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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 17, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. angry protests as survivors of the grenfell tower fire vent their frustration at authorities. demonstrators storm council offices and march in westminster demanding answers and more help. the government is making money available, we are ensuring we will get to the bottom of what has happened, we will ensure that people are rehoused but we need to make sure that actually happens. hundreds of mourners attend a late—night vigil for the ‘dead and missing' as the search for victims enters its fourth day. good morning, it's saturday 17th june. also ahead. the queen says it's difficult to escape a ‘sombre national mood' after the recent tragedies in manchester and london — in a message to mark her official
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birthday she says the country has been "resolute in the face of adversity". pc keith palmer who tried to stop the terror attack in westminster is among those recognised by the queen's birthday honours and gallantry awards. in sport the lions kick off the biggest match of their tour so far in halfan biggest match of their tour so far in half an hour, ahead of that, england's women are the number one tea m england's women are the number one team in the world after victory over new zealand. # easy as abc #. the first family of disco, the jacksons, will be here to tell us how they'll be celebrating their 50th anniversay. and helen has the weather. hi. good morning. hotterstill today and the first of a few today's for many of us with high uv levels, very high in the south. more details in about 15 minutes if you canjoin me. we will be back with you then, thank
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you. first, our main story. angry protests have been held in london as residents demand more support for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. the government has pledged £5 million to help victims but labour says it's not enough. around 70 people are thought to be ‘dead or missing' and last night the community held a candlelit vigil near to the site of the disaster. from where frankie mccamley joins us now. the search entering its fourth day, and growing anger from the search entering its fourth day, and growing angerfrom some the search entering its fourth day, and growing anger from some about the response of the authorities. yes, absolutely. a lot of emotions surrounding this tragedy. where i am, it's about 100 metres from g re nfell tower. am, it's about 100 metres from grenfell tower. this is a local church, one of the areas where people have laid flowers and lit candles and of course leave posters of their loved ones who are still missing. i have been speaking to people inside this church who are running the church. they say that thousands of boxes have been
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donated, they have been overwhelmed with people showing support, sending clothes and food and essentials needed, today people are arriving here, coming to pay their respects, it is still quiet, which is very different to the scenes that we saw yesterday. a moment to grieve for a community still coming to terms with what has happened this week. side by side, hundreds held a two—minute silence. because we're doing a candle vigil we stopped a riot. earlier the kids we re we stopped a riot. earlier the kids were getting angry because no one is communicating what is going on. there is no coordination at the moment, i've been here three days andl moment, i've been here three days and i haven't seen one council official to turn up and take responsibility and say we need to organise something, exactly. and that anger came to a head earlier on with protesters storming kensington
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and chelsea town hall demanding more information and calling forjustice. in westminster large crowds gathered, making their way to downing street before marching along regent street to the headquarters of the bbc with a clear message to the prime minister, who yesterday, protected behind police officers, met victims and volunteers at a local church. but appearance did not go down well with anger boiling over outside. mrs may has announced £5 million to help those affected, promising to re—home everyone and get to the bottom of what has happened. but with so many still missing, others dead orfeared dead, the questions keep growing but the a nswe i’s a re the questions keep growing but the answers are simply not there. and there are still many questions to be answered as the investigation is carried on. behind me you might be able to see activity, and number
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of investigations are taking place, three to be precise, one by the fire and rescue service looking into the fire to find out how it started and wide spread so quickly, please have also launched a criminal investigation to find out who, if anyone, is responsible for this. they say they do not believe the fire was started deliberately but they will look into whether the safety checks were in place. and of course the prime minister theresa may has ordered a public inquiry, she says she wants to get to the bottom of exactly what happened. as it stands, 70 people believed or dead. firefighters won't be able to confirm those numbers yet until they can get into those building behind me, now completely charred, it was home to hundreds of people. thank you, very much, frankie, at grenfell tower, we will be back with you later. as frankie said the prime minister
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faced hostility during her visit to the area yesterday. let's talk to our political correspondent emma vardy — there has been much focus, emma, and how theresa may has reacted and how people have reacted to her reactions. absolutely, it's been an extraordinarily difficult few days for theresa may and the government. of course people have legitimate questions. there is a legitimate outpouring of grief but the government is having to balance that with the need to take things step by step and act responsibly and is not able to provide all the answers that people are demanding. 0n newsnight last night theresa may underlined that £5 million emergency fund being made available yet she came under pressure as to whether her personal response has been adequate, whether she has struck the right emotional chord at this time. this is an absolutely awful fire that took place. people have lost their lives.
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people have had their homes destroyed. they have fled for their lives, with absolutely nothing. do you accept that you miss read the public mood on this one, you must read the anger that people feel on this one, they shouted "coward" at you this afternoon when you left saint clements. what i have done since this incident happened, is first of all yesterday ensure the public services have the support they needed to be able to do the job they needed to be able to do the job they were doing in the immediate aftermath. but this is three days on, they needed those things on wednesday. there were people that we spoke to who are housed for one night, did not know where they would spend the next night, had no money for food and were not told anything or anyone, no one was in charge. what i've done today is ensured that asa what i've done today is ensured that as a government we are putting that funding in place the people in that area. we've seen the government said
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this morning that it is now determined to build trust with survivors of this tragedy, a more conciliatory tone this morning. and also we saw the queen visiting survivors of the fire yesterday and people waiting for news of loved ones. that's right, the queen has now put out a statement saying it is difficult to escape a very sombre national mood. she said in recent months the country has witnessed a succession of terrible tragedies and asa succession of terrible tragedies and as a nation we are still praying for people who have been affected by recent events. thank you very much for the moment, emma. us officials say seven crew members are missing and three have been injured after a us navy destroyer collided with a merchant ship off the coast of japan. the commander of the uss fitzgerald and another sailor had to be winched to hospital. 0ur tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield hayes told us that questions are being asked about what exactly happened. it is very unusual and it is very
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serious that such a sophisticated chip as this, the uss fitzgerald, one of the most modern and sophisticated warships in the world with an array of different types of radar and sensors, how did this ship, ona radar and sensors, how did this ship, on a night, collide with a large merchant vessel of the coast of japan. it is large merchant vessel of the coast ofjapan. it is a busy part of large merchant vessel of the coast of japan. it is a busy part of the sea, these are highly trained crews nonetheless. a lot of questions have been raised by this, it has caused extensive damage to the uss fitzgerald. i've seen pictures from the scene, this huge gash down the side of the destroyer, the bow of the cargo vessel appears to have penetrated the side of the navy destroyer both above and below the water line and has taken on water, it is listing to one side although i understand from the us navy that it is not at risk of thinking. that is
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rupert wingfield hayes in tokyo. a jury in the us state of minnesota has acquitted a police officer who fatally shot an african—american man after pulling him over for an alleged traffic offence. philando castile's girlfriend, who was beside him in the car, live—streamed his dying moments on facebook lastjuly. laura bicker reports. we got pulled over for a busted tail light and the police, he's just killed my boyfriend. philando castile was pulled over by the police because he had a faulty brake light. minutes later he was shot five times. his girlfriend, diamond reynolds, streamed the aftermath on facebook as the officer kept his gun trained on the car. 0h facebook as the officer kept his gun trained on the car. oh my god, please don't tell me he's dead. please don't tell me my boyfriend just went like that. yes, i will sir, i will keep my hands where they are. philando castile was seen
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telling the officer there was a legally purchased weapon in the car but he wasn't neared. the officer said he felt his life was in danger, that tempt one mac was high on marijuana and matched the description of a robbery suspect, thejury description of a robbery suspect, the jury believed him and found description of a robbery suspect, thejury believed him and found him not guilty of manslaughter. a family of philando castile could not contain their grief at the verdict. my son loved this city and this city killed my son and a murderer gets away. no justice killed my son and a murderer gets away. nojustice pictorial killed my son and a murderer gets away. no justice pictorial no killed my son and a murderer gets away. nojustice pictorial no peace! this vigil sparked protests in cities across the us. first, peaceful but the frustration at the fault line of racial division grew. tonight again they gathered in the city of saint bought with a cry of justice. they marched, voices and banners raised, the police have
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dismissed officer at diamond reynolds despite the verdict and there is an appeal for calm but this community is again in pain and determined to show it. laura becker, bbc news, washington. a former new zealand trade negotiator has been appointed by the government to advise on securing new deals with countries outside the european union. crawford falconer, who previously called brexit an "enormous opportunity", will work with the international trade secretary liam fox to set up deals to be signed when the uk leaves the eu. mr fox is due to visit washington on monday to develop new links with the us. it's just it'sjust approaching it's just approaching 13 minutes past eight o'clock. let's go back to our top story. over the last few days we've been hearing horrific stories of loss and devastation after the grenfell tower fire in west london. but amongst those stories there have been tales of kindness, we've seen community spirit and heroism. residents and emergency service workers, willing to put their lives on the line to help others. one of those was off—duty nurse
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simone williams who ran to the scene in her slippers to treat those in need when she heard about what happened. she joins us now from our london newsroom. . . good morning, simone, we are grateful to you forjoining us. you we re grateful to you forjoining us. you were off duty, but you heard about the fire and you went to see what you could do. just talk us through those first few minutes when you became aware that something seriously wrong was happening at the tower. i was actually at home asleep when i heard a lot of sirens and there were lots of flashing lights andi there were lots of flashing lights and i heard a helicopter overhead. i live in central london so it isn't unusual to hear this but it was increasing. more sirens, so i ran outside to see what was happening. a gentleman ran past me, i said, where are you going, he said, my building is on fire. so i ran with him, naturally, to see what i could do. and as we said you were not working
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at that point. but what stage did that instinct kicked in to do what you are trained to do, to go and help those people? that instinct is within me at all times, to be honest within me at all times, to be honest with you. it is notjust because i'm a nurse, it is my moral compass to help people. so ijust went to where i knew people would need my help. and when you arrived clearly this was still in the early stages of that fire, we've heard those accou nts that fire, we've heard those a ccou nts of that fire, we've heard those accounts of how quickly the fire spread, tell us what you saw when you arrived there. it was absolutely horrendous. it was a lot of screaming. you could hear crackling, pimping, you screaming. you could hear crackling, popping, you could see people from the windows with makeshift flags, waving them. it was just, as you could imagine, absolutely awful. it was something you never want to see again. i understand how difficult it
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is to relive all of this but what is so interesting and important is that response from the emergency services, yourself included. relatively organised, the response, given the circumstances, because you have talked about how you are allocated a set of people to help, and you were able to fit in with an organised response to processing people and the walking wounded, certainly in your case. that is definitely true. it was very organised. i have to say a big respect to the firefighters, because, you know, even they, when they came out of that building, i could see the looks of horror and shock on theirfaces could see the looks of horror and shock on their faces as if they had never seen anything like it. the police were very supportive. the paramedics. the salvation army. just the general, our community, amazing, people were bringing things out of their houses to help us, blankets, clothes, you name it. we've seen
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photos of the firefighters who are facing awful conditions, very difficult conditions, you spoke to many of them over the evening, what did they say about the conditions inside? it wasn't really a direct conversation, i'll was listening to what they were saying amongst themselves. and one particular man said, it is awful, awful. he said something about when he got to the tenth floor, the heat. i am just thinking, he was wearing protective gearso imagine thinking, he was wearing protective gear so imagine those residents or we re gear so imagine those residents or were just wearing their bedclothes to go to bed. and for the people responding we have been discussing help that is helpfully on the way for direct victims and their relatives, what help is available for people like yourselves, the fire and ambulance crews are facing
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difficult conditions themselves, they do it because it is theirjob but is the help available for them to deal with this? for myself i definitely have a good support mechanism, i belong to a local church and they are supporting me both emotionally and with prayer. and i also work for a great organisation survey are also supporting me and my family and the community. we just need to pull together as a community and we have together as a community and we have to act in love, it is love that will get us through this, and patience and kindness to one another. what would you like to see, what would make the biggest difference to you in terms of how bright now? i'm thinking about the long—term of the bereavement for these young children because i am bereavement for these young children because i am aware bereavement for these young children because i am aware that there are a lot of young children witnessing things that they really should never have to witness. and i really want
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professional services to come in and support the schools, the local community for the bereavement of these young children and even adults as well but my heart is really going to the young children because it stood out to me, how many young people were outside yesterday witnessing something that they should never have to witness. absolutely. simone, iam should never have to witness. absolutely. simone, i am grateful for your time, thank you for sharing that because it is important to discuss that response from the emergency services and also everything people did after the fire. thank you very much, simone williams. we'll discuss this with first secretary of state, damian green at around half past eight this morning. let's pause, it is 20 past eight, let's look at the weather. thank you. hello, good morning. it is worth pointing out that today we
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have very high levels of uv across the country. we don't seek levels of aid across the uk very often at all. i have been forecasting for over 20 yea rs, i have been forecasting for over 20 years, so it's very strong today, the sun, that's a word of warning because there will be plenty of sunshine around. a few areas which are sunshine around. a few areas which a re less sunshine around. a few areas which are less sunny, the picture is universalfor are less sunny, the picture is universal for many of us but in the north—west of england we've got low cloud across the south—west and this weather front in the north, just to show you we do have this cloud, this is an area of language, many weather watchers are showing plenty of sunshine, the cloud in the north—west will lift and break throughout the day. the finals of northern ireland and western scotland, the weather front will stay for most of the day, you can see that breeze just blowing in the cloud, it's not a day the going walking in the highlands! and in the island is a lot of cloud and drizzle. after the sunshine in the northern isles and to be cloudy here
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as well, 16 degrees but in the sunshine, even for eastern scotland and northern ireland, we're talking about 2k celsius, quite rightly inland, a little higher than that as well. quite a leap up on yesterday. still a bit more refreshing around the coast if you found that stifling. 21 although still strong sunshine. as you can see in wisconsin, i am sure naga will be keeping an eye on the golf, we will have showers around the great lakes, it has been disturbed weak across the atlantic. for us very quiet in the atlantic. for us very quiet in the night, dry and weather, we will note the drop in temperatures are the uncomfortable humidity will build in the south and the east but that trend will continue north into monday night. so on sunday it looks like another very sunny day, if anything, less clout around england
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and wales today and more sunshine in northern ireland and eastern scotla nd northern ireland and eastern scotland but with that weather front again it will feel cooler here and at times quite damp. further south we will see temperatures a couple of degrees up on today's so it will be hot, if it isn't the hottest day of the year today, we will need to reach 29 degrees, that will certainly continue tomorrow and the heat will continue in england and wales into monday and tuesday but slow cooling off further north. ben and naga, thank you. good to see that we can know what the weather is the gulf. that's why you pay attention, for the golf! its 21 minutes pass date and time for a look at the newspapers. -- it is 21 —— it is 21 minutes past eight. political historian mike finn is here to tell us what's caught his eye. lots to get through. this is from the times, of course related to the
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g re nfell tower. the times, of course related to the grenfell tower. fundamentally the times has taken this angle about anti—elite settlements. we saw this with the protest but spontaneously emerged yesterday. viewers may be aware that as you can see in the photos the protesters were arguing justice for the grenfell tower survivors, what the newspapers talking about is this sentiment about the vast level of inequality that exists in kensington and chelsea, it is one of the richest boroughs in london, indeed europe and yet they have this inadequate fire safety within this tower. the protesters went with a specific list of questions that they wanted a nswe rs of questions that they wanted answers for. the council says it has a nswered answers for. the council says it has answered some of them yet protesters say they are not firm and clear enoughin say they are not firm and clear enough in the response. it's not just about responses to individual questions, it's about cancer responses, people being on the ground, ithink responses, people being on the ground, i think it speaks of that broader issue as well. you were a
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speech writer for the lib broader issue as well. you were a speech writerfor the lib dems broader issue as well. you were a speech writer for the lib dems about ten yea rs speech writer for the lib dems about ten years ago. essentially the way that politicians react, there's a lwa ys that politicians react, there's always a certain expectation. as an observer, someone who has touched the political machinery, how do you make about the way that they are positioning themselves in terms of the action? it's clear what the opposition did, jeremy corbyn going there straightaway and being on the scene, that's the kind of thing he is comfortable with. the coverage has been very much about the a p pa re ntly has been very much about the apparently slow response from the prime minister. some of it is fair, some of it is not fair, she was there although the issue was that she didn't meet the residents. she has done now. she has done now. speaking from a political point of view it is that sense of leadership, people are looking for leadership, consolation, the gurkhas are to blame and part of being a leader is that you have to shoulder some of that you have to shoulder some of that and i think at the moment that
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message isn't getting through. let's look at this story in the daily mirror aboutjo cox, one year since the murder, celebrations up and down the murder, celebrations up and down the country, a celebration of her life but also this idea of getting to know your neighbours. it's been launched by her family. to know your neighbours. it's been launched by herfamily. the headline, the kids see this event as a big party for the mum. headline, the kids see this event as a big party forthe mum. a headline, the kids see this event as a big party for the mum. a fitting tribute? yeah. it is hard to believe it has been one year since one of the biggest tragedies in modern politics, traumatic forjo cox's family, this is a chance to bid a legacy photo, and this great get—together through the country, meetings in church halls, village halls, it's an opportunity to build on what she said in her maiden speech which is that we have more in common than that divides us.|j speech which is that we have more in common than that divides us. i love this quote from her widower, he says that his daughter will be doing a dance for the neighbours and his son
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will be playing the ukelele which he can't play. a very dignified reaction from the family. new year honours list has been released. the famous faces —— the queen's birthday honours list. paul mccartney, ed sheeran but it is this man we are focusing on. the last dambusters hero. johnny johnson, the last survivor of the dambusters who bombed the dance in 1943 has been recognised with an mbe. the culmination of a campaign that has run figures. —— culmination of a campaign that has runfigures. —— bond culmination of a campaign that has run figures. —— bond the dams. he has finally been recognised. they are pointing out that it is almost 75 years since the raid itself. and that he is our last living connection to that raid. it is a memorial notjust to himself and his legacy but of those in bomber command who survived or did not survive in many cases, the odds were
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500-1 survive in many cases, the odds were 500—1 for their chances if they had served in that squadron in world war ii. we have run an interview with him, he is a very charming and dignified manner as you can imagine. where was the pasty invented, devil or cornwall? don't ask me, i'm not answering that, i don't want to make enemies in the south—west! answering that, i don't want to make enemies in the south-west! historic england has waded into this row. this isn't the picture, the picture is something different but this is about the origins of the humble pasty! historic england has been running a campaign nationally about objects and things associated with particular locations, like scales from where i come from. they went on radio devon, and reiterated the sentiment that the pasty was created in devon, not cornwall, based on some archival research from plymouth records office which dates back to 1509. the cornershop responded with the idea that there cave paintings
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that shows some and an 8000 bce to the pasty so they are not going to give up without a fight! you are making me hungry. thank you, mike. we will see you in an hour. who can resolve this argument? matt tebbit in saturday kitchen. that argument could rage. —— diamond reynolds. today my guest will tell me what she wa nts, today my guest will tell me what she wants, what she really really wants, it is geri horner. what is your food heaven? alaves anything with chips. and what about hell. lobster because it is rubbery. only because it is overcooked. lobster and chips. and
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we have to great chefs, zoe, what will you be cooking. a classic from ghana, of egan and bean stew with some spice plantain. looking forward to that and making a welcome return, record—brea ker the randolph. what will you be cooking? red mullet, olives, parsley and breadcrumbs. very you. sam, have you got nice wines. and a beer. and you guys are too will be in charge of deciding what geri horner will be eating at the end of the show, i'll see you at nine o'clock. thank you, i'm even more hungry now so i'm going to get some breakfast. not yet, you're not. coming up in the next half—hour. # shake your body down to the ground... #. wheel will be talking to three
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members of the jackson family who are celebrating 50 years of musical success. stay with us. the headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. coming up before 9am kat will be here with the sport and helen will have this weekend's weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. it is 8:30am. first, our main story. angry protests have been held in london as residents demand more support for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. around 70 people are thought to be dead or missing and last night the community held a candlelit vigil near the site of the disaster. the government has pledged £5 million to help victims — but labour says it's not enough. the queen has issued a statement on her official birthday, in the wake of the recent tragedies in london and manchester. she says it's "difficult to escape a very sombre national mood". during a visit to the westway sports centre, close to grenfell tower, the queen and duke of cambridge met volunteers, residents and community representatives. us officials say seven crew members
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are unaccounted for after a us navy destroyer collided with a merchant ship off the coast ofjapan. the uss fitzgerald was seriously damaged after it was struck by a philippine—registered container ship in the middle of the night. among the injured is the ship's commanding officer who has been taken to hospital by helicopter. a jury in the us state of minnesota has acquitted the police officer who fatally shot an african american man after pulling him over for an alleged traffic offence. the shooting last year became international news after philando castile's girlfriend live streamed his dying moments on facebook. 0fficerjeronimo yanez was found not guilty of manslaughter. a former new zealand trade negotiator has been appointed by the government to advise on securing new deals with countries outside the european union. crawford falconer, who previously called brexit an "enormous opportunity", will work with the international trade secretary liam fox to set up deals to be signed when the uk leaves the eu.
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mr fox is due to visit washington on monday to develop new links with the us. some great pictures for you now. giraffes, turtles and fire—breathing dragons have been taking to the skies along the south west coast of denmark — for the 33rd international kite flyers meeting. this is brilliant. 5,000 kite flyers from across the world have gathered on the island of fanoe for the three day event. with its optimal wind conditions and 700—metre—long beach the island is perfect forflying kites of all shapes and sizes. did you see a lion? that has really tickled me. i didn't spot a lion but i see what you are doing. the lions are busy in new zealand. they will not be floating in the air. they are about to take to the pitch for the fifth game of their tour,
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feels like they have been there for ages, it is a massive test for them, it's been a really busy morning of by, it's been a really busy morning of rugby, we have had scotland playing, england's women playing, onto those results in a moment. the lions have started their toughest test of the tour so far — against the maori all blacks in new zealand. warren gatland's side includes six new faces. johnny sexton starts at fly half, and in the last few hours former welsh players have been recalled to join up to the squad, the teams are about to take to the pitch in rotorua, we will keep you up—to—date with the score. it also looks likely that scottish pair finn russell and allan dell are going tojoin up with the lions squad too. they've both been in action this morning, helping scotland to their first ever win in sydney. they've beaten australia this morning 24—19. russell scoring 11 of those points, including this try. it was a great end to the contest, the victory wrapped up
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for scotland by hamish watson. it's a second consecutive win for new head coach gregor townsend. ireland were also in action this morning, beating japan 50—22. england's women are the world's number one side this morning — after they beat new zealand. the red roses had beaten australia and canada already in the international series — they'll take great confidence from these results in what is a world cup year. lydia thompson, marlie packer and vicky fleetwood added second half tries to help seal a 21—29 victory. brilliant from england's and women, the world's number one side now. for the first time since world rankings began in 1986, the world's top three golfers have missed the cut at a major. dustinjohnson, rory mcilroy and jason day are all out of the us open in wisconsin. while they were struggling, others were making light of the huge course at erin hills. england's paul casey set the early pace, finishing on seven under. there he was joined by another englishman tommy fleetwood. they are both part of a four—way tie for the lead with the americans brian harman and brooks koepka. at least i know what's in there, it's just a matter of getting it out of me and getting myself
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in the right frame of mind. yesterday, coming off the injury and a month off, i was anxious going out there. i got off to a good start, but it sort of caught up with me as the round went on. but the more rounds i can play, hopefully i'll get rid of all that stuff and hopefully strip it down to what you saw in the last six holes. british number one johanna konta will play in the semi finals at the nottingham open this afternoon. she overcame australia's ashleigh barty in straights sets yesterday in her first tournament on home soil since breaking into the world's top ten. she'll play slovakia's magdalena rybarikova for a place in the final. leeds rhinos are into the semi finals of rugby league's challenge cup after thrashing featherstone rovers 58—0. leeds are a step closer to winning the competition for a third time in four years, running in ten tries against their championship opponents. in superleague, huddersfield beat st helens. nottinghamshire 0utlaws have completed the highest successful run
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chase in limited—overs cricket — chasing 371 to beat in the semi—final of the one day cup. alastair cook had made a century in essex's mammoth total but an unbeaten 122 from former england all rounder samit patel helped see notts home with just three balls to spare, and that means they're into the lord's final on 1stjuly. and the queen's birthday honours have recognised a number of figures from the sporting world. double 0lympic rowing champion heather stanning — who won her second gold with helen glover in rio last year is now an 0be. lions prop rory best has also been awarded an 0be. the coach who guided great britain's women to hockey gold in rio, danny kerry, has received an mbe — as has world superbike champion jonathan rae and northern ireland football captain steven davis. and judy murray receives an 0be too. i was talking to her earlier this week and
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she said her sporting summer involves watching nervously as the boys play tennis and then she's back on the road bringing that grass—roots tennis to youngsters all around the country. she contributes a lot. she contributes a lot. she does and deservedly receiving a 9°”9 she does and deservedly receiving a gongin she does and deservedly receiving a gong in the honours. the time is 8:37am. more on grenfell tower now — let's speak to first secretary of state damian green. thank you for your time. good morning. we have a lot to get through, so we will start with the reaction of people still waiting to be rehoused in the chelsea and kensington borough. many say they still don't know where they are going although the commitment has been made to rehouse people within three weeks. why aren't people being told where they are going? as fast as we can come as you said, everyone
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will be housed within three weeks. many of the survivors of this incident are large families so we must find appropriate properties but we must do it as fast as possible. we are glad of the london councils are cooperating with kensington and chelsea so that they can be as possible to where they were living previously. the last thing we want is anyone's lives being disrupted further after this most unspeakable event. do you think £5 million is enough? and if it isn't enough is there a contingency to make sure that people are looked after properly and as well as can be? there is some misunderstanding about this. the £5 million is an immediate payment to make sure that those who need emergency support get it. certainly there are people who fled literally without clothing, as well
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as losing all their possessions. this is initial emergency fund to make sure that as fast as possible they can be helped and cared for. but obviously one imagines there will be further expenses of various kinds that, of course, we will meet. you will guarantee you will meet those expenses? yes. there are many people who are reporters and correspondents have spoken to who are protesting and are very angry, and maybe, many relatives, who say there isn't a centralised system, there isn't a centralised system, there isn't a centralised system, there isn't anywhere they can go to find out who is in which hospital so they can check off where their missing loved ones are. why hasn't this been organised better?m missing loved ones are. why hasn't this been organised better? it has now. after the meeting yesterday of the recovery task force there is now from today on the ground a central
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operation precisely to answer all those perfectly reasonable questions that people have in these desperate circumstances. so there will be a combination of the local council, central government, the department for communities and local government command other departments as necessary , command other departments as necessary, representatives of those departments will be on the ground immediately accessible to the residents so those questions can be answered. can you respond to the speculation now, which is speculation now, which is speculation and i understand this, but the great concerns about the cladding that has been used on the g re nfell tower? cladding that has been used on the grenfell tower? was this the cheaper flammable version that has been reported as less safe? was that the one being used? that's precisely why we have moved very fast to set up a public inquiry. we want that to be set up as fast as possible and we will appoint a judge as chairman within days rather than weeks. we
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have said it will produce interim reports so people won't have to wait a long time, and i think very importantly the residents will have a direct voice. they will be consulted on the terms of reference of the public inquiry, and if they wa nt of the public inquiry, and if they want legal representation at the public inquiry the government will pay for that. so the residents' voices will be heard very loud at the public inquiry and that is the body which will look at the cladding and all the other issues that have arisen. if that cladding is found to be of lesser quality, or the flammable one, will you commit to removing that from the other tower blocks in england where this is used? we will obviously look at the public inquiry recommendations, and if that's one of the recommendations then that is what will happen. i think it would be wrong to prejudge the public inquiry, that's the body that will look at all the evidence as fast as possible and then take the necessary action to make sure that nothing like this can happen again. of course, at the same time,
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councils all over the country are inspecting buildings to check high—rise buildings, to check on their safety now, that has been happening over the last two days so that's very important, so that people all around the country living in similar buildings can be reassured. when will you be able to say to the people who live in the 4000 high—rise blocks around the uk that they are safe? you can't say that they are safe? you can't say that now, can you? that is what local councils have been doing all over the country for the past two days. they have been talking to people who actually live there and checking on the fire safety of there. so that reassurances already happening. in the longer term, obviously. in as short a long term as possible, it will be the public inquiry that is the place where all of the evidence can be gathered and therefore authoritative recommendations can be made as to what needs to happen now. you will
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be very aware of the protests yesterday and the anger that has built up amongst many in reaction to what has happened at grenfell tower. people at times like this want consolation, they won leadership, they want honesty and they want empathy. theresa may, there is the accusation that she has shown none of this. your reaction to that.|j think of this. your reaction to that.” think that is unfair. the prime minister is distraught about what happened, as everyone in the country is. we are all desperately sad, we are all angry, but none of us are as angry as those directly affected. i absolutely get why they are angry and it is the responsibility of government at all levels to make sure that they get information so that their immediate questions can be answered. we are doing that. that there is money available so that their immediate needs can be met. we are doing that. and that we are taking the right action to make sure
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that this can never happen again. and we are doing that as well. i absolutely understand why there is so much anger out there. we all feel it. the government's responsibility is to take those actions i have just outlined, and that is what we are doing. the leader of the country's responsibility is to make sure people know and understand what they are going through, to see them, not for them to be harangued to be at the scene to visit emergency workers, victims, people in hospitals, two or three days after the event. on the first date the prime minister's focus quite rightly was on whether the emergency services had the appropriate resources so that they could do their immediatejob. resources so that they could do their immediate job. then she resources so that they could do their immediatejob. then she did do precisely that. she visited some of the survivors in hospital and heard harrowing tales of what happened, and also she visited a wider group
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of residents to listen to their concerns in the local church. her task now having done that is precisely to turn the concerns that she has heard into action and that is what is now happening with the recovery task force that has been set up. you are the first secretary of state, probably the closest thing we can put in a box, for want of a better word, for deputy prime minister. in your opinion do you think theresa may has judged the mood of the nation well in the last few days? i think she has done everything that could have been asked, making sure that the emergency services are working well, listening to residents' concerns, and above all acting on those concerns as quickly as possible. that is what the prime minister should do and it is what she has done. you think she understands the
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mood of this nation? yes, i think she does, as i say, as is as distraught as anyone, as all of us are, we all feel this sadness and recognise the anger and can see why people are that angry and the prime minister feels that as much as anyone. damian green, first secretary of state, thank you for your time this morning. the queen's honours list has been released, and among those being recognised are a host of musicians, including mbes for ed sheeran, emili sande and 19605 singer sandie shaw. also honoured is classical double bassist, chi—chi nwanoku, ...iknew i knew! i knew i would get this wrong andi i knew i would get this wrong and i apologise because there is nothing more frustrating than getting somebody‘s name wrong. you co—founded the orchestra of the age of enlightenment, which employs musicians from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. shejoins us now. cani can ijust
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can i just correct you, can ijust correct you, i founded and orchestra made up of majority black and minority ethnic musicians, professionals and juniors. we should say, you already have an mbe, so this is the icing on the cake, and we have talked before about how it is important to thank people for the work that is done and that is how you see this. yes, it is definitely an upgrade. i think i'm very proud and honoured to have received this. it is important to be able to receive thanks and give thanks, especially in the world of classical music. in the arts in general, but especially classical music, quite often seen as the least popular genre of music. the liner that i'm particularly pleased about is the fact that people are
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beginning to take real notice of the work that is being done, this genre of music is so underrepresented by people from all the communities. i've been a musician all my life and been on the stage all my life and the older i got the more i realised i was actually quite alone in a certain way. and why do you think that was? many reasons, i had no role models, there aren't many role models, and i also think socio economic situations play a big part for people in the arts. we mustn't forget about that. we are often led towards other genres of musicjust because of the way we look. jazz? reggae? yes, hip-hop, you name it.
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it is fantastic, music is wonderful. 0ne it is fantastic, music is wonderful. one thing! it is fantastic, music is wonderful. one thing i am really advocating is getting more musical education back into state schools, because that has a natural knock—on effect. celebrating role models and encouraging teachers and people from the back room to take a leading positions. it is also that pipeline you touched on, about getting people involved in classical music at an early age and being able to filter them through different orchestras and being able to play at different levels. i know you have created a junior orchestra to do exactly that, how is it going? fantastic, starting points are crucial. the juniors are outstanding, and one of our cellists made history by being the first black child to win bbc young musician, so you will see quite a lot of him on the television. the
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power of the role model is unprecedented, he is a wonderful person, goes to a state school in nottingham and plays football. you get them to go back to their schools to inspire the next generation as well. exactly, children who see him and his family performing are dragging their parents to our concerts and other concerts. dragging their parents to our concerts and other concertsm dragging their parents to our concerts and other concerts. it goes back to you saying visible role models. yes. thank you forjoining us. nice to see you. it is 8:50am. what is happening with the weather, helen? hotter than it was yesterday and it is with us to stay for a few days. not sunny everywhere, low cloud across northern england and western scotla nd across northern england and western scotland but you can see on the satellite picture it is melting away across northern england but across scotla nd across northern england but across scotland it is with us to stay for the rest of the day. we have that sunshine but also the weather front sitting across the north of scotland, blown in by a brisk south—westerly wind so across the highlands and islands including the
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northern isles it will be damp but elsewhere a good spell of sunshine, and temperatures into the mid—20s for most of us, 23 and 24 around the coasts, low 20s in the southern and eastern areas, high 20s, could be the warmest day of the year so far, if not today and definitely tomorrow. it is worth noting the sun indexis tomorrow. it is worth noting the sun index is very high, which is unusual, even in the height of summer in the uk. something to be warned of if you are out and about, high levels of pollen for those who suffer. repeat performance for tomorrow and the weather front across the north west of scotland, and fortunately it stays most of the weekend. if anything temperatures will be higher still tomorrow, to be pushing towards 32 celsius, the high 80s fahrenheit, and it continues into monday as well. thank you, helen. with hit after hit to their name it's no wonder they're known as the royal family of pop. this year motown legends the jacksons are marking their 50th anniversary with a new world tour. we are both quite excited. we are
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very excited. jackie and marlon willjoin us on the sofa. but first lets take a look back at their astonishing career. good morning. we love to listen to this, we have been boogying on the sofa all morning every time we hear this. shall we have a listen? are you going to dance? trust me, you don't want to see it. # abc # abc # easy as one, two, three # easy as one, two, three # and # easy as one, two, three #and| # easy as one, two, three #and i do # easy as one, two, three # and i do know that i want you # and i do know that i want you # shake your body # you should have seen some of the dancing in here. good morning, tito, jackie and marlon. back in the uk,
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the tour begins, tell us about being backin the tour begins, tell us about being back in the uk. we love being in the uk, we will be at scarborough tonight and tomorrow blenheim palace. that's my brother, jackie. july the 2nd at the 02. how does this dynamic work? who is the oldest? take a guess! you are the oldest? take a guess! you are the oldest? it seems like these guys correct you, or make sure...” oldest? it seems like these guys correct you, or make sure... ijust let them feel good. you are the chilled ones? we are brothers so we just speak what we have to say, we know each other, how we like doing things, so it's pretty easy for us. does it all slot back into place? that is what it does. you are
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enjoying the rehearsals? everything. we are lucky because we had a great foundation and everything falls into place. quito, when we look at those pictures, the incredible career, people will know many songs, if not all, do you still get the same excitement? —— tito. all, do you still get the same excitement? -- tito. yes, it's been a fun ride hanging out with these guys, they are fun guys. we have to get away from each other once in awhile to get a breather. what is your downtime? my downtime is spending life with my wife and family and grandkids and doing things i like to do and they like to do. are they musical? some of the more musical. if that is the route they want to go you help them but if not you have them do whatever they wa nt to not you have them do whatever they want to do, help them become the best at whatever they do. that is a good motto, to be the best at whatever you do. being good human beings, that is most important. 50
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yea rs of beings, that is most important. 50 years of performing, jackie, there must be lots of highlights but give usa must be lots of highlights but give us a couple of them. performing for the queen here. that was a big highlight. we did it twice. that was one of my biggest performances, i would say. last year we were at bestival, that was great. considering how huge your repertoire is, when you do the tours, how do you pick? we don't pick. the fans pick. we ask them to send in the songs they want to hear and we make the show. you must sometimes think i don't want to do the old favourites, not the big hits, i want to do some of the b sides. if we didn't do blame it on the boogie... you are absolutely right. you have a new
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solo record coming, tito. the last jackson to record. it is a tribute album. ididn't jackson to record. it is a tribute album. i didn't want to be the only one not to record. is that the motivation? my album is out today. tito time. what is the sound? the soundis tito time. what is the sound? the sound is tito time. just lyn brown, mind first single in the uk. coming up mind first single in the uk. coming up to the anniversary of michael's death, how do you mark that? what do you do as a family? we have a book thatis you do as a family? we have a book that is coming out of over the 50 yea rs, pictures of that is coming out of over the 50 years, pictures of the brothers, various countries, archives, things that have never been seen before. we are looking forward to that and
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putting that out there for the fans to pick up. i've been doing this since i was nine or ten years old. it is like second nature to us. it just falls into place. we get some down time and i guess you just want to chill out and be by yourself and hang loose. can i ask who chooses your outfits? when you are younger and you see the older stuff there is and you see the older stuff there is a theme that you are all connected in some way. what happens now when you are on stage? ijust say i'm going to wear this tonight, cool. you go out there and give 100%. he looks good today. he looks really dapper. he's saying he looks like your attorney! you are a bit more casual in sportswear, so you are the fit casual one. and you are just chilled. just relaxed. what can
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people expect at the concerts? your favourites, their favourites. doing all of our hit songs. it is hard to sing all of those hit songs in one two—hour show, sometimes we just sing the verse and go to the chorus and go to the next song but we try and go to the next song but we try and give the fans as many songs. so there is a medley so you can tick them off the list. two hours, there isa them off the list. two hours, there is a lot to get through. yes. we have ed jackson party and have fun. do you wear your sunglasses all the time? we are feeling decidedly uncool. i just time? we are feeling decidedly uncool. ijust got into the uk yesterday. sobered the jet lag, uncool. ijust got into the uk yesterday. sobered thejet lag, came from morocco. we had to put on our sunglasses. we are grateful for you for bringing the sun. you've obviously been listening to helen with the forecast. thank you for joining us. the uk leg of the 50th anniversary
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tour takes place in june the uk leg of the 50th anniversary tour takes place injune and july including blenheim palace and greenwich. this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. angry protests as survivors of the grenfell tower fire vent their frustration at authorities. chanting may must go! demonstrators storm council offices and march in westminster demanding answers and more help. theresa may has been criticised by some for her response to the fire, in the last few moments damian green, the first secretary of state, said she had been deeply affected by the tragedy. the prime minister is distraught as is everyone in the country, we are all desperately sad, we are angry.
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