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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 16, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at three: police confirm that at least 30 people died in the grenfell tower fire and the bbc understands more than 70 people are dead or missing. but the cause of the fire is still unknown. the police have taken the lead for the investigation, and if criminal offences have been committed, it is us who will investigate that. the queen and prince william visit a relief centre which has been helping victims of the fire. police here say many bodies remain inside the charred building as the painstaking forensic work goes on. the prime minister visited victims
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in hospital this morning. and she will chair a special meeting this afternoon. we'll have all the latest developments from west london in a moment. the other headlines here on bbc news: a second soldier has died following the incident involving a tank, at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. the archbishop of canterbury is due to speak at a "service of hope" at southwark cathedral in honour of first—responders, families and survivors of the london bridge attack. an eu source tells the bbc that next week's brexit talks will deal with citizens‘ rights and money issues before moving on to trade talks. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the number of people known to have died in the grenfell tower fire has risen to at least 30.
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police say they believe the final total will be higher. this morning the queen and prince william visited the scene, they went to a relief centre which has been helping victims of the fire. they spent time speaking to local residents, volunteers and members of the emergency services. also this morning theresa may has been to chelsea and westminster hospital to visit the injured there. richard lister has our first report, and a warning that it contains distressing images. the queen came today to join a community in mourning. many people today have said they felt ignored, both before the grenfell tragedy and after too. this was a royal visit designed in part to show that the nation was sharing the pain. at times it was overwhelming. in the background the queen could hear a woman clearly overcome with grief. prince william described the fire as one of the most terrifying things he'd ever seen, and he praised those who had to respond to it. you guys did a brilliantjob in unprecedented circumstances. stung perhaps by criticism she didn't meet survivors yesterday,
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the prime minister was at chelsea and westminster hospital to meet some of those injured. while it could take weeks to get a final figure, the confirmed number of dead continues to rise. sadly, as i said before, we always knew the number of those that died would increase, and i am able to say at this point in time we know that at least 30 people have died as a result of this fire. sadly, and tragically, that includes one person who was taken to hospital, and despite the very best medical care from the nhs, has now sadly died. this is the flat that i live in... sajar watched the fire destroyed his home that night and is now among those wondering what the future holds. the council is paying for him and other grenfell tower residents
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to live in nearby hotels. theirfood is being paid for as well, but this is not home. he still has the keys to his old flat and notes he made about what went wrong that night. the sign said, stay in your building. is that true? when there is a fire, should you stay in? people stayed home and people died. i saw with my own eyes people jumping out, because they had read that sign and they thought they were safe if they stayed. the only chance they had was to jump out. that is one of the factors to be considered by the public inquiry into this disaster. there are many questions, most urgently about the cladding on this building. getting all the answers will take months at the very least, but the government is scrambling to reassure millions of other high—rise residents that their homes are safe. the community support has been almost overwhelming. refuge centres say they no longer
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need donations of food and clothes. what is really needed are new homes for the hundreds of survivors. the council says finding them temporary accommodation has been hard. finding permanent homes will be even harder. what we are committed to doing is making sure every household from grenfell tower tower can find a permanent new home in the local area, but because of the shortage of housing in london, but in particular in this borough, that will take some time. we could be talking about a couple of years while we get to that end point where every household is back in a permanent new home in the borough. but the trauma of this event will last long beyond the need to find new homes. this has been life—changing for all those affected, survivors and also the emergency teams. the conversations i have had, you know, one colleague said he was going in there literally having to choose who to save and who to leave to die because, you know, you only have two hands and can only take
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out so many people. my colleagues who went in, took people out, went in again, took people out, the scenes they would have encountered in the early hours of tuesday morning, it is absolutely unimaginable. as the days pass, the need for answers is becoming even stronger and the grief, it seems, is just as raw. we have been reporting on concerns that tower blocks around the country after that fire. the chairman of the local govenment association has been saying, as they represent 150 councils around england, they are reviewing fire assessments and the construction of buildings along with their partners, as well as talking to te na nts their partners, as well as talking to tenants and residents about safety advice. he says, following the horrific fire and grenfell tower, councils with tower blocks in there every have been working with there every have been working with the local fire service and
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undertaking urgent reviews of their buildings. double checks having made to make sure that previous work has been carried out properly. thatjust came in from the local govenment association. let's get the latest on the investigation into the fire now from our correspondent mark lowen, who's at the police cordon. you heard in richard lister‘s report a clip from the metropolitan police who came out here to give us a little more information this morning, in which they confirmed that there were at least 30 people known to have been killed in this fire, but the representative from the metropolitan police said there are many more bodies inside the building and that is now the painstaking forensic work that is continuing. when you look at the charred shell of grenfell tower, you can see how difficult it would be
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for people to access particularly the higherfloors for people to access particularly the higher floors will stop we have seen sniffer dogs here this morning, and they are using any means they can to try to establish the identities of those inside — dna and dental records, fingerprints and whatever. around the streets, as i have been wandering round, the number of missing person posters around, that is the agony that continues for those who do not know the fate of their loved ones and they wonder whether they happen to maybe be in a hospital, although police say they have established the identities of those in hospital, 2a remaining in hospital. what has happened to their friends and family, the numbers of missing, we think, has gone above 70, but the police do not —— have not confirmed that yet. as you say, the fears of
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those living in similar towers of this —— similar towers up and down the country. of course, there was initial grief and horror in the wake of the fire, but that has been replaced with anger this morning on the streets. we are hearing reports ofa the streets. we are hearing reports of a protest march planned for later this afternoon possibly from here up to the borough building. there has been a bit of hostility here towards journalists. there is a lot of angen journalists. there is a lot of anger, certainly, towards the government. there was a lot of anger towards theresa may that she did not come and speak to the victims yesterday, although she went to visit some in hospital this morning. anger that warnings were not heeded, warnings about inadequate fire regulations put out by the residents association group sometime ago was
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not heeded, and the state put policy that was in place, where residents we re that was in place, where residents were told to stay put in case of fire. that could have worked if the other regulations had been put in place, if there had been sprinklers, a central alarm, and externalfire staircase, but none of that was in place. this, of course, was a tragedy waiting to happen. 0ne lady i spoke to outside the methodist church said, it makes me feel sick when i think of the conditions in which people were living in the social housing buildings. impoverished people and a lot of immigrants, and she said, to me, it is murder. well, there are still a lot of people who are unaccounted for. heartbreaking stories of last phone calls and messages from people who were trapped in their homes. sophie hutchinson reports on the desperate search for the missing, and again viewers may find this distressing. outside a local church, people have come to honour the injured and the dead. the number of flowers, candles and toys has been
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growing as the extent of this tragedy emerges. the official death toll is now 30, but no one is in any doubt that actual figure will be far higher. mohammed al—haj ali, a syrian refugee, the only victim to have been officially named. his friend paid tribute to him. mohammed was a kind man, he was full of passion for his family. he was a great individual. he came to the uk looking for safety. he wanted to do his degree in civil engineering, and once i asked him, why are you studying civil engineering? why don't you study it so i can find you a job? because i'm a computer engineer. he laughed and said, "because i want to go back to syria when the war is over and help rebuild the country. " he said, "they will need us." this is the kind of person he was. these are some of the faces of those who are missing. these children
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lived on the 20th floor with their pa rents lived on the 20th floor with their parents and little brother. all are missing. this woman lived in the building with her two—year—old son. she called her brother and said she was told to stay in her flat. eventually, the phone cut out. local residents are still reeling from what happened. thinking of the people who died, the babies, the children, the mothers, the grand father and grandmother ‘s. they are all on our minds today. 24 people injured in the blaze are still being treated in hospital, 12 in a critical condition. today, police said they didn't expect to find any more survivors. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. there is of course a lot of focus on the new exterior cladding that was put on this 1970s tower
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block just last year as part of a £10 million refurbishment. but there are still many questions outstanding for the local authority, builders, and subcontractors, as well as the company that managed the tower. simon gompertz reports on the investigations that will take place into the causes of the fire. there is still so much unclear — evidence perhaps destroyed in the fire — which is now subject to what is bound to be a lengthy investigation and public inquiry, but some worrying claims are emerging. firstly, that the sort of cladding that may have been used at grenfell tower, if the polyethylene or plastic material which might have been inside it wasn't fireproof enough, is banned in high—rise buildings in other countries, included the united states. polyethylene as a material is used as the core of certain composite panels, and it does have the ability to burn. having said that, the panels here on this building, we don't yet know precisely what the make—up was. if they include an element of polyethylene, that could be acceptable if the other materials going with it are noncombustible. it is common among refurbishments of older tower blocks to attach a layer of foam insulation, leave a gap, then fix on a cladding likely to consist of aluminium outer
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layers and filling that could be plastic, the standard version, or a fire resistant material. there is concern that grenfell tower had the standard cladding, likely to be around £2 cheaper per panel. it is alleged today fire resistant panels would have costjust £5000 more overall. now other buildings have to be assessed. the first point is obviously to identify those buildings. there are about 4000 high—rise buildings in the country, but not all of them have been re—cladded, but let's not make the assumption it is all about cladding. we need to be led by the experts. as soon as we have more information from the experts, which we expect either later today or certainly over the weekend, i think that is what should be used for these emergency inspections. the six towers at a london estate just a mile from the fire show the challenge now faced by councils up and down the country. you can see the cladding that has
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been put on here recently, as in so many buildings around the country. the local authority says they complied with safety regulations and there is no reason to suppose it is exactly the same material as at grenfell tower, however it does come from the same supplier and now urgent checks have been ordered into the cladding itself, and the way it has been installed. i do know people there. i have a lot of cousins here living in these buildings, and over there as well, people in both the properties. and if they have done that in a similar way they should do something about it. i know some people who actually went to the housing that live in these towers, and they have told the housing that they do not want to live here any more. and that is very stressful for the housing as well. everyone is very upset, scared. families are scared. even young kids are scared. the aim must be notjust to find out why this happened, but to make sure it can never happen again, and allay the growing fears of people living in tower blocks.
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simon gompertz, bbc news. sadiq khan has written a letter to theresa may about the action he believes the government needs to ta ke believes the government needs to take in the aftermath of the fire. 0ur political correspondence, eleanor garnier, was in westminster earlier. sadiq khan has written an open letter to the prime minister in which he says he touches on a number of issues that have been raised by the local community. the first thing he talks about is the information about the victims and their identities. he says that some people feel their grief has been made even worse by the fact that there is, he says, a lack of information about the number of victims and about some of their identities. he goes on to talk about the relief efforts and his concern around the coordination
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and organisation of those efforts, saying it is a huge task for local authority to deal with. he also talks about the issue of housing and providing new housing for people who have been affected, and that there was some mix—up in the communication around that overnight. he raises the issue of people living in similar towers to the one affected by the fire, saying that information about the local area and the towers that are similarto the local area and the towers that are similar to grenfell tower, the issue of the safety of the residents in those towers needs to be addressed and that inspections need to ta ke addressed and that inspections need to take place he says by the end of the day. finally, he welcomes the prime minister's announcement that there will be a public enquiry led bya there will be a public enquiry led by a judge into what happened, but he says that answers need to come sooner he says that answers need to come sooner than in a few years. he asked the prime ministerfor
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sooner than in a few years. he asked the prime minister for an sooner than in a few years. he asked the prime ministerfor an interim report by the summer. questions being asked of the incumbent government, and there are layers of responsibility and accountability at government and local level. the local authority, developers, government and local level. the localauthority, developers, housing association, and of course questions that go back perhaps over a generation. the headlines on bbc news: the bbc believe the number of dead in the grenfell tower fire may be over 70. the queen has visited the site to speak to residents and emergency services staff. a march of local people is planned for this afternoon. in sport, the bbc understands that cristiano ronaldo wants to leave real madrid after being accused of
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tax fraud. his advisers would prefer him to stay in europe. johanna konta this through to the semifinals of the nottingham 0pen. i will be back with all the stories that have passed. see you then. a second soldier has died after being wounded in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. two other soldiers were injured at castlemartin ranges on wednesday afternoon. sian lloyd reports. flags lowered to half—mast at castlemartin as a mark of respect for the two soldiers who died. two others were seriously injured during a training exercise carried out here by the wiltshire—based royal tank regiment on wednesday. inevitably, because they are trying to get as close as possible to the real experience of testing and firing their weaponry, there is a danger element, a risk element, attached to that.
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this just serves to remind us that, as i say, these guys put themselves in this position on our behalf on a daily basis. the castlemartin range is one of two training areas in the uk used for tank training, where live firing exercises can take place. it is understood this incident involved ammunition. what happened here is being investigated by the ministry of defence together with dyfed—powys police and the health and safety executive. for the moment, tank live firing at castlemartin has been suspended as a precaution. the ministry of defence has not yet released any information about those who were killed or injured here. 0ne soldier died in hospital, his family by his bedside. they have asked for privacy before any details are made known. sian lloyd, bbc news, pembrokeshire. 0ur correspondent is in castlemartin
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for us. it is still unclear what happened here at 3:30pm on wednesday. we do know there was a serious incident involving live ammunition from a challenger tank, and four soldiers we re challenger tank, and four soldiers were seriously injured as a result of that incident. two of them were taken to hospital in swansea, and we heard earlier yesterday morning that one of those had died. another individual was taken to hospital in cardiff and late last night we heard from the ministerfor cardiff and late last night we heard from the minister for defence and vetera ns from the minister for defence and veterans that the other individual had died. another individual is in a serious condition in hospital in birmingham, where there is a special
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unit for service men. he's been dealt with there. as mentioned in the piece, there is an enquiry that has already begun into what happened here on wednesday. it is being led by the local police, and the mod are involved as well, as our health and safety executive representatives. —— as are health and safety executive representatives. this is one of the few places where live fire exercises can take place, and this is clearly a tragedy. we're waiting for more details on the individuals who died and what happened here. by definition, anything involving live ammunition carries risks. of course, and other people we have spoken to
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who had served in the military say that when it comes to cuts, people in the military do not want cuts to happen to live fire training because it is integral to their training. there is only so much you can do using simulation and virtual reality. i spoke to one former military service person who is now an mp who said that you cannot simulate that. 0nce an mp who said that you cannot simulate that. once you step inside a tank and fire a live round, it is only then that you realise the power and how to use these vehicles in a combat situation. tragic events like these are very rare, but live fire exercises do have to happen to prepare our soldiers for combat. thank you very much. a service is being held at southwark cathedral this afternoon, in the wake of the terrorist attack on london bridge nearly two weeks ago. the service of hope, as it's being called, is being attended by survivors and theirfamilies, and members of the emergency services.
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0ur religious affairs correspondent martin bashir is outside southwark cathedral. the dean of southwark cathedral has said that while they were at the centre of those horrific events on june the 3rd, this is an opportunity for southwark cathedral to re—establish itself as a place of reconciliation, healing and community. it's also an opportunity to honour those whose lives were impacted by what happened. 0f course, those near 50 people who we re course, those near 50 people who were taken to five local hospitals, and those eight individuals who lost their lives. eight people who, by their lives. eight people who, by their own countries of origin, are an indication of how london is a multicultural city, coming from australia, spain, france, and of course, great britain. the archbishop of canterbury is preaching, and he says in his sermon, preaching, and he says in his sermon, we are here preaching, and he says in his sermon, we are here in this building which was built to say that the future that each of us has in christ
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is one of life, of hope, and eventually, though hard it may be to see today, choi. ——joy. it's appears that britain has accepted the eu's demand that brexit talks, which are due to begin next week, should agree citizens' rights and a financial settlement before moving on to a future trade deal. from luxembourg, here's our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas. well, what we have is a clear announcement about what will happen next week, when brexit talks begin, which is going to be one day of face—to—face negotiations between david davis and michel barnier of the eu. what we have then been told
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by an eu source is that the subsequent pattern is going to follow what they believe, what the eu has set out — one week of face—to—face talks every four weeks. and what the source has then said is that the understanding is that the talks will follow the eu's desired pattern, they understand, which is to deal with exit issues first, that is, citizens' rights and money issues, before moving on to a future trade deal. remember, david davis the brexit secretary, said the row of the summer would be about that sequence. we will see what he says on monday in brussels. a man has been tasered by police outside the houses of parliament, after he reached for a knife when approached by officers. police on routine duties became aware of a man acting suspiciously. the man, in his 30s, was arrested for possession of a knife; he's now being held in a central london police station. nobody was injured. the inquest into the death of manchester arena bomber salman abedi has been opened and adjourned by the city's coroner. the court heard that abedi died of multiple injuries when he detonated an improvised
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explosive device at the end of an ariana grande concert last month. a full inquest will be heard once the police investigation into the attack has been completed. british airways cabin crew are to stage a two—week strike in a long—running dispute over pay and travel concessions. members of the unite union working in the so—called mixed fleet division will walk out between saturdayjuly ist and sundayjuly 16th, at peak holiday season. the union also announced it would "vigorously" pursue legal action against the airline on behalf of 1400 cabin crew, who say they were "sanctioned" for taking previous strike action. british security officials have told the bbc that hackers in north korea carried out the cyber attack that crippled parts of the nhs last month. the hackers are thought to have done it to make money, and had underestimated the extent to which the computer virus would spread. here's our security correspondent gordon corera. the cyber attack spread around the world, with the nhs badly hit.
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computers were locked, with hackers demanding a ransom be paid for them to be made usable again. britain's national cyber security centre led the investigation and security sources have told the bbc that the centre believes a north korean—based hacking group known as lazarus launched the attack. the same group is believed to have targeted sony pictures after it planned to release a film involving the north korean leader, and was also thought to have been behind the theft of more than $80 million from bangladesh's central bank last year. the ransomware last month did not target britain or the nhs specifically and may well have been a money making scheme that got out of control, especially since the hackers have not yet retrieved any of the ransom money that's been paid into the accounts. now, the weather. good afternoon. a fair bit of cloud
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across the north of the uk, bringing rain. the best of the sunshine in the south. this weather system is being pushed along on a south—westerly breeze. that is bringing warm air in the next few days. we have high pollen levels in england, wales and northern ireland. rain in north—west is drifting north overnight. patchy rain continues in the western side of scotland. elsewhere, dry and clear but warm. it will be fairly humid in some places, so a difficult night for sleeping. it will be a hot weekend for some. away from the north—west, where it will be cloudy, breezy, rainy, temperatures will be widely into the low to middle 20s. 0n
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sunday, another warm day for most. the south east may see temperatures of 30 celsius. it will be a hot one here. good afternoon. this is bbc news. the headlines atjust after 3:30pm: the queen and prince william visit a relief centre helping victims of the grenfell tower fire and meet volunteers, local residents and community representatives. police have confirmed that at least 30 people were killed in the tower block fire and that the number of dead is expected to rise. the police have taken the lead in the investigation and if criminal offences have been committed it's us who will investigate that. the prime minister has visited survivors in hospital this morning and is chairing the so—called grenfell tower recovery taskforce this afternoon. a second soldier has died after he was wounded in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in castlemartin in pembrokeshire. the archbishop of canterbury is due to speak at a "service of hope" at southwark cathedral in honour of first—responders, families and survivors of the london bridge attack. now the sport.
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cristiano ronaldo wants to leave spain. the contract he is then blessed you giving him at real madrid forfive blessed you giving him at real madrid for five years as a i billion euros release clause. what is going on with cristiano ronaldo and who is going to payi billion euros to get him out of the contract. you would think china could be a destination if he was to leave but we are told his advisers would prefer him to stay in europe and that means paris st germain could be a favourite. a source has said that he is very upset. he does not want to stay in spain. he feels he did everything 0k
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so spain. he feels he did everything 0k so he does not understand. at this moment he wants to leave. this relates to a tax investigation case, claims which he denies. he will hope to clear his name. these stories will not go away. it is a four home world player of the year and four time champions league winner and the world's richest sportsman. one of the biggest names in world sport. british number one johanna konta is through to the semi—finals of the nottingham 0pen after a straight—sets victory over australia's ashleigh barty. konta won it 6—3. wales caretaker coach robin mcbryde
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says he's ready to help out the british and irish lions if they call on any of his players to bolster the squad in new zealand. lions coach warren gatland is set to call up a handful of players and wales are already in new zealand, having beaten tonga in auckland this morning. if the call comes then we have to support the lions and we will do so gladly and congratulate those players that gets elected and wish them all the best. and wales won 24—6 with alex cuthbert and a penalty try helping wales over the line. the welsh next face samoa in apia next friday. meanwhile the all blacks have given the lions a clear warning ahead
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of next week's first test. they demolished samoa 78—0 in auckland this morning. beauden barrett scored twice and there were 12 tries in total in what was a really impressive showing from the world's best team. the former england captain alastair cook has scored a century for essex in the semi—final of the one day cup against nottinghamshire. cook scored the runs which took him to his hundred off the bowling of england test teammate stuart broad. he's still in now and essex are 200 for 3, looking set to make a big total. let's bring you up to date with what's going on at the us open golf — because the second round is underway in wisconsin and it looks like world number one rory mcilroy will be having a weekend off as he's dropped another shot already today. the 2011 champion now seven over par after his dismal 78 yesterday. mcilroy now 14 shots off leader rickie fowler and seemingly about to miss the halfway cut. fowler is out later, he still leads paul casey by a shot, the englishman is level
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for his round so far today. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. more now on our top story, and the devastating fire which destroyed a london tower block. the death toll from the blaze has risen to at least 30 but that figure is expected to rise. earlier stuart cundy from the metropolitan police gave this update. so the metropolitan police is leading the investigation and we have primacy. we'll be working with our colleagues from london fire brigade and the health and safety executive. the purpose of that investigation will be to establish the facts. this will be about providing, as best we possibly can, answers for those that have been so deeply and tragically affected by the terrible fire here at grenfell tower. the investigation will look into what criminal offences may have been committed. it'll be undertaken by a number of specialist detectives, using expertise and specialisms from other organisations, where required. now, sadly, as i have said before, we
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always knew the number of those that have died would increase. i'm able to say at this point in time we know that at least 30 people have died as a result of this fire. sadly and tragically, that includes one person who was taken to hospital and despite the very best medical care from the nhs, has now sadly died. 12 of those victims have been taken to the mortuary. and a number of those bodies, sadly, still remain here within grenfell tower. in a moment i'll cover the work we are doing with the lfb and others to recover those as quickly as we possibly can. the latest update from the hospitals is that we still have 24 people who are being treated.
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12 of those are in critical care. we have specialist and dedicated family liaison officers supporting 36 families. through our casualty bureau and through the reception centre and through, indeed, the coverage out on the media over the last couple of days, i have a request that if you are a family member and a police officer has not yet contacted you directly, if you are able to please go to the westway reception centre, or phone the casualty bureau and a specialist officer will be in touch with you to support you. the london fire brigade has also been giving an update outside the tower block. we have had crews here since the start of the incident. currently we
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have six fire appliances and six fire rescue units. we also have specialist teams here in urban search and rescue. their role is to help support the police in the extrication of the victims and the stabilisation of the building. we anticipate this is going to be considerably protracted incident and we will remain on scene for as long as necessary to ensure we give as much support as possible to our other colleagues and we reunite the victims as best we can with their relatives. we are very clear that this is subject to an investigation and as yet we are not prepared to comment on the gods of the fire until that investigation has been fully concluded. we would like to thank all of the support of the community and they help they have given us throughout our time here and we will endeavour to support the police and other agencies to resolve
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this incident as quickly as possible. i would also like to see it gives me huge pride the amount of community spirit and also the amount of work that was done by the majors and services to help deal with this incident and was all the going forward. 0ur incident and was all the going forward. our thoughts are very much with the families and friends of those involved and we give our deep condolences. ministers have said they will do whatever is necessary to prevent a repeat of the deadly fire. but up to 110 households from grenfell tower are in need of new permanent housing. i spoke to someone from the university of warwick who is an expert on social housing. i began by asking if there is a sense of corners having been cut by the council which could have contributed to the tragedy. yes. i think so. that is what the
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news reports seem yes. i think so. that is what the news reports seem to be suggesting. the priority given to social housing by previous governments has been soul or that things have been done with not sufficient attention. and a lack of money? i do not think money with the issue, lots of money has been spent but not very wisely. how would you have spent the £10 million? i am not an expert in the construction of buildings but it seems from what i have read that having sprinkler systems installed there is something i would have assumed you would have needed in a blog like this. if you go into any commercial or private tower block you will find sprinkler systems installed , you will find sprinkler systems installed, in offices. one looks back at the fire which killed six in 2009 in camberwell and we are
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talking about kensington and chelsea we re talking about kensington and chelsea were magnus tower block, in the shadow of this, is some of the most expensive housing in this country. this is one of the deep ironies of kensington and chelsea. i have done a quick calculation that the £10 million invested is not a cheap option. they should have been able to install the very best. whether the scheme was short—changed, whether there was over profiteering, isimply do whether there was over profiteering, i simply do not know, but it was not cheap to do and they should have been able to do it properly. in terms of the divisions in kensington and chelsea this is one of the ghastly tragedies. i hope that the borough, which is set —— secondly the second is not the first richest borough in the country, and huge divisions, will rise to the challenge. i hope this is not going to be just
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challenge. i hope this is not going to bejust a blame challenge. i hope this is not going to be just a blame time, challenge. i hope this is not going to bejust a blame time, blame challenge. i hope this is not going to be just a blame time, blame the te na nts, to be just a blame time, blame the tenants, the council, the community organisation, the refuse collectors, other people. it has to be a real ha rd other people. it has to be a real hard searching. we have to insulate our buildings. we have to protect our buildings. we have to protect our communities. we have to do it add quality and it is never cheap. we know that retrofitting a block properly is a lot cheaper than demolishing it and replacing it. if it had been demolished, as it will be, it will be extremely hard to replace those 110 low cost homes. u nless replace those 110 low cost homes. unless the government decides to drive care of social housing and investment in it we are not going to get out of this problem. we cannot simply abandon insulating homes or social housing. without it we are stuck. they will not be looking at
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private tower blocks for the sort of problem. i would not like to bank on that. i was asked that this morning andi that. i was asked that this morning and i do not think there are any guarantees. it may well be that private tower blocks get much better security checks when they are being built. what is more likely is that when they are being occupied there isa when they are being occupied there is a lot of on—site management and my question on the grenfell tower situation would be, was there a 24—hour con cr. the bottom? i doubt it. was there an on is cite a state of this evening anxiety is so that everybody was up to speeds? 0r of this evening anxiety is so that everybody was up to speeds? or is there a real communication between there a real communication between the kensington and chelsea council is who are the owners and landlords of this estate and the tenants who we re of this estate and the tenants who were trying to do the job of running it on the ground? in terms of trust
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and understanding each other‘s point of view. i do not get that impression from what certain councillors who have been involved have been seeing. there is a kind of attack, criticise and undermine to the point of tragedy. as we have seen the point of tragedy. as we have seenin the point of tragedy. as we have seen in the last few weeks of terrible tragedies in manchester and london bridge we should see some of that spirit coming forward, otherwise how are we going to help the community come through and how are we going to get kensington and chelsea to want to do right by that community in a situation where they are running a very community in a situation where they are running a very divided of london? that was the profession of social policy at the london school of economics and someone from the university of warwick. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc news: the bbc believes the number of people dead or missing following the grenfell tower fire is as many as 76, with 30 confirmed dead by the police.
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the queen and prince william visit a relief centre helping victims of the grenfell tower fire, meeting residents, volunteers and emergency services staff. angry residents are asking how the fire spread so quickly. a march for local people is planned for this afternoon. british airways cabin crew are to stage a 16—day strike injuly. members of unite in the so—called mixed fleet are taking industrial action as part of a dispute over pay and travel concessions. the union also announced it would "vigorously" pursue legal action against the airline on behalf of 1,400 cabin crew, who say they were "sanctioned" for taking previous strike action. amazon is to buy whole foods the upmarket food retailer for £10.7 billion. the deal ramps up the e—commerce giant's bid to disrupt the grocery business worldwide. it's expected that whole foods
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will still continue to operate bricks and mortar stores under its brand. shares injapanese car parts maker takata were temporarily suspended ahead of expected bankruptcy. the company is reported to be preparing to file for bankruptcy after its faulty airbags led to the biggest safety recall in the car industry. the filing could come next week in both japan and the us. the japanese company behind the biggest recall in the history of the car industry appears to be on the verge of bankruptcy. worldwide about 100 million takata airbags —— which can rupture with deadly force and spray shrapnel at passengers, have been recalled.
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professor david bailey is an automotive expert at aston university business school. 0ver over 40 million airbags in the us have been recalled and only a third have been recalled and only a third have been recalled and only a third have been replaced. it is such a massive job that takata have been unable to deal with it quickly. ta ka ta unable to deal with it quickly. takata going into bankruptcy could effectively so that down. there will be some concerns about how quickly this is getting fixed. other in a replacement airbags to service all the vehicles are needed? that is one of the problems, 100 million airbags recalled worldwide, there has been a struggle by takata to replace those quickly enough, and whether
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companies bring in alternative suppliers... i think they will have to look at that going forward to speed up the resolution of this problem. do many customers act on recall notices or are they ignored? it varies. in some cases they do and in other cases they are unlikely to do so, like with rock slide in. when it isa do so, like with rock slide in. when it is a safety issue and they are notified they are much more likely to do so. we have very accurate records of who owns what vehicles and a very good track record on contacting drivers. we have seen an estimate of how much this cost, does that include the fines levied against the company by us regulators? we do not know. the forecast... we do not know how high the liabilities will go. the 7 billion include some of the finds so far but takata has agreed to pay the car—maker something like 850 million
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us dollars. that is in doubt of the company is going to administration. companies concerned about how quickly this is being fixed and whether they will receive compensation? how likely is it that ta ka ta compensation? how likely is it that takata will file for bankruptcy? very likely. the company will go into ba nkru ptcy very likely. the company will go into bankruptcy and be broken up with parts of it taken over by rival suppliers. thank you. in other business stories we're following today: mobile phone provider three has been fined £1.89 million for failing to ensure customers could contact emergency services. it follows a temporary loss of service for customers in kent, hampshire and parts of london on 6th october. networks are supposed to allow emergency calls to be connected, even when they experience technical problems, but 0fcom said vulnerabilities in three's network made this impossible. spending by foreign tourists in the ukjumped 20% in april
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compared with the same month a year ago, that's according to the office for national statistics. the rise is due to the fall in the pound since the brexit vote, which has made visiting britain cheaper. mcdonald's and the international 0lympics committee are ending their long—running sponsorship deal three years early. the fast food chain said it was "reconsidering all aspects of its international 0lympics committee business" as part of a plan to re—invigorate its business. the ioc said it understood "that mcdonald's is looking to focus on different business priorities". european markets have rebranded since yesterday. the ftse as lifted slightly. there was a sharp downturn
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in us retailers after it was announced that amazon are going to buy all foods. american politicians have played their annual charity baseball match in washington dc, a day after a leading republican and three other people were shot as they practised for the game. steve scalise is still critically ill in hospital, though his condition has improved. 0ur correspondent laura bicker reports from where the game was held, nationals park. together, with hands on hearts, their minds were on those who could not be here. congressman steve scalise
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is critically ill in hospital after the shooting on wednesday. he has undergone several surgeries. president donald trump had this video message for the players. this game is always an important moment for both parties to come together to support charity, build friendships and celebrate our national pastime. the ceremonial honour of the first pitch went to david bailey, the capitol hill police officer who was injured when he helped bring down the gunman. the crowd had come in their thousands, to pay tribute to the spirit of this game. for two hours each year, these politicians put their often bitter and entrenched party divisions aside. for those who survived the gunman's hail of bullets, that message is particularly poignant. we are glad to be here, raising twice as much money for charity as we usually do, twice as many eyes on us tonight, to watch us mess up in the field! it's intimidating. but all of us are pulling for steve scalise. for one night, for one game,
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republicans and democrats will manage to put their bitter divisions aside. but what happens after the last inning? what happens in the longer term? it is less than a mile from this stadium to capitol hill. can the bipartisanship mood make thatjourney? democrats and republicans can lower the temperature on our rhetoric in the hopes of proceeding in a way that does not incite people. the democrats were well ahead by half—time, though perhaps the score won't matter, because, yes, the rivalries are fierce, but so are the friendships forged on this field. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. the weekend is almost upon us and for most parts of the uk it is going to be high summer. quite hot and
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quite funny. not everybody likes that sort of weather but that is what we are expecting. it is going to be quite humid as well. a lot of sunshine in the forecast. you have to look towards the south where that air is coming from. very hot weather across the iberian peninsula. the air is coming from that direction so we will see temperatures up to 30. probably more than that into the early pa rt probably more than that into the early part of next week. south—westerly winds bringing fairly warm air. good spells of sunshine. more cloud further north. some rain across scotland over the next few hours. a few patches of low cloud here and there but essentially a dry night with clear skies and light winds and it is going to be warm. some places no low than 16 or 17 so difficult for sleeping. the north
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and west of scotland sees the workload tomorrow morning and outbreaks of rain but already we have temperatures of 19 or 20 in aberdeen. it is the upper teens in northern ireland. england and wales, 19 or 20 northern ireland. england and wales, 19 or20 in northern ireland. england and wales, 19 or 20 in one or two places. even in the south—west, 16 or 17 degrees, plenty of sunshine, low cloud around the coast. plenty of sunshine across england and wales, patchy cloud here and there and after the warm start it is going to be hot afternoon. temperatures low underneath the cloud in the north and west but for most cloud in the north and west but for m ost pla ces cloud in the north and west but for most places it is the low to middle 20s. much like today we are expecting to see high or very high pollen rivals across much of england and wales and northern ireland and it could get higher in the south—east of scotland. just the north—west of the uk's seeing some
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rain. elsewhere it is a warm night and the warm start the day on sunday. by sunday afternoon with lots of sunshine we are going to get 30 degrees. upper teens or middle 20s elsewhere. probably 30 degrees or more in the south—eastern corner on monday. if you look towards tuesday those temperatures are coming down but still 27 degrees in london, hot enough. this is bbc news live in west london, where police say that at least 30 people are now confirmed to have died in the fire that engulfed grenfell tower. the police have taken the lead for the investigation, and if criminal offences have been committed, it will be us who investigate that. the official death toll has risen to
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30, but the bbc believes that around 70 people are dead or missing. the cause of the fire is still unknown. the queen and prince william have been visiting a relief centre which has been helping victims of the fire.
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