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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 17, 2017 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. angry protests as survivors of the grenfell tower fire vent their frustration at authorities. chanting may must go! demonstrators storm council offices and march in westminster demanding answers and more help. theresa may has been criticised by some for her response to the fire, in the last few moments damian green, the first secretary of state, said she had been deeply affected by the tragedy. the prime minister is distraught as is everyone in the country, we are all desperately sad, we are angry. hundreds of mourners attend a late—night vigil for the dead and missing as the search for victims and as its fourth day. —— enters its fourth day. good morning, it's saturday 17th june.
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also ahead. the queen says it's difficult to escape a "sombre national mood" after the recent tragedies in manchester and london — in a message to mark her official birthday she says the country has been "resolute in the face of adversity". pc keith palmer, who tried to stop the terror attack in westminster, is among those recognised by the queen's birthday honours and gallantry awards. in sport and the lions have got underway in the biggest match of the tour yet, before that game england's women have become the worlds number one team after over new zealand. and the weekend weather this morning. good morning, it will be hotter still today, the first of a few hot days are many areas with high uv levels, very high in the south. more details in about 15 minutes if you canjoin me. details in about 15 minutes if you can join me. we details in about 15 minutes if you canjoin me. we will, thank you. our main story.
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angry protests have been held in london as residents demand more support for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. the government has pledged £5 million to help victims but labour says it's not enough. around 70 people are thought to be ‘dead or missing' and last night the community held a candlelit vigil near to the site of the disaster. from where frankie mccamley joins us now. frankly, it is the fourth day of this search operation and we have seen growing anger towards some of the authorities about the response. yes, there are very mixed emotions, ben. we are about 100 metres from g re nfell tower, ben. we are about 100 metres from grenfell tower, at a church where people have been laying flowers, lighting candles and of course leaving pictures of missing loved ones. the church says it has been com pletely ones. the church says it has been completely overwhelmed by people trying to donate, donating boxes of clothes, and food, and essentials, there are thousands of boxes just piled up inside there. it is quite
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quiet this morning, people are quite sombre as they look at the flowers and the pictures, which is very different to the moods we saw yesterday. a moment to grieve for a community still coming to terms with what has happened this week. side by side, hundreds held a two—minute silence. because we've doing a candle vigil we've stopped a riot. earlier the kids were getting angry because no one is communicating what is going on. there is no coordination at the moment, i've been here three days and i haven't seen one council official turn up and take responsibility and say we need to organise something, exactly. and that anger came to a head earlier on, with protesters storming kensington and chelsea town hall demanding more information and calling forjustice. in westminster large crowds gathered, making their way to downing street before marching along regent street to the headquarters of the bbc with a clear message to
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the prime minister, who yesterday, protected behind police officers, met victims and volunteers at a local church. but her appearance did not go down well, with anger boiling over outside. mrs may has announced £5 million to help those affected, promising to re—home everyone and get to the bottom of what has happened. but with so many still missing, others dead orfeared dead, the questions keep growing but the answers are simply not there. and the hope is that those questions will be answered in three different investigations currently ongoing. 0ne investigations currently ongoing. one said up by firefighters who are looking into how the fire started and why it spread so quickly. police have also launched a criminal investigation to find out who if
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anyone is responsible. they say they do not think the fire was started deliberately but there are questions over whether safety checks will put in place when the building was renovated and build. and of course the prime minister has launched a public inquiry, saying she wants to get to the bottom of what happened. we believe that 70 people are dead 01’ we believe that 70 people are dead or missing. firefighters and the emergency services will not be able to confirm those numbers until they can get safely into this charred building that used to be home to so many people. absolutely, frankly, for the moment, thank you. while ago we spoke to the first secretary of state damian green who said theresa may was distraught the disaster. this highlights how people are perceiving her reaction to the incident. we can speak to our political correspondent emma fadi. no 10
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political correspondent emma fadi. noioi political correspondent emma fadi. no 10 i imagine very conscious of this criticism. absolutely with such an emotionally charged couple of days this has been a very difficult time for theresa may and the government. they are clearly struggling to deal with it, the announcement of the £5 million emergency fund was clearly an attempt to address concerns and this morning first secretary of state damian green has attempted to answer some of the questions fuelling public anger. he said the £5 million was initial payment and there would be more funds made available for the expenses. he says now there is better coordination on the ground to help people check up on loved ones between different hospitals. he's also been pressed over whether theresa may has shown enough empathy. the prime minister is distraught about what has happened, as everyone in the country is. we are all desperately sad, we are all angry but man of us as angry as those directly affected. i absolutely get why they are angry.
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“ none absolutely get why they are angry. —— none of us as absolutely get why they are angry. “ none of us as angry. absolutely get why they are angry. —— none of us as angry. it's the responsibility of government at all levels to make sure that they get information so that there are immediate questions can be answered. we are doing that. meanwhile labour leaderjeremy corbyn, his strength is meeting people face—to—face and we have seen him doing that in recent days with survivors. he's also said the £5 million emergency fund is not enough and has put pressure on the government over this. of pressure on the government over this. of course this will remain a very emotionally charged situation in the coming days and will continue to bea in the coming days and will continue to be a real challenge for the government. emma, thank you. the queen has issued an official statement in the wake of the tragedies in manchester and london saying it is difficult to escape a sombre national mood. an interesting statement from buckingham palace, coming after that visit that she
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made to the families, to the relatives and the emergency services yesterday. it is a statement without precedent, i think, yesterday. it is a statement without precedent, ithink, on yesterday. it is a statement without precedent, i think, on this official birthday. it is, as you can see, a beautiful morning, bright sunshine, is subdued mood unquestionably, and that would has been reflected in the statement that was issued by buckingham palace this morning. as the queen says, it is difficult to escape a sombre national mood after, as she says, a succession of terrible tragedies. as you say we saw the pictures of her yesterday at g re nfell tower saw the pictures of her yesterday at grenfell tower with the duke of cambridge. and she says that during that visit yesterday and during the visit to manchester after the terrorist atrocity that last month, she says, "i have been profoundly struck by the immediate inclination of people throughout the country to offer comfort and support to those in desperate need. and she goes on to say this, but to the test, the
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united kingdom has been resolute in the face of adversity. and she says, finally we are determined to support all those who are rebuilding lives so all those who are rebuilding lives so horribly affected by injury and loss. that is, as i say i'm an president statement from the queen on her official birthday. the trooping the colour ceremony will go ahead as normal. large crowds are here already and of course there is tight security, the queen and other members of the royal family will leave buckingham palace to make their way towards guards parade at 1045. nick, thank you. us officials say seven crew members are missing and three have been injured after a us navy destroyer collided with a merchant ship off the coast of japan. the commander of the uss fitzgerald and another sailor had to be winched to hospital. 0ur tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield hayes, told us that questions are being asked about what exactly happened. it is very unusual and it is very
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serious that such a sophisticated ship as this, the uss fitzgerald, an arleigh— burke—class destroyer, one of the most modern and sophisticated warships in the world with an array of different types of radar and sensors, how did this ship, on a calm clear night, collide with a large merchant vessel of the coast of japan. it is a busy part of the sea, these are highly trained crews nonetheless. a lot of questions have been raised by this, it has caused extensive damage to the uss fitzgerald. i've seen pictures from the scene, this huge gash down the side of the destroyer, the bow of the cargo vessel appears to have penetrated the side of the navy destroyer, both above and below the waterline and it has taken on water, it is listing to one side
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although i understand from the us navy that it is not at risk of thinking. rupert wingfield hayes in tokyo. a former new zealand trade negotiator has been appointed by the government to advise on securing new deals with countries outside the european union. crawford falconer, who previously called brexit an "enormous opportunity", will work with the international trade secretary liam fox to set up deals to be signed when the uk leaves the eu. mr fox is due to visit washington on monday to develop new links with the us. it is just approaching 12 minutes past nine. it is expected to become one of the deadliest peacetime disasters in british history with over 70 people thought to be dead or missing, the grenfell tower fire over 70 people thought to be dead or missing, the grenfell towerfire has devastated the lives of hundreds of families. how will this affect to be feeling and what kind of support is available for them. questions that trauma psychologist richard reid steals with. hejoins trauma psychologist richard reid steals with. he joins us now. trauma psychologist richard reid
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steals with. hejoins us now. good morning. we've been talking to firefighters, to the nurse this morning and to a lot of emergency workers. and to residents. the trauma is unimaginable for us sitting on this cosy sofa nowhere near what is happening. what is so clear as well is that these people should not be left to bottle this up deal with this alone. how do you put a timescale on that, the format, the structure of recovering? it's very, very tricky. at the moment most people will be trying to deal with uncertainty, where are missing relatives and friends, where will i sleep, where will we get money from, most people are dealing with the practicalities and situation, fear is being directed, people want to direct that it something constructive so it's becoming anger. it is only when that settles down andi it is only when that settles down and i think people will fully connect with the impact of what has
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happened. and it is extremely surreal, watching that as an outsider, it is something you might see ina outsider, it is something you might see in a tv movie, not something you expect to happen so even if you are not involved a lot of people will be evaluating how safe they are. when we get into about a month point, clearly grief will last for a long time but when the emotions begin to settle down, when they don't settle down that is when they might need more support. how would you recognise someone's emotions not being settled? recognise someone's emotions not being settled 7 by recognise someone's emotions not being settled? by after one month for most people their sleep will have settled down and they will be dealing with things in terms of reality, if they have lost people that will be grief that won't go away in a month. but things like irritability are there, if they are highly withdrawn, these other types of things that are red flags, most people react like that but if it is going on for a month they need psychological support, right now
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it's about getting people in a calm state and meeting the practical needs. we have spoken to doctors and first responders, there's a tendency after things like this to think of the victims but we should remember the victims but we should remember the people who went into help. is it similar for them the people who went into help. is it similarfor them with the the people who went into help. is it similar for them with the same stresses because i imagine they will be doing what they are trained to do and then it is much later that the reality sets in. this is the risk, they experience these things further down the line because they are trying to support people. i spoke to an as earlier. she was trying to compare her reaction to what happened to people who lost family and friends. i would say, it doesn't matter if you lost friends or family or if you're an observer what you feel is what you feel and don't belittle and because this is how these things get pushed down and re—emerge in a bigger way later. what happens if you suppress those
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feelings, i suppose if you are a policeman or a firefighter you say, i'm supposed to be able to deal with this it is myjob. i suppose there isa this it is myjob. i suppose there is a tendency to suppress these things? absolutely. i work a lot with the police. you will find that months and years afterwards they will sometimes have an over reaction to something simple and it is because all this trauma will start flooding to the surface and that is disconcerting for people when they think that they've got it under control. and they have normal lives to get on with. even if you do not think you have an issue, talk to someone, think you have an issue, talk to someone, get that reassurance and learn some of the symptoms to look out for. what about children? one thing that has shocked and upset so many people is the thought of these children suffering this, watching this as well. we have almost gone through so many emotions in life, we have been taught how to suppress emotions or manage situations and
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children have not yet. is a very different approach in terms of offering support. it's about finding m essa g es to offering support. it's about finding messages to explain what has happened might happen over a more extended period. children don't necessarily have the vocabulary to particulate what they feel so speaking to perhaps a play therapist is the way because they will help you to learn how to talk to that found, understand how they are feeling and explain some of the uncertainty to them. be observant round? richard, thank you very much. it's just round? richard, thank you very much. it'sjust approaching round? richard, thank you very much. it's just approaching 70 minutes past nine. let's look at the weather with helen. some very warm hot weather is on the way, a big leap in temperatures, increasing humidity tonight and a
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lot of sunshine. for many good news, however, not for all. we have cloudier skies other parts of northern ireland and scotland. this picture was sent in from ballycastle, a lovely shot but clearly much clout. we've seen most cloud melting away from the north of england, this is a weather front. it's keeping our uv levels low. you don't see these temperatures forecast very often in the uk. its strong sunshine for most of today. bad weather front is sitting over scotland, a different picture here, if you are watching the two being the colour bear in mind that it will be quite stifling out and about. —— if you're watching the trooping the colour. west of scotland and the northern isles a different story, damp and cloudy. yet sunshine in
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scotla nd damp and cloudy. yet sunshine in scotland and northern ireland away from bad weather front will reach the mid—to high 20s. exceptions around the coast because sea temperatures are about 12 degrees, a refreshing breeze limiting the attempted to 21 degrees. the sun is just as strong whether it is 20 degrees or 29 degrees. through the evening and overnight similar to last night, what is different is that the humidity is starting to rise so it will become uncomfortable for sleeping in the south and east side, tomorrow night more generally, and man denied again more widely, the humidity, no relief for those who don't like heat, it's back again tomorrow, parts of north—west northern ireland will have cloud from that front at temperatures overnight don't fall as much, they are at the highest starting point tomorrow, they will be a degree or two up and again potentially more so
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on monday. back to you, ben and naga. it is rare that we get to see golf weather. they might have some downpours, they can keep them! we might get some downpours next week. we don't need them, no, no! it is great that the weather is good because there are lots of great events happening across the country. street parties, concerts, picnics and barbecues will be just some of the events taking place to mark the first anniversary of the murder of the labourmp,jo first anniversary of the murder of the labour mp, jo cox. the family insists this is a celebration of her life, it is called the great get together and has been organised. the idea is that friends
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and neighbours who have never met to dojust that, and neighbours who have never met to do just that, they meet and they celebrate life. john maguire has spoken tojo cox's family ahead of the celebrations. 0ne one year ago jo cox one year agojo cox was a young mp with just one year of experience in thejob, she was with just one year of experience in the job, she was young and passionate, a rising star with so much to give. but that was all taken away in moments, she was brutally murdered just as she was about to hold a constituency surgery and meet people in need offer help. in honour of her life and in keeping with their beliefs, there are more than 100,000 events taking place across the uk this weekend. yards from the recent terror attacks at borough market in london jo's recent terror attacks at borough market in londonjo's sister kim tells me why these events are so important. part of the recent terror attacks, it brought it all back to us attacks, it brought it all back to us isa attacks, it brought it all back to us is a family, we found it difficult, families ripped apart, this isn't a way of feeling bad but what it is a way of doing is saying,
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asa what it is a way of doing is saying, as a country, as a community we will not be beaten by those who try to divide us. because the vast majority of people are good and we have seen that in 12 months, there is such kindness in that country. that small minority of people who want to change that, we cannot let them win. a street party here on sunday in bags that will cater for local people, the theme of the weekend is the great get together. there's even a specially commissioned beer. in the birmingham christians and muslims have come together to prepare and eat the meal taken at the end of the day of fasting during ramadan. birmingham itself is a really diverse city but we don't often create opportunities to cross paths or integrate, that's the word i'm looking for, so this isjust paths or integrate, that's the word i'm looking for, so this is just an opportunity for people from different walks of life to get together and hopefully have some conversations. that's the plan. how
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come i'm not helping with this mail. because i am a veteran, as i've said, and you're not! the great get together in its simplest form is a celebration both of the life ofjo cox and the lives of our communities. is important in a city like birmingham that we don'tjust live side—by—side but we are connected and know our neighbours in a deep way, that we can talk about things, understand each other‘s points of view and although we are not trying to be the same we have lots in common asjo so famously said. it is a way of understanding each other better and when you know each other better and when you know each other better and when you know each other well this prejudice is fears can't flourish because you know the reality of each other‘s lives and business and stereotypes just seemed to vanish. during her first speech in the house of commons jo said "we have far more in common with each other than things that
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divide us". this weekend potentially millions of people from different generations, religions and backgrounds share time together the words will be more pertinent than ever before. john maguire, bbc news. the sentiment clear from the family ofjo cox, talk and communicate and celebrate life. and the weather is supposed to be hot in most parts of the country if you're having parties. you are watching breakfast, it's 9:23am and time for the luck at the papers. political historian mike finn is back. good to see a again. you have picked up on this story about a potential deal with the dup and the tories. ijust potential deal with the dup and the tories. i just want to give a potential deal with the dup and the tories. ijust want to give a bit of background. you are a speech writer for charles kennedy and ming
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campbell about ten years ago. i've got a few miles on the clock since. as we all have! it must‘ve been interesting to be that coalition between the tories and the lib dems and now theresa may is looking for another deal. is a very different dynamic, looking at what happened in 2020 compared to now. the northern irish dimension hides a completely different character to it which is what comes through, the dup say they are ready to dance with the tories. that comes from a quote by arlene foster. she has said it takes two to tango and they are ready to dance. although it isn't that easy because the government has to play the role ofan the government has to play the role of an honest broker in the northern ireland peace process and there isn't a devolved government in northern ireland at the moment. this week we have seen allegations from a number of sites about that, we will see how it works but we still waiting on response from the government. there's even been
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criticism from her own party. story suggesting that the nhs is paling private companies to offer beds,is paling private companies to offer beds, is this new? —— paying private companies. i think in fairness to the government one thing we are dealing with is a success story, people are living longer. with more complex conditions, surviving longer. which places additional strain on the nhs. 0ne longer. which places additional strain on the nhs. one of the figures quoted in the story is an easy around the sheer increase in the number of people who require a ca re the number of people who require a care package in hospital, that's in three figures, you have seen a dramatic uplift in that. the nhs is having a bed blocking problem because there are not the beds to release people to in social as anything else. what we like at school, i imagine you were good at english and writing. is that fair? fair comment. a dexter? gold stars?
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not gold stars, because we didn't have that in my environment. this is the eternal dilemma. parents will be familiar with this. do you want a grade? do you want the child to feel demolished by a bad grade orjust feedback to tell them how to do it better. a school in south park has developed a system called flash marking where kids aren't given grades. instead they are given codes. and the code, cr, creative original idea, or needs more ambitious vocabulary, that was pilot scheme and know it's going to be rolled out to 12,500 pupils nationally. feedback is great because you need to know we've gone wrong but with a grade at least you know where you are in relation to others, if you get c or a t, you know you need to do better. or coming up to exams knowing how you
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are doing in your mock exams. you can have all the creative ideas in the world but if you can't put them on paper, one thing that does images will they do this at gcse level? i think it might be the level before gcse. as an educator, someone who does give grades, albeit at university, the first thing people look at is the grade. it is all—important. look at is the grade. it is all—importa nt. if you look at is the grade. it is all—important. if you are right down feedback they don't necessarily pay attention to it. have grade boundaries been watered down in recent years? the grading system is so different, it is not universal grading system any more, it's a bit pointless. in reality, it's all about pressure. it is how about you get them to read the feedback. mdb. must do better! that's my assessment of me! it is sunny for many people today, are you a fan of hot weather?
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no. but my figure i have to avoid it as much as him any possible. but we are facing a heatwave apparently and is always in britain is a news story! so allegedly we could be looking at 32 celsius, it could go as long as wednesday, some things i took from this but i thought were fun were firstly, in london, heatwave, it takes more to get a heatwave, it takes more to get a heatwave in london, 32 degrees andy awford a heatwave, in yorkshire it's only 28. the standards are different depending where you are. the thing i liked about this is that there was an inset, time to pack a hip—nic. a p pa re ntly an inset, time to pack a hip—nic. apparently it's not enough to do sausage rolls and savages, it is a hipster picnic. this is the way forward. for me it would be a
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trigger cheese and a barbecue but we will see how that goes.|j trigger cheese and a barbecue but we will see how that goes. i like the nibbles. this is stuffed calamari, in this hip—nic, tequila and infused prawns. in this heat, that would be asking for trouble. pungency might not be compatible with the hip—nics. i think you are pretty safe. it has been lovely having you with us, mike, thank you. it'sjust approaching 9:30am. coming up in the next half—hour, in the blue corner, theresa may and in the other blue—collar borisjohnson. last summer's heavyweight contest to become prime minister has been recreated for a docudrama. we'll speak to the team behind it before ten o'clock. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. coming up before 10am kat will be here with the sport and helen will have this weekend's weather.
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it is going to be hot for some of us. just approaching 9:31am. a summary of this morning's main news. angry protests have been held in london as residents demand more support for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. around 70 people are thought to be dead or missing and last night the community held a candlelit vigil near the site of the disaster. theresa may has faced criticism for her reaction to the tragedy but the first secretary of state, damian green, has told breakfast that she has been deeply affected by what happened. the prime minister is distraught about what has happened, as everyone in the country is. we are all desperately sad. we are all angry but of course none of us are as angry as those directly affected. i absolutely get why they are angry and it is the responsibility of government at all levels to make sure that they get information so that their immediate questions can be answered. we are doing that. the queen has issued a statement on her official birthday, in the wake of the recent tragedies in london and manchester.
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she says it's "difficult to escape a very sombre national mood". during a visit to the westway sports centre, close to grenfell tower, the queen and duke of cambridge met volunteers, residents and community representatives. us officials say seven crew members are unaccounted for after a us navy destroyer collided with a merchant ship off the coast ofjapan. the uss fitzgerald was seriously damaged after it was struck by a philippine registered container ship in the middle of the night. among the injured is the ship's commanding officer who has been taken to hospital by helicopter. some lovely pictures next. giraffes, turtles and fire—breathing dragons have been taking to the skies along the south west coast of denmark — for the 33rd international kite flyers meeting. 5,000 kite flyers from across the world have gathered on the island of fanoe for the three day event. the reason this place is so good for
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this is it has optimal wind conditions. it has a 700—metre—long beach the island is perfect forflying kites of all shapes and sizes. if anyone can tell us how they don't get it all tangled up please tell us. it is because, you just read it out, it is optimal wind conditions. it wouldn't be if they were blowing around everywhere. 0ptimal wind conditions must be wind going in one direction. evenif direction. even if you lift it... how does it? i will never know. you have all of the answers. scotland are playing, england's women are playing, the lions playing. i feel sorry england's women are playing, the lions playing. ifeel sorry for them because it is lovely, hot and sunny weather in the uk and they are on tourin weather in the uk and they are on tour in new zealand where it is winter, raining and cold to the point that they are steaming on the pitch. half—time in rotorua and the
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lions lead in what is their toughest test of new zealand so far, taking on the mario all blacks. liam messam score the only try of the first half for the all blacks but the lions have edged ahead at half—time. we will keep you up—to—date throughout the morning on bbc news. finn russell has scored 11 points including this try the scotland. it was a thrilling end to end contest, the victory wrapped up for scotland by hamish watson, second consecutive win for the new coach gregor townsend. ireland in action this morning also beating japan 50—22. england's women are the world's number one side this morning — after they beat new zealand. the red roses had beaten australia and canada already in the international series — they'll take great confidence from these results in what is a world cup year. lydia thompson, marlie packer
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and vicky fleetwood added second half tries to help seal a 21—29 victory. coming across to a rugby mad country is not an easy place to place. we found out the hard way when we lost all three tests. tonight was a real showcase of women's rugby, the top two sides in the world going hammer and tom against each other and we are and tom against each other and we a re really and tom against each other and we are really happy with our performance. brilliant stuff for england's women. now onto golf. for the first time since world rankings began in 1986, the world's top three golfers have missed the cut at a major. dustinjohnson, rory mcilroy and jason day are all out of the us open in wisconsin. whilst they were struggling, others were making light of the huge course at erin hills. england's paul casey set the early pace, finishing on seven under. there he was joined by another englishman tommy fleetwood. they are both part of a four—way tie for the lead with the americans brian harman and brooks koepka. — never led a us open so tomorrow
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will be a very cool experience. distil only saturday. 36 holes is a long time in the us open and anything can happen and there is a lwa ys anything can happen and there is always ups and downs out there. —— it is still only saturday. i will make the most of having to relax for a bitand make the most of having to relax for a bit and not worry. tommy fleetwood doesn't look like guon tommy fleetwood doesn't look like gijon believe he is top of the leaderboard for now. thanks to goalkeeper jordan pickford, england's u21s drew their opening match with sweden at the european championship. a day after completing a record £30 million move to everton, pickford produced a vital penalty save with ten minutes remaining to help england draw 0—0 in poland. they face the hosts and slovakia in their remaining group games. british number one johanna konta will play in the semi finals at the nottingham open this afternoon. she overcame australia's ashleigh barty in straights sets yesterday in her first tournament on home soil since breaking into the world's top ten. she'll play slovakia's magdalena rybarikova for a place in the final. and the queen's birthday honours have recognised a number of figures
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from the sporting world. double 0lympic rowing champion heather stanning — who won her second gold with helen glover in rio last year is now an 0be. lions prop rory best has also been awarded an 0be. the coach who guided great britain's women great britain's women to hockey gold in rio, danny kerry, has received an mbe — as has world superbike champion jonathan rae and northern ireland football captain steven davis. and judy murray receives an 0be too. congratulations to those brilliant athletes and coaches and everyone involved behind—the—scenes in sport involved behind—the—scenes in sport involved in the birthday honours list. fantastic achievement. stick around for the next story, we are talking about orienteering. we have been talking about whether it is a sport. you like it and did it as a child. idid it you like it and did it as a child. i did it in the scouts. it is a mental and physical challenge, running around outside but it relies on the weather being good. it does.
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mike has been giving it a go in media city. there is not what to see there. don't knock media city. not much in their sense of wildlife. once upon a time you could only find them in the countryside. but now they are popping up in our cities as well. and on the search for them, some of britain's 10,000 orienteers. it's a race against the clock around a course, using a map you are given at the start. the idea, really, is to get from the start here which is shown by a triangle, to the finish, visiting all of these points. the aim is to go as fast as you can. try and not make mistakes because then you will lose time. so a start of 1.5 kilometres. the control point is getting more challenging because of the buildings, it is a jungle out there. it has made the sport a lot quicker. taken it out of forests and moved it
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into a whole new area where it's all about speed, the speed of running and the speed of making your mind up about where you will go. where do you want to go? this way? watch out for the steps. so alongside that building, it's more about the map reading rather than the running, isn't it? it is. we've got it! number two! it's not just about being the fastest runner but more importantly reading minute details on the map correctly. it's closed. you can see here we have that... there is a tiny fence in there. show everybody there. somewhere there there is a tiny fence. has he got it? and don't think you can just follow the others either. oh, no, he has a football. sorry, i thought you were looking for a control point. you have to be alert. the best people can read the map as they move. this kid seems to know where he is going. look, got it first!
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catherine tackles courses with her whole family, including her six—year—old. moving into the cities has helped the sport boom again. 50 clubs and in addition to temporary courses, there are 500 permanent ones across the uk. it is notjust about getting lost in a forest. you don't need a compass, you do not need to be fit, you do not need to be sporty. you can do it with family, with friends or by yourself and you can come and do it like this. the british team will be hoping for medals at the world championships in estonia at the end of this month while, at the other end of the scale... the finish! oh, dear, iforgot that bit... there is a lot to think about and i went way off piste which is why i am so far behind the winner who finished the course in ten minutes. well done, mike.
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mike will be telling me off now. i like it and think it is a good sport. he has inspired us. the time is 9:40am. helen will have the weather shortly but now we will return to a story we have been covering over the past week and a story none of us have wa nted past week and a story none of us have wanted to cover this week, the fire that destroyed grenfell tower in west london. those who survived still face incredibly major problems, many of them fled with no more than the clothes on their backs they were wearing. banks and insurance companies say they are ready to help with emergency cash, replacement credit cards and access to bank accounts, all of that without the usual ide, which might have been left in the building. paul lewis from radio 4's money box has beenin lewis from radio 4's money box has been in contact with them. let's talk about practical realities for the people facing this, not least the people facing this, not least the first issue, proving you are who you say you are without any sort of
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id. this is the problem because as naga said people fled in the night clothes so that is all they would have had, they would have lost clothes, possessions, cash, wallets, purses and bank cards and of course they need documentation. the banks tell me, and we have talked to a number of them over the last 24 hours, that they have special procedures so that if somebody turns up, obviously they know they are be, they do have people they're trained to identify those who come in with literally nothing, and they will be giving them access to their own cash, and if necessary they will be making overdrafts cash, and if necessary they will be making overd rafts available, although the terms of those are not com pletely although the terms of those are not completely clear for everybody, but they will help as much as they can and they say they have these specialist staff in place and will be opening this weekend. 0ne specialist staff in place and will be opening this weekend. one of the other big issues is insurance, suggestions many people in the tower did not have insurance in place.
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what help is available for them? i'm sure that is true because one in four households doesn't have insurance for their possessions nationally and in areas where people have less money it is much higher than that so a lot of people would not have had insurance. if they did they should obviously get onto their insurer. without the documentation that might be a bit tricky. if you didn't have insurance you have to rely on the various funds available. the government has made £5 million available. the evening standard, the newspaper in london, has 2.2 million now and rising fund it is making available to help with uninsured losses, emergency needs, and in the longer term refurbishing and re—equipping homes when they are rehoused, and that is run by the london community fund. i am told this morning there will be an application form online for that on monday. meanwhile they can ring the london community fund, or they can e—mail them. london community fund, or they can e-mail them. i wanted
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london community fund, or they can e-mailthem. i wanted to london community fund, or they can e-mail them. i wanted to ask, london community fund, or they can e-mailthem. i wanted to ask, if london community fund, or they can e-mail them. i wanted to ask, if you area e-mail them. i wanted to ask, if you are a friend or relative, or somebody caught up in this, how do you go about getting hold of this cash because i imagine you have so many other priorities now and this must be a relatively simple process. it does and at the moment it is not clear, the dispossessed fund, the evening standard fund, will have a form on monday. as for the government fund it has made available, £5 million, that is being administered by kensington and chelsea borough council. that's the very organisation which many of these people do not trust and believe have some responsibility a nyway believe have some responsibility anyway for the fire in the tower. i'm not sure going to kensington and chelsea to ask for money will be popular among the residents. again, i have no details yet but exactly how people can apply to that. apart from the things i have mentioned it will also cover funeral costs. there is more on my twitter feed will also cover funeral costs. there is more on my twitterfeed @ paul lewis money, which i will keep updated. much more from paul on money box at
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midday on bbc radio four, lots of practical advice for the people affected. the time is 9:45am and helen will have the weather for us shortly. many have been rewarded for the less high profile work in the queen's honours list. trevor and sheena fairhurst will receive mbes for their services to people who have suffered domestic abuse. good morning. it is almost bittersweet, almost as if you should not have to be receiving this mbe. i know this will be hard. would you tell us why you are receiving this award. will be hard. would you tell us why you are receiving this awardm will be hard. would you tell us why you are receiving this award. it is for our work with domestic violence victims and raising awareness of domestic violence. when we first lost our daughter there was a counselling service that lost the lottery funding, which meant that
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nobody else in the borough could have counselling. many people won't know what happened to your daughter. would you mind telling us? she was murdered by her boyfriend in 2006. this is carly? carly fairhurst, he pushed her down the stairs and left her for pushed her down the stairs and left herforeight pushed her down the stairs and left her for eight hours. at that time she was breathing in the contents of her own stomach and he came back eight hours later and she was still there and he rang for an ambulance. things might have been different if he had called an ambulance in the first place. you were not aware at all of the extent of the domestic abuse, or the fact that there was any in her home. we only found out on the day she was buried at her funeral, and one of her friends came forward and told us she was a victim of domestic abuse and we hadn't a clue. she collapsed at the graveside when we found out what was going on.
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trevor, you talked about some of the counselling you received at the time. how important was that because clearly it came as a big shock to both of you at the screen role but how important was the counselling you were able to get? it was very important, it says sheila's life, i'm sure she won't mind me mentioning that she tried to take her own life and the counselling provided by victim support saved her life. while you are having the treatment the money ran out. that's right. you were supported by the charity. that's right, it was lottery funded and the funding ran out and my counsellor said i have something to tell you, it is going to run out but you don't need to worry, i will promise you counselling for the rest of your life. we are in this position through no fault of our own and there are other people out there that really need that service. so we decided to set up the carly fund and
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we have raised over £60,000 since 2006 and kept the funding going for the counselling and also helped to fund a 24—hour support line for victim support helping people through the atrocities of the manchester bombing. it is focusing on trying to keep carly‘s name alive and help other people in the process. did you know you were this good as people? we are not really. we're just fighting to survive. people will be listening to you today and thinking you have gone through hell and out of that you have done something for other people. how do you get through that? it gives us a purpose to get through. it is to keep carly‘s name alive and in the process she is helping other people which she did when she was alive so it is carrying on her work and that is all we ask.
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it is recognition of the work. what difference will it make? it keeps ca rly‘s difference will it make? it keeps carly‘s name alive but what difference will it make for the work you are doing and the money you are raising? it keeps the fund open, the counselling service for victim support and raising awareness of domestic abuse. we have done training with people in the local area and various police forces, gone all over the country doing talks about domestic abuse and what happened to us. i'm getting nervous. . . happened to us. i'm getting nervous... no one will object to you being nervous or emotional. you've touched the hearts of so many people this morning, raising for london and manchester and we are all mindful at the moment and it's manchester and we are all mindful at the moment and its people like you who are recognised. thank you.
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trevor and sheena. it is coming up to 9:50am. let's talk to helen to find out what the weather holds. we have talked about communities getting together this weekend, there will be lots of sunshine as people will be lots of sunshine as people will be lots of sunshine as people will be showing some love. there certainly will be lots of sunshine for people to enjoy and thatis sunshine for people to enjoy and that is what people want this time of year at the height of summer but it comes with the usual warnings and it comes with the usual warnings and it is not for all, as you can see from the satellite picture, quite a lot of cloud across scotland and parts of northern ireland but there will be an abundance of sunshine. these are the warnings, high levels of pollen and high uv levels, as high as it gets in this country, thatis high as it gets in this country, that is unusually high across england and wales. but as i say it will be virtually wall—to—wall sunshine away from the west of scotla nd sunshine away from the west of scotland where we must mention it is breezy and damp, the northern isles joining in with the damp and cooler weather today, contrasting temperatures but they have lapped up from yesterday because we have more
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sunshine and the humidity is rising. if you do not like the heat, it is more refreshing on the coast but there is still strong sunshine and it will be siphoning at night, in the eastern areas initially and the heat creeps northwards —— stifling at night. with higher temperatures tomorrow we can expect the temperatures to get higher during the day. very high humidity, temperature is increasing, plenty of sunshine, but take care in the sun. back to ben ando naga. thank you, are we seeing you tomorrow? —— ben and naga. it's an intriguing tale of double—dealing, backstabbing and betrayal. this isn't fiction but the real story behind theresa may becoming prime minister according to a new docu—drama. it uses actors to reconstruct some of the key moments during last summer's contest to replace david cameron. we are going to speak to one of the
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actors and writers behind this. before we speak to the team behind it, here's a scene where borisjohnson tries to convince andrea leadsom to join his team. andrea. boris. michael. coffee? yes, please. great, better make a pot. didn't wejust please. great, better make a pot. didn't we just show them at wembley? yes, we did. i loved the line of viewers, can you name the six eu prisons? five. donald tusk. jean—claude juncker. prisons? five. donald tusk. jean-claude juncker. schultz. this will bloom. you must know how much we would love to have you on board. ido, you we would love to have you on board. i do, you mentioned it a few months ago, you mentioned the treasury, i hope you are on that. michael has agreed as chancellor. deputy pm charged with brexit negotiations.
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agreed as chancellor. deputy pm charged with brexit negotiationsm is all a bit close to the bone, isn't it? it is and joining us as you can see, actor will barton, who plays boris johnson, producer samir shah command directed justin who is with us this morning. nice to see you all, thank you for coming. will, i will start with you. quite a character to way and when you talk about boris johnson character to way and when you talk about borisjohnson character springs to mind. tell us about playing him. yeah, i mean, he is the first living person that i have actually played. i once played tony hancock in something but of course it's a dream to be cast as someone thatis it's a dream to be cast as someone that is such an effusive, over the top, has this over the top persona in reality, doesn't he? isn't it a bit intimidating because we are seeing in everyday on the tv so if you are getting it wrong... thanks so much! no pressure! i had to go
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and look at youtube. even as i'm talking now it's really weird because i'm thinking about him. part of me is coming out as him. i looked at him on youtube and you start with the external. i've started with the exte rna ls, the external. i've started with the externals, with his mannerisms, the way he speaks, his eyes. his eyes have this sort of hooded sort of thing. i started from the outside in and once i got that i could feel him. ididn't and once i got that i could feel him. i didn't need to make too many choices, ijust then respond within the facts of the situation. is almost magical watching you slip in and out. it is quite weird. i suppose it is quite bizarre. i supposed to produce something like this, samir, in this political strife, you must get the nuances just write without making judgment on what is happening now. we were lucky in the sense that as we
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started out in this process i didn't know if we would get this information about what really happened, would they speak to us, or would they climb up? what has happened is they have been so exhausted we were kind of therapy for them, they started talking to us and telling us everything that happened. all of the politicians involved? and their teams and advisers and they came out with it and justin saw gold dust in terms of creating drama out of this. justin, you are the director. how did you make this? looking at some of the storyli nes make this? looking at some of the storylines it is almost like satire itself but it is absolutely based in fa ct. itself but it is absolutely based in fact. how would you portray that without it looking like satire?m is fundamentally a machiavellian tale and therein lies the credit of it and also the pitfalls. it all happened within 20 days, so you have a structure. and at the beginning david cameron, we know, said boris
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is going to win. and yet, we know, that someone else won. the question is, how did that happen? and it really comes down to an extraordinary, intimate, lid lifted off tale of how doris got scuppered. samir, you got access to people as you said, it is yourjob to portray the scenes in which the happened. how much poetic licence do you get? you know what happened and heard from the people concerned but you have to portray how it happened. i'm not the villain of the piece here in that i do have to make choices. i have to make difficult choices, but samir is always on my shoulder and it's a constant negotiation. when we we re it's a constant negotiation. when we were asked who would write this, peter morgan was not available and we couldn't afford him. journalism wrote this film. journalism wrote the interviews, journalism wrote the
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archive, and journalism ultimately wrote the script. we have had everything double—checked. wrote the script. we have had everything double-checked. what is extraordinary is some of the dialogue you see you can't believe what was said, it is extraordinaire, but it was. have any of them seem this? they are starting to today. we've seen the trailer this morning so it is starting to come out. it is filtering through so we are waiting. do you think you will be needing to play boris johnson again? turning to cameron, yes, i need the work! yes, i would love to. you never know the way things are going at the moment. they say a week is a long time in politics, i think a day is a long time in politics. it feels that way at the moment. who is the villain of the peace? justin hardy says he isn't. it is justin! what should
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people expect them? we have people who are intrigued by politics, angered, intricate, amazed by it. if you had to say in a couple of words what would you expect from this piece? you wouldn't believe how they conduct themselves. it isjust jaw—dropping. conduct themselves. it isjust jaw-dropping. if that doesn't excite you about a programme. if you want to channel your inner borisjohnson do you want to read when it is on to camera five? camera five, right, crikey! theresa v boris, how me became pm is on tomorrow at 9pm. brilliant audition! —— how may became pm is on bbc two, tomorrow at 9pm. thank you forjoining us. that's it from breakfast this morning. for all of you involved in the
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celebrations today, commemorating jo cox's life. it should be hot in most places. enjoy whatever you are doing. i will see you tomorrow at 6am. have a lovely day. goodbye. goodbye. hello this is bbc news. iam ben i am ben brown reporting live from the grenfell tower in west london where the death toll remains at 30 but is expected to rise significantly. the headlines. in an unprecedented statement on her official birthday the queen has said it is difficult to escape a very sombre national mood in the light of recent tragedies. angry residents are demanding justice for the victims of the tower block fire but
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ministers have defended theresa may ‘s handling of the disaster. ministers have defended theresa may 's handling of the disaster. the prime minister is distraught about what has happened as is everyone in the country. we are all desperately sad, we are all angry but of
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