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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 18, 2017 8:00am-9:00am BST

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it was a robust discussion. there was forceful emotion in the room. people were able to say what they wa nted people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to, and listened to carefully. good morning. it's sunday 18th june. also ahead: claims of growing inequality across britain. a new report says the gap between rich and poor is getting wider. next year's queen's speech is due to be cancelled to give mps the maximum time to debate plans for brexit. a forest fire in portugal claims the lives of more than 20 people, including motorists trying to escape the blaze. in sport: tommy fleetwood remains firmly in contention at the us open in wisconsin. he isjust firmly in contention at the us open in wisconsin. he is just one shot off the leader brian harman going into today's final round. and more sunshine on the way.
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helen has the weather. good morning. another hot day for the vast majority. the sunshine as strong as it gets and it is likely to last for another few days yet for most of us. i will have the details inis most of us. i will have the details in 15 minutes. thank you. first our main story. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire in west london. police have revealed that 58 people are missing and are believed to have died but that figure could still rise. yesterday theresa may met with volunteers and those left homeless. government staff have been drafted in to improve the response to the disaster, as nick quraishi reports. the devastation caused by the inferno stops people in their tracks. the dark reality abundantly clear in broad daylight. four days on, the community is still angry about a lack of co—ordination, communication and accountability. it's always the public that runs to the rescue. where's the authorities? where are they?
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residents, community leaders and volunteers took their frustrations to downing street, spending two hours with the prime minister. it was a robust discussion, there was forceful emotion in the room, people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to and listened to carefully. theresa may, who has come in for widespread personal criticism over her handling of the crisis, said she'd heard the concerns. the prime minister admitted: whitehall officials have been drafted in to help kensington and chelsea council cope with the response and the red cross will provide psychological support. as people wait and pray for the missing, church services today will remember those who didn't make it out of grenfell tower. a reminder of the complex and lengthy process of recovering bodies from this charred shell.
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nick quraishi, bbc news. simonjones is simon jones is outside simonjones is outside notting hill methodist church. that is where one of the services will be taking place today. good morning. after the shock, after the grief, after the angen shock, after the grief, after the anger, church leaders are hoping that today will be a pause for reflection. and you can see here at the side of the church the flowers that have been left to mark so many lives lost. there are also lots of posters here of the faces of people missing, who are now sadly presumed dead. what we have had is a lot of concern that it has been organisations like the church and the volunteers who have stepped in to fill the breach. churches opened their doors on a night of the fire at about three o'clock in the morning to take people in. they have
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been involved in getting donations. but a question from a lot of people is where is the government, what have they been doing and where is the local council? the government, stung by the criticism, has announced it is sending in more civil servants to work on the council offices to support the operation. ijust council offices to support the operation. i just want to give you council offices to support the operation. ijust want to give you a sense of the scene here. this is the police cordon right next to the church. we have seen fire officers going in during the course of the morning. and behind there, that is what is left of the tower, still a very shocking sight when you see it close up, when you see it in the daylight like this. the church is hoping that after the initial crisis control, now they can move on to offering more support for people, people who have lost loved ones and friends, and families who have lost their homes, and also what they want to do is offer support for people who live in this area who may not have been directly affected but need some moral support. simon, thank you for the moment. simon jones.
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a report by the think tank the resolution foundation claims that britain's wealth inequality is growing. it suggests that a fall in the number of people who own their own home has resulted in a widening gap between the rich and poor. the government says income inequality is now at its lowest level since the mid—1980s. wealth is arguably the biggest determinant of living standards over people's lives but yet it barely features in today's living standards debates, and that's a big deal because our analysis shows wealth is far more unequally spread across scoiety than incomes are and because of declining property ownership, declining home ownership for the least wealthy households, that inequality has started to go up. that is a big concern. the government says it intends to double the length of the new parliamentary session to two years to give mps the maximum possible time to scrutinise brexit legislation. the unusual move will mean next year's queen's speech will be cancelled.
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our political correspondent susana mendonca is in our london newsroom. good morning. is this significant, the cancellation of the queen's speech and the lengthening of the term? i think what it shows isjust how difficult the government realises that getting brexit legislation through parliament will be, particularly now that it doesn't have that majority that it had beforehand. so you have got this plan now to have this two year parliament. during that time it will give mps extra time to go through key legislation, for example the great repeal bill. also controversial legislation around immigration. another key issue for the government really, one key advantage of this, by not having another queen's speech in a year's time, it offsets that risk really, that a second queen's speech might be voted down by opposition mps. of course this year's speech, they are getting the support of the dup, and
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there is no guarantee they would get that support next time round. although it is unusual having a two year parliament, it has been done before. the coalition government did in 2010 to get through the coalition agreement. just pick up on a story in the sunday times, if you would, on the front page. it says tories tell theresa may you have ten days. talking about a grassroots view that maybe theresa may isn't doing a good enoughjob. and maybe theresa may isn't doing a good enough job. and mps maybe theresa may isn't doing a good enoughjob. and mps might be influenced to try and unseat her. what more do you know? the prime minister is clearly under pressure and she has been under pressure since that election where she lost the majority that the conservatives had. since then, more issues, for example the tragic event at granville house. she was criticised for not meeting people there. —— at g ru nfeld for not meeting people there. —— at gru nfeld tower. all of for not meeting people there. —— at grunfeld tower. all of these things have played into getting people to question her leadership again. in terms of the conservatives who are
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worried about whether or not the brexit that you spoke about, the idea of not having the customs union, the single market, no freedom of movement, they are worried that things might be diluted if the government has got to rely upon the support of the dup for example, and maybe other groups that want them to ta ke maybe other groups that want them to take a less stringent stance on those things. certainly if she goes back on any of those promises made to the eurosceptics, certainly, potentially she could be at risk. she has got a difficult time ahead. thank you. a forest fire in central portugal has killed at least 39 people. victims died in their vehicles as they tried to escape but became trapped by flames. nimesh thaker has more. a deadly mix of strong winds and a severe heatwave have fanned the flames now threatening to engulf homes. burning uncontrollably, this fire is already one
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of the worst forest fires in portugal in decades. more than 20 people have died, most of them trapped in their cars. a number of people were reported to be missing. translation: it was a big tragedy. we've already identified 2a victims but this number could rise. all of those who died were on a road in the same fire at the same place. it started on saturday at 3pm local time in a mountainous area 200 kilometres north—east of lisbon. around 500 firefighters were called to the scene. translation: i was there staring at my house. i don't know what will happen with it now. officials describe the fire spreading violently. some properties have been destroyed. the local mayor said there wasn't enough firefighters to deal with the number of villages at risk. nimesh thaker, bbc news. seven sailors who were
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missing after a us warship collided with a container ship off the coast ofjapan have been found dead. rupert wingfield hayes joins us now. we were talking yesterday when we knew that the collision had taken place and people were missing. these developments are tragic. yes, very sad. what everybody here feared but everybody was hoping would not turn out to be the case has turned out to be the case. when navy divers were able to get inside the flooded compartments of the fitzgerald this morning, they found the bodies of the seven missing sailors inside those compartments. the sea and air search has now been called off. the bodies have been transferred to a nearby hospital. we have also heard from the command of us naval forces here injapan, who has said this was a very large collision and most of the damage was actually below the water line, so out of sight from the television cameras that have shown
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the damage to the ship. and it was in danger of sinking. the water rushed in very rapidly and it was only the prompt action of the crew that saved the ship from sinking. it is obviously a very serious incident. there is now a joint investigation begun with the japanese authorities about why it happened. that is focusing on the cargo vessel that struck the fitzgerald, which appears, according to gps tracking records, to have made a number of very rapid and tight u—turns as it approached the coast of japan. it will be focusing on why it may those dramatic turns up on why it may those dramatic turns up by on why it may those dramatic turns up by the collision happened. thank you. rupert wingfield hayes. french voters go to the polls today for the second round of the country's parliamentary elections. president macron‘s en marche party, which was formed just over a year ago, is predicted to win up to 80% of the seats. it is currently ahead in 400 out of 577 constituencies. a traditional polynesian canoe has
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become the first vessel of its kind to complete a round—the—world voyage. the canoe returned to honolulu in hawaii after visiting 19 countries during three years at sea. the crew used the stars, wind and ocean swells to guide them. they wanted to use the same techniques as the first polynesian settlers to hawaii did hundreds of years ago. there it is going into new york. and sydney. proof, if you needed it, that it has been round the world. it is 12 minutes past eight. helen will have the weather later and we will have the weather later and we will have the weather later and we will have the sport in 20 minutes. now oui’ have the sport in 20 minutes. now our main story. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. we can speak now to the bishop of kensington, graham tomlin. church services will be held today to remember the victims
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he helped organise the meeting with the prime minister. thank you for your time. you helped to organise that meeting. give us a flavour of the atmosphere in the room. it was passionate. it was robust. it was constructive. my role was simply to enable the meeting to happen. the key thing was for the voices of residents to be heard. they did make that voices heard. they did make that voices heard. they spoke very strongly about their love for the community here. they talked about the deep anger that there is in this community about the fire itself and what led to it and some of the aftermath as well. they have spoken very much about the need for listening, real listening to people. i think there is a deep sense here very often that people here don't feel listened to by those making decisions about their lives. they talked about the need for real action and we need to see action sooner action and we need to see action sooner rather than later. we had a real sense that the prime minister was listening to what the group had
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to say. that was the atmosphere. it was a good, constructive if passionate meeting. that was going to be my question. was the prime minister listening? you say she was. did you sense a sympathetic ear? we had two meetings, one in north kensington on friday, and another where we were invited back to downing street the day after. we we re downing street the day after. we were encouraged after our first meeting when the prime minister put out a statement responding to some of the concerns of the residents. one of them was to say that a lot of people around this area have been made homeless and simply don't have cash to use for normal things during the day. it was good to hear that an amount of money had been made available for that. we were concerned about the lack of coordination of care for people in the area and again we were glad to hear that one centre had been designated as a place where people
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can go to find care. the westway centre. words are good but action is better. there is a real sense of waiting to see whether some of the words will be translated into action. there has been a lot of talk this week about the nature of the borough of kensington and chelsea. such affluence next to such poverty. i wonder how that sits with you as the bishop. yes, i have been very aware that in this borough for quite some time it is a place of great extremes. we have some of the wealthiest parts of london alongside some of the most deprived wards in the capital as well. that brings its own tension and it raises some real issues for us, i think, about housing, about how we look after the most vulnerable in our society, and it is an uncomfortable thing that is here. via this tragic thing that has
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happened over the last week, it really raised those issues that we need to deal with as a society. do people feel forgotten, as though they were not listened to? within hours of the fire, midweek, people we re hours of the fire, midweek, people were saying we have been warning them and telling them that this is a real risk. i think that is right. i very much picked up this week a sense of the voiceless feelings around here, that people don't have around here, that people don't have a voice about their lives and they don't have much impact. that was why i was hopeful about this dialogue that has opened up and the ability to speak directly to the premise. my hope is that it is the beginning of a process and not the end, the beginning of a real listening to people in areas like across london. this is the first sunday since the fire. can you just tell us what will
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be happening today and how important a role you and your fellow clergy have in helping people there? christian clergy, ministers from different religions imams, have been helping a lot throughout the week. churches and mosques and local community centres, they have risen up community centres, they have risen up to provide the care that has been needed. the clergy has been involved in many of our clergy have been out on the streets in kensington. i askedif on the streets in kensington. i asked if anybody had time to come to kensington to walk around and be available to talk to people and it is amazing to see them doing that. today across this area there will be churches meeting of all different kinds. i will be at one of the church is just down the road, kinds. i will be at one of the church isjust down the road, near to the tower. my message today is simply to say thank you to the people who are here for the extraordinary amount of compassion and care that has been taking place
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and care that has been taking place and the significant role that the church has played in this last week. but also to give a message of hope. i think we have got to deal with hope. i have got to hope. i am a christian. that is what i do. that is the message we have got to give today. yes, there is the grief, the angen today. yes, there is the grief, the anger, the passion. yes, there is the pride that we take in our emergency services and all the people who have helped over this week. but we have also got to strike that note of hope today that lives could be rebuilt and there is the future and it is possible for communities to come together and for the kind of justice communities to come together and for the kind ofjustice that people in this area are longing to see to take place. bishop, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us. the bishop of kensington. it is 8:18am. this is a view outside the studios this morning. sunshine here and in london as well. this is the view over salford quays. gorgeous
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still water and a reflection of the bridge as well. this is the picture that many people will be waking up to. not salford but the sunshine! there will be a few waking up to sa lfo rd ! there will be a few waking up to salford! let's see who will be experiencing sunshine today with helen. good morning. that is a beautiful picture looking over salford quays. and this is lovely as well. i took a particular shine to those poppies. not great news if you suffer from hay fever, just showing you the flowers. pollen levels will be very high again today for many parts of the uk, away from the cloudy north west. this is fairly held, taken cloudy north west. this is fairly held, ta ken half cloudy north west. this is fairly held, taken half an hour ago as well. plenty of sunshine across the board. the sunshine as strong as it gets a cross board. the sunshine as strong as it gets across the uk. you don't see is that tyler. —— you don't see such high levels very often. and in the
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far north west, the highlands, we have cloud and patchy rain coming and going through the day, tending to go away from shetland and orkney later. things will brighten up there. but in the cooler and things just 13 or 1a but eastern parts of scotla nd just 13 or 1a but eastern parts of scotland might see 2526 again, as we will see across the eastern part of northern ireland. not to wash today but rather cloudy as opposed to sunny and bright. —— not a wash—out today. and there is an outside chance of a thunderstorm brewing up because of the heat. that is no surprise when we are talking about temperatures getting into the low 30s. we are likely to break the 30 degrees of yesterday. 32 would make it the hottest day of the year so far. it is notjust in southern and eastern areas. overnight this were the front is still with us and it is slowly starting to make its way to the south. —— this weather front.
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uncomfortable because of the high humidity, but it will be rising elsewhere as well. if you vowed last night uncomfortable, unfortunately repeats tonight. that weather front is slipping south tomorrow and on tuesday so it gets cloudy and cooler across scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern england but the heat stays with us further south, is taking longer to break down in southern areas, possibly midweek. or even longer. the heat can rise again in the south. if you find it uncomfortable, the coast will be a relief with refreshing sea breezes but the sunshine is just as strong even though it feels fresher. asi strong even though it feels fresher. as i found out to my costa north wales yesterday! it feels fresh on the beach but it burns you! 70 years ago the waverley, a sea—going paddle steamer, set sail for the very first time. now she's retracing the route of her maiden voyage.
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our reporter sally mcnairjoined some of the ship's original passengers for the cruise down the clyde and a trip down memory lane. cake, a piperand cake, a piper and friends. a great way to start the celebration. there are people who were on the maiden voyage. it is very emotional because to me the waverley makes me think of my parents. i was ten when they took me on the waverley 1910 and she was brand—new and she is just looking like she did then. some newcomers to the waverley‘s chance. like she did then. some newcomers to the waverley's chance. my husband andi the waverley's chance. my husband and i have been planning to come on the waverley for a few years and we just happened to be here on the anniversary. we thought it was a great opportunity to come on—board. and enthusiast whose fundraising helps to keep her afloat. a final hat to match the final! they sell in the shop downstairs. in her earlier days, she and her sister ships took families to the resorts along the
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clyde. happy days and holidays. but in the mid 70s, no longer viable, she was bought by the paddle steamer preservation society for a princely sum. i handed over £1 note to the people who had decided we would be the best people to buy the paddle steamer. it was a huge surprise at the time and we hadn't a clue what to do with the ship. she was restored to her original condition and returned to business but on the bridge she is not always the easiest vessel to handle. the challenges are wide and varied. one of the biggest difficulties i have is manoeuvring the ship. she was originally ill to navigate the wooden structures on the clyde but they have fallen into disrepair and we can't call there now. some of the harbour as we go to a challenging and tight and the ship does not handle as well as a modern shipboard. the waverley sales on for the rest of today's trip and into
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her eighth decade. sally mcnair, on the firth of clyde. spectacular. 8:24am. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the poet ian mcmillan is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. speaking of spectacular vessels! i am a vessel sailing steadily across the news. and what have you picked out? there isa and what have you picked out? there is a fantastic story in the mail on sunday about this fellow who was one of the first firefighters to go into g re nfell tower of the first firefighters to go into grenfell tower and what an amazing thing. no matter what your training is, your instinct would be to run away. mine would be. and yet these people run into disasters. not only firefighters, police operatives, but human beings just walking firefighters, police operatives, but human beingsjust walking down firefighters, police operatives, but human beings just walking down the street, members of the public. they will run and help and you always wonder what you would do in that
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situation. in your head you think you might run and help it in your heart you know you might run away. it is an amazing story of somebody who ran in to help. it is one of those things that gives us hope with this story. in the end, people will a lwa ys this story. in the end, people will always wa nt this story. in the end, people will always want to try and help, whether professionally or not. the london bridge incident. they always say about the emergency services, they run about the emergency services, they ru n towards about the emergency services, they run towards danger rather than away. amazing. one of the interesting stories and we have heard from so many people in the emergency services about how they made choices about who to save in that fire, the families and the agonising choices and the memories they will be left with. at the moment of thinking do i save this person or that? terrible. ona save this person or that? terrible. on a lighter note, lipstick can help you to shine in exams according to the report in the mail on sunday. i was terrible at exams. the report in the mail on sunday. i was terrible at examslj the report in the mail on sunday. i was terrible at exams. i kept
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failing my a—levels. if only i had worn lipstick! gives you confidence. it doesn't make you clever but it makes you feel clever. it was hay fever time and i was struggling, sneezing, and the girls near me warn lipstick and got better grades than me. what is the actual thinking behind this? there is no thinking behind this? there is no thinking behind it. it is simply a daft story. but wearing lipstick gives you confidence to write down what might be the wrong answer but to write it down with style which has a lwa ys write it down with style which has always been my thing. the sentence you used to describe that story was very accurate. you would have got ten out of ten from me. now the famous five rebooted by tech savvy children. fantastic. the fantastic four. the fantastic four were not in at brighton. that is modern. the secret seven, at brighton. that is modern. the secret seven, yes. at brighton. that is modern. the secret seven, yes. a dog called
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timmy and a girl called george. she was very good. but my favourite was julian, the kind of leader of men. he took them to uncle quentin's island. he had an island but my uncle jack had shared and now it has been rebooted for to first and it. children are being asked to devise an app forthe children are being asked to devise an app for the famous five which makes me very happy. hopefully my grandchildren will not cure when i get out by famous five books and i prepare “— get out by famous five books and i prepare —— will not yawn when i get out my books and pretend we are going to uncle quentin's island. people say that kids should be like the famous five, out having an adventure, not in front of a screen. if you read about the famous five going to summon's island vicariously, then you are not going to the island but it might make you wa nt to to the island but it might make you want to go. that is my feeling. thank you. have a safe journey back to barnsley. still to come:
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september and the sunshine still shining. from humble beginnings in shropshire, it's bloomed into one of the bbc‘s most iconic programmes. we'll be looking back on 50 years of gardeners' world. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. coming up before 9am... helen will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire in west london. police have revealed that 58 people are missing and are believed to have died, but that figure could still rise. yesterday, theresa may met with volunteers and those left homeless. the prime minister admitted that the government's response, in the hours following the disaster had not been good enough. short while ago we spoke to the bishop of kensington who visited
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downing street. they talked about the deep anger there is in this community, about the fire itself, what led to it and the aftermath as well. they spoke very much about the need for listening, listening to people. there is a deep sense here that people here do not feel listened to by those making decisions about their lives. we talked about the need for real action and that we need to see action and that we need to see action sooner rather than later. we had a real sense the prime minister was listening to what the group had to say so that was the atmosphere that was there. a report by the think—tank, the resolution foundation, claims that britain's wealth inequality is growing. it suggests that a fall in the number of people who own their own home has resulted in a widening gap between the rich and poor. the government says income inequality is now at its lowest level since the mid—1980s. the government says it intends to double the length of the new parliamentary session to two years to give mps the maximum possible time to scrutinise brexit legislation.
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the unusual move will mean next year's queen's speech will be cancelled. the government says the decision was part of measures to build the broadest possible consensus for brexit. at least 39 people have died in a forest fire in central portugal. a number of the victims died in their vehicles as they tried to escape but became trapped by flames. portugal has been experiencing a heatwave, with temperatures exceeding a0 celsius in several regions. seven sailors, missing after a us warship collided with a container ship off the coast ofjapan, have been found dead. their bodies were discovered by divers in flooded cabins. the ships commander and another sailor have been airlifted to hospital for treatment. french voters go to the polls today for the second round of the country's parliamentary elections. president macron's "en marche!" party, which was formed just over a year ago, is predicted to win up to 80% of the seats. it is currently ahead in 400 out
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of 577 constituencies. for opposition teams, the sight of 15 new zealand rugby players doing the traditional maori haka is intimidating enough, so imagine seeing more than 7,000 people take up the challenge. this is a new world record, which was achieved before the british and irish lions took on the maori all blacks yesterday in rotorua. it did not work because the british and irish lions won! they had to perform for five minutes to break the record. it wasn't just locals taking part though — a number of lions supporters also joined in. he could be a star of the future. there he is. he is great! great time
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and eye action. i am not going to do at! i have the world's smallest tongue. let us move on to the golf! tommy fleetwood right up there on the leaderboard, we do not make it easy. he has never been in that position before and here we are with our microphones in his face, how are you going to feel? how are you going to stay calm? he is quite chilled. all of us want to know what it feels like to be leading the us open, any major. the same with andy murray at wimbledon. you might win, what would it be like? hang on, one match at a time. that is what you should think in golf as well, one shot at a time. ido in golf as well, one shot at a time. i do not know how they shut it out, it must be impossible. yes, good
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morning. after day three at golf‘s us open, england's tommy fleetwood remains firmly in contention at the top of the leaderboard. he sits just one shot behind the overall leader, brian harman, going into the final round in wisconsin. adam wild reports. for tommy fleetwood, there is plenty to smile about. for getting amongst the leaders in wisconsin is one thing, staying there is quite another. this weekend, it is a crowded place. still, he was making his presence felt, progressing steadily in the right direction. for others, that didn't appear to be the case, but here forjustin thomas, even going in the wrong direction can work out perfectly in the end. his round of 9—under par is a tournament record and was enough to put him for the moment ahead of the rest. while he flourished, others floundered. england's paul casey's hopes of staying in contention lost somewhere in that deep, deep rough. they call day three moving day — there was now plenty of that on the leaderboard and with shots like this, the american brian harman
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was heading towards the very top. fleetwood remains in the crowd, just one stroke behind, plenty still to smile about, but the us open has rarely been more open. adam wild, bbc news. this is my first time in contention in a major, so whatever happens, i'll be doing my best and seeing how well i can finish and that's that really. that's all you can do. but it will be a pleasure to go out on a sunday trying to win a major. warran gatland has named his side to face the chiefs on tuesday, and has included all six controversial call—ups he made yesterday as replacements. ireland hooker rory best captains the side, with the bulk of the squad that beat the maori all blacks yesterday aren't playing so they can prepare for the first test against the all blacks next saturday. gatland says those involved on tuesday will be playing for themselves and for the whole squad.
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we brought you scotland's historic win over australia here on breakfast yesterday morning and that was just the start of it as england completed a 2—0 series victory over argentina after winning the second test in santa fe. full back mike brown broke clear before producing a brilliant off load to send piers francis over for a great try before half time. england went on to win 35—25, but eddiejones's squad was missing 30 of their best players, he said, largely due to the lions tour. very pleased. today we found a way to win, we were outgunned in the first half, second half, we came back in the forwards, particularly, and scrums and our maul defence improved and that got us back in the game and then our ability to score off their mistakes i thought was fantastic. england batsmanjason roy made a welcome return to form as surrey reached their third straight one day cup final. roy, dropped by england in midweek, smashed 92 as surrey beat worcestershire rapids by 153 runs at new road. they'll play nottinghamshire in the final on 1stjuly. india take on arch—rivals pakistan
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in the champions trophy final this afternoon. india were the easy winners when the two sides met in the group stages. but with tickets at a premium for the match and talk of over half a billion people watching the game on tv, everyone's hoping for a classic at the oval later. i don't see any relevance of the first game here because you can never tell how the particular team starts a tournament. some teams start very confidently and they fade off, some teams may not have the best starts and they come back amazingly, which pakistan have done. everyone is aware of the kind of talent they have in their team. i said before the edgbaston game, i thought they were really calm, but they're very excited right now and there's a hell of a good vibe in that dressing room. so let's hope we can put together our a game tomorrow because
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if we can, i said it before the england game, if we put our a game together and we do the basics well, we can beat anyone. johanna konta could become the first british woman since virginia wade a0 years ago at wimbledon to win a tour event on home soil. she's reached the final of the nottingham open after coming through in straight sets against magdalena rybarikova of slovakia. it's the first time the british number one has reached a grass court final. she'll face croatia's donna vekic, ranked 70th in the world. the draw for queens which starts tomorrow will see defending champion andy murray face fellow brit aljaz bedene in the first round. murray beat him in the second round last year. wigan warriors are into the semifinals of the challenge cup, surviving a late warrington fightback yesterday to win 27—26. four converted tries, including this from john bateman, and a drop goal had put wigan clear going into the final stages. but warrington could have forced extra time with the last kick of the game, only for it to drift wide. castleford play hull fc this afternoon in the final quarterfinal
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england strengthened their position at the top of their pool in the hockey world league semifinals with a 7—3 thrashing of malaysia. samuel ward and mark gleghorne scored twice, as did captain barry middleton. as well as reaching the world league finals later in the year, the top five teams qualify for the world cup in india next year. scotland's men are in the other pool. if a 3—0 defeat to the netherlands means they've lost both a busy afternoon of sport.|j a busy afternoon of sport. i know it is sunny and people will be outside, but why not watch the cricket? nottingham open. and then the golf this evening until the early hours of the morning. i have a better plan. play golf, record everything off and watch it later and then watch the golf throughout the night. you are lucky you are not working tomorrow! what is interesting about the sports
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written is? all of it! -- the sports bulletins. not a single mention of football. england under 21s playing in the year rose, women's euros... don't spoil it by mentioning it! in the year rose, women's euros... don't spoil it by mentioning mm is good football, not that day—to—day drudgery. lots to look forward to. thank you. when warrant officer kim hughes risked his own life in afghanistan to manually disarm seven bombs without wearing protective clothing, he saved the lives of eight of his colleagues. he was awarded the george cross for what the ministry of defence described as "the single most outstanding act of explosive ordnance disposal ever recorded in afghanistan. " kim has now written a book to explain what he calls the human story behind his actions. he spoke to charlie and i about his experiences. when you first do it, it is a very
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surreal moment. to be faced with something that could kill you in an insta nt, something that could kill you in an instant, it drives it home. the ability for us to go and do that is great and the feeling we get when we achieve that is phenomenal, but we are trained to such a high standard within the british armed forces to be able to look at that device and get on with it. we saw an image a second ago of you lying there, doing thejob you are second ago of you lying there, doing the job you are trained, as you say, highly trained to do, but nonetheless, is there still a thought process about the danger you are in? there is. but we look at everything around that scenario when it comes to the device you're dealing with, not just it comes to the device you're dealing with, notjust focused on exactly what we are doing in front of us, looking at the environment we are working in, what the signs are,
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the local population in and around the local population in and around the area, we formulate a threat assessment. we are aware of everything to do with that device and everything in and around it. in theory, by the time we get down there and physically on the belt buckle, we know what we are dealing with. in your book, you have written about your journey, how you joined the army. many will relate to it and what the army did for you in terms of transforming your personality and your responsibilities. explain to us how you have gone from a young kid, in your words, how you have gone from a young kid, in yourwords, a how you have gone from a young kid, in your words, a chubby young kid, bullied, not very confident at school, to someone who went to the top of their game and responsible for dozens of lives. i think certainly early on, in my younger yea rs certainly early on, in my younger years as certainly early on, in my younger yea rs as a certainly early on, in my younger years as a child, i wanted an escape. i was brought up on a council estate in telford, in shropshire, and i wanted to get away from that. i did not want to fall
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into the bad crowds. the army was my out. it was my escape. the armed forces, the army, it has given me everything to make me the person i am today. don't get me wrong, everything i am today is also from my past, having a tough childhood, to where i am now, everything in between has made me who i am. with that group responsibility which you can take very seriously and be very mindful of, you also speak about a god complex where you almost fall down on yourself a little bit, is that fair? absolutely. there is a fine line between being confident and arrogant and i have crossed that line on many occasions. i am the first to admit that. we went out on tourin first to admit that. we went out on tour in afghanistan and i think my drive to want the next device, the next bomb, to be the best, to have
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the biggest bomb count, ifell foul of that and i was brought back down a peg or two by one of my closest friends there and a number of insta nces friends there and a number of instances where i was injured, not badly, but enough to make me think to myself, you need to behave now, you need to stop... and not put other lives in danger as well. absolutely. if you go one step too far, wanting the next one, not listening to people closest to you, not only are you putting yourself at risk but other people too. you have been given the highest award for your bravery. you describe it as an adrenaline rush. but the other side, documented in the book, the real trauma that you saw first—hand of seeing friends and colleagues died in the course of what is such a dangerousjob. you in the course of what is such a dangerous job. you are still operational. how do you reflect on
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the darkest of times?” operational. how do you reflect on the darkest of times? i think the way is certainly within bomb disposal, our trade group, ammunition technicians, we use humour to get past a lot of things. i use that when i was away on tour. every one of the operators, every one of the royal engineers, they have had dark moments. i have had a number of them, my colleagues have. the way i got past it was with humourandi the way i got past it was with humour and i locked it away in a box, that is probably not healthy. people hear you say that, they will say, that box will reopen sometime. are you ok, i suppose?” say, that box will reopen sometime. are you ok, i suppose? i feelfine. that is not to say in five, ten, 15 yea rs, that is not to say in five, ten, 15 years, i will not be. ptsd is a massive thing at the moment. i massively support it. close friends of mine have been affected. personally, i do not feel i am affected, but i do not know. i might
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be, i might be in the future. my form of dealing with the pressures and the dark moments and colleagues of mine, it is purely humour and getting past it. at the end of your book, you leave us with you going into training, having finished your tour. you are now active again. is that the correct term? yes. working with bomb disposal units around the country. we are very mindful of what happened in manchester. is that something your team would be involved in? i am part of the royal logistics corps and the regiment itself covers anything from conventional ammunition is found across the uk, up to improvised explosive device is. yes, the regiment responded to manchester and they respond every day on the ground doing some form of task, whether it be an improvised explosive device or conventional munition found, a
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grenade or something dug up, the quys grenade or something dug up, the guys are grenade or something dug up, the guys are extremely busy. thank you for coming in. the book is an extraordinary read. a real learning curve for those of us looking in from the outside. thank you. very charming man, very humble, considering what he does. hugely courageous. warrant officer kim hughes talking to charlie and i. kim's book is called painting the sand. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... services will take place today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. the gap between rich and poor is growing across britain, according to a new report from the resolution foundation. almost but not everywhere in the uk, we have been enjoying glorious weather. yesterday was officially the hottest day of the year — 30.2 degrees was recorded in london.
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it's expected to be even hotter today, with highs of up to 32 degrees. helen will bring us more details shortly, but first here are some sunny scenes from yesterday. music: "walking on sunshine" glorious weather. it does make you feel good. looking outside the window in salford quays, glorious blue skies, not always the case, but it is fantastic today. we will enjoy that. i will say goodbye now. i am that. we will say goodbye now. i am going to do the news for andrew marr. father's day! i got a bag of gums. i thought you were going wine gums. i thought you were going to say a bag of wine. i would have
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been worried! the morning's weather, it is hot! it is not even the hottest. of it is not even the hettestpaxteef day yet. i am just putting this the day yet. i am just putting this up, the bearer of doom and gloom, bearin up, the bearer of doom and gloom, bear in mind, very strong sunshine and around the coast, it feels fresh, but the sun is just as strong and it is not for all, cloud in the north and west. day, and it is not for all, cloud in the north and west. - day, it is north and west. father's day, it is for most a really lovely day. this is chesterfield in derbyshire, the poppies are beautiful. however, very high levels of pollen affecting many parts of the country as well as the very strong sunshine. i view of the brecon beacons. the satellite picture to show you it is not all enjoying the sunshine, parts of the highlands and western islands, cloud. it will come and go, but there will be patchy rain and a stiff south—westerly breeze. eastern parts of scotland and northern
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ireland, really good spells of sunshine and it will be hot too. 26 in edinburgh yesterday. we could see that again today. there isi little that again today. there is a little bit of sea fog around. it is cooler because of the refreshing sea breezes. the difference in temperature between the coast and inland. we are thinking somewhere could get 32 degrees. the small chance of a thunderstorm later today. in east anglia and the south—east. more chance if you're watching the golf in wisconsin. quite a lot of showers here. any storms here will be few and far between. the main difference overnight is the weather front toppling further south, but in the south, uncomfortable for sleeping and the humidity will spread further north. we are starting to see things cool down a little bit in the north tomorrow. more cloud on monday and tuesday. by tuesday, starting to
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taper off. it will take into the middle part and perhaps latter part to clear. plenty going on. we will keep you updated. enjoy the stands—— enjoy the sunshine, stay safe. you enjoy your day as well. with humble beginnings in a shropshire garden, it has bloomed into one of the bbc‘s most iconic programmes. as gardeners' world turns 50, kay alexander has been digging through the decades to investigate how a show rooted in plants and personalities has experienced such enduring success. 50 years ago, the advent of colour television enabled the bbc to make a new horticultural programme and gardeners' world was born. it was presented by the legendary percy thrower from his garden near shrewsbury. good evening.
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september. the sun still shining. in my family, everything stopped dead for gardeners' world. my mother was a keen gardener and so was this little girl. i am still a big fan of the programme. peter was one of the presenters in the 1970s and is still a big influence in gardening today. percy was god and everybody watched every friday without question. and if he showed a plant on his programme, then by 10am the next day, they would be sold out across the country. the effect was remarkable. in 50 years, there are a number of personalities who have made their name on gardeners' world, including geoff hamilton whose garden was one of the eight gardens used over the years. after he died in 1996, alan titchmarsh became the next main presenter. if this does not make you drool, nothing will. i think i am proud of having had a hand in gardeners' world and having been a part of its history. my mission in life is to impress upon people the pleasure to be
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gained from growing things and the importance of keeping our planet green. it is the sharp end of looking after the planet, gardening. since the programme debuted in 1967, it has gone through all sorts of fashions and trends and styles. is there a magic ingredient that keeps it fresh and exciting? one of the magical things about gardeners' world is the fact you canjoin the head gardener in their garden every friday. it is a value of looking over the garden gate to see it is about plants, passionate plant people and the places in which those plants grow. lumbering outside broadcast vehicles of the past have been replaced by the latest technology. but what about the future of the programme? every gardener knows that every season is different and new and exciting and if you can
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just capture the excitement, you will not have to worry about the future. just go with it. no worries there, then. so happy golden birthday, gardeners' world. and here is to the next 50 years! happy birthday! we have been asking for your pictures of summer blooms. let us show you some wonderful pictures. a great year for show you some wonderful pictures. a great yearfor their show you some wonderful pictures. a great year for their roses, it certainly has. john sent in a photo of this beautiful pink bowl of beauty variety of peonies. lovely bright summer colours in this garden in seaford. and these hanging baskets, they are quite a spectacle, those are helen's. and in exeter, this photo of a particularly colourful garden. wonderful. thank you. now let us talk about
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inventions. now, where do you think the running shoe was invented? you'd be forgiven for thinking america orjamaica. but it was actually the brainchild of bolton born, joe foster. it's facts like this that historic england says celia richardson from the organisation joins us now, along with social historian, charlotte wildman. good morning to you - why do you think now is the time to make sure we know these things? we live in uncertain times and our sense of national identity and pride is really important. what we are doing is we have got ten judges, category judges, and they will help us, we are seeking public nominations to find the 100 places in england that told a national story. there is so much going on. we have layer on layer of history and we are looking for the best bits. which areas have been a more -- which areas have been ignored the most? this is a very old country and a small country so lots
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has happened here, the splitting of the atom, the uncovering of dna, the industrial revolution started here, we have a lot to choose from. a lot of science places where amazing things have happened, the atom being split in manchester, not a lot of people know about it. we are saying, this extraordinary thing happened here. we need the public‘s help. we are not just looking for here. we need the public‘s help. we are notjust looking for the obvious stuff, we want the unusual stories as well. we are finding out fascinating stuff. the reason i asked about which areas perhaps have asked about which areas perhapshaxe more forgotten is because there been more forgotten is because there a pride been more forgotten is because there a - pride when you can claim is a real pride when you can claim something for your own as a community. absolutely. knowing stories behind inventions and it gives particularly landmarks, it gives particularly smaller towns and a sense of their uniqueness. i love hearing from people about what is special about
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their city. i people about what is special about theircity. lam people about what is special about their city. i am from birkenhead. everyone who knows me is fed up of hearing about how birkenhead park was the inspiration for central park in new york. that is a good one! it is fascinating to see how passionate people are about their towns' claims to uniqueness. this is about whether cornish pasties come from cornwall or devon. does it - i would or devon. does it matter? i would not like to delve into... i think it does matter. we are living in uncertain times. towns, cities, they used to have identity built around trade, jobs. so much- over the trade, jobs. so much change over the past century. that is no longer the case. it is important to have these accolades. thank you very much for talking to us. that is it. dan and louise will be with you tomorrow. louise will be with yoo tomorrow
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looise will be with yoo tomorrow the sunshine. put on suntan enjoy the sunshine. put on suntan lotion though. take care. this is bbc news. the headlines at 9am: government staff are drafted in to manage the response to the grenfell tower fire, following fierce criticism. chorch services will teke'ptooe to remember those affected by the grenfell tower fire. queen's speech to parliament next year is to be cancelled to ee-ee-e-ee— =e +e lee eeeeeggee +e. e, we, . e— mps ee-l-l-e-ee— =e le ee eeeeellee le. m, lee . e— mps time ee-l-l-e-ee— =e le ee eeeeellee le m, lee . e— mps time to ee-l-l-e-ee— =e le ee eeeeellee le m, lee . e— mps - time to scrutinise allow mps more time to scrutinise brexit legislation. at least a0 people are - in a at least a0 people are killed in a forest fire in central portugal, which continues to whjoh’oontinoesto—soreetb names of growing inequality the names of growing inequality across britain. a new report says the gap between rich and poor is getting wider. also in the next hour we'll take a look at the papers with broadcaster vincent moss and journalist sean dilly.
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