at grenfell tower are being named in the media. police have warned they may never be able to identify all those who died in the fire. there's growing anger amongst people in the area over whether the blaze should have been prevented. andy moore is at the scene for us this morning. what's the latest on the investigation andy? the official death toll stands at 17. police have said it will rise significantly. the operation to recover, re m ove significantly. the operation to recover, remove and identify the bodies will continue today. very difficult operation, especially on the top floors of the building. we heard yesterday that they weren't safe enough for fire investigators and police investigators to go out, they will have to be shored up. the total number of fatalities, while
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the bbc understands it could be somewhere higher than 60. a lot of families are actively searching for family members. they are using social media to find out information about them. families just want certainty. police and the fire service have warned that this could bea service have warned that this could be a very long and complex operation and have also warned that at the end of the day some victims may never be identified. thank you for the moment. the prime minister is facing criticism for not meeting residents when she visited the scene of the grenfell tower fire yesterday. labour mayor of london sadiq khan was heckled by some angry residents at the scene. labour leaderjeremy corbyn spoke to local campaigners who demanded answers about how the fire was able to spread so quickly. later in the programme we'll be speaking to the communities secretary sajid javid. that's at 7:10am. british security officials say
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they believe that hackers in north korea were behind the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. the hackers are thought to have been attempting to make money, but did not predict the extent to which the computer virus would spread. the group believed to be behind the attack is lazarus, which is also thought to have targeted sony pictures in 2014. a second soldier has died after he was injured in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. he was serving with the royal tank regiment. two other soldiers were injured at castlemartin ranges on wednesday. over to the sport. good morning. the longest course in us open history, the longest grass in the rough for those players who find themselves in it, so no wonder the top six have been struggling. so some different names at the top. the longest list of complaints as
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well. many of the worlds top players have struggled in their opening round. but the english pair of paul casey and tommy fleetwood sitjust behind the leader rickie fowler, as adam wild reports. they are calling this the longest walk. at the us open there has never been a longer course and for the world's test the hard yards start here. leading the way was american rickie fowler. his round of seven under par took him into the early lead. much has been made of the unforgiving link for this cause. many expect players to struggle. englishman tommy fleetwood didn't. five under put him ahead of the chasing pack. the world number one and reigning champion dustinjohnson couldn't keep up. in fact, none of the world's top six, including rory mcilroy, managed to break par.
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instead the challenge was left to the likes of england's paul casey. after this eagle at the first he ended the day ahead of fleetwood, just one stroke off the lead. the longest walk in golf perhaps, but there is still plenty of distance left to travel. jordan pickford has officially become the most expensive british goalkeeper in history, afterjoining everton for a fee that could rise to £30 million. he joins from sunderland, who were relegated from the premier league last season. pickford will play in this summer's under 21 european championship for england, but has yet to make his debut at senior international level. it was a big spending day for everton, who also paid over £23 million for ajax captain davy klaassen. india will play pakistan in the final of the icc champions trophy following a nine—wicket win over bangladesh in birmingham. the defending champions managed to restrict bangladesh to 264 in their 50 overs.
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it looked a reasonable total, but india's batsmen knocked the runs off with ease. the final is then a repeat of india and pakistan's opening match in the tournament — india won that match. johanna konta has continued her winning start to her grass court season with victory in the second round of the nottingham open. the british number one lost in the first round at the french open on clay, but is top seed in nottingham and has comfortable eased past belgium's yanina wickmayer in straight sets. she'll play ashleigh barty in the quarter finals today. iam very i am very happy with the matches i've got into play here so far. two singles matches and also the doubles match yesterday. the more time i can get on the surface right now the better. for the first time in 19 years salford red devils are into the semi finals of rugby league's challenge cup. they ran in five tries before the hour mark to beat wakefield trinity by 30—6 at the aj bell stadium.
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craig kopchack grabbed the fifth, bulldozing his way over the line. britain's jake wightman knocked over a second off his personal best, as he beat a high—quality field in the 1,500 metres at the oslo diamond league meeting last night. wightman tweeted afterwards that he was in utter shock. "i cannot believe i'vejust won a diamond league." the 22—year—old scot follows in the footsteps of seb coe, steve ovett and steve cram, who have all won the race known as the ‘dream mile' in oslo. a fantastic achievement. very good, thank you very much. a long and complex forensic investigation will have to be carried out before the exact cause of the grenfell tower fire is known, but already similarities are being made to a blaze in camberwell in 2009. there, six people died and fire safety failings were uncovered in the resulting inquiry. dr peter mansi was the lead fire
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investigator at that time. he joins us from our london studio. thank you very much forjoining us. iimagine thank you very much forjoining us. i imagine that you never thought you would be talking about something like this again after that fire. no, and you would like to have thought that lessons would be learned and this wouldn't happen again, certainly in this country. what do you think hasn't been learnt? well, that's going to be the result of a very extensive and complex fire investigation. once the area of origin and the cause of the fire is established, it will then be upon the investigators to determine why the fire spread the way it spread and all of the materials that we re spread and all of the materials that were used to envelop the outside of that tower block will be examined and tested to see why the fire
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spread the way it did.” and tested to see why the fire spread the way it did. i want to talk to you about the forensic process in just a talk to you about the forensic process injust a moment, because we've been hearing a lot about that and the difficulty in identifying and the difficulty in identifying and recovering bodies, but before that can talk about the safety aspect? there was an enquiry after the 2009 fire. there was a report asking for more safety procedures to be put in place, especially for example sprinklers. sprinklers in newer buildings are regulated, but not all the buildings. do you think that sounds logical? it is always sensible to learn from these tragedies and try to put in place measures that will stop them or mitigate them from happening again. we will always be having fires and there are often fires in high—rise buildings. they don't progress the way this one has. certainly not to spread to other compartments. before the fire brigade get there, which they did in this case in about six
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minutes. so when there are extensive investigations, such as this one will be, once the findings are out in the public domain, once it is fed back to the right authorities, then, yes, you would like to think they would act upon those recommendations, similar to an air crash investigation, so that they don't happen again. let's talk about the investigation now. what happens next? a5 the investigation now. what happens next? as i mentioned we have been told that it could be difficult to identify those who are still in the building and those who have perished in the building and retrieve those bodies? yes, it will be. it will be very, very difficult and a long and protra ct very, very difficult and a long and protract the investigation because the priority now is for victim recovery and identification. each flat, each level of the building,
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needs to be gone through with a fine tooth comb and the teams that are doing this are the london fire brigade and metropolitan police and they are highly skilled and will do their utmost to complete that task, but it will take a long time. what happens in terms of trying to determine the cause of the fire, in terms of forensic investigation and how quickly it spread, where it spread to? what do you look for? there are three aspects. to identify the area of origin of the fire, because until you've done that you can't identify the cause. there are lots of potential causes on everybody‘s homes, but you need to narrow that down to identify the area of origin. once that's done you need to look at the available sources and fuel packages involved and look for evidence to see what the cause may be by the artefacts and component parts that may be left in the ashes. those are the two
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aspects, the origin and the cause of the fire. but that should have been contained within the department for at least 30 minutes, and how's separation between that apartment and the adjacent flat as well. but the most difficult part will be to see how this then developed and spread the way it did. certainly the timescale that we saw on a lot of the video footage. thank you very much forjoining us and talking to us much forjoining us and talking to us this morning. just to let you know, we will be speaking to the secretary of state for. that's coming up. they find out what's happening with the weather. a bit ofa a bit of a fresh start today than it has been in recent days. not as hot and muggy. this was taken this morning in east sussex. a5
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and muggy. this was taken this morning in east sussex. as we had through the day it will be another warm day, with spells of sunshine. there will be a bit of cloud, especially in northern and western parts of the country. that cloud is bringing some rain in the northern ireland, in the western scotland and perhaps a few spots into the north—west of england. elsewhere it is looking dry and as the cloud brea ks is looking dry and as the cloud breaks and sunshine breaks through it will be another warm afternoon. this afternoon, at 4pm there will be rain in the western half. eastern scotla nd rain in the western half. eastern scotland should brighten up as well. the northern ireland, and improving picture. it will be dry this afternoon. 20 or 21 degrees. a little light rain into the north—west. the east of the pennines is got brighter skies, sunny spells continuing south across the rest of england and wales, with light winds. temperatures up to about 22 or 23 degrees. where we do have the brakes on the cloud there will be high levels of u —— uv. very high levels
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of pollen widely across england and wales. moderate levels across scotla nd wales. moderate levels across scotland and northern ireland. moving into this evening, the rain across the west of scotland eases away. hats and little drizzle in the far north—west. most places overnight look dry. warm and muggy aircoming upfrom overnight look dry. warm and muggy air coming up from the south. temperatures overnight falling no lower than about 13— 17. on the weekend and things will be heating up. down to the fact that we are importing airfrom up. down to the fact that we are importing air from further south. southern spain likely to see about 44. that drifts up to the uk and we could see temperatures topping 33 degrees or even a little more through the weekend. high pressure on saturday is the driving force. we have a weather front sitting to the north—west. that will bring rain at times on saturday for the north—west of scotland. a bit of cloud for the west and perhaps in the western parts of northern ireland. more cloud bubbling up in the afternoon,
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but most places having warm spells of sunshine and temperatures likely to reach about 27 or 28 degrees during the course of saturday. on the sunday and a bit of rain in the far north—west, but another dry day in the west of the country. likely to see 29 or 30 degrees by the time we get to sunday, especially in the south—east. that heat holds on, but if you aren't a fan of the heat and humidity things will turn cooler by the time we get to tuesday. everyone likes a bit of relief from the heat. thanks very much. to help businesses grow, hsp has launched a £10 billion fund to support small and medium—sized businesses in the uk —— hsbc. on the face of it, it sounds like quite a lot of money. who will it go to? good morning and welcome to the city of that. a lot of money, £10 billion foot —— put aside by hsbc. they say
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they want the final that to small businesses. it is interesting because the small businesses today could be the big visitors tomorrow. for the big banks the challenge is spotting which ones will be the winners and supporting them through this process because they need money to grow. now we might say is a good time to borrow the money, with interest rates historically low, kept low yesterday by the bank of england. what does it mean for business and how do they get hold of that money? ian stewart is the chief executive of hsbc in the uk. good morning. £10 billion put aside for small firms. you might say you should be lending to small firms anyway. why do you need the special fund? this is the fourth time we have done it. the money goes regionally. it is not one fund for one place in
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england. it goes all over the country. it allows businesses, from the smallest to the largest, to get access to the funding through local networks. you have to find the firms that will make more money down the line and spot the winners. this is not charity, it is to make money. how do you spot them? we are not good enough to spot the winners. we have to use the support from thousands and millions of businesses. doing that, hopefully the small ones grow to medium and then large. the uk is good at doing that. some of the best industries today started off as very small businesses. we have to help small businesses. we have to help small businesses through the trading cycle and help them become the ambitious larger companies they want to be. now was a good time to row because money is quite cheap and business
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rates are at a record low. —— borrow. perhaps now is the time to do it. i would say it is. borrow. perhaps now is the time to do it. iwould say it is. if borrow. perhaps now is the time to do it. i would say it is. if you have plans and think now is the chance to take the next step, now is as good a time as any with money costs. there is a lot of talk about. the next is brexit. we have heard from many big banks about whether they will have to move operations abroad. passporting, whether we can do the right things in the right place at the right time. talk us through hsbc. one of the things we cannot do in the uk, well, roughly 1000 jobs have to go. that was updated over yesterday. that depends on whether it is a hard all soft brexit. —— or. it could change. it is updated all the time. we are in
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uncharted waters. we don't know how which will look in the next few yea rs. we have which will look in the next few years. we have to plan ahead. at the moment, it is capped at 1000 but could be less. what are the defining factors of a hard or soft brexit? could be less. what are the defining factors of a hard or soft brexit7m depends what we can do in the uk to be some things we can do and others might have to leave. we don't know the exact numbers. were employing thousands in the uk. hsbc is a massive employer. talk us through relocation and staff. you are moving a big operation to birmingham. that pa rt a big operation to birmingham. that part means a huge thing for birmingham. are you able to get staff out of london? i am aware i may get criticised suggesting that talent is not out of the south—east.
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can you get the right people?” think we are doing very well with recruitment activity in birmingham. iam recruitment activity in birmingham. i am hugely excited by it. it is a brand—new building coming out of the ground. it is well on its way. we will move into it early january into february. all of the plans are on track. do you have to incentivise people to go there? we have! we are making it easier to come with us. 63% of the roles are filled. we are down to the last 300. plans are on their way. i am very confident we will be 85% by the end of the year. that is where we thought we would be. we will be ready go on line. 60 or more you have set to close. people worry about branch is. yes. —— branches. we have committed to 625 branches. we are investing in
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them. the branches of the future will be different to the date. i am happy with the 625 and we will keep investing in them. thank you. we know all about relocating, as part of the bbc is moving to salford. i will hand back to you from salford. thank you. you play tennis, don't you? times. is more fit, you me, in terms of physical fitness? -- is more fit, you me, in terms of physicalfitness? -- who is more fit, you me, in terms of physical fitness? -- who is. is more fit, you me, in terms of physicalfitness? -- who is. i have no idea. it depends on how much sport you play to the apparently, people who play tennis, if you put them against people who go to the gym or the other sports regularly, tennis players are more fit.” gym or the other sports regularly, tennis players are more fit. i think any sport is good. now we go to holly hamilton who was checking out
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the theory of this. good advice from charlie. that is the message this morning. all sport is really good for you. but tennis is specifically good for you. is it the best sport to keep you fit mentally, physically, physiologically, psychically? we have had fun this morning. i have to admit my server is not the best compared to these guys, is not the best compared to these guys, but i can tell you it is definitely gruelling! —— service. exactly how good is this for you, not just exactly how good is this for you, notjust in the short—term, but in the long—term ? time to have a look. it takes years of dedication, training, and hard work, to be the world number one. but you don't need to be the next andy murray to enjoy
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the efforts of tennis. bryan and sue are avid members of their local tennis club. they don't have titles, but both say they have improved stamina and health. how often do you play? 3-4 times a week. i play doubles. we play against other clubs in liverpool. then i come down and play a game of singles for a few hours. i practise some of the shots. it must mean you are extremely fit. i really enjoy it. we know it gives you fit, but can it really improve your long—term health? using 3d motion capture and strength exercises, 90 fitness fanatics have been put through their paces. somewhere tennis players and others preferred alternative forms of exercise. how are you feeling? i
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will try not to interrupt you too much. you are busy. what are you learning? we are measuring bryan's cardiovascular fitness. learning? we are measuring bryan's cardiovascularfitness. endurance, stamina, how fit his heart and lungs us. iron play a hell of a lot. i definitely do. it helps fitness. stress levels. it is good for so many things. i will let you get back to pumping those muscles. we checked the people of different age and background. we have evidence that it im proves background. we have evidence that it improves health in the long—term. keep it going. while it is not for everyone, the benefits of tennis are clear. though, for some of us, it may take a while to get to wimbledon. that was pathetic. you can say that. it is ok.
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like i said, my serve is not the best. but look, it is bryan! he made it out of the lab! and now we will speak to one of the people doing research. why are we doing tennis? it isa research. why are we doing tennis? it is a unique sport. it has such a diverse set of attributes really that you train and that get involved in the particular competition, strength, endurance, flexibility, mobility. it is a whole host of different aspects, i think, which makes it unique and interesting to look at in terms of health benefits. i think also the intermittent nature of tennis is something that hasn't necessarily been blue sedated to see whether it is better than others. ——
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elucidated. it involves the whole body as well. we were really interested to find out exclusive health benefits down to tennis itself as opposed to other activities. and you found that, yes, it is really quite superior. can you say that confidently compared to other sports? we cannot say. we have not measured them directly. but from our study, according to government recommendations, they are meeting recommendations, they are meeting recommendations through other sports, but tennis is coming out superior in terms of cardiovascular risk and muscles and skill and skeletal benefits. it reduces stroke and heart disease risks as well later on in life. their reason so
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much more to discuss. we could talk about it all day. —— there is. but you are getting onto the court. you are the chairman of the local tennis association. you were involved in this research. why did you get involved? we love the sport. i was the first participant. i was incredibly impressed by the facilities at liverpool. and the equipment and technology behind this research is brilliant. did you find it tough? it was tough for me. i am getting slightly older. i tried to arrive in good condition. i thoroughly enjoyed it. it was a top rate study. it is good news we are doing these studies in liverpool and promoting tennis. it is bringing a lot to the game, to be honest. thank you. i will let you get back on the
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court as well. i will have a go. with wimbledon around the corner, if you need an excuse to get involved with tennis, we will get involved now! over! i'm happy with that! i will quit now. we are happy with that as well. now for the local news. good morning from bbc london news. the first victim of the grenfell tower fire has been the first victim of the grenfell towerfire has been named as a syrian. so far, 17 bodies have been found. police say they hope the final tally will be below 100 and though they cannot confirm the numbers yet. a vigil has been held last night for the victims of the grenfell tower block disaster.
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crowds gathered outside the notting hill methodist church to pay their respects and observe a minute's silence. candles were placed alongside floral tributes and posters appealing for help to find those still missing. 17 people are known to have died but dozens are still unaccounted for. meanwhile, a rally is being organised in westminster at 6am this evening to call forjustice for those caught up in the fire. borough market is preparing for its first weekend of trade since the london bridge terror attack. the iconic south london market had been closed since third june, but reopened on wednesday following a minute's silence for the eight people who died. yesterday prince harry visited the area and described the strength of the community "magic." its managing director said it was good to be back. i have seen the best of people over the last few days. the whole community coming together. people turning up. today will be difficult, but we will get through it. it is so good to get back on the market and see all of the colour come back and people doing what should happen here, enjoying themselves! let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on all tube lines at the moment. on the roads, the usual problems
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around the blackwall tunnel with slow traffic on the a102 northbound from blackwall lane. and on the a13, the westbound entry slip road for the m25junction 30 is closed due to a broken down car transporter. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. hot weather to come in the next few days, especially for the weekend. sunday looks like the peak for the temperatures. today, though, still very warm. sunny spells. and it looks like it will stay dry as well. a fair bit of cloud building really through the day. plenty of breaks to allow the sunshine. watch out for the high uv levels and pollen count. temperatures, 23—24 today. now, through the evening, cloud breaking up. clear spells overnight. it is looking like a dry one. very warm.
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17 degrees after a fresh start this morning. tomorrow, again, lots of sunshine around. the whole weekend looks like it will be staying dry. temperatures tomorrow getting up to the high 205. and on sunday, we could be seeing 30 degrees celsius. but, it is certainly going to be a warm day indeed. and that continues into the beginning of the week. it is not going to become unsettled until tuesday. you can see the temperatures gradually rising over the next few days. it looks like a warm start to next week as well. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on the website. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
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munchetty. anger over the london tower block fire. the only thing keeping me going at the moment is anger and adrenaline and i will keep going on anger and adrenaline for as long as i can, because frankly i'd rather not sit down and actually contemplate the scale of what's happened here. pictures emerge of the inside of the building. 17 are known to have died, more than 60 people are being named in the media as dead or missing. as the search of the burned out continues, police launch a criminal inquiry into the fire. good morning, it's friday 16thjune.
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also this morning: new evidence that north korean hackers were responsible for the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. one yearon one year on from the murder ofjo cox we are back in her constituency for her legacy and to say good morning to everybody, planning for a big weekend of celebrations ahead. good morning from london. we are asking whether the tesco turnaround is working. we will get the result from the supermarket giant in a next few minutes. they are expected to show that things are looking up. in sport, england's paul casey is the pick of the european challengers at the us open. a first round of six under par sees him just a shot off the leader rickie fowler at golf‘s second major of the year.
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good morning. another warm day on the cards today. dry for most of us but a bit of rain in the north—west. a full forecast in about 15 minutes. thank you. first, our main story: more than 60 people who are believed to be dead or missing following the fire at grenfell tower are being named in the media. police are warning they may never be able to identify all those who perished. there's growing anger amongst people in the area over whether the blaze could have been prevented. some viewers may find some of the content of this interview distressing. andy moore reports. the first victim of the fire to be officially named is mohammed alhajali, a syrian refugee who came to britain for a better life. his brother was led to safety by firefighters, but, in the chaos and confusion, mohammed got left behind. i called and we said, where are you? he said, i'm in the flat. i said, why didn't you come?
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they got us outside. he said, no one got me outside. i thought they took him outside with me! but they didn't. some of those trapped in the blaze did survive. we now know this man is elpidio bonifacio, a partially blind grandfather in his 705. his family say he is in intensive care, suffering from serious smoke inhalation. they have thanked the bravery of the firefighters who risked their lives to get him out. elpidio was finally rescued 11 hours after the blaze started. there is anger in the community, directed at almost anyone in authority. the london mayor sadiq khan saw it for himself when he went to visit. how many children died and what are you going to do about it? police say they have now started a criminal investigation. that's not to say there was a crime committed, but they will investigate to establish if there's any evidence of one. the list of the dead and missing grows all the time.
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police have voiced the hope that the final number of casualties will be below 100. they admit that some victims may never be identified. the leader of the local council said they did in the bout installing sprinkler system in grenfell tower when it was renovated last year, but he said there was no collective view among residents in favour of it. our correspondent andy moore is at the scene of the fire in west london. the search continues, but the real anguish of those people searching for those missing and unaccounted for? —— there is real anguish. that's right. what they want above all else is certainty. but they are hearing from the police and fire service, that they may not be able to provide that, certainly not any time soon. the operation to recover those bodies and identify them we are being told could take weeks,
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months and in some cases may never be successful, some of those victims may never be identified. it is difficult some of the top floors of the building behind me. some parts of it are structurally unsafe, so the police investigators can't actually get out and recover those bodies. so the families are being told it will take a long time, but that's really not what they want to hear. thanks for the moment. a rally is being organised in westminster at 6pm this evening to call for justice westminster at 6pm this evening to call forjustice for westminster at 6pm this evening to call for justice for those caught westminster at 6pm this evening to call forjustice for those caught up inafire. the pm has been criticised for travelling to the area, are not meeting residents of the building. chris masten joins meeting residents of the building. chris mastenjoins us. meeting residents of the building. chris masten joins us. —— meeting residents of the building. chris mastenjoins us. —— mason. understandably there is a lot of anger about the building they were housed in, the way they feel they are being treated at the moment and politicians who visit the scene
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understandably will be a target of that? absolutely. that has happened and we saw that, in terms of the response sadiq khan received. the prime minister was there yesterday pretty fleetingly and she has been criticised for that. there are still images often meeting firefighters and charity workers, but she didn't meet any local people, those who are bereaved or who have been left homeless. there has been criticism from some conservatives and the public about her response. my understanding is they did consider the prime minister doing some sort of walkabout, but they decided it would it a distraction, given the amount of security she would have with her and they didn't want to get in the way. seeing the end they decided against it what was quite striking was the prime minister plus a response on the ground to that of jeremy corbyn, who was there about one hour later and did ingall
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amongst people. we saw him hugging one woman who was desperately trying to find someone. —— mingling. the government says it has activated a scheme to make sure lots more money is sent in the direction of the local council. and there will be this full, independent public enquiry which will ask some very probing questions about what went wrong here, as clearly there is a huge demand for answers locally and also people around the country, the tens of thousands of people who also live in tower blocks and need reassurance that their homes are safe. thanks very much. in a few minutes we will be speaking to the community is secretary. —— communities. a soldier has died in pembrokeshire. two others were injured on wednesday. hackers are thought to have
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attempted to make money but did not predict the extent to which the computer virus would spread. here is our security correspondent. the cyber attack spread around the world, with the nhs badly hit. computers were locked with hackers demanding a ransom be paid for them to be made usable again. written's national cyber security centre led the investigation and security sources have told the bbc that the centre believes in north korean —based hacking group known as lazarus launched the attack. the same group is believed to have targeted sony pictures after it plans to release a film involving the north korean leader and was also thought to have been behind the theft of more than $80 million from theft of more than $80 million from the central bank last year. the ransom ware last month did not target britain or the nhs
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specifically and may well have been a money making scheme that got out of control, especially since the hackers have not yet retrieved any of the ransom money that's been paid into the accounts. a new poll has revealed a widespread lack of knowledge about where significant moments in england's history took place. a campaign has been launched to raise awareness of the sites which have helped shape the nation. colin paterson has more. geneva, switzerland. home to the large hadron collider and the most common answer when people in england are asked, where was the atom first split? but it was here in manchester that the scientific breakthrough was made by ernest rutherford, in 1917. this new research suggests that only one in ten people know that and it's far from the only common mistake about england's most impressive achievements and inventions. when it comes to where the first trainers were made, three times more people think it was in the usa than know the truth. it was in bolton, lancashire.
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jw foster & sons created them in the 18905 and later became reebok. and the majority of people believe that bungee jumping originated in australia or new zealand, when in fact it all started in bristol, with a leap from the clifton suspension bridge back in 1979. historic england hope their new campaign will fill the gaps in people's knowledge and more people will be aware of the country's greatest achievements, like the fact the pencil was invented in cumbria. searches of grenfell tower in west london are continuing as dozens of people remain unaccounted for after the huge fire on tuesday night. police are warning that some of the dead may never be identified. there is growing anger in the community over what happened.
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there is growing anger in the community over what happenedm there is growing anger in the community over what happened. if you had seen that building go up like i saw it from a back window, you would know that building was not fit for purpose. somewhere along the line someone made a catastrophic error. at the moment we are grieving, but there is a public anger and neath and we do want to see someone held accountable for this. —— underneath. i feel angry that i saw people dying in front of my eyes. i saw kids and women and kids this age hanging from windows, with teddies. that angered me and nobody could help them. that really angered me. there are few who i know who are already dead and i know for certain that they are dead. there are a few others who i strongly suspect are dead. the only thing that's keeping me going at the moment is anger and adrenaline and i will keep going on anger and adrenaline for as long as i can because frankly i would rather not see down and actually contemplate
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the actual scale of what's happened around here. because i think that if ido around here. because i think that if i do sit down, i won't stand up again. the prime minister is facing criticism for not meeting residents when she visited the scene yesterday. we can speak now to the secretary of state for communities and local government, sajid javid. we arejust we are just hearing from people. those were in many ways the more measured angry voices we are hearing. is it your intention to visit the scene? i will be visiting today, but let me first say what's happened is horrific, absolutely horrific. my thoughts are still very much with the victims, their families, theirfriends much with the victims, their families, their friends and much with the victims, their families, theirfriends and i have nothing but admiration for the emergency services and the local community in how they have handled this tragedy so far. the answer your questions, i will be visiting this morning. my own department is
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helping with the recovery effort, along with council. we've done a lot in the last 34 hours but i want to make sure we are doing everything we can to help. i want to ask you a couple of things in connection with these figures around the missing all those feared dead. the media widely reporting that figure is around 65 people missing or dead. what light can you share on that for us? at the moment i can only share with you what the police have made public. they have confirmed sadly there are 17 confirmed fatalities. there are around i think 30 people still in hospital and 15 of them are in a critical condition and still there area number of critical condition and still there are a number of people missing. police don't know at this point how many are missing. i'm afraid from what we are hearing and from what the police have already said publicly they are preparing the country for further fatalities. so
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it is very sad, the information is coming out, but i don't have any more information at this point. moving onto some of the practicalities. everyone is aware there is an investigation ongoing and that will take some time, but the questions people want answering immediately, and many will be living in tower blocks not to this and there are question marks over cladding used. do you know how many other tower blocks in the uk have used this same form of cladding? we do know exactly yet. first let me say that anyone living in a tower block in this country, i can totally understand they will be very concerned. what we've already started is an emergency review, five review, of all similar buildings throughout the country. social housing providers, local authorities, we've asked them to stop compiling a list of what they think might fall into that category. today you don't know how many other buildings in the uk have the same
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form of cladding? the reason i am asking about that specifically is because it is widely reported that in other countries, like germany, these panels have what are called a b2 rating, placing them in the same category as unprotected wood. the same panels are and for use in high—rise tower blocks in america. those people who are sleeping in a tower block that may have those panels on them tonight and last night will be thinking, should ibm is building at all? and you are saying at this stage it had even know how many buildings have that cladding. there is a lot of speculation about what caused the fire and what led to it spreading so rapidly. we have to be led by the experts in this. the process has started and will be done ina process has started and will be done in a matter of days. those people need reassurance in days, but it needs to be led by the experts.
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first we need to identify the buildings, about 4000 high—rise buildings, about 4000 high—rise buildings in the country, not all of them recladded. and we will not make them recladded. and we will not make the assange and it is all about cladding. we need to be led by the experts. —— assumption. once we have got that, that is what should be used. this is your responsibility. you are saying within days you will have expert advice about whether it was the cladding that caused this. what will happen next? first of all, we need an emergency expection —— inspection... we have moved on from that. what will happen immediately to make sure people in buildings with that cladding are safe? we will do whatever is recommended by the expert advice to make those
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buildings safe and the people safe. whatever it takes. we have to be led by the experts... this is so important. you are saying whatever it takes. in two days' time, you will know whether it is the cladding that led to the speed of the fire escalating. are you saying from that point those buildings will be evacuated, that cladding will be changed as a matter of hierarchy? i am not asking about further investigation. —— priority. will the buildings be altered accordingly? we have to be led by the evidence. you said in two days' time. but it has to be led by the experts. it would not be right for me as a minister to push them in a way they are not co mforta ble push them in a way they are not comfortable with. when we have information from the experts, which has already begun, we will act on that and do whatever it takes.
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again, it has to be led by the experts. there may be other measures they recommend, but it should not be political, ministerial, it has to be led by the experts. anyone listening to what you say, you keep referring to what you say, you keep referring to experts, anyone who has done the least bit of research will no experts have already made judgement on e—panels. a fire brigade report from a court, they said that cladding led to a fire previously. recommendations were made about sprinklers in southwark previously. focusing on sprinklers. how was it possible, how is it possible, that a
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building of similar height built long ago could be allowed not to have sprinklers, yet a more modern one has sprinklers. a number of fire precautions can be taken for any building. sprinklers could be one of those. we cannot jump building. sprinklers could be one of those. we cannotjump immediately to the conclusion that sprinklers were the conclusion that sprinklers were the problem. we need to follow expert advice. of course, there are many lessons to learn from this. in the short—term, no one wants to wait months or years for this public enquiry the end. some of the longer term issues about decisions, whether they are made at government, local council, elsewhere, that is why the prime minister is right to have a publicjudge led prime minister is right to have a public judge led enquiry prime minister is right to have a publicjudge led enquiry that is
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com pletely publicjudge led enquiry that is completely independent.“ publicjudge led enquiry that is completely independent. if you were living in these tower blocks, you don't live in one of those, i don't, if you were, this is not a long—term report issued. they may well want to know that from now on, retrofitting of sprinklers that could have contained the fires, not about how it progressed, could have initially stopped the fire. and many experts have said this in the past, retrofitting of those sprinklers should be brought into place now. we don't need to wait for an enquiry. what harm could do?” don't need to wait for an enquiry. what harm could do? i completely agree with you. people don't want to wait months and years for a report. that is why i am saying this emergency review of similar buildings is starting now and will happen right away. and what is going to be informed that is the first results from the fire investigation
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report. —— inform. there is already a police investigation going on. the fire investigation is going on now. we have to listen to them to tell us exactly what needs to be done to be and that is what should be driving the response to this from the government. i am absolutely clear anyone living in similar buildings, many of them will be concerned over the last few days, but we have to do everything we possibly can to reassure them. that is a matter of days. not weeks and months, a matter of days. you will not categorically say you will retrofit sprinklers at the expense of the government and local authorities? you will not see a dead this morning and say that will happen regardless?” a dead this morning and say that will happen regardless? i am saying this may not be just about sprinklers. i did not say that. no one has suggested that. i am talking about one specific issue. we will do whatever it takes, but first we have
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to listen to the fire investigators and be driven by them. we will do whatever it takes. people are were listening to you this morning that the accusations already made of government, of the prime minister directly, the response has not been appropriate. people listening this morning will say every answer will be looking to the future and reports. that is not what people wa nt to reports. that is not what people want to hear. i bring you back to the suggestion that when the prime minister, theresa may, arrived at the scene, she talked to the emergency services, but none of the people in the community directly affected. will you do that today?” will be doing that today. we have to be clear, the prime minister was right to go as quickly as she could and learn about the operation and discover if there is anything more the government could be doing to
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help with the operation. for example, one of the first things she did she knows she got back to downing street, was to authorise local authorities and their ability to help. it is right the prime minister goes and listens to what is going on and works out what more can be done. and i will be going along today visiting one of the centres, because one of the areas my department is involved in is trying to make sure the council is leading the recovery effort and helps in any way it can. what i am concerned about is making sure that everyone that needs to be rehoused is first of all given the right quality of local and temporary accommodation. but i also want to make sure that permanent accommodation is somewhere local and people get what they need and goodness knows, they have enough
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on their mind. it is horrific what they have gone through. i want to do everything i can to help. thank you for your time this morning. thank you. it is 724. the weather. good morning. cloud around many parts of the country this morning. this was a view taken by a viewer in wakefield. sunshine breaking through the cloud through the day. a warm day on the cloud. not as sticky as recent morning. more cloud in the north—west of the uk. drizzly rain to northern ireland. it will go to north—west england as well. away from these areas, another dry bright day. a split east— west in scotland. dry and bright conditions in the east in the afternoon. northern ireland, improving pictures through the day. 22 degrees. drizzly rain
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for the north—west of england. the east of the pennines, under shelter, bright. sunny spells further south in england and wales. not wall—to—wall sunshine. a bright day to come. top temperatures, 23 degrees. with breaks in the cloud, very high levels of uv. a day for sunscreen today. high levels of pollen, especially in england and wales. you will notice that if you suffer hay fever. this evening, rain in the west of scotland going away. drizzle in the far north—west. elsewhere, a dry evening and night to come. turning warm and humid once again. a sticky night. temperatures falling no lower than 17 degrees. warming up further through the course of the weekend. hot conditions. further south in europe, 44 degrees in southern spain. that hit as it goes north will lift temperatures. 30 degrees in the uk,
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perhaps even higher. high pressure in charge of our weather. a weather front lingering in the north—west. through saturday, breezy conditions in the far north—west of scotland with rain. the same in northern ireland at times. sunny and dry and the rest of the uk. cloud in the south—east through the afternoon but temperatures between 20— 27 degrees. maybe a bit higher than that in one two spots. sunday, similar. rain in the far north—west. top temperatures, 29. possibly 20 degrees. that hit goes into monday as well. if you are not a fan, it looks like things will turn more cooler by tuesday. and now it is time to go back to you. thank you. holly hamilton has a reason to pick up holly hamilton has a reason to pick up your tennis racquet. she is already on the court. good morning.
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good morning. iam already on the court. good morning. good morning. i am on the court. i am causing a hazard. we were talking about how tennis helps your health. that may seem obvious, obviously sport keeps you fit. it has definitely been keeping me fit this morning. but we are looking at long—term health benefits, whether it helps you stay away from diabetes, heart disease, and lowers your cholesterol. scientists say yes. i have been talking to people taking part in the study and the people doing the research to find out the science behind this finding out the science behind this finding out what they have discovered. before that, the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. as we've been hearing the first victim of the grenfell tower fire has been named as syrian refugee mohammed al—hajali. the 23—year—old's brother said he lost him on his way out
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of the building and later spoke to him on the phone. so far, 17 bodies have been found. police say they hope the final number of fatalities will be below 100, but that they can't confirm numbers yet. it is much more quiet than yesterday under the westway. thousands of donations came yesterday to the car park. hundreds of people tried to help. here at the bus stop outside the church, glass is covered in pictures of missing people. this 12—year—old. stefan antony mills, not seen since the fire. raymond moses bernard and others. notjust here at the bus stop, but all the way along the walls of the church.
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people have pain and hurt and it is now turning to anger. meanwhile, a rally is being organised in westminster at 6am this evening to call forjustice for those caught up in the fire. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on all tube lines at the moment. on the roads, this is the m25. it's slow anticlockwise between junction 19 for watford and junction 18 for chorleywood due to an accident. congestion is back to junction 21 for the m1. and on the a13, the westbound entry slip road for the m25junction 30 is closed due to a broken—down car transporter. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. hot weather to come in the next few days, especially for the weekend. sunday looks like the peak for the temperatures. today, though, still very warm. sunny spells. and it looks like it will stay dry as well. a fair bit of cloud building really through the day. plenty of breaks to allow the sun to shine through. watch out for the high uv levels and pollen count. temperatures, 23—24 today. now, through the evening, cloud breaking up a little more. clear spells overnight. it is looking like a dry one.
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very warm as well. 17 degrees after a fresh start this morning. tomorrow, again, lots of sunshine around. the whole weekend looks like it will be staying dry. temperatures tomorrow getting up to the high 205. and on sunday, we could be seeing 30 degrees celsius. but, it is certainly going to be a warm day indeed. and that continues into the beginning of the week. it is not going to become unsettled until we get to tuesday. you can see the temperatures gradually rising over the next few days. it looks like a warm start to next week as well. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on the website. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
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munchetty. there's growing anger amongst people affected by the grenfell tower fire over whether more could have been done to prevent the blaze. more than 60 people, who are believed to be dead, are being named by the media and police are warning they may never be able to identify some of those who died. earlier on breakfast, the communities secretary sajid javid said he wanted to reassure people living in similar tower blocks across the country. the process we've already started and this will be done in a matter of days. those people need to be given reassurance within days. it has to be led by the experts. the first point is obviously to identify those buildings, about 4000 high—rise buildings, about 4000 high—rise buildings in the country, but not all of them have been re—cladded. but it isn't all about cladding. we need to be led by the experts. a5
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soon as we have more information from the experts, which we expect later today or at the weekend, and that's what should be used during this emergency inspections. the prime minister is facing criticism for not meeting residents when she visited the scene of the grenfell tower fire yesterday. labour mayor of london sadiq khan was heckled by some angry residents at the scene. labour leaderjeremy corbyn spoke to local campaigners who demanded answers about how the fire was able to spread so quickly. in other news, british security officials say they believe that hackers in north korea were behind the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. the attack led to delays in operations and treatment for patients. the hackers are thought to have been attempting to make money, but did not predict the extent to which the computer virus would spread. the group believed to be behind the attack is lazarus, which is also thought to have targeted sony pictures in 2014. a second soldier has died after he was injured in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. he was serving with the royal tank regiment. two other soldiers were injured
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at castlemartin ranges on wednesday. the weather forecast shortly. first, let's get up—to—date with the sport. good morning, mike. good morning, mike. good weather for the golf? yes, and the roughest and longest course in us history has not bothered two englishman. you play with paul casey and tommy fleetwood ? yes, and they meditate on the golf course! is there a limit... you say it is the longest course in us open history. is there a limit to how long... today to say, this year we will have it that long? guy demel if there's a limit but they definitely discussions about what is reasonable —— i don't know ifa what is reasonable —— i don't know if a limit. it is more about the length of the grass, which they did cut back, although rory mcilroy said that was
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unnecessary because if you are good enough to play in the us open you should keep it on the fairway! many of the world's top players have struggled in their opening round, but the english pair of paul casey and tommy fleetwood sitjust behind the leader rickie fowler, as adam wild reports. they are calling this golf‘s longest walk. at the us open there has never been a longer course and for the world's best the hard yards start here. leading the way was american rickie fowler. his round of seven under par took him into the early lead. much has been made of the unforgiving link for this course. —— length. many expect players to struggle. well, englishman tommy fleetwood didn't. five under put him amongst the chasing pack. the world number one and reigning champion dustin johnson couldn't keep up. in fact, none of the world's top six, including rory mcilroy, managed to break par. instead the challenge was left to the likes of england's paul casey.
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after this eagle at the first, he ended the day ahead of fleetwood, just one stroke off the lead. the longest walk in golf perhaps, but there is still plenty of distance left to travel. in the rugby, the british and irish lions are back in action tomorrow against the new zealand maori. and the rest of the home nations are also on tour, including wales, who are in new zealand too. they're playing tonga right now in auckland. alex cuthbert has scored the only try of the match so far. wales leading tonga 8—3 at half—time. jordan pickford has officially become the most expensive british goalkeeper in history, afterjoining everton for a fee that could rise to £30 million. he joins from sunderland, who were relegated from the premier league last season. pickford will play in this summer's under 21 european championship for england, but has yet to make his debut at senior international level. it was a big spending day all round for everton,
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who also paid over £23 million for ajax captain davy klaassen. india will play pakistan in the final of the icc champions trophy following a nine—wicket win over bangladesh in birmingham. the defending champions managed to restrict bangladesh to 264 in their 50 overs. it looked a reasonable total, but india's batsmen knocked the runs off with ease. the final is then a repeat of india and pakistan's opening match in the tournament — india won that match. johanna konta has continued her winning start to her grass court season, with victory in the second round of the nottingham open. the british number one lost in the first round at the french open on clay, but is top seed in nottingham and has comfortable eased past belgium's yanina wickmayer in straight sets. she'll play ashleigh barty in the quarter finals today. i am very happy with the matches i've gotten to play here so far. two singles matches and also the doubles match yesterday. the more time i can get
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on the surface right now the better. for the first time in 19 years salford red devils are into the semi finals of rugby league's challenge cup. they ran in five tries before the hour mark to beat wakefield trinity by 30—6 at the aj bell stadium. craig kopchack grabbed the fifth, bulldozing his way over the line. britain's jake wightman knocked over a second off his personal best, as he beat a high—quality field in the 1,500 metres at the oslo diamond league meeting last night. wightman tweeted afterwards that he was in utter shock. "i cannot believe i'vejust won a diamond league." the 22—year—old scot follows in the footsteps of seb coe, steve ovett and steve cram, who have all won the race known as the ‘dream mile' in oslo. now a new star of british
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middle—distance running is born! well done to him. that's all for now. the tragedies and disasters of the last few months have really highlighted the skill and dedication of our doctors, nurses and emergency services. now a bbc two documentary crew got to see first hand how one tea m crew got to see first hand how one team helped with the westminster terrace tap. cameras had unprecedented access and our correspondent has more. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. we are here to review vacancies and retention. 0k. how many vacancies do we have the moment? 699. a routine meeting at st mary's hospital in london. it was the early afternoon on the 22nd of march, the day of the westminster attack. it would be nice to see... yes, for our assessment unit...
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we are on standby for a major incident. westminster bridge. we are on standby for a major incident at westminster bridge? do you have any more details? 15 casualties estimated. westminster bridge. this is believed to be the first time cameras have captured emergency contingency plans as it unfolds in an nhs hospital. we will wait for further information. just a few miles away, this was the scene, a policeman stabbed to death outside parliament, and pedestrians mown down by a car on westminster bridge. a number of the injured were french schoolchildren. st mary's, a major trauma centre, was one of the major hospitals that received some of the 50 injured
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and six people who died, including the attacker, khalid massoud. the first victim to arrive is a french schoolboy. on three, one, two three. this is victor. he is 16 years old. he was hit by a moving vehicle head—on. what's this one? victor's school friend arrives in accident and emergency. this 18—year—old has lost a dangerous amount of blood from a severe scalp wound. people need to move. he is taken for immediate life—saving surgery. as the police investigation got under way, and arrests were made, the injured continued
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to recover in hospital. eventually, the two french teenagers, best friends, were reunited. painful memories for so many of the victims caught up in the horror of the attack. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. extraordinary, those scenes. we will be talking to a member of the emergency services later, and at about 8:10am we will speak to a
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firefighter about recent events. that will air next tuesday on bbc two at nine p.m.. let's bring you up—to—date with the headlines. police say some of the people who died in that grenfell tower fire may never be identified, as the search continues. the priming inner city is facing criticism for not meeting residents of the tower when she visited the scene yesterday —— the prime minister is facing. let's get the weather forecast. good morning. a fresh start today than we've seen. not quite as sticky and muggy and there's more cloud around. this was the scene in wakefield. it will be another warm day and for some of us there will be spells of sunshine. in other areas we keep more cloud, especially in northern and western parts of the uk. for northern ireland, scotland, western england, cloudy and a few
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spots of rain. elsewhere, dry, with light winds and plenty of sunshine. if we look at where we have the rain in the western half of scotland in particular, eastern scotland is faring better, dry with some brighter spells. northern ireland is also brightening up. lifting temperatures to about 21 degrees. there could be low cloud and drizzle for the likes of cumbria and lancashire but to the east of the pennines more sunshine breaking through. heading south across england and wales, temperatures not as warm as recent days. a pleasant day to come, with spells of sunshine. where you do see the sunshine. where you do see the sunshine breaking through we could see high or very high levels of uv, especially to the south. also if you suffer from hay fever we have very high levels of holland, especially across england and wales. —— poland. living through this even in the rain for the west of scotland is largely easing. most places looking dry, with light winds. clear spells and
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with light winds. clear spells and with warm aircoming with light winds. clear spells and with warm air coming from the south it will be another muggy and sticky night. temperatures about 13— 17. through the weekend it will be heating up even more, down to the fa ct heating up even more, down to the fact that we have very warm air in southern europe. 44 degrees possible for southern spain. that's moving northwards across france and towards the uk, where we could have temperatures topping 30 degrees or higher later on the weekend. for saturday, high—pressure still the driving force. we have weather fronts it into the far north—west, so that means a bit of rain and cloud for the of scotland. elsewhere, dry. cloud building through the days. fair weather cloud towards the south—east, but temperatures between about 20— 27. a warm feeling day on saturday. that theme continues on the sunday. hot and humid again. some rain and cooler in the far north—west, but away from the north—west of scotland elsewhere is dry. temperatures
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likely to reach 39 or 40 degrees on sunday. that it continues into monday. 30 degrees likely and perhaps even higher than that. if you are not a fan of the heat and humidity it looks at things will turn fresh again by monday. i always get confused as to what can we should expect at this time of year. i always wanted to be sunny and hot, because i enjoy golf, but that's not the same for everyone. it is looking above average for the next few days, about five or 10 degrees above average for some of us, but we return to usual the next week. and a lot of that because it is so hot down in europe and southern spain? yes, that's right. we have the heat and humidity in southern europe that is driving up to the uk. if you like the heat, you've got quite a bit on the heat, you've got quite a bit on the cards over the next few days. iam going the cards over the next few days. i am going to enjoy it while i can! one year ago today, the mp, jo cox,
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was murdered in her constituency. schools and communities across the country are taking part in a great get—together. country are taking part in a great get-together. these are to celebrate her life. there will be special assemblies held in schools across the country. this morning, john maguire is in batley high school, her constituency. i imagine her family are pleased people are celebrating the life. batley high school, where people are celebrating her life. it is just one year since she was murdered here in batley and spenjust down the she was murdered here in batley and spen just down the road. we can find out more by talking to the head teacher. you were a friend of her,
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weren't you? you spent a lot of time with her. tell us what she did. she was fabulous and inspirational. she was fabulous and inspirational. she was a people person. when she walked into a room she had a big smile. she talked to children about all sorts of issues, eu referendums, syria, being a working mum... people felt a real connection to her. that is why we wanted to do something as a school she would be proud of. we are meeting up with ryan riess calls and eating cake. lots of cake this morning. hopefully she is looking down on us. this centre is named in her honour? yes. we wanted to do something that was a legacy for her. she wanted to bring people together and talk about the environment. we are renaming this centre in her
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name. thank you. i want to come around and talk to some of the boys here. tell me about the tree. so what is currently happening is this is the prayer tree. when the ceremony begins, there will be these hands representing all of the people jo cox worked with. there will be some pens to write a prayer on, something personal to you and that you knew about her. it will be put up you knew about her. it will be put up here. all of it will come collectively together. a great idea. and you have these roses. we made some white roses. they have come from all around the world. she was a
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yorkshire girl and the yorkshire rose represents the place. good morning. you have had a busy week. for the family, it is one year on. these anniversaries are very difficult. how have you been coping asa difficult. how have you been coping as a family? we have been doing ok. it is difficult as a family. it is not like today is different for us in many ways. but what i chose to do, and! in many ways. but what i chose to do, and i think it is the right decision, is to come into the community and be around people who loved her and who she loved, in the place we were born and were brought up. that is my way of coping with it. i wanted to let people know that we will not be beaten as a family and asa we will not be beaten as a family and as a community we are not beaten. it is notjust this community with the big get—together this weekend. how many events are there across the uk in the next few
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days? people have embraced the great get—together. thousands of events. a few million people. 20,000 events. it shows there is an appetite for something positive, appetite to come together to take a break from the division and politics and things we fall apart about and focus on humanity and basic kindness. that is whatjo cox stood for. people have embraced it and it is wonderful.m seems an appropriate time given the dreadful events of the past few weeks, to drive home those messages, that is. it seems like an eternity it has been that we have do turn on the tv and radio and hear these things. the country feels unstable. people need something to bring us together. even if that is just switching off for a few hours and
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spending time with family and friends and remembering what is important in life. respect, equality. if we take that away from this weekend, it has been a campaign that has worked. thank you very much indeed. iam that has worked. thank you very much indeed. i am sure that you and the family and her friends indeed. i am sure that you and the family and herfriends have done her proud. you will see a lot of this over the next few days. they are the words from the maiden speech ofjo cox, the first speech an mp makes in the house of commons. it says we have far more united and far more in common than what divides us. she died 365 days ago, but every day those words become more and more appropriate. thank you to everyone involved. it rather stops you in your tracks given all the news we reported recently. people embracing that spirit. it is good to hear that kind of thing. it really is. it
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really is. it makes you think. we are talking about one of britain's biggest retailers this morning. tesco has shown strong figures. decent figures. quite a troubled sector. good morning. good morning. you are right. i will come to those figures in a minute. we are in the shadow of st paul's this morning in london where it is a glorious morning. a busy morning of economic and corporate data. tesco has released its latest figures. those for the first three months of the year. a sixth consecutive quarter of growth. it is a competitive sector. all of the discounters biting at the heels of tesco and sainsburys and
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others. sales are up in the uk, but down in the rest of the world. what will it mean for customers? one person who can explain more is the a nalyst theresa person who can explain more is the analyst theresa wickham. tesco has had a hard time like other retailers, but they are turning around. they are on a consecutive sales path. they have done better in the uk than internationally. it shows they are doing... whatever they are doing in store, improving customer service, for example, it is interesting lots of the sales has been fresh food. they have decided clearly to go down that route. it is a steady result for them.” mentioned discounters like lidl
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biting at their heels. there is a relatively new player, amazon, doing that. they have their rights on fresh food as well. an on line retailer delivering fresh food. yes. they have been competing well against discounters in reducing prices. people have moved away from promotions and have gone to everyday low prices, which is what the customer wants. amazon is on a battle for fresh food. the other battle for fresh food. the other battle is on how fast can i get it to the customer? one hour deliveries in london. on line, amazon, they are keen of interest for the customer. people are showing to prices are back on the up. we have been so used to price wars, always making it cheaper. that is at an end. they are not vying for custom just based on
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price. yes. tesco hinted at this. they are absorbing some of those costs a nd they are absorbing some of those costs and not passing them on. they don't want to be seen as more expensive than other people. thank you for shedding light on that. we have heard from the boss, david lewis this morning. they are very competitive. it seems there is a lot for them to consider. sales up overall by a 1%, their sixth consecutive quarter of growth. and while we are here, they have set up a strange crazy golf set. it is back to you, iam off to a strange crazy golf set. it is back to you, i am off to play. i am jealous. you never know what you will find! and now, what is still to
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come this morning? #baby, we're lost without the cause#. it is still very similar, that sound. after three decades in one of the world's biggest bands she stepped out of the limelight for 16 years. now, fleetwood mac's christine mcvie is back. she'll be here to tell us why she's hooked up again with her former band mates. good morning from bbc london news. as we've been hearing the first victim of the grenfell tower fire has been named as syrian refugee mohammed al—hajali. the 23—year—old's brother said he lost him on his way out of the building and later spoke to him on the phone. so far, 17 bodies have been found. police say they hope the final number of fatalities will be below 100, but that they can't confirm numbers yet. they said come, come. i could not see anything. they opened the door.
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there was smoke everywhere. they we re there was smoke everywhere. they were pushing and pushing. they were pushing all of us. i could not talk, i could not look around. i did not see anything. so far, 17 people have been confirmed dead. police say they hope the final number of fatalities will be below 100. many people are still missing, as we report. it is much more quiet than yesterday here under the westway, where thousands of donations came to the car park. and also hundreds of people tried to help. here at the bus stop outside the church, glass is covered in pictures of missing people. this 12—year—old. stefan antony mills, not seen since the fire. raymond moses bernard and others. notjust here at the bus stop, but all the way along the walls of the church. people have pain and hurt and it is now turning to anger. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. gants hill, traffic light failure. on the roads, this is the m25. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. hot weather to come in the next few days, especially for the weekend. sunday looks like the peak for the temperatures. today, though, still very warm. sunny spells. and it looks like it will stay dry as well. a fair bit of cloud building really through the day. plenty of breaks to allow the sun to shine through. watch out for the high uv levels and pollen count. temperatures, 23—24 today. now, through the evening, cloud breaking up a little more. clear spells overnight. it is looking like a dry one. very warm as well. 17 degrees after a fresh start this morning. tomorrow, again, lots of sunshine around. the whole weekend looks like it will be staying dry. temperatures tomorrow getting up to the high 205.
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and on sunday, we could be seeing 30 degrees celsius. but, it is certainly going to be a warm day indeed. and that continues into the beginning of the week. it is not going to become unsettled until we get to tuesday. you can see the temperatures gradually rising over the next few days. it looks like a warm start to next week as well. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on the website. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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an emergency review is launched into tower blocks across the uk the communities secretary tells this programme that following the tower block fire in london, he expects answers about the safety of other buildings within days. so what we've already started, had started right away, is an emergency review, fire review, of all similar buildings throughout the country. pictures emerge of the inside of the building. 17 people are known to have died, more than 60 are being named by the media as dead or missing. as the search of the burned out tower continues, the police launch a criminal inquiry into fire.
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—— into the fire. good morning. it is friday the 16th ofjune. new evidence that north korean hackers we re evidence that north korean hackers were responsible for the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. it is one year on since the murder of mpjo cox, this morning we are backin of mpjo cox, this morning we are back in her constituency to remember but, more importantly, to celebrate her life. england's paul casey is the pick of the european challengers at the us open so far. a first round of six under par sees him a stroke of the leader rickie fowler at golf‘s second major of the year. sarah has the weather. a slightly fresh start than recently but things will warm and it is looking try, a
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bit of rain in the north—west. all the details in about 15 minutes. first, our main story. the communities secretary has said that the government has launched an emergency review of tower blocks in response to the groenefeld tower fire. sajid javid said his department has asked local authorities for a list of residential buildings that might be affected by safety concerns. there is growing anger in the community about whether the blaze could have been prevented. you might find the content been prevented. you might find the co nte nt of been prevented. you might find the content of this report distressing. the first victim of the fire to be officially named is mohammed alhajali, a syrian refugee who came to britain for a better life. his brother was led to safety by firefighters, but, in the chaos and confusion, mohammed got left behind. i called and we said, where are you? he said, i'm in the flat. i said, why didn't you come? they got us outside. he said, no one got me outside. i thought they took him outside with me! but they didn't.
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some of those trapped in the blaze did survive. we now know this man is elpidio bonifacio, a partially blind grandfather in his 705. his family say he is in intensive care, suffering from serious smoke inhalation. they have thanked the bravery of the firefighters who risked their lives to get him out. elpidio was finally rescued 11 hours after the blaze started. there is anger in the community, directed at almost anyone in authority. the london mayor sadiq khan saw it for himself when he went to visit. how many children died and what are you going to do about it? police say they have now started a criminal investigation. that's not to say there was a crime committed, but they will investigate to establish if there's any evidence of one. the list of the dead and missing grows all the time. police have voiced the hope that the final number of casualties will be below 100. they admit that some victims may never be identified. the leader of the local council said
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they did think about installing sprinkler system in grenfell tower when it was renovated last year, but he said there was no collective view among residents in favour of it. andy moore is at the scene of the fire in west london. you have been there since that fire took hold in the early hours of wednesday morning, you have seen just how the progression of the investigation has continued and the reaction of residence? that's right, shock initially, now quite a bit of anger. we saw in that report the first person officially named and with me is a friend of his, abdul. first of all, tell us about mohammed, what kind of man was he? he was a kind man, a great
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individual. he came to the uk seeking safety. he wanted to do his degree in civil engineering. i asked why he was studying engineering, why not it, then i could find you a job? that is because i am a computing engineer. he said he wanted to go back to syria when the war is over and help rebuild the country, he said they were leaders. this is the kind of person he was. is a civil engineer, what would he have made of the fire safety arrangements up the tower block? i think the safety measures are the most important thing in any tower. when i visited him here in this building i really had a negative thought about it and i asked him why do you live here? you said, to be fair, we don't like ita you said, to be fair, we don't like it a lot but we moved to the country, we are refugees, it takes time to find better accommodation. unfortunately the fire took him
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before he moved out. what do you think about the fact that you lost him to this fire, this fire that seems to have been accelerated by the cladding on the exterior of the building? so many people died, what do you think? it is a huge loss for us and syria as well, we lost one of our future civil engineers. i think someone must take the responsibility. he came here to seek safety, he did not come to end up dying ina safety, he did not come to end up dying in a fire. i think this tragic incident could have been prevented. but i think the local council, the management organisations must take the responsibility. lots of questions need to be answered. how is his brother doing? we know they we re is his brother doing? we know they were separated in the smoke and confusion, obviously devastated by this, how is his brother doing?
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about physically he is fine, he did not suffer any burn injuries. but he is traumatised by the whole thing, by the loss of his brother and buy, like, living through the horrific experience. i hope he will be fine but i believe it will take a really long time. abdul, thank you. this is the story of mohammed, the first victim. thank you very much, andy miller. earlier in the programme, communities secretary sajid javid said he wanted to reassure people living in similar tower blocks throughout the country. anybody living in a tower block, especially if it has recently been clad, i understand they will be very concerned. so right away we started an emergency fire review of all
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similar buildings throughout the country. we are in touch with local authorities everywhere, social housing providers, we have asked them to begin compiling a list of what they might think falls into the category. those people sleeping in a tower block that might have those panels on them tonight and last night will be thinking should i be in this building at all? you say at this stage you don't even know how many buildings have that cladding? the process we have already started, which will be done in a matter of days, i think those people need to be reassured within days, it has to be reassured within days, it has to be led by the experts. we need to identify those buildings, about 4000 high—rise buildings in the country, not all of them have been re—clad. let's not make the assumption it is all about cladding, we need to be led by the experts. a5 all about cladding, we need to be led by the experts. as soon as we have more information from the experts, which we expect later today or over the weekend, that should be used to do these emergency inspections. sajid javid, the
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secretary of state for communities and local government, speaking to serbia. a rally is being organised in westminster at six o'clock this evening, to call for justice for those caught up in the fire. the prime minister has been criticised for travelling to the area but not meeting residents of the tower when she visited the scene of the fire yesterday. our political correspondent, chris mason, joins us from our london newsroom now. sajid javid was quick to point out he will be visiting the scene today, in amongst the other things he was talking about. the prime minister has come in for some criticism for visiting but talking to the emergency services rather than those individuals caught directly? good morning. one labour shadow ministers spitting with anger on social media about the prime minister's unwillingness, in his view, to meet local people. my understanding is that downing street did consider the prime minister giving a more extensive visit when she was there yesterday but
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concluded, having ta ken she was there yesterday but concluded, having taken advice from the police, that this risk, effectively, getting in the way. the very nature of the security details surrounding the prime minister would have meant this could have required manpower from the emergency services which, frankly, could have been better used dealing with what they are having to deal with on the ground but, yes, there has been criticism. there was a stark contrast between the prime minister's visit and a couple of hours later the labour leaderjeremy corbyn arriving, mingling amongst the crowds, putting his arm around one woman who was desperately looking for somebody who is still missing. the government says it is doing everything it can, it has activated a scheme which ensures that central government funding is channelled directly to the local authority, which obviously faces a huge number of additional costs. there will be a public inquiry. this could be a huge endeavour. clearly there is a demand for answers quickly and public inquiries very
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rarely provide quick answers but they tend to provide very detailed a nswe rs they tend to provide very detailed answers that can shape the whole approach of governments, this one and future ones, in terms of their approach to housing. we do not yet know who will chair that, we know it will be a judge but we do not know quite who, or its exact terms of reference. it gives you an insight that the whole issue of housing, its safety a nd that the whole issue of housing, its safety and fire risk are likely to be something that politically remains salient for a long time as a result of this. chris, for the moment, thank you. some of the news to bring you. —— some other news. a second soldier has died after he was injured in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. he was serving with the royal tank regiment. two other soldiers were injured at castlemartin ranges on wednesday. british security officials say they believe hackers in north korea were behind the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. the hackers are thought to have been attempting to make money, but didn't predict the extent to which the computer
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virus would spread. here's more from our security correspondent, gordon corera. the cyber attack spread around the world, with the nhs badly hit. computers were locked, with hackers demanding a ransom be paid for them to be made usable again. britain's national cyber security centre led the investigation and security sources have told the bbc that the centre believes a north korean—based hacking group known as lazarus launched the attack. the same group is believed to have targeted sony pictures after it planned to release a film involving the north korean leader and was also thought to have been behind the theft of more than $80 million from bangladesh's central bank last year. the ransomware last month did not target britain or the nhs specifically and may well have been a money making scheme that got out of control, especially since the hackers have not yet retrieved any of the ransom money that's been paid into the accounts. a new poll has revealed
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a widespread lack of knowledge about where significant moments in england's history took place. a campaign has been launched to raise awareness of the sites which have helped shape the nation. colin paterson has more. geneva, switzerland. home to the large hadron collider and the most common answer when people in england are asked, where was the atom first split? but it was here in manchester that the scientific breakthrough was made by ernest rutherford, in 1917. this new research suggests that only one in ten people know that and it's far from the only common mistake about england's most impressive achievements and inventions. when it comes to where the first trainers were made, three times more people think it was in the usa than know the truth. it was in bolton, in lancashire. jw foster & sons created them in the 18905 and later became reebok. and the majority of people believe that bungee jumping originated
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in australia or new zealand, when in fact it all started in bristol, with a leap from the clifton suspension bridge back in 1979. historic england hope their new campaign will fill the gaps in people's knowledge and more people will be aware of the country's greatest achievements, like the fact the pencil was invented in cumbria. we will have the sport and weather shortly. surgeons at grenfell tower in west london continue. dozens of people are still unaccounted for. police are warning some of the dead may never be identified. tim moffat has been speaking to some of the family and friends of those missing. the wait for news is unbearable.
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pictures of 12—year—old jessica can be seen posted across this area. the last time i saw her was 1:39am. i couldn't get up to get her. she was in panic. that is the last time i spoke to her. i don't know. i'd like you have got these pictures of her and these posters around everywhere. lots of people have same —— have said they saw her. but we don't know if it is true. it was just a schoolboy saying that. i'm just worried about people that are missing. my little sister's friend is missing. they have been missing since four o'clock, the first day it
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started. no sign of them. just thinking of the people that died, the babies that died, the children, the babies that died, the children, the families, the mothers, the grandfathers, the grandmothers. all our minds are on them today.” grandfathers, the grandmothers. all our minds are on them today. i know of quite a few were missing. they area of quite a few were missing. they are a few i know who are already dead. there are a few others i strongly suspect are dead. the only thing keeping me going at the moment is anger and adrenaline. and i will keep going on anger and adrenaline for as long as i can. because frankly i would rather not sit down and actually contemplated that the actual scale of what happened around here. if i do sit down, i will understand up again. getting a real sense this morning, in among the grief and the anxiety, a real sense of anger this morning. tim muffett reporting there for us. let's now return again to the experience of the firefighters who battled
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this unprecedented blaze. lucy masoud is a firefighter and trade union official at the fire brigades union london branch and joins us now. thank you very much for talking to us. i understand you did not attend the scene but you have been in close contact with colleagues from your station who have. can you tell us what they have been telling you? good morning. i have been in quite close contact. a5 good morning. i have been in quite close contact. as a union official we are there to support our members. i have been in contact with people on my —— at my station in chelsea and colleagues at other stations. andy yeah, the things they have been telling me i absolutely horrific. just horrific. the incident itself is just unprecedented. we just horrific. the incident itself isjust unprecedented. we have never seen anything like it. i have been in thejob ten seen anything like it. i have been in the job ten years. i have been too many fires in high—rise buildings. these fires do not spread in the manner this one did. it is
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absolutely unprecedented. something has gone seriously wrong. this fire should not have happened. in regards to the firefighters i have spoken to, they did an absolutely amazing job. i have to pay tribute to the brave men and women who attended the scene. but also controlled workers as well, who would have had to have taken horrific calls and literally would have heard people perish on the other end of the line. it is a terrible situation to be standing here this morning. we heard from dany here this morning. we heard from da ny cotto n, here this morning. we heard from dany cotton, the london fire brigade commissioner, telling us that some have been injured and of course support will be given to firefighters who, as you have said, saw horrific scenes. the danger that they were facing, you said this is unprecedented. in terms of danger and risks that were being taken, what can you tell us? as
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firefighters we put our lives on the line every day. that is part and parcel of thejob. line every day. that is part and parcel of the job. we're line every day. that is part and parcel of thejob. we're happy line every day. that is part and parcel of the job. we're happy to do that. i have heard witness accounts from people saying as they were running out of the building, we were running out of the building, we were running towards the danger into the building. that is what we do. in most early as firefighters, we put up most early as firefighters, we put up emotional walls, so we are not too badly affected by is —— by these kind of incidents. otherwise we wouldn't be able to do ourjobs. something like this is absolutely unprecedented. we have never seen anything even close to this. i do worry for my firefighters. i do worry for my firefighters. i do worry for my members. we hold the london fire brigade to account. they said they will support us. i hope they do. we have been outside since they do. we have been outside since the incident took place and we will continue to be onside to ensure that our firefighters and control are supported. i'm sure you are aware the public is very grateful for the risks that the emergency services have taken while trying to save
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others. lucy, iunderstand have taken while trying to save others. lucy, i understand as well, that you have had phone conversations with colleagues very upset about snap decisions that have to be made while such a horrific event is under way. can you tell us about that? yeah. the conversations i have had, one colleague said he was going in there literally having to choose who to save and who to leave and die. you only have two hands. you can only take out so many people. my colleagues who went in, took the bilate, went back in. the red watch at chelsea were meant to finish at 9:30am, they didn't get back to station until 530 in the afternoon. that is an absolute tribute to the brave men and women who attended this incident. but here, the scenes they would have encountered in the early hours of tuesday morning, it is absolutely unimaginable. lucy, how do
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firefighters, emergency workers, how do they process this? you said you put upa do they process this? you said you put up a wall when you are doing yourjob. you almost have to be stone cold when you are tackling something like this. how are you trained to deal with this after?m is an interesting question. we are trained to deal with things like this to a certain extent but nothing on this scale. we deal das —— we deal with death on a daily basis. it comes with thejob. deal with death on a daily basis. it comes with the job. many of us have attended terrorist incidents and other horrific incidents. and we just deal with it. that is what we do. we are firefighters. something on this scale, speaking to the people i have spoken to, they are an absolute pits. i have never seen anything like it. i have spoken to people who have been in for 30 years and they have never seen anything like it. we need to ensure that the support is therefore our fire
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service. we know there has been a cut infunding service. we know there has been a cut in funding to the fire brigade in regards to the sport offered to our employees. —— support. we need to ta ke our employees. —— support. we need to take this opportunity to ensure the government is offering that support to all my colleagues. our thoughts are with all of your collea g u es thoughts are with all of your colleagues and the emergency services who attended this scene in this horrific tragedy. on a separate note, there are a lot of discussions about the safety of buildings such as this, and questions about how this fire spread so quickly. you alluded to this at the beginning of the interview. what thoughts of you got in terms of the numbers of fire inspections that are able to take place in the light of cuts? and also in terms of safety regulations? what will the fire brigades union be pushing for a? we have been pushing for more fire inspections for years. we have been pushing against the cuts for years. we have been screaming this from the rooftops for i don't know how long. it is far too
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early to speculate what has gone wrong and why this has happened. it would be inappropriate for me to stand here and throw allegations at people. what we do know is something has gone wrong. fires like this do not happen in this country and fires like this should not be happening in this country. residents and the public rightly angry and they should be. in regards to the cuts, it is too early to speculate, to say there isa link too early to speculate, to say there is a link between the cuts what happened. but we do know that ten fire stations have been closed down in three years in london. 600 jobs have been removed. and many fire engines have been removed from front line services. has that had an effect? we don't know. it is far too early. there are serious questions that need to be answered. all i would say is, how many more fires, and many more dead bodies does the government need to see before the stop these savage cuts on the emergency services? lucy massoud, thank you for your
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time. please do pass her best and our thanks to colleagues. we are going to take a break from our coverage of events in west london and have a look at the weather. here is sarah. it isa weather. here is sarah. it is a fresh start today than in recent days. things will turn warm later. this is a view taken this morning by a weather watchers in norfolk. spells of sunshine. things warming up. it will turn much hotter through the weekend. it will not be dry everywhere. we have got light rain across northern ireland pushing its way into scotland and perhaps some drizzle into the north—west of england. elsewhere, things looked dry. further south you will see more in the way of sunshine. the western half of scotland will have cloud and patchy rain. brighter towards the east of scotland. northern ireland also drying out later in the day. we
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could sequences of sunshine. 21 degrees in belfast. for northern inland, drizzle over the pennines and the west. further east it is looking brighter and drier. further south, spells of sunshine peeking through the cloud. temperatures added 22, 20 three degrees. where you see the sunnier spells, particularly in southern and south—west england, high levels of uv, you will be aware there are high levels of pollen, particularly across england and wales. through the day and into the evening, we will lose the wet weather from the west of scotland. perhaps a little drizzle continuing. overnight most places looking dry. we have some warm, humid air piling in from the south. temperatures falling no lower than16, 17 south. temperatures falling no lower than 16, 17 degrees. quite a sticky night. things warming up in the weekend. hot air developing across parts of southern spain. 44 degrees possible there. that warm air d rifters
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possible there. that warm air drifters way across france and towards the uk. our temperatures could reach 30 degrees, particularly on sunday into monday. high—pressure billing in from the south. we have still got a front towards the far north—west. that would bring wet and windy weather across the far north—west of scotland. more cloud at times across scotland into western parts of northern ireland. elsewhere across the uk, lots of sunshine. fairweather cloud building in the afternoon. temperatures between 20 and 27 degrees. a warm feeling day. sunday turns that bit hotter. some outbreaks of rain in the far north—west. elsewhere, another dry, sunny day. 2930 degrees lightly. that heat stays with us on monday. another day of 30 degrees in the south—east. things will start to turn a little bit fresher by the time we get to tuesday. now the news where you are. we have a pretty hot weekend on the
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way. temperatures in the south—east getting into the low 305 on sunday. that is because of an area of high pressure moving in from the south, drawing in hot airfrom iberia. towards the north and west, it will a lwa ys towards the north and west, it will always stay quite cloudy. these weather fronts bringing outbreaks of rain. through this morning into the afternoon it looks quite wet in the far north—west of scotland. to the east of scotland, brighter skies developing eventually, temperatures could get up to 20 degrees in
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aberdeen ‘5. further west, temperatures more like 14 to 16. rain in northern ireland should clear through the afternoon. staying grey a cross clear through the afternoon. staying grey across north—west england, parts of wales and the midlands but east of the pennines sunshine bull breakthrough. sunshine at times across southern england this afternoon. maximum in that sunshine up afternoon. maximum in that sunshine up to around 22 to 24 degrees in the south—west. overnight, staying damp and drizzly in the far north—west of scotland, low cloud. a woman might ban last night. temperatures no lower than around 14 to 16 degrees —— a warm at night than last night. saturday will be very warm, lots sunshine across england and wales into southern scotland. the cloud persists in the far north—west. still some outbreaks of rain, temperatures ramping up, 24 to 25 quite widely, 27 and the south—east. a5 for sunday, even hotter,
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temperatures could reach 30 or 31. in the far north—west corner of scotla nd in the far north—west corner of scotland you notice it will remain pretty damp and drizzly. over the weekend, high uv levels, particularly in southern and south—western areas, even further north they will be pretty high. more details available online, but that is it from me. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and rachel horne. cash stops the crisis for now. greece gets more bailout money to stop it defaulting on its massive debts. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 16th ofjune. there's still no clear agreement on debt relief for now. so is the greek government right to call it light at the end of the tunnel? also in the programme...
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after the biggest recall in the history of the car industry, could faulty airbag maker takata be about to file for bankruptcy? we will keep

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