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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 20, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's tuesday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling in for victoria. welcome to the programme. hundreds of people attended a vigil last night close to the north london mosque where a van was driven into a crowd of muslim worshippers. but will it take more than shows of unity to bring people together after yesterday's attack? and how do we prevent further violence? everyone is still shocked by what happened. there is a little bit of fear, but at the same time, no—one‘s staying away or hiding because of what happened, everyone is still coming out to pray. a week since the devastating fire at grenfell tower, we speak to a family who lived on the 15th floor, and who escaped with nothing but their lives, about where they have been staying and what support they have received. and with more and more high—profile sportswomen taking time out to have children, uk cyclist dame sarah storey, has been finding out what is being done to keep mums in sport. hello, welcome to the programme,
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we're live until 11 this morning. we'll bring you the developing news on ba rclays bank. we'll bring you the developing news on barclays bank. four individuals are facing fraud conspiracy charges including the former chief executive. it's a complex story and oui’ executive. it's a complex story and our correspondent will be here to explain. get in touch on everything we are talking about this morning. our top story today. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are shocked and devastated. father—of—four darren osborne was held on suspicion of attempted murder and terror offences after a van hit muslim worshippers in finsbury park. last night a vigil took place near the scene of the attack. simon clemison reports. call to prayer. they came to break their fast with prayer,
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just as they had 2a hours a demonstration that nothing has changed, ramadan too important to miss. everyone is still feeling shocked about what happened, there is a little bit of fear but at the same time, like, noone‘s staying away or hiding because of what happened. everyone is still coming out to pray. of course we are coming, it's a mosque, you have to pray. we cannot run away from our pray. it is after midnight and it was about this time last night that the attack took place. people have come from other parts of london to pray here at the mosque tonight in a show of solidarity, they've been embracing in the streets but the leaders here have told me despite being one of the busiest times within ramadan it has been quieter tonight, some have stayed away. earlier the community held a vigil attended by the commissioner of the metropolitan police cressida dick. and the mayor of london who spoke of communities fighting division. what you've seen over the last 2a hours is muslims, jews, christians, hindus, sikhs, those members of an organised faith
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and those that aren't, rich, poor, old, young, coming together and saying, ‘not in our name'. officers are continuing to hold a man arrested under terror laws who the bbc understands to be 47—year—old darren osborne from cardiff. his family said they were in shock and disbelief. our correspondent simon clemison is in finsbury park. simon, we were hearing in your report about the vigil, talk of unity. we can see the hashtag behind you, uniteded against all terror. what is the mood there now? hi, very good morning, joanna. well, this really was what we saw overnight, what i onced, was a demonstration of strength by a community doing little more than what they would normally do. they came to prayers injust what they would normally do. they came to prayers in just the same way had this not attack taken place. i was in the mosques early hours, headed up the stairs, there was a
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bit of food as they broke their fast. it was packed and outside it was quieter, the feeling was that it was quieter, the feeling was that it was slightly quieter. one of the leaders suggesting to me that people were anxious and they did stay away. it may have been of course that they'd just gone to worship in another part of london not realising that the mosque was open. it's a message of unity there, a lot of these flowers don't come from the muslim community, remember, they come from people outside as they come from people outside as they come together to get their message across. i can see come together to get their message across. i can see on come together to get their message across. i can see on the building over there an arsenal flag, that really is all the divide they want in this community, between two north london clubs, arsenal and spurs. but there is a lot of underlying tension here, not least to do with the language used by the media. that's something someone was very keen to talk to me last night about, when
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the media focuses on religion and when it highlights islam and when it doesn't. he was absolutely furious with the way some of the media are using the words they use, so a tension still that needs resolving. our correspondent, tomos morgan is in cardiff for us. the driver of the van named as father of four darren osborne. what is emerging about him, tomos? police have been carrying out a raid in the house they believe he owned or possibly lived at here in cardiff. it's in the north—east area of cardiff. they arrived here around mid afternoon yesterday and they've been here overnight and there's still a police presence here this morning. that van that was hired by the potential suspect was actually from a village to the north—west of
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cardiff about 50 miles away in pontyclu n. cardiff about 50 miles away in pontyclun. south wales police are passing on any information they get to the metropolitan police. i've been speaking to people in this community and they've been telling me that really the overwhelming feeling is that of shock really that if this turns out to be true, there's someone in the community that could have carried out such an horrific incident. we heard in simon's piece, there was a family statement. the family saying they are truly shocked. unbelievable they've called it and they're devastated for the families that have been injured. they say darren osborne himself had never expressed any racist views. south wales police continuing their investigations here in cardiff and passing on all the details to the police in london. annita is in the bbc
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newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the serious fraud office has charged barclays and four former executives including its chief executive, john varley with fraud over the bank's dealings with qatar at the height of the financial crisis. barclays raised emergency funding from qatar in 2008 to avoid a government bail out. we can speak to our business editor simonjack. i understand these are the first senior manages to face criminal charges over alleged activities during the financial crisis? yes, it's been a long time coming, nearly a decade. five years of a serious fraud office investigation‘s finally brought charges against four former executives there and barclays plc itself. it comes around events surrounding an emergency fund—raising from middle eastern investors who put £7 billion into the bank back in 2008. two charges —
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one is that barclays lent those investors some of the money which they used the buy the shares, so in effect lending to itself which is a big no—no, as faras effect lending to itself which is a big no—no, as far as regulators are concerned and also they didn't disloads the fees they were paying for advisory services to qatar holding who was the investor. these we re holding who was the investor. these were advisory fees that had no real value, that is the allegation. the holding company of barclays, not the actual bank itself — that is quite important because if a bank which operates all around the world actually is convicted of criminal charges, it finds it very difficult indeed to operate in those markets soit's the holding company, the bit that owns ba rclays soit's the holding company, the bit that owns barclays bank that's been charged. john varley, the former chief executive and rogerjenkins, head of the middle east operation, are the two executives. we have heard from rogerjenkin this is morning, he said he's going to vigorously defend the action. different calculations for the individuals and for the bank to
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make. if ba rclays individuals and for the bank to make. if barclays feels the holding company has to plead guilty, it gets away with a fine in the low hundreds of millions and can get on with its life, it might consider doing that. jenkins says he'll vigorously defend the charges because it can have immications on their directorships. an important moment, some will say the sfo in a way have gone after the wrong target here because you will remember rbs lloyds and others went to the government, you could argue that ba rclays to the government, you could argue that barclays made efforts to avoid taxpayer money that had got it into this trouble, so some will say the sfo may eventually get their man, some may say it's the t wrong person they're after. an american student, who was freed last week by north korea after spending 15 months in prison, has died. otto warmbier , who was 22, was in a coma when he was flown home last week. his family has accused north korea of torturing him after he was arrested for stealing a propaganda sign.
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president trump spoke shortly after his death. ijust wanted to pass onward that otto warmbier has just passed away. ijust wanted to pass on word that otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea. a lot of bad things happened. but at least we got him home to be with his parents where they were so happy to see him, even though he was in such a bad condition. he just passed away half an hour ago. it is a brutal regime and we will be able to handle it. our correspondent steve evans is in seoul. steve, a huge number of questions that the warmbier family and the us authorities will want answers to of course. what are the chances they're going to get any response from north korea?
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i say pretty slim really. the whole thing reeks with suspicion. you will remember this is a lad, 22—year—old student, went to north korea and he made the very, very foolish mistake of trying to steal a poster from a hotel. he was arrested on his way out, he was sentenced to 15 years ha rd out, he was sentenced to 15 years hard labourfor out, he was sentenced to 15 years hard labour for that, he out, he was sentenced to 15 years hard labourfor that, he took out, he was sentenced to 15 years hard labour for that, he took it very badly. in his trial which didn't last any time at all, he can be seen whaling and weeping at he his fate. that's the last we saw of him. then it emerged a month ago that, according to north korea, he'd fallen into a coma. north korea said he'd got ill with botch lift and gone into a coma, never recovered but they hadn't told anybody, hadn't told the us authorities, hadn't told his parents until a month ago. what then happened is the us diplomat plus two doctors flew out to
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pyongyang, discovered he really was ina very pyongyang, discovered he really was in a very serious state indeed. north korea seems to have panicked because an american citizen was about to die in one of its cells and that, it seems on the face of it, is why they called in the americans. the americans took him back in an air ambulance and he died promptly. so the obvious question is, when did he fall into a coma and why did he fall into a coma? those answers i don't think we are going to get. the government here in south korea is saying it wants to know the condition of the nine remaining south korean citizens and us citizens being held by north korea. it's got no response. philip hammond has demanded a brexit
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deal that manages and not shuts down migration. he said the future of the economy was inexorably linked to reaching the right agreement with the eu. a recent poll showed that 90% of respondents believe free trade is positive for our economy regardless of how they voted in last year's referendum. we are not about to turn inward. but we do want to ensure that the arrangements we have in place work for our economy. just as the british people understand the benefits of trade, so too they understand how important it is to business to be able to access global talent and to move individuals around their organisations. more than £200,000 has been handed out to 180 families affected by the g re nfell tower 180 families affected by the grenfell tower fire in west london. the payments were recorded by the government's newly formed grenfell response team. it said 78 families
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had been rehoused either locally or in neighbouring boroughs and that 126 hotel places had been secured. avan 126 hotel places had been secured. a van driver has been killed after migrants put tree trunks on to the motorway to stop traffic near calais. the incident happened in the early hours on the a16 after the van registered in poland hit a lorry which had been blocked by the tree trunks. nine eritrean migrants were found in one of the lorries. a teenage boy's drowned in a reservoir in rochdale in greater manchester. he was reportedly swimming with friends at the greenboth reservoir at6 friends at the greenboth reservoir at 6 o'clock yesterday evening. a spokesman said there were not thought to be any suspicious circumstances and his family has been informed. scientists have begun human trials of a cholesterol lowering vaccine to help prevent heart disease. the injection is
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designed to stop fatty deposits clogging the arteries. it would offer patients an alternative to taking daily pills to cut risks of stroke, angina and heart attacks. the number of tests carried out in england to identify if people have issues such as sleep apnoea, has doubled in the last nine years. it's believed one and a half million people across the uk have the condition, which can cause sufferers to stop breathing periodically whilst asleep. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. shortly we will be talking to the head of the finbsury park mosque about how his congregation and the wider community have reacted to yesterday's attack. and what more must be done to tackle far—right extremism. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now and hugh ferris is at the bbc sport centre for us this morning. good morning, hugh. we're going to start
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with rugby because the lions are playing their final warm—up match right now ahead of saturday's first test against the all blacks? yes, they are. good morning. traditionally it's the game that nobody really wants to be involved in if you play today with the first test against the all blacks just four days away in auckland, it's unlikely you'll play in that one. the game is in hamilton. it's under way. it's against the chiefs. the stadium had extra seating employed. it means there is some 30,000. the two previous defeats have come from this midweek team if you like so. a lot to prove for them and warren gatland the coach of the lions insist they can still prove that they are capable of taking their place either on president bench or in the starting 15 even for that first test. so who has been impressing? let's look at the best of the action so far. somebody who hasn't been, that's the england prop, barging off the ball into the chiefs prop and so he has seen ten
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minute in the sin—bin. a couple of penalties exchanged through bigger. an opportunist try in the 25th minute to give the lions what is with about five minutes until half—time, a 13—3 lead over the chiefs. onto tennis and andy murray begins the defence of his queens' title today? that's right. he won it five times, trying to win it for a sixth time. the five times that he has won it so far isa the five times that he has won it so far is a record for the queen's tournament. including of those 5—1 in each of the years that he has gone on to win wimbledon. so clearly, it's an important part of his process in warming up for the home grand slam. the world number one said he played some of his best ten us at queen's. vital preparation for him, but it's not the only reason that he loves queen's. it was where i won my first professional match. so i have a lot of great memories over the years. i've played, it has been my most
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successful tournament. i love the courts here. i like the conditions. it's very close to where i live. so i get to stay at home. it is always important to not to have too much of a commute. he plays this afternoon, another brit, kyle edmund lost in his first round match. also in birmingham, this week, the women have another one of those pre—wimbledon tournaments. naomi brodie is through to the last 16 there. she managed to beat the world number 39. in the end it was 7-6, 6-0 world number 39. in the end it was 7—6, 6—0 two contrasting sets. heather watson lost. johanna konta who is seeded numberfourfor the birmingham classic, she will take to the court to start her campaign. she's playing a ukrainian. you can follow that on bbc radio 5 live sports extra. they have commentary from 1pm. in a proudly multicultural area
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of london, where the biggest rivalry is normally if you support arsenal or spurs, the uk endured its fourth terror attack in just three months. a group of muslim worshippers were hit when a van mounted the pavement and drove into them in finsbury park. the attack happened during ramadan, muslim's holy month, after midnight, when many people were there attending evening prayers. the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick said the finsbury park incident was "quite clearly an attack on muslims". with the final days of ramadan being particularly significant and eid celebrations planned for early next week, does the attack play into the hands of extremists and does the community here feel safe? just to practice our religion, we have to look behind our backs. we're living in fear. we shouldn't have to live like this. we're not safe no more.
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like my daughter, who is working, they couldn't, this morning they couldn't go. they say, "how can we go to work?" that's the last thing you need, like, it feels like, you know, it's trying to divide the community. asa as a muslim how do i keep my son and i safe? because we don't feel safe at the moment. i didn't want to send him to school. well, first of all, i'm a muslim, i have children, i know many members of the community across britain that have expressed a very similar feeling to what you just said. they hear all of these things happening in london, as a muslim, you feel so pushed out. chanting: love will win.
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love will win. love will win. those who try to divide us and who aim to spread fear, hatred and division will not succeed. let's talk now to chaimaa. she prays most nights at finsbury park mosque and says the attack isn't going to stop herfrom going back to pray, despite her family being afraid. ruqaiya haris has seen a rise in islamaphobic attacks online since the attacks in manchester and london took place. alsojoining us is ishmerai muhammad, a bouncer who helped to save people during the borough market attack a few weeks ago. he says as the attackers raised their knives and shouted "this is for allah," he stepped out to save people as he believed
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they weren't acting in the name of his faith. we hope to speak to mohammed kozber, chairman of finsbury park mosque. tell us how you are feeling in the aftermath of this attack. first of all, hello. ican't aftermath of this attack. first of all, hello. i can't say that i'm particularly shocked. we live in a climate right now where there is such a high rise in islamophobia, you know, visibly muslim people are being attacked verbally and physically on our streets every single day. so i'm not going to sit here and say that, you know, people weren't fearing for their lives. i mean we didn't expect to be as horrific as we have seen. but i mean i'm trying not to let it, you know, deter me from going about my normal life and you know going to the mosque. so what sort of things have
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you experienced? i mean, i don't feel like, i feel like every visibly muslim person has experienced some form of islamophobia. i've had close friends of mine... sorry, have you directly? yeah, i mean, i've experienced a lot of islamophobia, but it has not been as horrific as so many things that my close friends have experienced, but i don't think, it's not necessary... what have you experienced specifically and what have your friends experienced specifically that you say is worse than snuff you don't feel safe walking on the street. you feel like you're blamed. you feel because of the type of messages that are going on in the media, no one looks at you and thinks she is just a normal member of society. sorry to keep interrupting, but i'm wondering why you think that is how people are seeing you? why i think it's
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happening to people like me because i'm visibly muslim? why do you have that prospective that people are looking at you in that way? because i look muslim. because of the type of m essa g es i look muslim. because of the type of messages that the media are perpetuating, silly headlines that one in five muslim sympathise with radicalism. things that are not true. how do you think it makes us feel that some people in the uk are sitting at home, have never met a muslim person and never inat the acted with a muslim person and they are listening to these headlines, they are going to slowly internalise this message that all muslims are a threat. i have had friends that had their hijaabs ripped off and their niqabs ripped off in the street. i wouldn't say we live like we feel, you know, free in our streets which is such a sad feeling, but it's, the
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reality is islamophobia is a reality. you also say that you've experienced increased islamophobia. tell us what your experiences have been? every time there is an attack, there is a big spike in islamophobia, that's kind of reported statistically. i've experienced that online countless times. i think any muslim person who is actually remotely in the kind of public eye talks about these kinds of issues. braces themselves for, you know, a kind of onslaught of abusive messages. targeted at them solely for being muslim really and even, you know, i've said before actually that even when i sent condolence to say victims after a terror attack or talk about how muslims have actually condemned these kinds of things and what muslim communities have done to deter extremism, i still get islamophobic abuse which kind of shows me, it doesn't really matter
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who somebody says, it is not about somebody being extreme, it isjust the fact that they are a muslim. do you feel that your experiences are taken seriously? not particularly, but then you know i do understand that in the kind of online sort of realm, it's very difficult for, i think, social media platforms to actually track every single kind of instance of abuse especially when it is such a huge amount... has your experience been online rather than face—to—face? experience been online rather than face-to-face? online. but what is quite terrifying, you have friends that you've heard these kind of stories and when i'm seeing these kind of abusive messages online, of course, most people are empowered by that anonymity, but it doesn't mean thaw don't feel threatened when you go out and about. just because something violent or abusive kind of hasn't happened to me yet in person, just the fact that i get that online, makes me think that it could very well happen. obviously, as you
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say, online trolling is people do it behind the mask of anonymity. people behaving actually face—to—face is a different thing. do you, you know, when you are out and about, you say that you have this perception because of what you're experiencing on line, but the day—to—day reality do you feel that there is integration and how do you feel that you are seen? it depends really where i am. it depends what time of day i'm travelling. i've said actually before that in most areas of london, especially in central london i do feel quite safe. there isa london i do feel quite safe. there is a sizeable muslim population in london. so i think people are quite used to our presence here. it might be very different in the rest of the uk and from what i've heard it is and there is different statistics of attacks and things like that, but then, you know, at the same time when i travel late at night, and you know, i'm on the tube and people are very drunk and there is a kind of hostility that you can feel like people can make comments or they can just give you horrible looks and you
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know what it is, you know. are you reassured now that the metropolitan police commissioner has said this incident in finsbury park was clearly a n incident in finsbury park was clearly an attack on muslims and the community will now see more police including armed officers in the area particularly around religious establishments. has what has happened here kind of changed, sort of brought this effectively out into the open in a way that's being discussed and looked at more closely? i mean, i think, discussed and looked at more closely? i mean, ithink, it's really promising and it's good that it's actually being referred to as a terrorist incident number one. i think that's really important and it has helped a lot of muslims be able to deal with the reality of it knowing that people do see it as terrorism, but unfortunately, it's not really enough and we have to look at how are these kind of opinions really coming out? what are, you know, we see this kind of islamophobia being reproduced this the press time and time again. we have to ask how these people, because it's notjust this have to ask how these people, because it's not just this terror attack, this might have been the
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most serious one against muslims in a while, but you know the same year that lee rigby was murdered we had a 75—year—old man in birmingham who was walking home from the mosque, he was walking home from the mosque, he was stabbed and killed. it is not really a new thing for the muslims, but it might be a new thing for wider society to recognise, but women have their scarfs pulled off in the day and are spat on. these kind of things keep happening and we have to look at hamas opinions, what kind of opinions are actually e—six nationsly radicalising you know the people that are responsible for this kind of islamophobic abuse and violent attacks. you wanted to come in... yeah, ifelt violent attacks. you wanted to come in... yeah, i felt like, violent attacks. you wanted to come in... yeah, ifelt like, it's almost become like a nolal thing. it's normalised. it's almost become like, you know, like the norm for muslim women to walk up the street and expect to have their hijabs pulled off and to expect comments being made and i do feel like, it is important and it is, you know
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reassuring that we have an increased presence of police especially around mosques and other places of worship, but i do feel as people we need it start asking questions. we need to start asking questions. we need to start addressing the underlying issue of islamophobia and hate crime and why they happen in the first place and how we as a society can tackle it? you were at borough market, you were working in security in borough market when that happened and you also went to finsbury park as well. what's your view on the kind of way, the responses to these different attacks? do you mean from the community or the media? the media and the community? for the most part, when you look at the incidents that take place, the route of it is you are dealing with a lot of people who're misinformed and uneducated. what i've seen from the community is quite a promising response. people
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are very quite a promising response. people are very clear that there is a distinction between that of those who carry out extremist attacks if the name of religion and those who're sincere believes in a religion like myself. there were many who did not know that i was a muslim, so when these men came towards us with the knife saying, this is for allah, my first thought was, not the allah i serve, because that's so far—fetched from where we are guided to by the prophet muhammad, peace be upon him. wejust don't condone that. we don't stand for that at all. i want to bring in the head of finsbury park mosque on the head of finsbury park mosque on the phone. thank you very much for joining us. four terror attacks now in the uk in three months but the first that has specifically targeted muslims. what is your reaction to that? well, it's shocking. we have been shocked by the incident yesterday or the day before. as we
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have been shocked by the terrorist attack which happened in manchester, westminster and london bridge. terrorists have no religion. we are all united against the terrorist attacks. these extremists, wherever they come from, or whatever background they come from, their aim is to divide us, to create fear, division and hatred. we'll not let them do that. yesterday in finsbury park, we showed how we can get together as communities. we have hundreds of people come to a vigil yesterday outside the mosque. faith leaders, community leaders, politicians, media — all got together to send a strong message to the extremists that they'll not win over us the extremists that they'll not win overus and we the extremists that they'll not win over us and we are the extremists that they'll not win over us and we are all united against their hatred and their attack on our communities. yesterday we had the prime minister, theresa
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may, she come to visit the mosque and listened to the concerns of the community, the faith leaders, who spoke with her about the rise of islamophobia and how much thissish use is making a big problem to, not just the muslim community, but to the wider side. there is a woman saying she can't go to the station at night alone any more. we are in britain's 215t century and we'll never should let these things happen in our country. we are all united against extremists and mosques like finsbury park mosque doing whatever they can to prevent extremists from being in our mosque and community centres. we are doing whatever we can as mosques to make sure that we engage positively with the community and this proved yesterday when even
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jeremy corbyn, the labour leader who came and addressed the community as well at finsbury park mosque, the police commissioner as well. this is the spirit we want, we want the spirit of unity against those that have tried to divide us. thank you very much. thank you also to my other guests. keep your thoughts coming in. still to come,we speak to a family who lived on the 15th floor and managed to escape the grenfell tower blaze. we'll talk to them about where they've been staying since that night. returning to elite sport after having a child, sarah sterey and successful british female paralympian and successful british female pa ralympian has and successful british female paralympian has been finding out what is being done to keep mums in sport. the serious fraud office has charged barclays
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and four former executives — including its chief executive, john varley — with fraud over the bank's dealings with qatar at the height of the financial crisis. barclays raised emergency funding from qatar in 2008 to avoid a government bail out. our correspondent simon gompertz is here. explain what the charges are about, simon? this goes back to 2008, the financial crisis. if you remember, the taxpayer was called in to rescue two major banks, lloyds and rbs, but they weren't the only ones who faced financial challenges. barclays was one of those. rather than calling on the taxpayer, it went to arab oil—rich investors to raise money on its own account and in 2008, in two trans.s, it its own account and in 2008, in two tra ns.s, it raised its own account and in 2008, in two trans.s, it raised £12 billion in order to keep the bank going. so at
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the time, it was seen as the bank that managed to rescue itself. but then questions immediately started being asked about how that money had been raised. that is what these charges relate to. so, as you say, the bank itself, barclays plc faces fraud charges, but alsojohn varley, the chief executive and roger jenkins who was a major figure in arranging that financing, thomas colarres, a former chief executive and richard both, high up in the bank at the time. they all face high charges, some in relation to the first money—raising in june charges, some in relation to the first money—raising injune 2008 and two of them, mr varley and mr jenkins were later fund—raising in the same year. what are the questions around how the money was raised? one is that there were advisory fees of obvious £300 million paid to the qataris and there's questions over the status
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and transparency of the fees. the other question is over a loan of over £2 billion that was made by ba rclays to over £2 billion that was made by barclays to the qataris and there's a suggestion that some of that money might have been used then to help them financially when they were buying shares in barclays to shore up buying shares in barclays to shore up the company. so both of those things at the serious fraud office's attention. nine years ago, these investigations have been going on for five years, this investigations have been going on forfive years, this is investigations have been going on for five years, this is the first time that a british bank chief executive has faced criminal fraud charges over events that happened during the financial crisis. thank you very much. now let us catch up with all the news with annita in the newsroom. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". father—of—four darren osborne, was held on suspicion of attempted
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murder and terror offences after a van hit muslim worshippers in finsbury park. last night, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, addressed a vigil near the scene of the attack. make sure we remember that these terrorists, whatever their inspiration, do not speak for the vast, vast majority of people, and what they want to do is attack our values, our freedoms and the respect we have for each other, and we are not going to let them win. we will defeat this terrorism. the serious fraud office has charged barclays and four former executives including its former chief executive, john varley with fraud. the charges relate to emergency funding the bank raised from qatar and abu dhabi in 2008 to avoid a bail out. the payments were recorded
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by the government's newly formed grenfell response team. it said 78 families had been rehoused either locally or in neighbouring boroughs and that 126 hotel places had been secured. it's the final chance for the lions players to impress coach warren gatland. they're playing their last warm up game before saturday's first test against the all blacks. it's against the chiefs in hamilton. jack nowell has scored the only try of the match so far, scampering over in the first half. other than that, two penalties apiece and at half time, the lions are leading 13—6. a crucial victory for the england under 21s at the european champoinships. nathan redmond scores the winner as they come from behind to beat slovakia in poland. they're top of their group and will qualify for the semi
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finals with another win. andy murray plays a brit on centre court this afternoon, saying another successful week in london will be a big boost to his wimbledon preparations. and that is all the sport for you for now. much more after 10. around 80 of the families who lost everything in the grenfell tower fire are being rehoused this week, as the slow process of recovery begins for some of the survivors. the initial £5 million fund allocated to support them has begun to be distributed; around 180 families have received £5,000. but the greatest cost of the tragedy was in human lives. it is understood that at least 79 people died and there's been anger at the official response and what some call the chaos in the days after the fire. the government and the kensington council have come in for particular criticism. the government has now written to local authorities across the country, asking them to check if tower blocks have been
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cladded using similar materials to those at the grenfell site. jim reed is here with the latest on that part of the investigation. thanks joanna. there are now a series of investigations going on into cause of the fire. and they'll look at the materials used in the construction. if we look at the outside of g re nfell tower. there's a number of reports that the fire started on the fourth floor. and then spread very quickly. the first call to the fire service at five to midnight. by 01.15 there were reports it had reached the 17th floor. that's had fire safety experts very worried, it simply shouldn't spread so quickly. this is footage first aired on the bbc‘s panorama programme last night of firefighters on the way to the blaze. so that shows just how out
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of the ordinary this was? yes so the question is how did the fire spread so quickly? well we don't know for sure. but a lot of attention still on the cladding on the outside of the building. last year there was a £10 million project to improve the block. covered the building in something called acm, stands for aluminium composite material. it's two sheets of metal with a filler inside. the brand is called reynerbond. that is the brand that
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was used. there are three different types of that material with different levels of protection. from speaking to the supplier, we think they used the most flammable version, the least fire retardant, the one with a so—called plastic core. that version is banned in much of the us and europe to buildings of this height. so why are these panels allowed in the uk? well the government says says, in fact, they are not. and using them above 18m would breach building regulations. this was the chancellor speaking over the weekend. my my understanding is that the cladding in question, this flammable cladding in question, this flammable cladding which is banned in europe and the us, is also banned here. that is my understanding. so why did it go up? so there are two separate questions, one is, are our regulations correct, do they permit the right kind of materials and ban
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the right kind of materials and ban the wrong kind of materials? second question is, were they correctly complied? so is that the case? are they banned ? well that's far from clear. the company which supplied the panels told us that the chancellor has got it wrong. and in fact they would not be banned at all in the uk. there appears to be confusion. one person i spoke to describes them as clear as mud so presumably it's something the government will be looking at. they have now written to every council in the country saying, if you use panels like this, you need to send samples as quickly as possible so that they can be tested to see how fire retardant they are. i should mention the main contractor said it did meet all required building regulations and the company which installed the panels said it was not aware of any link between the fire and the exterior cladding
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to this tower. as those investigations continue, stories of how people survived the blaze are coming to light. let's talk to sid—ali atmani and his wife rashida ali who lived in the 15th floor of the block. thank you forjoining us. i was watching you both while we were looking at those pictures. i mean they are distressing for anyone to look at, but that was your home. yes. how are you coping a week on? it's hard. it's like i see everyone i know in the building and i keep remembering, my eyes i'm getting, their faces, every second. remembering, my eyes i'm getting, theirfaces, every second. i'm remembering every few hours someone. i forget that person. i didn't know if he's safe. if that person. and most of the people i used to know, they lived on the top floors and i
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have been looking for them for two days after, i stayed and came back andl days after, i stayed and came back and i looked everywhere to see if they survived, but no one. all the familiar faces, no one survived. on every single level what you are coping with right now is obviously just incredibly difficult... we're feeling like we're still there. that's what we feel. we feel like it's a dream. it's not true. it's not happening. it's like, even now i'm sitting down here and i'm watching the building, nobody can believe that what happened. what help have you had? at the beginning, we wasn't happy. we were unhappy because i think the council, they haven't set up properly a programme
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like bringing groups to deal with it. for example one of the families have a victim and while we are based in hotel, there is old ladies, their condition is very bad. they should have sent the first priority, they have sent the first priority, they have to prioritise and send the doctors to the hotels and send counsellors to the hotels, not asking people to go to the doctors or if you need help. they should have done it. they should... so immediately after it had happened and you got had got out with your lives, although with nothing else, where did you go? where did you stay? we stayed the first night i was in hospital. from he was in hospital. my wife, she stayed with her mum. i took my daughter to my mum, first to my friend and i came back, i stayed awake, going through all the centres, going,
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back, i stayed awake, going through allthe centres, going, i back, i stayed awake, going through all the centres, going, i was standing with the ambulance all night to see if my friend made it, if anyone came out, if the children we used to go to school every morning together, are they all saved. i didn't recognise anyone. there was a lot of people in the building and my neighbour is called steve, he didn't make it. yeah, steve. he was a friendly guy. he has four dogs. we used to chat every morning, every day. he was a great man. ijust felt like i left hill behind. because i didn't recognise there is a fire. ijust went down just to see maybe i will come back again. and ijust left. itook just to see maybe i will come back again. and ijust left. i took my daughter and i left. again. and ijust left. i took my daughterand i left. i again. and ijust left. i took my daughter and i left. i didn't knock on my neighbours and that's really... these things are obviously playing over and over. why i didn't do that, why save someone next to me or anyone. it is completely
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understandable that will be causing you concern going forward. understandable that will be causing you concern going forwardlj understandable that will be causing you concern going forward. i was sleeping to be honest with you. my wife, she smelt and she came to me and said, "i smell smoke." i was very ill. i wasn't, i couldn't even stand. she had to help me to go to use the toilet or to wash. i couldn't eat. i zbt eat for three days. he had a high temperature the night before and i was giving him medication. she was about to tell me we go to hospital, we go in the ambulance. i told him, we go to hospital, we go in the ambulance. itold him, iwill carry you. i don't think it's a big deal. i think it's a small fire. just go down and you will come back. as soon asi down and you will come back. as soon as i left the building with my daughter and i turn and i saw half of the building burning. you just left my daughter with a stranger and iran left my daughter with a stranger and i ran back left my daughter with a stranger and iran back inside. i went to the second floor and then i was stopped andl second floor and then i was stopped and i told them my husband, he can't walk, can you bring him? i give the
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key and no one could reach him really in that time. i thought i lost him. i didn't want to turn back after 20 minute to say my daughter and say to her, "i don't think your dad's coming out. i don't think he can make it. " dad's coming out. i don't think he can make it." he came after i lost hope. he came out like drowsy, didn't know where he is. hope. he came out like drowsy, didn't know where he islj hope. he came out like drowsy, didn't know where he is. i heard a sound. it was a very strange sound, the window, because i was sleeping in my daughter's room. i didn't want to be ill. i stayed in the other room and i heard some things like, even though i was sick and i can't describe that sound. and when i opened the window i saw fire. i saw fire in the window going up. i said my god, my wife she is all right, that's what is going on. are you both getting support in terms of
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being able to actually talk to people about this? because, you know, obviously there is a lot of discussion around the practical assistance, the fund. firstly have you had money from the fund? yesterday. yesterday we had. on fridayle we had £500 from the council. then yesterday we went back to portobello post office and they we re to portobello post office and they were giving £500 to adults. we had £1,000. yeah. so that's something to help you start, but i asked also about, you know, the other support just the sort of human support. what are you... there is a lot of, we did yesterday. there is a lot of donations, muslim, british people, they come from everywhere. everywhere. that's why i wasn't happy because they organised very fast, it was very fast, more faster
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than the counselling they did. talk us through them. you say at the beginning you were in hospital, you went to your mum's and then have you been staying in hotels subsequently? i have been, we went to the hospital for one night and then we have been told that we are in hammersmith and thenl told that we are in hammersmith and then i went back friday to the rugby clu b then i went back friday to the rugby club because we were meeting there with other people who survived. and ididn't with other people who survived. and i didn't know everyone is going to we stway, i didn't know everyone is going to westway, i was in the rugby club most of the time. i waited until the evening to be told where to go and around 6.30pm... evening to be told where to go and around 6.30pm. .. who evening to be told where to go and around 6.30pm... who told evening to be told where to go and around 6.30pm. .. who told you? it was around 6.30pm. .. who told you? it was the council. the officers, they we re was the council. the officers, they were calling me and social worker and people was like, keep calling and people was like, keep calling and telling me did you get somewhere? i said no, i'm still
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waiting. in the end, through the evening, they told me to go to where we are now, kensington high street, the tower hotel. when i went there, my name wasn't on the list and the receptionist couldn't find my name and anything and i was so lucky, there was two ladies, a social workerjust arrived and they were arguing with them until they took my name and wrote it down and then they gave me a single room with my daughter and i told them, we are three persons and my husband is coming. iwant three persons and my husband is coming. i want a suitable, they say... that's only because they are following the procedures. that's all we have available. in the night again we saw the manager and we told him the situation and the manager offered us another single room. he said don't worry i will give you this. it's a very busy hotel. two
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single rooms. is that where you have been staying? my wife is away from me about two rooms. two doors away. how long is this going to go on?|j received a call yesterday from the council. someone, a volunteer in westway, it was a guy, he was doing a job there. he saw me and he knew i was frustrated. the guy from the council gave a call and he started, he said to them, "look, because this family, they are traumatised and." my family, they are traumatised and." my daughter isn't sleeping. she doesn't sleep. my wife doesn't sleep because it is the ninth floor. we can't look out the windows. so i received a call from the council
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yesterday and she tried to provide, to find another location. she said i can't do it now because it is no way to do it. there is many people. i said to her why are people on high floors? she said, we know about the deaf stags, we tried to get the ground floor, for everyone, but we couldn't. have you had any word on when you might get accommodation that you can actually move into? no, nothing. today, i'm expecting a call today from the council. she will give mea today from the council. she will give me a call today regarding... so what do you need? and what do you wa nt what do you need? and what do you want right now? we want, we're hoping, we're hoping, the council, m ista kes hoping, we're hoping, the council, mistakes happen. they panicked luke we're panicked. we're not blaming the council. we're blaming no one.
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we understand the situation. we understand what we are, what's going to happen. we understand that, but we need support, physically, to come to us, mentally. they need to come to us, mentally. they need to come to the hotels. they need to speak to us and keep us updated. there is nothing happening. and we heard recently the council has put their hand up and they gave all the process to different councillors. the victims are scared, they start to think negatively and they say... if you have to move away? from the borough, from where we used to live. where we had all our family. we were hoping our council... health issues, everything. we're willing to help
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them to support the council. you wa nt to them to support the council. you want to stay in the area... wet can't. we know nothing. we don't know nothing. if they come to speak to us and tell us we're here. to give us peaceful. mama is an old lady. she is lives in the second floorment her condition is very bad. she can't take that. there is another syrian, as well, she is a lovely lady. she is disabled as well. you know the syrian who escaped with his... with his brother. the one wearing the glasses, the syrian. they escaped, but she is with us in hotel. she is terrified. she is hugging all the time and she is terrified. we are all terrified. i just want to say i really have a lot of anger to the
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organisation, tmo, the tmo failed everyone living in the area. they we re everyone living in the area. they were ignoring everything. they were ignoring people... you have been going back, concerns of residents... yes. was it something that you had raised? yeah. we have been going in meetings since we moved to the building. what time was that? we moved building. what time was that? we m ove d two building. what time was that? we moved two years ago. everything was still like going on in the building. they were changing and fixing the building at that time. i saw all the neighbours, they were angry. they we re neighbours, they were angry. they were complaining complaining. they we re were complaining complaining. they were having meetings with the council. there was that big refurbishment. nearly £10 million was spent. the inside didn't look good. it doesn't look good. they didn't do anything inside. they changed a boiler and they did the boiler next to the door, the flat
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door. the entrance of the main flat. i used to sleep if this boiler blows up i used to sleep if this boiler blows up how am i going to leave the flat? we told him... we refused and they did it. they did it. they said, "don't worry, this system is safe. everything is safe." people used to come every saturday knock on the doorto come every saturday knock on the door to want to fit a new gas pipe in the front of the door. that's recently. it was a few months now. they only come saturday. one of the neighbours says, "i will take your picture and i will make sure if this is right." picture and i will make sure if this is right. " they left. picture and i will make sure if this is right." they left. they say, "no, we will come back again." they ran out. it's like there was something going on. we used to stay half an hour. the
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lift was broken. how is your daughter, your ten—year—old, you said she's really struggling? she didn't want to go out or go to school and she was telling me, i can't sleep because i don't want to wa ke can't sleep because i don't want to wake up again and the same thing happen, i don't want to see fire again. it took her two to three nights tojust again. it took her two to three nights to just feel, you know, calmer. when i went out and opened the main door and saw the smoke, it was everywhere. i couldn't see anything through the smoke and oh, my god, i closed the door, it's the first action, that's what i reacted to, i closed the door. i thought i lost him. yes. i'mjust to, i closed the door. i thought i lost him. yes. i'm just so sorry to hear what you've been through. lost him. yes. i'm just so sorry to hear what you've been throughlj
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lost him. yes. i'm just so sorry to hear what you've been through. i was so glad when i seen him came out, i was so glad when i seen him came out, i was glad, happy, everything. everything was mixed and i felt like ican everything was mixed and i felt like i can breathe now. we wish you the best with rebuilding your lives, it's leerily not going to be —— clearly not going to be easy but we hope you get all the support. we are very sorry for our friends who passed away, we are very sorry for them. our hearts, all of us, we are with theirfamily them. our hearts, all of us, we are with their family because their family they can't come. thank you, thank you very much, thank you. let's catch up with the weather now. thank you very much. yesterday was the hottest day of the year so far. we got to 32.5. for many today, it's going to stay hot. there will be one or two subtle changes. the hottest of the weather today will be across the west and south—west of england. look at this cold front moving
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south, introducing fresher conditions, more cloud and a breeze towards the north—east and eastern england. temperatures will be about 17 there, about ten lower than yesterday. towards the south and south—west, up to 30—32. for england and wales, a hotter day on wednesday. temperatures potentially about 3k in the south—east. that hotter air moving back further north into the north—east. hello, i'm joanna gosling.
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last night, hundreds attended a vigil in finsbury park to show solidarity with the muslim community after yesterday where a van was driven into a crowd of muslim worshippers. it's almost the norm for women to have their hijabs being ripped off and to have comments being made. have their hijabs being ripped off and to have comments being madem enough being done to tackle it? we speak to someone who used to be part of the violent far right group combat 18 who now helps to deradicalise others. the family tell us of the guilt and trauma of surviving. i remember every few hours, i forget that person's face, ididn't hours, i forget that person's face, i didn't know if he was safe, if it was i didn't know if he was safe, if it was that person and the people i used to know, they lived on the top floors, all the familiar faces, no—one survived. are tower blocks still
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appropriate places to live? we'll be discussing that and finding out what more can and should be done for those who lost their homes. and inside the chechnyan prison where gay men have reportedly been taken and tortured. good morning, here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". father—of—four darren osborne, was held on suspicion of attempted murder and terror offences after a van hit muslim worshippers in finsbury park. last night, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, addressed a vigil near the scene of the attack. the serious fraud office has charged barclays and four former executives
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including its former chief executive, john varley with fraud. the charges relate to emergency funding the bank raised from qatar and abu dhabi in 2008 to avoid a bail out. more than £200,000 has now been handed out to 180 families affected by the grenfell tower fire in west london. the payments were recorded by the government's newly formed grenfell response team. it said 78 families had been rehoused either locally or in neighbouring boroughs, and that 126 hotel places had been secured. a couple who lived on the 15th floor with their daughter said they had been temporarily housed on the ninth floor of a hotel. my daughter doesn't sleep, my wife doesn't sleep
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because it's on their mind. it's the ninth floor. we can't look out of the windows. i receive a call from the windows. i receive a call from the council yesterday and she tried to provide and to find another location. yes. she said, i can't do it now because there is no way to do it. there's many people. many people have been trying. i said to her, why people live on high floors and she said, we know about this devastation, we tried to get a ground floor for everyone and we couldn't. an american student, who was freed last week by north korea after spending 15 months in prison, has died. otto warmbier , who was 22, was in a coma when he was flown home last week. his family has accused north korea of torturing him after he was arrested for stealing a propaganda sign. the pound has fallen sharply against the dollar after the governor of the bank of england said he was against raising interest
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rates any time soon. speaking at the mansion house earlier this morning, mark carney said brexit negotiations meant it wasn't the time to increase the cost of borrowing from its historic low of a quarter of 1%. from my perspective, given the mixed signals on consumer spending and investment, and given the subdued inflationary pressures, in particular anaemic wage growth, now is not yet the time to begin that adjustment. in the coming months, i would like to see the extent to which weaker consumption growth is offset by other components of demand, where the wages begin to firm and more generally, how the economy reacts to the tighter financial conditions and the reality of brexit negotiations. a van driver has been killed after migrants put tree trunks onto the motorway to stop traffic near the french port of calais. the incident happened in the early hours of the morning on the a16 motorway after the van,
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registered in poland, hit a lorry which had been blocked by the tree trunks. nine eritrean migrants were found in one of the lorries. a teenage boy has drowned in a reservoir in rochdale in greater manchester. he was reportedly swimming with friends at the greenbooth reservoir at around six o'clock last night. a police spokesman said there are not thought to be any suspicious circumstances surrounding his death and his family have been informed. scientists have begun human trials of a cholesterol—lowering vaccine to help prevent heart disease. the injection is designed to stop fatty deposits from clogging the arteries. it would offer patients an alternative to taking daily pills to cut their risk of stroke, angina and heart attacks. the number of tests carried out in england to identify if people have issues such as sleep apnoea, has doubled in the last nine years. it's believed one and a half million people across the uk have the condition, which can cause sufferers to stop breathing periodically whilst asleep.
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that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. coming up, we'll hearfrom philip hammond. get in touch with us if your thoughts. now the sport. the lions are in action. warren gatland says there are still places for the side. jack nowell with the first try of the half, the winger scampering over the line. ian henderson was attempting to drive over, but the referee
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decided to award a second penalty try. in a sliingtly more expansive move, jack nowell again finding space for his second try. it's turning into a very comfortable victory. the latest score with about ten minutes to go in hamilton, the lions leading 311—6. andy murray says winning at queens would be a big boost to his wimbledon preparations. he's going for a sixth title in london and a third in a row and claims he's played some of his best tennis in the tournament. he takes on another brit on centre court this afternoon. it was where i won my first professional match so i have a lot of great memories over the years i've played. it's been by far my most successful tournament. i love the courts here, i like the conditions, it's very close to where i live so i get to stay at home. the surprise loser on the first day at queens yesterday was beaten in three
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sets by his opponent. in birmingham, naomi brody reached the last 16 with a straight sets win over world number 39. a straight sets win over world number39. in birmingham a straight sets win over world number 39. in birmingham yesterday, heather watson lost. later on, johan that konta starts her campaign against her opponent. what about this for a hero's welcome. this is the pakistan captain arriving back in karachi after they beat india to win the icc champions trophy at the oval on saturday. he is in that car, i promise you! ever even after the special convoy from the airport, it took then the skipper nearly half an hour to get from his vehicle to his house, he was surrounded by his adoring fans, many of whom waited through the night to welcome home their hero which led their country to that win against their rivals and the odds too. just before i go, time to tell you that frankie dettori will miss the whole of royal ascot which starts today after a fall at great yarmouth last week. he has an
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arm injury and will miss out on a number of well—fancied rides. that's it for now. let's talk more about the mosque attack in london. the impact is still very raw for those caught up in the attack. raqia's husband was injured and we can talk to her now. thank you very much forjoining us. tell us how your husband is first of all? my husband's doing a lot better than yesterday. he's great and he's got of course a broken ankle and a muscle problem, bruised muscles which is really bad at the moment, but he's really good. i've been at the hospital all yesterday with him
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and i've seen others who've got hurt and i've seen others who've got hurt and we have been very lucky that east not in —— he's not in bad shape. we feel very sad for what happened with the rest of the community on monday night. where was he when the van drove into people? what was he doing and where was he? he was on his way coming home and he saw this elderly man and he tried to help him along with other men. there was a circle around him before they know the white van hit them. the next thing he knew was that he was on the near and he couldn't get up and he couldn't feel his legs. nevertheless, he tried to get up and members of the community were asking him, you must stay calm. and so the numbness on his feet, and he was
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worried and shocked. so he was helping the man on the ground who it seems had had a heart attack and subsequently died, it's not clear at this stage whether he died of the heart oi tack or having been hit by the van, but did your husband not see the van even approaching because he was helping that man? no, he was actually one of the first persons to attend to help and as the men shouted for help, you know, in the late hour, seeing somebody fall on to the near, it was quite dangerous, an elderly man as well. so the last thing at that time you would think about is actually a terrorist attack orany about is actually a terrorist attack or any attack, particularly when it is the holy month of ramadan and the atmosphere in finsbury park is one of the greatest places to be during the month of ramadan. everybody is peaceful, loving and has been going
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there over 20 years, we never, ever experienced such a thing. that's the last thing on your mind. thank you very much forjoining us and we hope your husband gets better soon, thank you. the issue of extremism and radicalisation in the uk is most often associated in the media with the threat of islamist terror attacks, but one in four of the people reported to the government's deradicalisation programme are far right extremists. while the exact motivation behind sunday night's attack near a north london mosque are not yet known, eye witnesses reported that after the attack he shouted, "i want to kill muslims". the attacker, who has been named as darren osborne from cardiff, was not known to the security services in terms of far right extremism. so is the uk doing enough to tackle far right extremism? and could this attack have been prevented ? we can now speak to nigel bromage, who was formerly a far—right
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extremist including with the violent group combat 18. he's now reformed and works to help deradicalise others. sabby dhalu is from the group stand up to racism. sean arbuthnot who has spent years working in the government's deradicalisation programme, prevent. and phillip ingram, a former senior intelligence officer is in birmingham. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you. as i mentioned nigel, one infour thank you. as i mentioned nigel, one in four reports to prevent are for far—right radicals. those figures have come out from the reviewer, for the government of the programme. he has said that far—right extremism is as murderous as its islamist equivalent. do you think we have had our eyes closed to this?” equivalent. do you think we have had our eyes closed to this? i don't we have had our eyes closed, but
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happened professional, schoolteachers etcetera have become minister aware. so i think they have been able to highlight recommendations. so they have used the channel process to challenge extremist ideas. are you surprised that one in four reports to prevent are about far—right extremism?” that one in four reports to prevent are about far-right extremism? i am surprised, but it doesn't shock me. i think as time has been going on, more people have got angry. i think they have decided to take action. when you say more people have got angry, what is it, what's going on here? ijust think angry, what is it, what's going on here? i just think people angry, what is it, what's going on here? ijust think people have misread headlines and used emotion and took their emotion and not really understood the facts. you think people have built on that and then decided that for their point of view, you know, they need to step up. sean, you worked with prevent. has the threat been under estimated? has the threat been under estimated? has it been allowed to grow without people actually clocking perhaps what was going on so much? to be
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perfectly honest with i think that the threat may have been misunderstood by the wider public, but certainly within prevent we have been dealing with far—right extremism for sometime. you mentioned that at the moment about one in four referrals relates to the far—right. but when i was a prevent officer working in the police, 40% officer working in the police, 40% of my case load related to the far—right and there are some parts of the country where there is almost a 50/50 split between far—right extremism and islamism extremism being reported to prevent. it's something that's been on our radar for a long time and we're doing our best to get to the bottom of the problem and solve it. so where is there a 50/50 split i believe wales and south yorkshire have a very close split between islamist and far—right referrals. close split between islamist and far— right referrals. i close split between islamist and far—right referrals. i think it's sitting at 30% in the east midlands. so basically, throughout the uk, we're getting these even handed referrals sent to prevent and in many cases the vulnerabilities that
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are exhibited by these individuals who are referred to prevent are very similar. you know, they are two sides of the same coin in many respects. they may feel isolated, angry, have low self esteem, suffered bereavement and become politicised and extremist groups, whether they are far—right or islamist, they prey on those vulnerabilities and give people easy answers to complex questions, they make people feel valued and give them a sense of belonging so we try and put in place supportive measures to safeguard people against those. are you surprised as many people will be to hear that there is as much far—right extremism being reported to prevent in some areas as islamist extremism ? do reported to prevent in some areas as islamist extremism? do you think that that has been clear to people in the wider communities? i'm not surprised, but i could understand why yourself and others might be surprised looking at those figures
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because i think that there is a bit ofa because i think that there is a bit of a double standard in the way we treat terrorism. i think it's perceived in the public as islamic only problem and not really in relation to the far—right. i don't think there is this narrative that it isa think there is this narrative that it is a consistent problem and that there is a problem of violence and terrorism on the far—right as much as it is clear of a consistent and problem and a pattern with sort of isis—type extremism and that's clear in the public because you have just to give you a few examples. so you had in 2013, an elderly man was murdered by far—right terrorist and then he went on to actually bomb mosques in the midlands, in the west midlands. he was known as the tipton bomberand so midlands. he was known as the tipton bomber and so that was in 2013 and then you had this finsbury park terrorist attack yesterday. yu you've also had the violent murder ofjo you've also had the violent murder of jo cox you've also had the violent murder
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ofjo cox on the streets and you've also had a rise in violent anti—muslim hate crime with lots of women, i saw earlier on your programme, saying that you know women wearing a hijab are targeted, that you have had a rise in anti—muslim hate crime over a period of years and you've had far—right fascist groups targeting mosques on a regular basis and they still do. they target mosques. there is a big problem of far—right extremism and it needs to be tackled and treated and there is a link with terrorism now and i think we need to take that as seriously as we do isis—type extremism. philip ingram, you are a former senior intelligence officer. in terms of police resources in the reassurance sense of things and resources deployed on the ground,
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has this been reflected? you might think that if there had been a nightly gathering of large numbers of people in other communities there would have been a higher profile police presence around than there was in finsbury park?” police presence around than there was in finsbury park? i don't think we can criticise the police presence because the police were on the ground within a minute of the incident happening and they declared it as incident happening and they declared itasa incident happening and they declared it as a terrorist incident. i'm talking in terms of a deterrent and making communities feel safe in difficult times. police on the ground is one way of keeping the community safe and it's educating the communities as to what the threat is that's out there and i think one of the things that we have to be careful of here is giving a voice to groups that are not necessarily directly linked to atrocities and that will do is stimulate more support for those groups whether they be islamist extremist or right—wing extremist and we have to be careful about how we're doing things. the right—wing extremism has been around for a lot
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longerment it was there when the terrorism was caused by irish terrorism. terrorism has moved on to islamist extremism terrorism. in 20 yea rs' islamist extremism terrorism. in 20 years' time, it might be a different flavour of terrorism, but the police have got a good handle on the right—wing because most is to do with public order offences. it is when national security comes in that the intelligence services get involved in it. have things changed? what we have seen here is a similar attack to the ones carried out by islamist extremists using a vehicle to go into a crowd of people? well, there is, it's how people carry out attacks and there is two things that the police and intelligence services and the national intelligence services will be looking for. one is capability. does someone have the capability. does someone have the capability to carry out an attack? when an attack is carried out with weapons and explosives, that was difficult for people to deal with. now they have been carried out in vehicles, it is finding out the second bit which is the intent, who intends to do it? and individuals who self radicalise, who motivate themselves on an afternoon to go and
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do something that evening, it's very difficult for the police or the security services and no matter how many you've got on the ground to be able to pick that up and deal with it. nigel, when we talk about islamist, extremism in the wake of an attack, there is talk of how somebody was radicalised, howjoined up, not necessarily always the case when something happened with a far—right attack. what is the evidence in terms of howjoined up it is, what happens with recruiting and radicalising people in the far—right? and radicalising people in the far-right? recruitment on both sides is very, very similar, you know, you ta ke is very, very similar, you know, you take an emotion, you put a little bit of facts in and all of a sudden if you can buy into a person's vulnerabilities and offer them a vision all of a sudden they feel valued. maybe they are going through issues at home and they are part of a normalisation, and these people are manipulated. you have to understand what these people are going through is grooming, they are
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being groomed for a political purpose. thank you all, we are out of time for this discussion. i'm sure it is great to have you all on and i'm sure something we will be talking about more again. thank you very much. let us know your thoughts on that as well. the usual ways of getting in touch. formal talks between britain and eu to discuss brexit began yesterday. and today eu ministers meet in luxembourg to discuss the first day of talks with the uk. after the vote to leave the eu a year ago, a sometimes bitter debate has raged about what exactly our future relationship with the european union should be with some senior politicians calling for continued membership of the eu's single market and customs union, and others advocating a so—called " ha rd" or "clean" brexit, that would see the uk entirely outside of the eu's structures. a short time ago the chancellor, phillip hammond, said britain would fight for the best possible deal but that he was confident that it is possible for britain and the eu to reach a mutually—beneficial deal.
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the future of our economy is inexorably linked to the kind of brexit deal that we reach with the eu over the next 20 odd months, and i'm confident we can do a brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first, that reassures employers that they will still be able to access the talent they need, that keeps our market for goods and services and capital open. let's get some analysis on this story now. with me in the studio are three people with distinct views on how the uk should proceed in its negotiations. chuka umunna is a labour mp who campaigned to remain in the eu. he voted for article 50 in parliament, but thinks britain should seek a "soft" brexit settlement. suella fernandes, a conservative mp who campaigned to leave the eu and johnathan isaby, the editor of brexit central, a pro—brexit publication. he thinks we should leave the single market and the customs union. chuka umunna first of all, do we
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actually have a real choice at this stage? philip hammond says we are leaving the eu. we will be leaving the single market, we will leave the customs union, the negotiations are beginning? well, i don't think you need to take the best option off the table at the start of negotiations which is to remain a member of the single market and to remain a member of the customs union all it with us being outside of the european union. to put it in context for your viewers, turkey is part of the customs union, but not part of the european union. norway is part of the single market, but not part of the single market, but not part of the european union. why does this matter? it matters for people's jobs, we know that single market delivers lots of jobs, jobs, we know that single market delivers lots ofjobs, but also, if we wa nt delivers lots ofjobs, but also, if we want to end seven years of damaging austerity, we need the revenue coming into the exchequer to help make that happen. so for me, i don't think the chancellor should be taking the best economic options off the table abouts you he has, hasn't he? well, he doesn't have to do.
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let's not forget the role of parliament. the arithmetic in this new parliament is final balanced and this government is going to have could come back to parliament and get its deal approved. so that, the idea that this is all decided by number ten, by philip hammond, and ministers, is for the birds. it's going to be decided by parliament in a way it wasn't before. sue, that's a way it wasn't before. sue, that's a good point, isn't it? has the election changed everything actually? prior to the election, the government line was no deal is better than a bad deal. but talk now ofa better than a bad deal. but talk now of a hard brexit, has been mitigated by what we have seen happen with the election and where the parliamentary balance lies? well, over 8096 of people during the election voted for brexit supporting parties. parties that made clear in their manifesto that made clear in their manifesto that they accept the result of the referendum and that we're going to leave the european union. was it clear what was meant by that brexit? it wasn't really that well discussed
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during the election campaign. people knew what they were voting or and as the chancellor made clear today and over the weekend, to get the best economic benefits, to have a jobs—led pro prosperity brexit which is what i'm in favour of, we need to really happen into the potential of this great opportunity that our country faces. striking strayed deals with the rest of the world which we can't do as long as we're pa rt of which we can't do as long as we're part of the customs union. getting back control of our immigration policy. and taking back control over our laws so coming out of the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. all of those things are what people voted and without those brexit doesn't mean anything. jonathan, do you think there will be no negative impact as a result of coming out of the single market and the customs union? it's clearly going to be an interesting few years... economically difficult or interesting? there are going to be
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issues that will have to be addressed. awe politicians should get behind securing the best deal for the get behind securing the best deal forthe uk, get behind securing the best deal for the uk, accepting that the labour and tory manifestos both accepted the... how would the best deal work for you? and what would it be? we want to see as close to tariff free trade between the european union and the united kingdom going forward. but also the ability to force those trade deals with other countries around the world. we still want a close relationship with neighbours. the government have been extremely positive in their tone, there are all kinds of issues, not least security and terrorism which we need to continue to... the government hasn't been positive in its tone. during the general election, theresa mayjust during the general election, theresa may just after during the general election, theresa mayjust after she went to see the queen put that lectern outside numberten and queen put that lectern outside number ten and threatened to walk off without a deal. her tone has been absolutely appalling, not condusive to creating a good deal.
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on economics, let's be clear, if you are part of the customs union, you are part of the customs union, you are part of a block of a dozen people who negotiate. the european union currently has 56 of those and just going back to the single market. it's notjust about, by the way, tariff free access and the tariffs on goods, it's also about non—tariff barriers, being part of this engine for social justice non—tariff barriers, being part of this engine for socialjustice that sets a floor for employment rights, consumer rights and environmental protections and it makes sense for us to... protections and it makes sense for usto... do protections and it makes sense for us to... do you accept freedom of movement then? membership of the internal market necessarily means... freedom of movement. let me answer your question. freedom of movement at the moment is not unconditional so at the moment... we have freedom of movement and control over immigration policy because of our membership. that is not true. let me finish the answer. the eu can provide for people whoa don't have
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the prospect of getting a job, after three months we can require them to leave. we don't do that at the moment. if we did so, we could move towards free movement of labour, as opposed to free movement of people. lift accident stein is not in the european union —— lichtenstein is not in the european union but it's in the customs union. you said there for the benefit of viewers, sort of understanding what the different options are, viewers might be watching thinking, crikey, a year ago we voted to leave, these negotiations that have begun, there is no unifying position, no absolute clarity in terms of what is being done. isn't that the worst position to be in? clearly we have to move on from the referendum. you don't acce pt from the referendum. you don't accept the result. i do, but there are different ways of doing this.
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theresa may said, my way or the highway. the way she was proposing to do it was a job—destroying way. do you wish your party had been more explicit in the election about what the vision was? the labour party set out a number of principles. keir starmer said he could see britain staying part of the customs union. harriet harman said we have to leave. they are all over the place. contrast that with the conservatives. philip hammond has said we are leaving the customs union. that's really important for trade and the economy forjobs and prices. being part of the customs union is a protectionist racket which puts prices up and stops us dealing with the us and china. we have a trade deficit with the eu, a trade surplus with the rest of the world. we need to help develop countries, being more sustainable with trade. the customs union
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punishing developing countries who wa nt punishing developing countries who want to trade into the eu customs. how much trade do you believe there is? we are buying more than we sell from the eu and have a deficit of £71 billion. contrast that with the re st of £71 billion. contrast that with the rest of the world where we are selling more than we buy. the potential market for britain for our manufacturers, financial services, it's with the rest of the world... joanna, the answer to your question is this — the eu is our biggest customer so all the new economies, merging economies we want to get on to, we want to sell more into them, but they do not compare to the amount of trade we do with the people in the single market. they are our biggest customer. any businessman will tell you you don't dump on your existing clients to
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pursue new ones, you seek to retain your existing ones and seek to get new ones. still sell goods to the european union after brexit. you are saying we buy goods, we buy more from the eu than we sell, but if those trade agreements go and greater tariffs are put on the imports, then life is going to get more expensive isn't it? well, no, because world trade organisation rules kick in. i'm not scared of no deal. but are you certain that life will not get more expensive in we use the trade organisation rules already, they protect us from punitive tariffs. we only use those wto rules at the moment as part of the european union. to act individually in the world trade organisation, we need to... we can only do that by leaving the customs union. are the three of you. .. negotiating with the eu members
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who're part of that organisation. people talk about us... yon than just a quick final question — are you confident this country is com pletely you confident this country is completely set up to carry out the best negotiations that we can, that the best people are in position and that we are as well prepared for this as the eu negotiators? absolutely. that's the reason the government's spent the last year preparing the negotiations. there are some who say we should have got on with the talks immediately after article 50. a clear structure for the talks, a sequencing in terms of what gets talked about when, we don't seem to have had it from our government here, have we? yesterday, david davis and militia elle barnier agreed the talks and those will happen over the coming months —— michel barnier. chuka is still in denial of the vote. please don't say
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that, i accepted the will of the people. they voted to leave the european union. they did not vote for... but they did not vote for a particular way of doing that. they made an argument for £350 million a week extra to go into the nhs and they've seen precious little of that. that was the number one part of the vote leave manifesto that both these individuals supported and it hasn't been delivered on yet. where's the £350 million? we haven't left the eu yet. we'll pick up with you guys again because this is going to keep going, obvious, will but thank you very much for now. now the sport. the lions have warmed up for the first test against the all blacks with their most emphatic win of the tour so far. they beat the chiefs 36 points to 6 in hamilton with four tries...
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two coming from england wing jack nowell. coach warren gatland insists places are still up for grabs for that match on saturday in auckland. a crucial victory for the england under 21s at the european champoinships. nathan redmond scores the winner as they come from behind to beat slovakia in poland. andy murray begins his campaign to win a sixth title at queen's today. he plays another brit — aljaz bedene — this afternoon on centre court... saying another successful week in london will be a ‘big boost' to his wimbledon preparations frankie dettori will miss the whole of royal ascot... which starts today... after a fall at great yarmouth last week. he has an arm injury and will miss out on a number almost a week on since the fire and many residents are still complaining of a lack of support from the authorities, a lack of clarity on temporary and long term housing, and by far the biggest cause for tension is conflicting numbers on just how many died in the tragedy.
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our reporter michael cowan met up with amanda fernandez a local resident who whilst being evacuated from a neighbouring block herself has been volunteering day and night for almost a week. asa as a resident you can count the floors and know how many people lived on that floor and you know people. so between us, my friends, my mum and my family, the people that we know, we've got more than 130 people that are missing. that is the portuguese, colombian, spanish, moroccan side of things. what about the rest of the people? there are other people that know people who're missing. my half's just 130. other people that know people who're missing. my half'sjust130. so you are saying you personally know 130 people who were in that building? yes, minimum. and sometimes, god forgive me, but sometimes i speak to someone and they are like, oh, we haven't spoken to that person and gosh i didn't think about that person. you forget and you think, gosh i thought they lived in another
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block but they lived here. 130 to us, that's a lot. that's a lot. the numbers coming out in the media is wrong, that's what hurts you. you are releasing small numbers of people not really understand the crisis of it. fiasco, crisis, chaos, it's, you know, it's something that you can't kind of programme and there's no answers, no structure, you can't process anything. and you are saying six days on from the fire, you are still having to find accommodation for people, you are still having to, you personally as a volunteer, are having to book transport for people to their hotels? no—one is being given information still? no, you havejust caught me. my friend was booking a taxi for one of our friends mums who's just been put in a hotel nearby and you just heard one of my neighbours saying we have been housed too far away. that's the
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situation now and it's the sixth day. there's no hot water no, gas. we are still ving having to come to sports centre or friends houses to have a shower, you can't watch your clothes. so even in the blocks they have let people back into, there's no hot water, no gas? no. we are being told two to four weeks. i understand it's not theirfault, but the information relayed doesn't make sense. there is a lot of organisations going around saying, we can help you, but there's no kind of main body saying come here and we'll give you the help, come here and this is where you can come. we are doing that now but it's way too late. when the fire was all over the news, 1 o'clock the next day, by now they should have made so many arrangements for the evacuees, survivors, get them in and start
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them putting in places, get the army m, them putting in places, get the army in, i'm not evenjoking. so many people were thinking, the army isn't here and this was massive. thousands of people have signed a petition saying a public inquiry should be carried out. a civil liberties lawyer who worked on the hillsborough independent paneljoins me on the hillsborough independent panel joins me now. on the hillsborough independent paneljoins me now. thank you very much for coming in. tell us how an inquest and a public inquiry would differ? an inquest has a very specific statutory purpose, it's to determine who died, where and when the death occurred and how the deceased came by his death. it is necessarily by law deferred pending any criminal investigation and so here the current police
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investigation has to be concluded first. any prosecution emerging from it has to be concluded before an inquest takes place and even then it will be within the narrow parameters. in contrast, a public inquiry has wide—ranging powers of much broader scope and should have greater resources to address a whole range of questions that will emerge here. do the same conditions not apply for having to... that's the second difference. the public inquiry need not await the criminal sheingtion, it can be implemented and instituted immediately and that has happened before —— criminal investigation. in the ladbroke grove fire disaster, for example, an inquiry was set up within days, it reported within weeks and the point is, urgent, imperative, notjust for the families but the public at
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large, the important thing is to find out what went wrong and put it right. that cannot wait for years, that has to be addressed immediately. the public inquiry can address that immediately without excluding any of the survivors, any of the families, any of the other civil society groups. it's mistaken and simply incorrect to say first of all that it's either/or, it's not, you can have both an inquest and a public inquiry where an inquest can follow in due course. secondly, the bereaved family's survivors and the public at large can participate fully, including the questions of witnesses. of course this is dependent upon the resources being made available to the inquiry and 3-3 made available to the inquiry and 3—3 things that are prerequisites, funding for all participants so that there is an even playing field, consultation on the chair of the inquiry and consultation on the terms of reference of the inquiry. thank you very much. it's absolutely
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undeniable that people do want quick a nswe rs. undeniable that people do want quick answers. mayor of london has said the fire was caused by mistakes and neglect and has criticised the local council's response. the authorities in ken sing tonne and chelsea say they have been working around—the—clock to help survivors of the fire which killed at least 58 people. what more can we learn about the fire safety inside blocks like g re nfell tower the fire safety inside blocks like grenfell tower where the blocks are still appropriate places for people to live and what should be done in the aftermath of this event? we can speak now to andy slaughter, the shadow minister for housing, arnold tarling, a fire saftety expert, andrew boff, the conservatives lead on housing in the london assembly, and becka hudson, from the radical housing network. first of all, you're a chartered surveyor and fire safety expert. the chancellor, philip hammond, said that the cladding was used on this building is illegal?” that the cladding was used on this building is illegal? i disagree. it is not completely clear, is it? the
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building regulations are a complete mess. they give a drawing called diagram 110 which says the material has to be class 0. you then have to look at the back section e for a definition. section e sends you to appendix a and appendix a in two places states categorically that if you have got two sheets of material that do not burn around the material that do not burn around the material that will burn it complies. now, there is false news coming out from government on the basis of a clause called 12.7. the point that you're mcing is, it's really unclear, isn't it? it's perfectly clear because the clause about insulation is not referring to metal cladding and anyway, it refers you directly back to appendix a which tells you if you
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have two sheets of metal you can put anything between it. andy slaughter, is it clear enough? do the building regulations need to be looked at? what you just heard should persuade you that this does need urgent attention. you just dealt with what are the two key issues. one is to establish from those hundreds of thousands of people who live in high rise blocks that they are safe in their homes and the second is, i'm glad we had clarity on the public inquiry point, we need a public inquiry point, we need a public inquiry set—up, we need the terms of reference, i don't know why we haven't got them yet which give victims and their families the right to audience and full representation so that people can getjustice. i thought those would be the two issues, they would be the two main issues, they would be the two main issues we are talking about now. it's shock that we're still talking about disaster relief a week on. i have been down there every day and i spoke to the mp for kensington and she was there yesterday and there
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we re she was there yesterday and there were still people, as your interviews show are in severe need. in terms of establishing whether people in high rise homes are safe, how much progress has been made and how much progress has been made and how reassured can anyone living in a high rise home in london be now? the maintenance of tower blocks is a complex issue. i been pushing for many years now for us to effectively stop building these things and not just on the basis of their maintenance, the difficulties in maintaining them, but the social outcomes from tower blocks are pretty poor. every survey reveals that. they don't really provide... they are not going to disappear overnight. many people are calling for the existing 500 in london to have a programme of getting rid of them and building proper low rise homes. but also, more urgently, we
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have a london plan in front of us. which needs to be amended to take into account of the fact that people don't want to live in these places. there are 263 in the pipeline at the moment to be built this london. so becca, right here, right now, what do peel want, people living in those blocks? well, i think firstly, it would be a huge mistake to place the blame on tower blocks and on council housing and on council tenants, that will continue. the process that we have seen for the past 30 years where council housing is disinvested and council tenants are not listened to, the grenfell action group who fore warned of this disaster, they joined because they weren't being listened to on safety, on maintenance, it's not clearfor them who to go to prior to this, to look at safety in the building and that's partly because of privatisation.
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it's because council services have been subcontracted out and the council is then able to total crisis abdicate responsibility for council te na nts abdicate responsibility for council tenants and it seems that has continued post the disaster in the rev lef effort. whether this cladding was legal or not to be used in that way in this country, that block went up in flames in a way that simply shouldn't have happened. is it possible to make all tower blocks completely the safe places that we would have expected and hoped that they are? well, these tower blocks, this one in particular was tower blocks, this one in particular was built under the old london building act and it complied, it would never have behaved like this. we have never have had a disast near section 20 building. it is the changes in regulations that have led to this and the old ones worked. the old ones came out of years and years after the great fire of london. we built them up. the reason london survived the blitz without turning into a huge fireball was because of
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the london building act and we have completely forgotten that and we now have these dis asters, we have had lakanal, we have had this, we have had timber framed disasters in london, it would never have happened if we had not got rid of the london building act. thank you very much. rounded up, tortured and kept in secret prisons — the way authorities in chechnya have been accused of treating gay people living in the russian republic. the alleged anti—gay purge has been condemned by human rights organisations and german chancellor angela merkel spoke out urging russian president vladimir putin to help protect the rights of gay people in chechnya. the allegations have been dismissed by the country's leader. vice news has been given exclusive access to a prison where it's claimed the gay men have been taken. this is what they found.
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this is the ministry for affairs. he is the warden of the town's prison. they allegedly took part in torturing 100 gay men as part of a crackdown ordered by officials. victims claim they were locked up and attacked in the police facility and attacked in the police facility and other locations in chechnya. as soon as we arrived, we were met by police officers and we're being escorted by six cars who are taking us to one of the locations where it is alleged the victims were held. as far as we're aware, we're the first foreign journalists that have been taken here. can we go inside?
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we met several chechen gay men had had fled to moscow after they feared their lives were at risk. sometimes from their own family membersment they asked for their identities to be concealed to protect their safety. can you tell me what it's like to be a gay man in chechnya? what's it been like having to leave
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yourfamily and your what's it been like having to leave your family and your friends and your family and your friends and your life behind? let's speak now to hind hassan who you saw in that report. this was a chaperoned visit. do you feel you saw the true picture? well, we were, of course, very cautious about going into chechnya from the beginning because not many foreign journalist have gone there and we we re journalist have gone there and we were warned by human rights organisations not to try and talk to local chet chance because it could bea local chet chance because it could be a danger to their lives. so we knew when we went in there things could be controlled. we would only be able to speak to high level officials or the officials
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authorised by them so what was important for us that we got beyond, you know, the sur vas, we continued to ask them questions that would push this particular issue and expose some things. for example the quy expose some things. for example the guy thaw saw at the top of that report there, he is a man who is the warden of a prison which is the location where it is alleged that these tortures and the attacks against gay chechen men began. we spoke to him and you know he very quickly exposed his disdain to homosexuality by saying, "do you think my men would even touch gay people if they existed let alone torture them?" we took the footage and showed it to victims who say they were held at this prison who said that they were 200% certain that he brought them to their knees and beat them. in terms of specifically seeing evidence of torture, did you see anything? well, we were obviously very aware that by the time we went
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in there, any potential evidence would have been removed, but what was interesting is when they took us to this abandoned prison facility that had been named in the human rights organisation's report, we didn't know what to expect. we didn't know what to expect. we didn't know what we would see. we we re didn't know what we would see. we were taken into a room that used to bea were taken into a room that used to be a kitchen and we saw wires hanging from the ceiling and doors that had been ripped out and debris and large pieces of wood and shattered glass. so it was a very strange place to be taken into. a second room had a corridor that ran through it on and either side there we re through it on and either side there were lots of small rooms and once again, lots of debris. and it looked like a sort of secluded place. somewhere, i mean, it's speculation that potentially you could hold people, but we were surprised that they would want to take us to a facility that looked like this. the spotlight has been shone. you were invited in all be with it a
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controlled visit. do you think anything will change? well, human rights organisations says because of the international pressure, because of this consolidated international pressure the focus as you mentioned international, you know, leaders, heads of states have been coming out and condemning what has been happening. russia has put pressure on the chechen government to respond to this and as a result, at the moment, it seems as though the attacks against gay men have stopped. thank you very much, hind. thank you for your company. i will you at the same time tomorrow. have a lovely afternoon. bye—bye. good morning. yesterday was the hottest day of the day so far. temperatures got up to 32.5 celsius in the south—west of london and today it's going to stay hot for many parts of england and wales. the
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hottest weather will always be towards the south and the south—west of england. but just look towards the south and the south—west of england. butjust look at this cold front here. moving southward and introducing fresher conditions. an on shore breeze as well. it will keep the temperatures down. much lower compared to yesterday, but the hottest weather towards central and southern areas where we could see 32 celsius particularly around the west country and towards south—west england. there is the chance of the odd shower across wales and the midlands. quite an uncome forfeitable night to ta ke quite an uncome forfeitable night to take us into wednesday. for many, it is going to be a sunny and a hot day. hotter than today, is going to be a sunny and a hot day. hotterthan today, but is going to be a sunny and a hot day. hotter than today, but you notice across scotland and northern ireland, there will be showers and those could be heavy and thundery. maximum temperatures though in the south east up to 36 celsius and some of that heat moving its way further northwards, so a warmer day in newcastle compared to today. bye— bye. this is bbc news —
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and these are the top stories developing at 11... barclays and four former executives are charged with fraud over their actions in the 2008 financial crisis. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". the police are continuing their investigation and the residents of darren osborne. —— at the residence. chancellor philip hammond calls for smooth brexit to avoid a "cliff edge" for businesses as the uk leaves the european union. iam i am confident we can do a brexit
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deal that puts jobs and prosperity first. that reassures employers they can still access the talent that they need.

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