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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 18, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and mega munchetty. church services will take place today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. police say at least 58 people are believed to have died. residents and volunteers expressed their anger at a meeting with theresa may in downing street. it was a robust discussion, there was forceful emotion in the room and people were able to say what they wa nted people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to and listened to carefully. good morning, it's sunday the 18th of june. also ahead: claims of growing inequality across britain. a new report says the gap between rich and poor is getting wider. next year's queen's speech is cancelled to give mps the maximum time to debate plans for brexit. a forest fire in portugal claims the lives of more than 20 people,
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including motorists trying to escape the blaze. in sport, england's tommy fleetwood remains firmly in contention at golf‘s us open in wisconsin. he's just one shot off the leader brian harman heading into today's final round. and helen has the weather. more sunshine on the way? good morning. another hot day for the vast majority, the sunshine as strong as it gets and it's likely to last for another few days yet for most of us. i'll have the details for you in most of us. i'll have the details foryou ina most of us. i'll have the details for you in a round about 15 minutes. thanks, helen. first, our main story. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire in west london. police have revealed that 58 people are missing and are believed to have died but that figure could still rise. yesterday, theresa may met with volunteers and those left homeless. government staff have been drafted in to improve the response to the disaster, as nick quraishi reports. the devastation caused by the
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inferno stops people in their tracks. the dark reality abundantly clear in broad daylight. for days on, the community is still angry about a lack of communication, communication and accountability. it's always the public that runs to the rescue. where's the authorities? where are they? residents, community leaders and volunteers took their frustrations to downing street, spending two hours with the prime minister. it was a robust discussion, there was forceful emotion in the room, people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to and listened to carefully. theresa may, who is coming for widespread personal criticism over her handling of the crisis, said she'd heard the concerns. the prime minister admitted: whitehall officials have been
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drafted in to help kensington and chelsea council cope with the response and the red cross will provide psychological support. as people wait and pray for the missing, church services today will remember those who didn't make it out of grenfell tower. a reminder of the complex and lengthy process of recovering bodies from this charred shell. nick quraishi, bbc news. we can speak now to our correspondent, simonjones, who is outside notting hill methodist church where one of the services will be held. we understand as well as the services today the co—ordination is key and whitehall staff have been drafted in to help? the outside of this church has become a sea of flowers a nd this church has become a sea of flowers and also pictures of many of the people missing, now sadly presumed dead. on the night of the
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fire, churches like this one open their doors at 3am to welcome people m, their doors at 3am to welcome people in, to offer support, then they collected donations in the following days but a lot of people have been saying this really shouldn't be the role solely of the church and volunteers, where is the government and the local council, why aren't they doing more? stung by this criticism is why the government has sentin criticism is why the government has sent ina criticism is why the government has sent in a team of civil servants who will be based at the council to try to improve the response. i want to give you a sense of the geography here, the outside of the church and then we've got a police cordon here which is keeping people away because just in the distance is the tower itself. still all these days on really quite a sight for people to seek. now, today there will be a church service in this particular church service in this particular church at around 11am —— see. here they're feeling they want to move on from the initial crisis management
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after the initial dealing with the fire to really dealing with people's fears and the effect it's had on them, a lot of people remain of course very traumatised by what they saw and still buy this site behind me. thanks, simon, we will be with him through the morning following events. a fall in the number of people who own their own home is fuelling inequality in britain, according to a new report. research from the resolution foundation think tank suggests that 10% of adults own around half of the nation's wealth. our business correspondent, joe lynam, has more. the awful fire at grenfell tower has highlighted for many the issue of inequality in britain. dozens dead in the wealthiest borough in the uk. now an independent think tank has said inequality has worsened since the great recession because fewer people own their own homes. the
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resolution foundation says property ownership is now spread less evenly than salaries and incomes are. it says the richest 10% of the population own £5 trillion, or half the uk's wealth, while the top 1% of 1496 the uk's wealth, while the top 1% of 14% of britain's wealth. by contrast, 15% of adults have no or negative wealth. wealth is arguably the biggest determinant of living standards of people's lives but yet it barely features in today's living standards debates and that's a deal because our research shows wealthiest barb less bread and incomes and because of declining property ownership, declining home ownership, for least wealthy households that inequality has started to go up. the report is part ofa started to go up. the report is part of a wider study into a growing gap between older and younger people. the foundation says older people have incubated wealth due to wider housing —— rising house prices as well is contemplated pensions which the young won't enjoy. the government says we want to build an
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economy that works for everyone. income inequality is at its lowest level since the mid—19 80s and the lowest pa id saw level since the mid—19 80s and the lowest paid saw their wages grow faster than for 20 years. joe lynam, bbc news. the government says it intends to double the length of the new parliamentary session to two years to give mps the maximum possible time to scrutinise brexit legislation. the unusual move will mean next year's queen's speech will be cancelled. the government says the decision was part of measures to build the broadest possible consensus for brexit. a forest fire in central portugal has killed at least 2a people. 16 of the victims died in their vehicles when they became trapped as they tried to escape the flames. nimesh thaker has more. a deadly mix of their heat wave have fanned the flames. now threatening to engulf homes, burning
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uncontrollably, this fire is already one of the worst forest fires in portugal in decades. more than 20 people have died, most of them trapped in their cars. a number of people were reported to be missing. translation: it was a big tragedy. we've already identified 2a victims but this number could rise. all of those who died were on a road in the same fire at the same place. it started on saturday at 3pm local time ina started on saturday at 3pm local time in a mountainous area 200 kilometres north—east of lisbon. around 500 firefighters were called to the scene. translation: around 500 firefighters were called to the scene. translationzlj around 500 firefighters were called to the scene. translation: i was there staring at my house, i don't know what will happen with it now! officials described the fire spreading violently, some properties have been destroyed. the local mayor said there wasn't enough firefighters to deal with the number of villages at risk. nimesh thaker, bbc news. seven sailors missing after a us warship collided with a container ship off the coast ofjapan have been found dead.
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their bodies were discovered by divers in flooded cabins. the ships commander and another sailor have been airlifted to hospital for treatment. french voters go to the polls today for the second round of the country's parliamentary elections. president macron's en marche! party, which was formed just over a year ago, is predicted to win up to 80% of the seats. it is currently ahead in 400 out of 577 constituencies. this weekend, events across the uk are taking place to mark the first anniversary of the death of the labour mpjo cox. the cure get—together was organised by herfamily the cure get—together was organised by her family to celebrate her life and unite communities, as fiona trott explains. the perfect day for a great get—together. hundreds of people of all ages all gathered here at green park. they just wanted
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all ages all gathered here at green park. theyjust wanted to come together, be neighbourly and show support for the family of their old mp. the kids are over there at the moment eating too many pancakes, we had about six cakes and three ice creams so they'll be bouncing around for the rest of the date. it's a sort of thing she would have thrown herself into, she would have been buzzing around to as many as possible and that sense of how do we focus on those things, asjo spoke about in her maiden speech, the things we have in common. we spend so much time fixating on the differences and in fact people here and across the country will be coming togetherfor a moment and across the country will be coming together for a moment and celebrating the things we have in common, which this weekend includes good weather, which is a nice change. 120,000 are then side taking place. this national celebration of what people have in common continues throughout the rest of today. fiona trott, bbc news, west yorkshire —— 120,000 events are taking place. a traditional polynesian canoe has become the first vessel of its kind to co m plete a round—the—world voyage.
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the canoe returned to honolulu in hawaii after visiting 19 countries during three years at sea. the crew used the stars, wind and ocean swells to guide them. they wanted to use the same techniques as the first polynesian settlers to hawaii did, hundreds of years ago. it looks wonderful there but i bet it wasn't always like that. when they were in the middle of the pacific pines suspect it was raging! let's talk more about that story, which claims wealth inequality across britain is growing. conor d'arcy is from the resolution foundation think tank, which wrote the report, and we can speak to him now. good morning to you and thank you for getting up bright and early to talk to us. what has caused this growth in wealth inequality? wealth has always been quite an equally spread, to some extent whether you have a job or not you have some income but the size of wealth you've got is really unequally distributed and that's a long—term trend. what
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we saw in the 19905 and the 20005 wa5 we saw in the 19905 and the 20005 was more and more people were able to buy their own home and that was a really important way of reducing wealth inequality a5 really important way of reducing wealth inequality as house prices rose wealth inequality as house prices ro5e quickly and that was a big boon to lower and middle income families. what we've seen since the recession, it's not news it is harder to get on the housing ladder now, the amount you have to save to get a mortgage in the first place is a lot higher and that's been an important trend and that's been an important trend and we seen this growing wealth inequality against and i5 and we seen this growing wealth inequality against and is the start of the recession. the office of national statistics today report earlier this year and they said household disposable income and income inequality is falling. who do we believe, they're more you? they are two different things we are talking about. there's income, how much you have coming in from work or from your benefits, whatever is coming in from day to day and what you have to spend. wealth i5 coming in from day to day and what
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you have to spend. wealth is what we think of when what is left over after that 5pend, think of when what is left over after that spend, your financial a55et5, how much you have in 5aving5, current accounts, how much property wealth you own and how much pension wealth you own. there's two different trends and definitely income inequality has been flat and fallen a bit, and that is welcome, but what we've seen in wealth inequality is it is still really high and it is creeping up again in the last few years. you mention house prices, for a lot of people the value of their home is not a reali5able assets for much of their life anyway. lots of people own a home which on the face of it is worth quite a lot but they are cash poor nonetheless. that's a really good point. just because people have lots of well that's not necessarily a guarantee things are hunky—dory. it is the value of having your own home. as was mentioned in the piece, we are home. as was mentioned in the piece, we a re interested home. as was mentioned in the piece, we are interested in how this play5
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out across the life course and across different generations. if you're a young person today trying to get on the housing ladder, that's not just a place for you to to get on the housing ladder, that's notjust a place for you to live in the short you're building up an asset you can the short you're building up an a55et you can rely on the short you're building up an asset you can rely on in retirement so when you're finished working you don't have money coming into the 5ame don't have money coming into the 5a m e exte nt don't have money coming into the same extent as during your working life but if you're renting you still have to find money to cover your renting co5ts. there's a long—term dynamic that is really important in wealth. this issue to some extent has been thrown into sharp relief this week with what happened with the tragedy at grenfell tower and people have talked about such an affluent borough a5 kensington and chelsea council yet people living in the conditions and the clearly dangerous situation they found them5elve5. does that play into what you're talking about here? obviously first and foremost it's a tragedy what happened. i think there is ma55ive inequality in london in general but specifically in kensington, it is hard to look past
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that. but what we're talking about are two different trends, were talking about whether people own their own homes and whether they have wealth. whatever home you live ina have wealth. whatever home you live in a basic should be that there is health and safety annual meeting minimum standards. i'm not an expert on health and safety so i can't really comment. even if we do see rising inequality and fewer people owning their own homes, health and safety is a basic everyone should be able to rely on. thank you very much indeed for your time, conor d'arcy from the resolution foundation. it is quarter past six and the sunshine is out. i didn't wear sunscreen, but not enough yesterday. today will be another scorching day. helen will tell us about it. but look at this morning! this is the view at salford, just glorious. one
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of the first acer have come into work without a coat. helen has a misty picture behind her. what is going on? ijust want i just want to show you something a little different. football on the beachin little different. football on the beach in wales, how lovely. and the sun is strong, of course, and i will talk about that. as strong as it gets and unusually high. this is the picture in southwark. it is on its way out already, dismissed. just at this time of year with a quiet night it will then be a little misty in places. but that is being burnt away asi places. but that is being burnt away as i speak and we see temperatures reaching 30 degrees yesterday, equally as hot today, possibly one or two degrees more for most parts of the country. except in the north—east of scotland again. i came in without a coat today as well. i
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won't need one to go home either. we're not all enjoying the sunshine. it isa we're not all enjoying the sunshine. it is a bleak picture across the north—west highlands. the rain yesterday with dribs and drabs and low cloud. not a day for taking to the hills. the eastern side of scotland, much of the eastern northern ireland you can see again, the north—west of northern ireland has more cloud. across england and wales, apart from morning mist and sea fog it is basically plain sailing and wall—to—wall sunshine. even less cloud than yesterday. it is the way it continues. we will see fairweather cloud bubbling up and rain coming and going across the north of scotland. just the outside chance today, because of the heat is more than anything else and the wind coming together, that we could see a late afternoon thunderstorm. that is the exception, rather than the rule. most of us will remain dry and hot.
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potentially reaching 32 across south—east anglia. a degree up elsewhere. so you do not need me to tell you that pollen levels are high, very high in places. a5 tell you that pollen levels are high, very high in places. as we have already demonstrated this morning, the sun is quite strong as well. write the way across england and wales, you very rarely see this very high category so please take precautions. the strength of the sun not driven by temperature so even if you have a refreshing seabreeze it is still as strong. the heat is here to stay. you can see on monday in sheffield manchester. temperatures dropa sheffield manchester. temperatures drop a little bit is that northern weather front advances towards the south. the heat is with us in the south. the heat is with us in the south and till the middle of the week. that does look nice. it's time for the film review. this week mark kermode joins jane hill to discuss this week's cinema releases, including "churchill" and "whitney — can i be me." hello and welcome to
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the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases, as ever, is mark kermode. welcome. what do you have for us, mark? a very diverse week. we have churchill with a powerhouse performance by bryan cox. we have gifted which is not what it looks like it's going to be. and whitney: can i be me, the new documentary by nick broomfield. churchill, i do like bryan cox. he gives some fantastic performances. he plays winston churchill, which is a very big role. it is the run—up to d—day. effectively, he is played as a bulldog but as a kind of wounded bear. somebody who has been sidelined. you know, the military bosses are off doing their thing,
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he is somebody who is seen much more as a figurehead. he is convinced, in the film, that the d—day landings, the operation is very, very flawed and very dangerous and is going to end possibly in tragic loss of life, which recalls a previous conflict. he is sort of flashing back to world war i. we see him at the beginning, he's walking on the beach, and the sea is lapping and the sea starts to turn red and he is having visions of previous tragedies. and so the film is basically about him in the days leading up to d—day, attempting to convince everybody that this is not a good idea. here's a clip. this will be the greatest campaign we have mounted by our allied forced. operation overlord will require 200,000 vehicles, a fleet 7000 ships, swarms of planes, most essentially a quarter of a million men. all this will be focused in one place, taking the german army head on.
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that's right. no, gentlemen, no. this plan may be admirable in its bravery but in its risk it is foolhardy. jesus christ. our own casualty estimates predict that anything up to 160,000 french civilians will be killed. if overlord fails — which it all too easily could — we would lose at one strike most of our war material along with tens of thousands of our own men. who then will defend england? is it fair to say not a straight biopic because of this is looking at a very, very specific period? very specific period of time. and i have to say i think the film is carried shoulder high by brian cox. he brings an awful lot of king lear to this role. i mean, a number of people have pointed out, including brian cox himself, he plays winston churchill as this kind of slightly wounded
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figure, somebody who is a man out of time, somebody who is no longer in the position of power that they think they ought to be, and somebody who is also deeply conflicted, who is haunted by the ghost of gallipoli, who is absolutely convinced that what's going to happen is that they are walking towards tragedy. there are very few people to whom he listens — one is the king and the other is miranda richardson, as clemmie. her performance is terrific. actually performing alongside brian cox, who is doing such a great role — all eyes are on brian cox — it is a real tribute to miranda richardson that she holds the screen as well as she does, which is no surprise because she is a fantastic actor. there are a couple of weak points. there is a subplot about a secretary, a new secretary who is brought in, through whose eyes we originally meet winston churchill. she then has a relationship with the man also involved in the campaign, and all this weaves through the drama in a way which feels much too much like melodramatic contrivance. it also feels like it doesn't really need it because the story itself is interesting enough.
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i know that the particular take on history has ruffled some people's feathers but for me it felt like a fairly solid if occasionally somewhat ordinary and somewhat televisual drama but lifted high by that performance. it is a shakespearean performance. there is a moment where he is praying for rain, praying for bad weather... it's the storm scene... it absolutely is. i think he is aware that it is and we all are as well. he and miranda richardson are the main reasons for seeing this. 0k. gifted. i have only seen the trailer for gifted. the subject matter struck me as really interesting. this has potential to be interesting. how far does it go? and the poster i have to say looked very cheesy. from the director of 500 days of summer. the poster looked like it was going to be a particular kind of drama and i went in not expecting very much. i really liked it. the story is a single man who is raising a precociously intelligent young child. he wants her to go to a normal school. the school saying she is a genius
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and she needs to go to a special academy. he says, no i want her to have as a normal life. what i like about this film was, particularly since i hadn't expected that much of it, it is very, very sharply written by tom flynn. it is a film in which...it‘s a lot funnier than you expect it is going to be. i have this thing that something has to get six laughs in order to be a proper comedy. this passed that. the performances are all really welljudged. not least lindsay duncan who plays a character that could easily tip over into caricature — the controlling grandmother who wants the child to fully explore all her intellectual potential. in another drama, it could have been somewhat demonised but linsay duncan does a brilliantjob. i was rally surprised. i was really touched. it was funny, it was sensitive. i thought it was welljudged, great performances all the way round and i came out feeling joyous, feeling uplifted with a real smile on my face. i was very, very surprised by how much it did what it set out to achieve.
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fantastic. your third choice today is a documentary, the new nick broomfield, a man with quite a track record, massive track record in documentaries. whitney: can i be me. he has made things in the past like kurt and courtney, and has had a very particular kind of documentary style. originally he put himself into the documentaries a lot. the figure who walks around with a boom mic, wandering into shot. he has very much taken a back seat here. you hear his voice a couple of times, but that's all. he's using footage from a tour that was going to be turned into a fly—on—the—wall documentary but never did. this is never—before—seen footage. it essentially traces her story from her home life, her mother who was a very powerful singer, and how she was then picked up by a record company, marketed as a pop singer, rather that as a gospel and r&b, which is where she came from. found herself in a difficult position in which she did not know who she was meant to be, and her relationship with people like, for example, robyn crawford and, of course, bobby brown.
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he's a clip. he loved her as herself. she could come off the stage and not have to be the person that everybody in the world expected her to be or who they thought she was. he understood that part of her, he understood the pressures because he was bobby brown, you know. he understood her pressures and he understood her pain. what do i think that bobby and whitney gave each other? acce pta nce, love. she absolutely loved him. they loved each other. and there was acceptance. you can see from the clip, the film is more forgiving, more affectionate than some of nick broomfield's previous work. i went into this not being a big whitney houston fan, i did not know that much about her music — i'd seen her in movies, obviously —
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and the most important thing is i came out with a new—found respect for what she did, for the way she sang, for the way in which her music was important because i really didn't have a handle on it. stunning talent. absolutely and you do get that. and that is important that a film like this does tell you that. obviously the comparison to be made is with amy, the asif kapadia film. and it's also worth saying, straight off the bat, this is not as good as amy. what amy did was give you the sense of being intimately involved in that story, sometimes in a way that was deeply uncomfortable, but because of the way he used the lyrics, which seemed to tell the story almost like a diary, it really gave you what felt like a proper insight. this feels much more like watching something from a distance and that is inevitable. it is to do with the way that the film came together. it's also...there is a fairly familiar story of somebody who has a lot of talent, suddenly finding themselves involved in fame and fortune and finding it very difficult to deal with that and feeling insecure. the film investigates the relationship with the people around her, whether
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they helped her or not. there's an interview with her bodyguard who says that at one point he wrote down very clearly, all this stuff is happening and this is bad and this is not going to end well. he says he was then rewarded by being told "ok, we no longer required your services." what i came out of it with was, as i said, primarily a sense of an extraordinary talent having made some really brilliant records which i really had not thought of like that before and a great waste. a public waste shown with amy as well. as a piece of filmmaking it is not in the same league as amy. amy really is an extraordinary and remarkable and very, very painfulfilm. yes. and i think as a piece of film—making, it is the better piece, there's no question. best out? my cousin rachel, which is an adaptation of the daphne du maurier, from the 1951, which was filmed in 1952 with olivia de havilland. now we have rachel weisz playing this fantastically mysterious character. is she the femme fatale or is she somebody who is being
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completely misread by everybody around her? what the film manages to do is to keep that ambiguity. it starts off as a "did she or didn't she?" — who is to blame. and it is very clever because the film all the way through keeps you guessing as to its character's motives. rachel weisz said that what she did was she read the script, she decided for herself whether her character was "guilty" and she said to roger michell, the director, "i have decided," he said "don't tell me, i don't want to know, you keep it as a secret." the film manages to keep that secret. and i thought it was very fine. i love what you have chosen as a dvd. perhaps a little too understated, loving, but fascinating. that was the criticism levelled against it. this is basically ruth negga — terrific performance. she is fantastic, isn't she. she's brilliant. it's a story about a couple fighting racist laws to get married, and the understatement is actually the thing that makes it work. the key thing about the couple is they do not want to be in the public eye. they do not want to be people who are fighting a really important case.
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they don't want to be the figureheads. they just want to be left alone to get on with what htey‘re doing. but they are very strong. they're characters that you absolutely believe in. i love the understatement of it but i know that that'sexactly the thing that had made some people think there's no huge grandstanding moment — no, that's the point. it all happened at a much more controlled level, and i just think that just add to its power. that's the joy of it. it is. it is a remarkable piece, i have to say. maybe i'll come down more on your side, to be fair. not for the first time. thanks very much. a reminder that you can find all film news and reviews from across the bbc online. and all the previous programs are on the bbc iplayer, of course. that is it for this week. happy cinema going. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast,
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with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. coming up before 7am, helen will have the weather. there could be more son on the way. but a summary of this morning's main news. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire in west london. police have revealed that 58 people are missing and are believed to have died but that figure could still rise. yesterday, theresa may met with volunteers and those left homeless. the prime minister admitted the government's response, in the hours following the disaster, had not been good enough. a report by the think tank the resolution foundation claims british wealth inequality is growing. they suggest the fall in the number of people that own their own home has resulted in a widening gap between the rich and poor. the government says income inequality is at its
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lowest level since the midnight in 805., —— mid— 19805. the government says it intends to double the length of the new parliamentary session to two years to give mp5 the maximum possible time to scrutinise brexit legislation. the unusual move will mean next year's queen's speech will be cancelled. the government says the decision was part of measures to build the broadest possible consensus for brexit. at least 2a people have died so far and more than 20 others have been injured ina and more than 20 others have been injured in a forest fire in central portugal. 16 of the victims died in their vehicles as they try to escape but became trapped by flames. portugal's been experiencing a heatwave with temperatures exceeding 40 heatwave with temperatures exceeding a0 celsius in several regions. seven sailors missing after a us warship collided with a container ship off the coast ofjapan have been found dead. their bodies were discovered by divers in flooded cabins. the ships commander and another sailor have been airlifted to hospital for treatment. french voters go to the polls today for the second round of the country's
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parliamentary elections. president macron's en marche! party, which was formed just over a year ago, is predicted to win up to 80% of the seats. it is currently ahead in a00 out of 577 constituencies. for opposition teams, the sight of 15 new zealand rugby players doing the traditional maori haka is intimidating enough. so imagine seeing more than 7,000 people take up the challenge. this is the world record attempt undertaken before the british and irish lions took on the all blacks yesterday in rotorua. they had to perform for five minutes to officially break the record previously held by the french. kat is shaking her head. it was the maori all blacks. not the other all blacks shall we say. it wasn't just locals taking part, though, a number of lions‘ supporters also joined in.
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that is a good one. i suspect the all blacks were a good deal more intimidating than those guys. the maori all blacks do the scariest harker, did you see it before the match? they were in a line and they had a special spear —— haka. the maori all blacks do it best. that haka was maori all blacks do it best. that ha ka was directed maori all blacks do it best. that haka was directed at the lions team hotel. 7000 people all doing it towards the lions. even the lions fa ns were towards the lions. even the lions fans werejoining towards the lions. even the lions fans were joining in. did they break the world record? they tried to. more lions news coming up because the squad for the next team has been named, we will go through that. but we will start with golf. after day three at golf‘s us open, england's tommy fleetwood remains firmly in contention at the top of the leaderboard. he sits just one shot behind the overall leader brian harman going into the final round in wisconsin. adam wild reports for tommy fleetwood, there is plenty
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to smile about. for getting amongst the leaders in wisconsin is one thing, staying there is quite another. this weekend it is a crowded place. still he was making his presence felt, progressing steadily in the right direction. for others that didn't appear to be the case but here forjustin thomas even going in the wrong direction can work out perfectly in the end. his round of nine under par is a prominent record and was enough to put him for the moment ahead of the rest. while he flourished, others floundered. england's paul casey's hopes of staying in contention lost somewhere in that deep, deep rough. they call day three moving day, there was now plenty of that on the leaderboard and there was now plenty of that on the leaderboa rd and with there was now plenty of that on the leaderboard and with shots like this the american brian harman was heading towards the very top. fleetwood remains in the crowd just one stroke behind, plenty still to smile about but the us open has rarely been more open. adam wild,
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bbc news. this is my first time in contention ina this is my first time in contention in a major so whatever happens i'll be doing my best and seeing how well ican be doing my best and seeing how well i can finish and that's that really. that's all you can do. but it will bea that's all you can do. but it will be a pleasure to go out on a sunday trying to win a major. and you've played golf with him? it's fantastic, i'm following him very closely because i was lucky enough to play with him, they always do an event before a big competition called a pro—am, the professionals play the very lucky amateurs so i played with him ahead of the bmw pro—am at wentworth but he didn't make the cut! i think you jinxed him? maybe i was his good luck charm for the next one. there you go, maybe all down to you. great to see his absolute delight at being in the next. there you are lining up together. the little one. it was withjodie kidd together. the little one. it was with jodie kidd and together. the little one. it was withjodie kidd and georgy bingham withjodie kidd and georgy bingham with tommy. he was a very chilled
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out guy. very lovely. he will need to be chilled out if he's going to hang on at the top of the leaderboard at the us open. warran gatland has named his side to face the chiefs on tuesday and has included all six controversial call—ups he made yesterday as replacements. ireland hooker rory best captains the side, with the bulk of the squad that beat the maori all blacks yesterday aren't playing so they can prepare for the first test against the all blacks next saturday. gatland says those involved on tuesday will be playing for themselves and for the whole squad. we brought you scotland's historic win over australia here on breakfast yesterday morning, and that was just the start of it as england completed a 2—0 series victory over argentina after winning the second test in santa fe. full—back mike brown broke clear before producing a brilliant off load to send piers francis over for a great try before half time. england went on to win 35—25 but eddiejones's squad was missing 30 of their best players, largely due to the lions tour. very pleased. today we found a way
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to win, we were outgunned in the first half, second half we came back in the forwards particularly and scrums and our malt defence improved and that got us back in the game and then our ability to score off their m ista kes then our ability to score off their mistakes i thought was fantastic. england batsmanjason roy made a welcome return to form as surrey reached their third straight one day cup final. roy, dropped by england in midweek, smashed 92 as surrey beat worcestershire rapids by 153 runs at new road. they'll play nottinghamshire in the final on the first ofjuly. india take on arch—rivals pakistan in the champions trophy final this afternoon, india easy winners when the two sides met in the group stages. but with tickets at a premium for the match and talk of over half a billion people watching the game on tv, everyone's hoping for a classic at the oval later. don't see any relevance of the first
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game here because you can never tell how the particular team starts a tournament. some teams start very confidently and they fade off, some teams may not have the best arts and they come back amazingly, which pakistan have done. everyone is aware of the kind of talent they have in their team —— best starts. isaid i said before the edgbaston game i thought they were very calm, but they're very excited right now and there's a hell of a good vibe in that dressing room. so let's hope we can to oura that dressing room. so let's hope we can to our a game on tomorrow cause if we can, i said it before the england game, if we put oura if we can, i said it before the england game, if we put our a game together and we to the basics well we can beat anyone. johanna konta could become the first british woman since virginia wade a0 years ago at wimbledon to win a tour event on home soil. she's reached the final of the nottingham open. after coming through in straight sets against magdalena rybarikova of slovakia. it's the first time the british number one has reached a grass court final. she'll face croatia's donna vekic, ranked 70th in the world. wigan warriors are into the
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semi—finals of the challenge cup, surviving a late warrington fightback yesterday to win 27—26. four converted tries, including this from john bateman, and a drop goal had put wigan clear going into the final stages. but warrington could have forced extra time with the last kick of the game only for it to drift wide. castleford play hull fc this afternoon in the final quarterfinal. england strengthened their position at the top of their pool in the hockey world league semi—finals with a 7—3 thrashing of malaysia. samuel ward and mark gleghorne scored twice, as did captain barry middleton. as well as reaching the world league finals later in the year, the top five teams qualify for the world cup in india next year. scotland's men are in the other pool. a 3—0 defeat to the netherlands means they've lost both of their games so far. nice to see some hockey on the tv,
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don't thing we do it often enough. indeed, such a success in the olympics. exactly. brilliant, kat, thanks very much. see you in the next hour. how about a bit of sunday morning trivia. where do you think the running shoe was invented? you'd be forgiven if you thought america orjamaica. but the first trainer, designed in 1895, was the brainchild of joe foster from bolton. i kept quiet because i knew the a nswer i kept quiet because i knew the answer but the only reason i did is because i read it on there! it's facts like this that historic england says more of us should know. it's launching a campaign to improve people's knowledge about our nation's history. celia richardson from the organisation joins us now, along with the social historian charlotte wildman. thanks for coming in. sealy, are you surprised by some of the things you found out, like the trainer came from bolton originally, what other things did you find out? -- celia. everyone thought the first bungee
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jump everyone thought the first bungee jump was in new zealand but it was in bristol off the clifton suspension bridge. there's lots of amazing history and inventions here, people think they happened elsewhere. the first thing we asked was where was the atom split, people said geneva but actually it happened two miles from here in manchester. so we don't celebrate our successes and off? absolutely and this is what the campaign is about. -- enough. why should we know and what is this all about? it's a fascinating survey. i was most struck by the inventions we associate with other countries, the story about shrewsbury, the skyscrapers, we think of them associated with new york, but it is so interesting because these inventions give towns and cities their claim to being unique, which is so key to local pride and civic pride and i love hearing people's stories about their hometown and any kind of invention
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or first thing that cap on there, it's great to hear in the user as so it's great to hear in the user as so it's great to hear in the user as so it's great to hear more stories we have lost coming through —— first thing that happened there, it's great to hear enthusiastic. —— enthusiastic. charlotte, you were talking about how communities or areas like to be able to claim things, have you heard of pasty gate? i haven't. you have. there's an argument about where it came from, cornwall or devon, cornwall having previously claimed it, but now devon is claiming it, not the cornish pasty, just the pasty. how would you go about coming down on one side on this argument?
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there's a mention of it in the 15th century text of the pasty. it's the first mention of the pasty in literature it happened in devon. i mention this on devonshire radio, then cornish radio got in touch, we had lots of people saying how dare you —— mentioned. i understand, i'm from the north—east, i know a bit about local pride but i didn't understand how the star rivalry was between devon and cornwall. there we re cave between devon and cornwall. there were cave drawings of pastis in cornwall? -- understand how fierce the rivalry was. how do we celebrate the rivalry was. how do we celebrate the things we are good at and what we have given to the world? -- pastis. it's important because early in the 20th century local identity would be linked to things like work and trade, every town had a clear
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trade and identity but we have seen such massive cultural and social shifts that we have lost that sense of local identity and civic pride, so of local identity and civic pride, so these kinds of links to invention, uniqueness, difference are really helpful to construct that sense of uniqueness and celebratory local pride. who knew that the pencil was invented in cumbria, the tubular band came from oldham. pencil was invented in cumbria, the tubular band came from oldhamlj didn't know. there used to be a sign in oldham that said welcome to the home of the tubular bandage. helen, even though many of us are celebrating how warm it was, in the north—west of the uk, they did not have such a great day. now, they did not. good morning to you both. they probably will not have a good day i ever although the cloud is a lot
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more broken this morning. this is highlands scotland. let me show you the latest satellite picture. our first glimpse of where we doing don't have sunshine. you can see this more extensive than yesterday. these spots of cloud understand fog but just like yesterday we have these spots of cloud understand fog butjust like yesterday we have an extensive cloud across the north—west of northern ireland scotla nd north—west of northern ireland scotland hence the levels of uv. just for the benefit of roger, these levels are very high and very unusual here in the uk so it is as strong as the sunshine gets. unrelated to the temperature, the strength of the sunshine but it does help temperature to rise. if the temperatures we had today with up to 28 degrees in some areas. we are starting on a high platform of 16 or 19 degrees. that is more like the average through the day at this time of year. are not a night—time temperature. it has been an uncomfortable night for some. we won't have that hit across the far
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north west of scotland, particularly up north west of scotland, particularly upa highlands. north west of scotland, particularly up a highlands. is misty and murky low hill cloud and fog. brakes and a cloud will continue through the day. eastern parts firing better and a a sickly unbroken sunshine for wales. there is just an outside chance, if we get seabreeze is coming in and converging with our normal wind, that we could spark an isolated evening thunderstorm for east anglia and the south—east. late in the day will brighten up for the northern isles that you can see rain coming and going across parts of scotland. limiting out averages here is pointed out, we will not see those 20 degrees in these areas but for the vast majority, it will be another hot day, uncomfortable for some, a little stifling, fresher around the coast with sea breezes, more refreshing for hayfever sufferers as well. but the uv
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strength is still the same as we around the post. more on the outlook for you later. thank you, helen. now, don't let me forget together sun cream out. cloke, swap on the —— slip, slop, slap.. the headlines coming up shortly on breakfast. but now it's time for click. this week the team is is in la for a huge video games show, which has opened its doors to the public for the first time. right. let's see. dragons? check. singing pirates? check. orcs... yes. all of which can only mean it is time for e3, the world's maddest video games expo,
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in the heart of downtown los angeles. this is where new games are launched and new hardware is lauded. it is always big, loud and bright but this year, for the first time, it is notjust open to those who work in the games industry. 15,000 members of the public have also been allowed in, each paying up to — get this — $250 for a ticket. you do the maths. how exciting it is, depends on whether the big console manufacturers have any big announcements or not. this year, microsoft generated the most excitement by announcing a new console. we got hands—on. welcome to e3 2017. and with that, xbox head honcho phil spencer kicked off the xbox e3 press event.
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it is a big yearfor xbox as it announced a brand—new console, code—named scorpio, is now called... xbox one x. its high—end spec includes six teraflops of graphic performance. that compares to the psa pro's a.2. it is capable of producing ak high dynamic range visuals at 60 frames a second. as well as producing dolby atmos audio. all this adds up to a whole lot of horsepower for a console. it is being billed as the most powerful console ever, but is more computational grunt enough to shift sony from its number one position in the console market? in an attempt to do just that a parade of ak resolution games assaulted the senses, including a peek at the latest addition to the popular assassin's creed series, origins — this one set in egypt. the expendable's terry crews brings
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the smack down to crackdown 3. open world smashed everything in sight, destructo—fest. as well as family—friendly platform super luckey‘s tale. these games will play on the old xbox one and will play with ak graphic enhancement on the xbox one x. leading that ak charge with the new machine, racer forza motorsport 7 and anthem, a new sci—fi exosuit game created by bioware. and weirdly, ak enhanced minecraft. one of the few games where high—end lighting effects do not seem necessary. a strong line—up then for the new xbox. but is it strong enough? that was long and loud.
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but a2 new games. very little in the way of fan favourites and franchises such as gears of war. people know the other franchises will be coming. halo, gears of war... i spend last month, i was at both the studios last month looking at amazing work they were doing. we were able to fill this arena with great games, without even bringing two of the biggest franchises here. here it is. the most powerful console that microsoft has ever made. we do know what it looks like. it is actually quite slimline. smaller than the old machine, the xbox one s. and we know how much it costs. £aa9. and we know it is released on november seven. we do not know what games are like when you actually power the machine up, grab hold of the controller and play them on it. to find that out, i have to go over there. ok, now you may think
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that my driving here is a little scrappy but there is method to my madness. by damaging the car i can see the additional level of detail it has added. you can see individual raindrops. a smorgasbord of different weather effects going on here. all of them showing what this machine is capable of. the first time i played a game on the new xbox one x and ijust played forza motorsport 7. the most recognisable of all titles will be launched with this machine when it comes out later this year. it is fantastic. the beautiful game to look at and as you expect, it has ak resolution. but there is more to this than just incredible graphics. i received a challenge recently, come and play me, at killer instinct. fight on!
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it didn't say "if you dare", but it might as well have done, because, as it turns out, ben is somewhat of a combo expert. ok, now you're punishing me. i can't do anything! ben, have mercy! this is unbelievable. just unbelievable. ben hasjust taken me out in about 20 seconds. i could have done it quicker than that if i didn't screw up my inputs at one point. we're playing killer instinct, a five—year—old combat game. it's a big esports title with players competing for millions of dollars each year, but it's not only its popularity that makes this game stand out. so there, kathleen has blocked low and the only reason i know she blocked low is because i heard that sound, that you heard there. ben is relying on his hearing because he's blind, which makes his win even more impressive. if you throw a fireball. . . it travels
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and that rather satisfying connection sound at the other end when it hits the opponent. when i say, do you realise you're fighting a guy who can't see, they are like, no, i did not realise that at all. and they're like, how does it work? and that starts conversations in itself about how games are and aren't accessible. and you're passionate about taking that conversation further now? i think it needs to go further because gamers without sight are kind of being left in the dust. things like being able to tell your friendly team and your enemy team apart, so different footsteps. it can be done. it's not an impossibility. audio only games have been around for many years and it's only now that sound designers are beginning to harness the potential of modern hardware. home, episodes, clips,
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judges, spencer kelly, about click. on the web, a screen reader speaks out the options. it took years of the internet before accessibility features like this became commonplace and it's still not 100%. and as for games consoles, currently blind gamers have to memorise the menus within games. that's where the real big barrier is — the middleware. the tools people use to make games aren't compatible with the software that can be used to operate technology. so if that barrier could be solved then we would see a big increase in the amount of blind accessible games there are. ian hamilton has produced accessibility guidelines for games developers. his mission is to make gaming more inclusive. accessibility‘s job will be done when people stop innovating the technology. there's always going to be some new barrier that needs to be overcome. ian has been working with people like ben for years, but it is really down to the console makers now to bring about change. we need to be sure the games and consoles we build are accessible to any kind of player,
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whether it's someone who has sight issues, hearing issues. we're working with apis, with our controller. we announced copilot mode, where people can use two controls to play one version of the game, so if someone can't use all the buttons there. microsoft is really leading the way when it comes to accessibility for blind gamers. they've released a new text—to—speech api, which means for the first time in—game menus will be read out. let's see what ben thinks about this news. if other developers, like sony and nintendo, anybody else, want to make their content more accessible using in—game menus and spoken ui elements, that's brilliant. if i can go in and buy a game without have to worry about how much i'm paying for it, versus accessibility, then that would be ideal. games, games and more psa games. sony kicked off its playstation press event with a bang, thanks to a trailer from developer
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naughty dog's latest adventure, uncharted: the lost legacy. oh, thank you. i'm slipping! the crowd certainly liked that sony made it snow in sunny la for robo dinosaur mash—up horizon zero dawn's expansion, frozen wilds. and everyone's favourite friendly neighbourhood spiderman swung into action in a new game which features an innovative use of his athletic abilities and his web slinging. hi, is this the flight to newark? and, unlike xbox, who didn't even mention vr, playstation renewed its commitment to techno welding goggles, sorry, virtual reality, by showing off a host of vr games, like platform adventure star child. and an utterly bonkers final fantasy vr fishing game.
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final fantasy 15: monster of the deep. playstation is riding high at the moment with its psa outselling its rival, the xbox one. but, with the superpowerful xbox one x on the horizon, will things like vr help sony to maintain its lead? i think that over the long—term it really is an opportunity to create a new entertainment medium, but i do stress that it's over the long—term. you'll see lots more technology innovation. i think content makers, game makers and others, including folks that are making television programmes, they are really only starting to just learn what the tools are to make really good vr content. that is it for the shortcut. much more in the full—length version which you can see online right now. you can also find this on twitter and facebook. thank you for watching.
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hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. church services will take place today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. police say at least 58 people are believed to have died. residents and volunteers expressed their anger at a meeting with theresa may in downing street. it was a robust discussion, there was forceful emotion in the room and people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to and listened to carefully.

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