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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 16, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines at 8pm. protesters storm kensington and chelsea town hall as emotions run high following the grenfell tower inferno. they are demanding answers as to why the building went up in flames. it looks like people are actually trying to get in to the council... to make their point directly. we are in the richest borough in the uk. and in this very borough we have a building where some of the poorest people live. and the safety measures are totally inadequate. this is the scene right now at another demonstration in oxford circus. demonstrators angry at the g re nfell tower circus. demonstrators angry at the grenfell tower disaster are not better sit down protest —— are at a
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sit down protest blocking traffic in central london. police confirm 30 people are now known to have died in the fire. the bbc understands more than 70 are dead or missing. the prime minister — already criticised for her response to the tragedy — visits some of the injured in hospital. she has announced a £5 million fund to help the victims. what we need to do is to ensure that immediately people have the support that they need in order to deal with what is an horrific and terrible circumstance that people are in. and the queen and prince william visit a relief centre where some of the hundreds left homeless are staying in temporary accommodation. good evening and welcome to bbc news.
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there have been angry scenes in west london, as people affected by the grenfell tower fire tried to storm the offices of the local council. some protestors managed to get inside kensington and chelsea town hall where they were confronted by security guards. tonight there are two protests in london let's show you this one. this is in central london at oxford circus, filmed from bbc news helicopter. you can see protesters have been marching towards oxford circus, they have now started a sit down protest at oxford circus, in the heart of london. buses and traffic stop there. it is one of the busiest parts of central london and these protesters were carrying banners
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saying justice for grenfell. demonstrators really demanding a nswe i’s , demonstrators really demanding answers, furious that residents' complaints many months ago about what they saw as a lack of fire safety measures in the blog that those concerns were ignored. you may remember that there was one blog that said it would take a catastrophe for those concerns of some of the residents to be addressed. but these protesters are demanding answers. the prime minister has promised a commission of enquiry. but these people want a nswe i’s very of enquiry. but these people want answers very quickly. they also want quicker identification of the day. —— of the dead. and confirmation of the death toll. this is the other demonstration, both are running concurrently. this one is closer to g re nfell tower concurrently. this one is closer to grenfell tower itself in north kensington in west london. again, you can see the banners and placards similar sentiment. you can see the banners and placards
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similarsentiment. people for you can see the banners and placards similar sentiment. people for with grief but also wrought with anger as well. they are demanding questions. —— raw with grief and anger. the government have promised a £5 million aid for the disaster but many have criticised her response. although she visited the scene and spoke to emergency workers, she did not talk to residents or survivors. should go to hospital today to speak to patients but people are complaining not only about their own borough council, kensington and chelsea borough council, but also about the government ‘s response. police say that at least 30 people are now confirmed to have died in the fire that engulfed grenfell tower in west london. the bbc understands that the total number of people who are dead or missing so far is around 70.
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as we have been seeing, there is growing anger at the way the authorities have dealt with the aftermath of the fire — at around 4pm this afternoon around 400 protestors tried to get in kensington town hall. the queen and prince william have been visiting a relief centre which has been helping victims of the fire. our first report tonight — on the latest on the tower block fire, is from our correspondent jeremy cooke. a crowd storms kensington town hall, demanding action. we wantjustice, we wantjustice. demanding justice. and demanding answers. we need to be heard. we have things to say. we are in pain. i understand that the response we get from the council is not satisfactory.
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how could this tragedy have happened, on this scale, they want to hear from the local authority officials that they hold responsible. how could this tragedy have happened, on this scale, in this city, in 2017? the whole procedure is chaos. we are sent from hospital to hospital. two shelters. why is there not community hope for family members? why do we have to actively look for them and be given misinformation, be told they are possibly alive, making us call family members? and there is someone else telling us, sorry, and there is someone else telling us, sorry, . we live in the modern world. why is it carried out like this? it doesn't make sense. today, again, in the shadow of grenfell tower, a different kind of response. it is an overwhelming community tragedy with an overwhelming community response. we get all the missing people on the same window.
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a continuing grassroots mobilisation, doing all that they can. and visited today by royalty. a time to reflect and to thank. you guys do a brilliantjob. but the queen and prince william left in no doubt of the agony and the grief here. royal protocol meets raw emotion. william, come here. where are the children? the queen turning up, everyone came. go to the media, show the queen you are nice, sorry to the policemen, sorry to the firemen. but you are not doing the right job. could you tell us who they are?
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not my daughters. families, friends. not my children, my family's friends. not necessarily my children. all of them but died, they are my families, friends and children. rescue crews are still making their way through the building. it is hard to imagine a more challenging task. dangerous and slow work. it is why the official death toll remains so much lower than what the people here expect, and what they fear. the building itself is in a very hazardous state. it is going to take a period of time for our specialists, both from the police and the london fire brigade, to fully search the building, to make sure we locate and recover everybody that has sadly perished in that fire. we will be doing that as swiftly as we can, absolutely. i completely understand the need for those that have lost loved ones that, as quick as we can, we are able to confirm that. with all of that comes frustration and the sense among many
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that more help is needed at the official level. there is a woman on the train who goes past and she sees body bags. loads of them. why are they lying? even if you can't identify them, don't lie. say, we have this many bodies unidentified. because there are people out here looking for their family and friends. we have not met anyone from the council who has come here and spoken to anyone. nobody. the mp came here on wednesday for about five minutes but we haven't seen anyone who has even come in and speak to any of the local people who have been affected, which is really annoying. you need some engagement? yes. we haven't got any of that. all we have is people coming to volunteer, to do this and that, drop things off, but we haven't seen anyone in authority who we can give some responsibility to. they are not bringing
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out the truth, man. they need to talk the truth and get real. theresa may comes down and doesn't see none of us. when it was manchester, she was all about the place. no truth. they have always been wanting to do something like this to ladbroke grove. and now something is done, it would be nice if something was done properly to help us. the investigations, inquests and enquiries will take perhaps years to complete but the people here believe they already have a fundamental understanding of this tragedy, that the fire swept through the building at breathtaking pace, and that so many people from this neighbourhood have lost their lives. away from the crowds, it is now three days on. the fire is out and london rumbles on. grenfell tower, 127 homes, stands monument now to the lives, to the families who have been lost. jeremy cooke, bbc news, north kensington. we got a taste of this period there
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—— be if you read and protesters. speak to our correspondent, what's happening? you can see 1000 strong, many who have come from the town hall. many went inside the town hall earlier and have marched through here and come gathered here outside the police headquarters. we are in the police headquarters. we are in the shadow of the grenfell tower, it's 1000 the shadow of the grenfell tower, it's1000 strong, angry but peaceful. people here are telling me to my great things. i want to hear accountability, and they want greater rights. one lady said theresa may did not even look us in the eye, couldn't speak to be relatives of the victims of great bell tower.
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—— speakto —— speak to the victims of grenfell tower. this is a hugely affluent boer, and yet what we saw in g re nfell tower boer, and yet what we saw in grenfell tower and other tower blocks around is really felt very keenly. one girl said to me that she feels the number of the dead has been vastly understated. clearly there were more inside the tower, but the police were saying there we re but the police were saying there were more bodies inside the tower that they are waiting to retrieve. it's painstaking work inside the tower, the upper floors are extremely difficult to reach. there we re extremely difficult to reach. there were sniffer dogs, forensic teams trying to establish the identities of people. but all the while, the anger continues to grow. mark, thanks indeed. our correspondent in north kensington. there is another
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demonstration concurrently as well. that is in central london. these are demonstrators to who have been marching with similar protests, similar slogans, similar anger. banners that say justice the g re nfell tower. banners that say justice the grenfell tower. —— justice for grenfell. they were in the heart of central london in oxford circus, now moving up towards broadcasting house, the bbc‘s headquarters. complaining about, as we were hearing from mark, how will this disaster happened, how awful warnings from residents about safety concerns were ignored. and complaining about the response of both the borough council and the government. i want quicker action to identify the dead, we house the
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homeless, —— they want quicker action. they want a faster response to this disaster. politicians from all parties, the prime minister in particular, are facing a barrage of criticism from local people over how they've responded to the fire. many feel their voices have been ignored for years. today, the local government secretary sajid javid promised that — whatever recommendations are made by safety experts — including rehousing people living in other tower blocks — they will be done. in the last hour the prime minister has been speaking to my colleague emily maitless — lets here what she had to say. we are committed to rehousing people as far as possible in the borough or another borough. some people will wa nt to another borough. some people will want to go to another part of london where they have relatives or support. we are going to make sure people are rehoused so they have a home to go to. do you accept that
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you misread the public mood, the level of anger? you didn't meet residents and they really resented that? this was a terrible tragedy that? this was a terrible tragedy that took place. people have lost their lives and others have lost everything. all their possessions, their home and everything. what we are doing is putting in place the support that will help them. but it isa support that will help them. but it is a terrible tragedy. i have heard horrifying stories from the fire brigade, the police and from the victims themselves who were in that tower. but also from other local residents, some of whom have not been able to go to their homes either. what i am now absolutely focused on is ensuring that we get that support on the ground. as i say, government is making money available, we eyes showing that we'll get to the bottom of what happened, we are ensure people will
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be be house. but we need to make sure this actually happens. that was the prime minister earlier. here are live pictures from the protest, people protesting what they see as in action from the authorities that they believe may have contributed to the causes of the grenfell tower disaster. they are demonstrating outside the bbc, marching through central london this evening, a few minutes ago they were sitting down, a sit down protest in oxford circus stopping the traffic there. it was in protest and demand demanding answers, really, from what they say were warnings from some residents about poor safety
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facilities at grenfell tower is, why do those were ignored and also the response of the kensington and chelsea borough council to the disaster. and, indeed, the government. you can see police officers there outside new broadcasting house and all souls church. the demonstrators are peaceful fair, church. the demonstrators are peacefulfair, just church. the demonstrators are peaceful fair, just having their say. justice for grenfell are the words that are on their banners. you sensed this is the start of quite a long running campaign by protesters from the area. from north kensington. who believe that there have to be answers. the prime minister has promised an enquiry, and that enquiry will get underway but many of these people, you concede the justice the green —— justice for grenfell banners. demanding an enquiry and that the whole are
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the prime minister has promised £5 million in government funds for those affected by this terrible disaster. we now know, we are hearing, has claimed 30 lives, that is confirmed. but the bbc understands that 70 people are either dead or missing. as a result of this disaster, the fire that engulfed grenfell tower. there have been protests all day, some of the more dramatic protests were earlier this afternoon at lipm. kensington town hall was the location, the borough council that has been so criticised over this disaster. some of the protesters have stormed inside the building, got inside and tried to run up the stairs because they saw councillors and council
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officials, upstairs. they tried to get upstairs but were stopped from doing so by a police officer. there we re doing so by a police officer. there were some scuffles. but you can do this is a peaceful protest, going on for a while now, marching through central london. this is the scene outside the bbc‘s headquarters, film from our bbc news helicopter. well, as we've been hearing dozens of people are still missing. many families are searching for information, trying to find out what happened to their loved ones. more heartbreaking stories are emerging about last phone calls and messages from people who were trapped their homes. sarah campbell reports now on the victims, and those still missing. viewers may find this distressing. with each day, the number of people dead or feared to have died increases. the scale of the loss of life is almost impossible to comprehend. confirmed today, khadija saye, who was 2a years old.
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she was a promising young artist. the mp david lammy, a friend, tweeted: former colleagues feared the worst, after reading her final tweets about thick smoke in the 20th floor flat she shared with her mother. khadija was the whole package. she had everything going for her. she had a beautiful soul, she was a kind person, she was always volunteering, always looking out for other people, buddying younger people. she was very passionate about her own community and a hugely talented, creative artist. her photography and her art speak for themselves. she really had a massive future ahead of her, and she'll be hugely missed by all of us. two other victims have been named so far. five—year—old isaac shawo, his mother described him as a "beautiful boy". and mohammad alhajali, a 23—year—old syrian refugee. once i asked him, why are you studying civil engineering? he laughed and said, because i want to go back to syria
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when the war is over, and help rebuild the country. he said, they will need us. this is the kind of person he was. this wall has become a focal point for the community, a place for people to leave tributes, to write down messages, and express their thoughts and feelings about what happened. it's also a place where, even today, family members and friends have posted pictures of those they desperately want to hear from. what do i expect? well, i'm hoping, basically, they are in the hospital. even if it means they are unconscious, but they are in hospital, that's what i'm hoping. i feel angry, i feel sad, i feel everything. i miss my friend, my friend is inside, but i can't do anything. she's there, but i can't help her. i saw her the same day before she died. morning and afternoon, but... no—one helped her. the wait for news goes on for family after family.
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mo khalil spent much of his day putting up pictures of his uncle hesham rahman, who lived on the 20th floor. we don't know, we don't know. it's like a really... kind of, empty feeling that we've all got. we don't really know anything, we've got no answers. we are alljust looking at each other, hoping that we find them. orfind something. it will take time, but there will be many more names to add to the list of the dead. many more families left in grief. sarah campbell, bbc news. we are going to talk now to the ethiopian ambassador, hailemichael aberra afework.
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eight british nationals of ethiopian origin are amongst those who are still missing , including a whole family. thank you for coming in. they people of ethiopian origin still unaccounted for? yes. what do you know about those are still missing there is a family of five, the old est of there is a family of five, the oldest of the children is 14 and there is a mother and son, the sun is very young. and there is another one. another son. again, a young one of five years old. some of them have lived in london for about ten years. so the age ranges from five to over 40. do you know where about in the
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blog they were living with lycra which floor? —— in the block? blog they were living with lycra which floor? -- in the block? the rest were in the middle. and there isa rest were in the middle. and there is a connection with your embassy, one of those missing? one of those missing is the sister in law of one of our drivers in the embassy. obviously, so many people of ethiopian origin who are unaccounted for. what are you, as an embassy, doing at the moment to help their relatives, their loved ones and friends? the last three days, we have been going from centre to centre and hospital to hospital, trying to comfort them. emotionally. because they are in great grief. supporting them. we have organised
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teams to do this. to work with the ethiopian diaspora here in london, so together we can do whatever we can to support them, in addition to what the people of london are doing in terms of providing food, clothing. it's amazing. the emergency services and the people of london. the ethiopian community in london, they are coming together to help these people? yes, it's amazing, there are so many of them. in one of the churches in kensington where the two families are sitting with them, comforting them, because they are in great grief. they are hoping that something might turn up, they still do not know the definite a nswer to they still do not know the definite answer to what happened. and it really is so heartbreaking and it is what many people are going through
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at the moment, but searching hospitals and searching emergency services, trying to find information, but as time goes on and the days goes by, hope is fading? one tends to lose hope but at the same time people are crying and weeping, it's a horrible thing to see. and you as an embassy will continue to do what you can to support those who have been affected and the relatives and loved ones? that's right, all the diplomats and staff at the embassy will go to them, morning, afternoon, evening. because they are here and supporting each other, it is very important. thank you for taking the time, i know you are very busy and clearly incredibly distressing time for you
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and all the people in your embassy as well. ambassador, thanks for joining us. thank you. we will pause now for the latest weather prospects. good evening. it's been predominantly dry with decent spell of sunshine, with hardly a crowd in the sky in cornwall judging hardly a crowd in the sky in cornwalljudging by this dutiful butcher from st ives. cornwalljudging by this dutiful butcherfrom st ives. the cornwalljudging by this dutiful butcher from st ives. the clear skies will continue through the night. it'll be a warm night to try and geta night. it'll be a warm night to try and get a good nights sleep at the south—westerly breeze continues to bring outbreaks of drizzle, and mystique and conditions to the north—west. elsewhere, decent spells of sunshine and temperatures this bonding. the humidity will start to build as well. we could see temperatures into the high 20s and
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mid—20s further north. underneath the cloud and drizzle, and more disappointing i3 the cloud and drizzle, and more disappointing 13 to 16 celsius. more again on sunday, with higher temperature is at 13 degrees, we haven't seen temperatures like that since last september. —— 30 degrees. this is bbc news — the headlines: the prime minister, who has been criticised for the government's response to the grenfell tower fire, has announced £5 million will be made available immediately for emergency supplies, food and clothing. we are ensuring that support is put in place for people. now, that means that money should be made available, and one of the things i've just heard from people is about making sure that that money actually gets through to people. earlier, anger spilled over at kensington and chelsea's town hall as residents and protesters stormed the council offices to call for action. scuffles broke out as the crowd demanded more help for those
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caught up in the tragedy. chanting: we wantjustice! we wantjustice! some of the protesters have been marching through central london, and in the last few minutes, they held a minute's silence outside the bbc studios. the total number of confirmed deaths has now reached 30, but the bbc understands the total number of people dead or missing is now around 70, although that number is expected to rise further. the queen and prince william have met residents, volunteers and emergency services staff at the sports centre which has become one of the makeshift shelters for those affected. police said today there was nothing
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to suggest that the fire which broke in the early hours of wednesday morning was started deliberately. investigators are still trying to piece together what happened and how the blaze spread so quickly throughout the building. lets just show you some of the protesters who have been marching through central london, and they have now come to where we are, broadcast house, —— broadcasting house, you can see them with their banners saying justice for grenfell. this could be the stuff of a long—running campaign, perhaps in the same way as the hillsborough campaign, a campaign for answers as to how this fire was able to spread with such rapidity, and to kill so many people, but also, anger at
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perhaps the aftermath, the way that kensington and chelsea borough council dealt with the aftermath of the tragedy, and the government as well. there is a lot of anger but grief, of course, but no increasingly, anger as well. —— but now. there are now three inquiries — by the police, by the fire brigade and the full public inquiry. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds now, on the questions the inquiry will have to consider. my mate told me 20 minutes ago that grenfell tower is on fire. it is the first, obvious question, for the fire brigade to answer. this video was shot 20 minutes after the fire started. where? how? i saw someone come running out of flat 16 on the phone, calling for the fire brigade. he said it was a fridge fire. his fridge was by his kitchen window, so when the fire brigade put
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the fire out, the fire had already gone through the window to the cladding on the outside, and the wind has helped it. all of a sudden, the cladding caught. he said the cladding caught, which leads to question number two. it should not have. the building was clad with aluminium panels in 2016, the work signed off by the council. so far there is no evidence that standards were breached, but... the regulations are a minimum safety standard expected for a building, to keep it reasonably safe for the occupants and people around it. if you are using materials, or using it in circumstances that you know are more dangerous, then you have to mitigate that, make a risk assessment and engineer out the risk. in this test, the fire is contained by flameproof walls. experts say that good fire safety results from good design. so was the redesign
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to grenfell tower safe? were there other factors? after the work was completed, gas pipes were moved to public areas. residents were furious. thejob of finding out who might be to blame has now been taken over by the police. what we will do with the investigation is we will get to the answer of what has happened and why. that is why the police have taken the lead for the investigation, and if criminal offences have been committed, we will investigate that. examining the wreckage willjust be the start. they will have to look at the role of the council, building managers, contractors, subcontractors, a vast job. the question of whether tower blocks are safe will be for the public enquiry, but for now, across the country, this is luton, councils are checking fire safety procedures and refurbishment work. deaths in fires are rare. just 229 people were killed at home last year. another question for the public
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enquiry, because there have been plenty of warnings in the past. cladding was a factor in this fire in southwark in 2009. a coroner suggested more sprinkler systems might be considered, but introducing them widely might mean a new approach to fire safety. something for the enquiry to consider. the 19705 era grenfell tower was designed simply to contain the spread of flames, what is called passive fire safety. but all of these modern developments will have fire detection systems and sprinklers, bringing those older blocks up to this sort of standard would not be cheap, and it would certainly be disruptive for their residents. but what price should be put on a life? especially on the lives of those living in towers, often the poorest in society? this disaster has triggered a national debate which could last years. the prime minister has ordered a
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full public enquiry into the blaze at grenfell tower. the death toll, we are expecting to rise, and fire chiefs say they do not expect to find any more survivors in what is left of the building. let us talk about the terms of this enquiry, and how it might function, how quickly it might come up with some answers. nicholas griffin is a barrister who has worked on several enquiries, including the bloody sunday enquiry, the undercover policing enquiry and the undercover policing enquiry and the child abuse enquiry, so very well qualified to tell us a bit about how this enquiry might unfold. because it is difficult. we have seen the process even now today, tonight, people demanding really fast a nswers, tonight, people demanding really fast answers, but in a sense, a
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public enquiry often wants to take a long time. the chilcot enquiry took yea rs long time. the chilcot enquiry took years and years. the first point is that a public enquiry is there to look into matters of public concern. to make findings of fact and make recommendations to la that concern. we know there will be a full public enquiry, we do not know exactly what form it will take, but we hope that it will have proper powers to compel evidence. but you are right, when you have that kind of enquiry, can ta ke you have that kind of enquiry, can take a little bit of time, because there are procedures that need to be followed. and in terms of what its terms of reference would be, is it the case that the broader they are, the case that the broader they are, the longer the enquiry would take? speed is of the essence for many people. that is right. the key thing to do with this kind of enquiry is to do with this kind of enquiry is to think very carefully about its terms of reference. if you have them
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to focus, you will have a quick enquiry, but it may not have the breadth that lots of people want for justice. if you have a very broad enquiry, it can take a long time and can cost a lot of money, and there may be a loss of public patients with that. so you need to get the balance right. and it is urgent not just because people are angry but because lots of people live in tower blocks in this country, people have real concerns about whether they're a tower blocks are safe. so will it come up with interim answers, interim reports, perhaps before the full enquiry recommendations, it might bea full enquiry recommendations, it might be a few weeks or months? there is a process under the very form of double public enquiry for interim reports, but even with an interim reports, but even with an interim report, there are procedures that need to be followed. so you can do that quite quickly. whether you would be able to do it in a matter of weeks, i think that would be difficult. when you talk about its powers, it could compel witnesses to
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come and give evidence? if you have an enquiry under the enquiries act, that gives thejudge an enquiry under the enquiries act, that gives the judge leading the enquiry powers to make people hand over evidence and powers to require people to come and give evidence to the enquiry. so it would have teeth. what about its recommendations? would they necessarily be implemented by the government? there area implemented by the government? there are a lot of complaints that after the tower block fire a few years ago in south london, the recommendations of the coroner were not properly implement it, people are saying. well, there is no law that requires a government to put in place new laws that reflect recommendations in a public enquiry report. however, often governments do take action as a result of recommendations that are made. but clearly, there is huge concern about what happened here.
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this is exactly the sort of disaster where it seems right that there should be a public enquiry, a public enquiry on the terms you have outlined. i think that is right. public enquiries have sort of entered the national psyche now, whether our points of real concern, but the anger and frustration, the sorrow, we can really feel all of that, and a public enquiry is the vehicle that allows people to get to grips with what has happened and try and plana grips with what has happened and try and plan a path to the future and to allay concern. it would have been pretty unthinkable not to have had a full enquiry into a disaster of this magnitude. it is difficult to comment about that, but you could see why the prime minister was keen to establish an enquiry quickly. lot of implications for a lot of potential residents of other tower blocks. thank you for talking to us, nicholas griffin. just to show you the scene now in
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central london, where some of the protesters who have been demanding a nswe rs protesters who have been demanding answers along the lines of what we have just been talking about, they have just been talking about, they have been demonstrating and protesting in central london. these are pictures from around oxford circus, there was at one stage a sit down protest right in the middle of oxford circus. they then moved on to outside new broadcasting house. but they have now dispersed, a peaceful demonstration running in tandem with one nearer grenfell tower as well this evening. 24 people remain in hospital, 12 of them are critically ill. for hospital staff, it was an incredibly busy time, treating the victims of burns and smoke inhalation. our health editor hugh pym has been talking to two members of nhs staff who treated victims through wednesday night. siren king's college hospital, one
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of london's major trauma centres, its staff on the front line of the nhs response to the traumatic and horrific aftermath of the westminster and london bridge attacks, and this week, grenfell tower. dr tom best arrived in the early hours of wednesday. the urgent task was to clear the airways of victims of smoke inhalation and then the particles in their lungs. we found lots of soot lining the lungs. some of that was quite hot when it got into the lungs, and so there were some burns underneath. we washed out as much of that soot as we possibly could to remove it. the emotion at the end of a punishing week is raw. it's... sorry. on a professional level, i feel immensely proud, but there is something so enormous about what's happened is that it's impossible to comprehend.
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for most staff, there was a need to care for families in distress as well as the patients themselves. how did you feel at the end of your shift? it's really tough. i think when you're working, you just powered through a bit and it's only when you step back and you finish at the end of the day that you realise how upsetting it can be, sorry, dealing with some of these things. it was really tough. the nhs in london has had to cope with two major incidents in the space of less than a fortnight, and just to illustrate the ongoing challenge, they are still treating patients here from the london bridge attack as well as those who came in during the early hours of wednesday morning. many staff have been involved in the emergency response both times. a brief look at some of the day's other other news stories.
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a man has been arrested outside the houses of parliament on suspicion of having a knife. officers used a taser when they detained him. there were no injuries in the incident, which happened by the main carriage gates entrance, close to where constable keith palmer was stabbed and killed during the terror attack in march. a second soldier has died after being wounded in an incident involving a tank at an army firing range in pembrokeshire. two other soldiers were injured at castlemartin ranges on wednesday afternoon. live tank firing exercises have been suspended while the enquiry continues. british airways cabin crew are to stage a two—week strike in a long—running dispute over pay and travel concessions. members of the unite union will walk out between saturday, july ist and sundayjuly 16th, during the peak holiday season. ba said the proposed action was "extreme and completely u nnecessa ry". the headlines on bbc news.
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there have been protesting western central london as emotions run high following the grenfell tower fire. there are growing calls for answers as to why the building went up in fla mes as to why the building went up in flames so quickly. the prime minister, already criticised our response, has announced a £5 million fund to help the victims of the tragedy. police have confirmed 30 people are now known to have starred in the fire. the bbc understands more than 70 are either dead or missing. —— now known to have died. the labour mp the labourmpjo the labour mp jo cox the labour mpjo cox is being remembered across the country on the first anniversary of her murder. the mother of two was killed as she
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arrived to a constituency surgery in west yorkshire. more than 110,000 events a re west yorkshire. more than 110,000 events are being held today and over the weekend as part of the great get together. in a special programme this evening in west yorkshire, bbc and itvjoin this evening in west yorkshire, bbc and itv join forces this evening in west yorkshire, bbc and itvjoin forces for this evening in west yorkshire, bbc and itv join forces for the first time to remember the late labour mp. welcomed to look north. these are two programmes come together to celebrate the life and legacy of a remarkable mp, jo cox. we are live in bristol on the first anniversary of her death, as hundreds of thousands of people come together to celebrate all that they have in common. today, there have been moments of reflection in birstall. we will focus on howjo lift and it felt very right for me to be in the
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community today. —— how she lived. hundreds of children from nine local schools, including the onejo went to asa schools, including the onejo went to as a child, gathered together for a big singsong. and we will also hear from those inspired byjo to bring different cultures and communities together. people are going out unconsciously trying to make friends with people orjust letting people know more about themselves. just to prove we are all approachable and we are all one, really. i don't know about you, but i have used the expression welcome to a special editions so many times. but this is extra special because this is the first time i have presented with you, my friendly rival! it is the first and the two companies have come together and we are here for a
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special reason, because one year ago,jo special reason, because one year ago, jo cox was tragically murdered here. this is the garden of hope, and her family have here. this is the garden of hope, and herfamily have campaigned for communities to join together, celebrate their diversity and put aside their differences. it is a pleasure to be with you tonight, harry, but her message was always, we have more in common than that which divides us. and a big weekend of events have been planned to celebrate her legacy. that is why we're together tonight, among hundreds of thousands of people doing the same. —— along with. so todayis doing the same. —— along with. so today is also about remembering how. —— remembering her. they sing children singing a pointed riposte
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to what happened just yards from here a year ago. there are some of harmony and diversity chimes with the visionjo cox held so dear. a year after her murder, today was all about making that vision a reality. it started this morning in heckmondwike, where jo it started this morning in heckmondwike, wherejo kular. —— drew up. —— de roon. 500 children from nine different skills came together to sing injo's memory and for herfamily. together to sing injo's memory and for her family. —— together to sing injo's memory and for herfamily. —— nine different schools. her parents were clearly moved. so uplifting, so amazing to see all the different children together. singing in unity. see all the different children together. singing in unitym see all the different children together. singing in unity. it is all part of remembering her. she was all part of remembering her. she was a great contributor to the community. she was really nice to
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eve ryo ne community. she was really nice to everyone so i don't know why someone would want to kill her. meanwhile, tea and cake were on the menu at the newly named jo cox conference centre. immunity guests mingled with schoolboys and wrote messages of unity for a tree of many hands. she was a nice lady to our community, and we would obviously... she used to have a lovely smile. we will all have different opinions on examples like the government and politicians. we all support different size. but we still seem to come together, like this get together we have hosted today. now you will never be rid of jo, today. now you will never be rid of jo, she will be here all the time! it gives us a lot of pride and pleasure to open the centre. thank you. applause we decided very early on that we
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would not remember how she died but how she lived. it felt right for me and for my pa rents it felt right for me and for my parents as well to be in the community today, and so fat that is the right decision for us. jo loved this area, that is one of the reasons why she wanted the job. so many people around here just really love her. then to birstall, the scene of the shooting, transformed into a place to make paper flowers and to write on a gauzy memorial wall. eight replaced with friendship and hope. she always said there was former good in the world than evil, and there is. and we have found that this year. she was right. for the sake of the children in birstall, we need to hope that is true. we are so pleased to be able to welcomejim, jo's sister, we are so pleased to be able to welcome jim, jo's sister, and we are so pleased to be able to welcomejim, jo's sister, and her mum and dad. it has been a very special day but it must have been
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one of mixed emotions for you. yes, it has been a tough day, i'm very tired, it has been a very long and emotional day but i think the decision to come out, to meet the community that jo loved, it was the right decision, but it has been tough. i think you are almost torn in half because one part is that you are so sad, then you see this, all these people turning up tonight, thousands of people all over the rest of the county celebrating what your daughter gave. we are just so proud of what she did. and as i said, we have seen her legacy in action today, which is brilliant for us action today, which is brilliant for us all, but can ijust say her pride —— how proud i am of kim? she has been amazing. we have two brilliant daughters. i think you have passed
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on those inspirational genes! when i first met you, you were the shy one! but have you find this an uplifting experience today? it has been a wonderful day, which may seem strange in some respects, but we have been to many schools, several open—air concerts given by dave hundreds of people —— given by hundreds of people —— given by hundreds of people —— given by hundreds of pupils from different schools, and it has been great. we get a lot of strength, we can feel the warmth that people have for us. the children, they were only so little when this happened last year, what will all this mean one day to them? we have saved everything and every card, every flower that was laid last year, and kim had her loft
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boarded out and it is all in the loft, and when they are old enough, we will let them look at everything, andl we will let them look at everything, and i am sure they will be so proud. we talk about her every day it is not something we have put in the back of our minds. we keep her memory alive for them. and they talk quite naturally about her. memory alive for them. and they talk quite naturally about herlj memory alive for them. and they talk quite naturally about her. i think they deserve a round of applause. well done. thank you so much. one of the things that really hits you is the things that really hits you is the number of events that have been going on all around in the batley and spen constituency, to encourage people of all ages, cultures and communities to enjoy more leisure time together. that was one of jo's big passions, as was helping older people avoid being lonely. spencer stokes reports. did the horrific death of a young and
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talented mp have a long—term impact on the constituency she so proudly served? on the constituency she so proudly served ? can strands on the constituency she so proudly served? can strands of hope be drawn from such a tragic waste of life? one projectjo supported was street bikes, a diverse mix of people learning how to cycle. jill decided she wanted to build on her work. how do you get over the fact that some arejust doing theirjob has been murdered? so you thought, we have got to do even more? definitely, to make a statement, that people do get on from different backgrounds and cultures. this group of women take pa rt cultures. this group of women take part every tuesday, going for a bike ride together down the spen valley greenway. the loss of their mp has played on their minds for the last year. if you think about what jo cox released four, which was bringing everybody together and focusing more on what we have in common, it is what she was about, bringing communities together and i think
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thatis communities together and i think that is what this group does. communities together and i think that is what this group doeslj think people are trying to be a bit more inclusive and maybe just saying hello to people and talk to people they might not have done before, just to show support. the group did not come about because ofjo's death, but those tragic events a year ago do seem to have given this community activity and added impetus. elsewhere in batley, there has been a surge of interest in another cause that jo was has been a surge of interest in another cause thatjo was passionate about, luminous. the royal voluntary service coordinator team of volu nteers service coordinator team of volunteers who help elderly people who live on their own. the charity has received half £1 million from thejo has received half £1 million from the jo cox foundation and has received half £1 million from thejo cox foundation and has seen volunteer numbers rise.|j thejo cox foundation and has seen volunteer numbers rise. i really enjoy doing thejob. i look volunteer numbers rise. i really enjoy doing the job. i look forward to monday when i come and see her and chat with her, how she has been for the week. do a bit of shopping, it is really good. it helps me give
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something back to the community. it is really good. it helps me give something back to the communitylj think this area was always very community focused and that is whyjo love working here and was so passionate about the residents. after her death, we did have people approaching us to volunteer who just wanted to give something back. approaching us to volunteer who just wanted to give something backm wa nted wanted to give something backm wanted to give something backm wanted to bring about change for stubborn batley and spen there is a determination to make that happen. pa rt determination to make that happen. part of her legacy. and that special report recorded a little earlier. let's have a look at the weather now. good evening. it has been a pretty typical day for this week, dry with the best of the sunshine across england and wales, more cloud into the north and west. the cloud has been big enough to produce some light drizzle. disappointing in the north west of scotland, decent spells of sunshine elsewhere. but the want is set to build as we move into the weekend. it will turn very
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hot for some of us, quite humid as well. and it will be mostly sunny, no significant rain and the forecast. one of the reasons is the wind direction has started to come from the south west and will drag out some humid air. temperatures across central and southern port of spain are into the mid—405. —— the southern part. the high—pressure sitting across england and wales toppling over that high is this weather front, still producing the cloud and drizzle. so it stays pretty murky through the night, some mist and drizzle into the north west. quite a warm start to the day. temperatures will respond and it is not looking too bad for northern ireland and eastern scotland, the cloud should break up some sunshine, just to the north west of the great glen, it stays rather dull and damp.
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temperatures a little disappointing. 13 to 15. some sunshine across aberdeenshire, similar story into northern ireland. so it will be a generally warm day across the country and we should see some temperatures peaking around 27 or 28. a little more refreshing close to the coast, and certainly if you're heading in that direction, it is worth bearing in mind that the uv is worth bearing in mind that the uv is expected to be generally high across the country. we do it all again on sunday, dry, hot and sunny, again on sunday, dry, hot and sunny, a week weather fun sitting in the far north, subduing the temperatures a little. but highs of 24 to 30, highly likely. on monday, we keep the heat but by tuesday, things turning just a little fresher. we keep the cloud into the far north—west. this is bbc world news today. i'm kasia madera. our top stories. frustration and anger
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following the tower block fire in west london — as crowds gathered to add their fire in west london — as crowds gathered to add their voice to growing calls for answers. the british prime minister — already criticised for her response — visits some of the injured in hospital. she's announced a six million dollar fund to help the victims. what we need to do is to ensure that immediately people have the support that they need in order to deal with what is an horrific and terrible circumstance that people are in. also ahead — "terrible and misguided." president trump's view on the previous administration's deal with cuba. he's signed an order to revoke the agreement set up by barack obama.
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