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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 20, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11... barclays and four former executives are charged with fraud over their actions in the 2008 financial crisis. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". the police are continuing their investigation and the residents of darren osborne. —— at the residence. chancellor philip hammond calls for smooth brexit to avoid a "cliff edge" for businesses as the uk leaves the european union. iam i am confident we can do a brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first. that reassures employers they can still access the talent that they need. donald trump denounces north korea as a brutal regime after
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aus north korea as a brutal regime after a us student that was imprisoned there guys. stay hydrated, as the uk heatwave continues. —— imprisoned there guys. —— imprisoned there has died. good morning. it's tuesday 20th june. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the serious fraud office has charged barclays and four former executives — including former chief executivejohn varley — with fraud over the bank's dealings with qatar at the height of the financial crisis. barclays raised emergency funding from qatar in 2008 to avoid a government bail out. now barclays has become the first bank to face criminal charges for actions during the financial crisis. with me is ben thompson. the first
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senior executives to face charges over alleged activities in that period of the financial crisis. tell us more period of the financial crisis. tell us more about what the charges are. you have two turn the clock back to 2008, the height of the crisis. three of the biggest banks said they we re three of the biggest banks said they were in danger of collapsing if they did not have funding. they needed money to prop up the banks. lloyds and rbs turned to the government, the taxpayer, for a bailout. we know thatis the taxpayer, for a bailout. we know that is slowly being unravelled. lloyds returns to private hands, rbs very much still owned by the taxpayer. but barclays did it differently. they went to guitar. they said, give us an injection of cash and we will use it to prop up the bank. —— the qataris. there is speculation about how it was done and what terms were associated with it. the serious fraud office is concerned. there are two issues they
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wa nt to concerned. there are two issues they want to know, one, a payment, an advisory fee of £346 million, they wa nt to advisory fee of £346 million, they want to know what it was for and why it was paid. there is also fundraising including $3 billion. about £2.3 billion of loans offered to the qataris in return. questions about what the terms are associated with that. the serious fraud of this is very concerned that there was some misconduct involved. barclays said they will conduct their own investigation but will respond to these allegations. but four former berkeley ‘s bosses will appear before westminster magistrates on july the 3rd. before westminster magistrates on july the 3rd. charges against the holding, not the bank itself. it is a bit technical. yes, it is the holding company and not the individual bank. but as you said in the introduction, the interesting thing is it is the first time it has been brought against former bank executives. do some people it seems
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slightly counterintuitive because this bank did not ask for a bailout. —— for some people it seems. this bank did not ask for a bailout. -- for some people it seems. it seemed maybe we were doing a paper because we are going to the markets, doing ourselves and raising money that they would have to pay back. they did that on the basis of avoiding to need to ask the taxpayer for more money. i was out in the middle east when the deal was done. there was a feeling then, i was there soon after the deal was announced, that it was the gulf rescuing british banks because they had got in so much trouble at the height of the crisis. all the banks we re height of the crisis. all the banks were facing a big funding shortfall, all related to the sub—prime housing crisis which began in the us and spread around the world. the availability of cash in the banks was a real issue. they needed the money, they said they would not ask the government but seated themselves from the market. they have done that
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and now four former executives face and now four former executives face an enquiry from the serious fraud office. thanks for that, ben thompson. some breaking news to bring you now. we are hearing from vince cable that he will be a candidate for the liberal democrat leadership. he announced that with 20 years on the national political stage he is as passionate as ever about the party's liberal values. he said with the prospect of another election looming large, they must be ready for the fight. the brexit negotiations started, the government is weakened, and he argues the liberal democrats alone have a consistent and principled outward looking approach. he said the contest is going to take place with the biggest membership electorate in the biggest membership electorate in the party's history. these arejust some lines from a lengthy statement from sir vince cable. he has announced he is standing to replace tim farron as leader. we will get
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more about that with norman smith in just a few minutes. before that... the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". father—of—four darren osborne, was held on suspicion of attempted murder and terror offences after a van hit muslim worshippers in finsbury park. last night a vigil took place near the scene of the attack. simon clemison reports. they came to break their fast with prayer. just as they had 2a hours earlier. a demonstration that nothing has changed. ramadan too important to miss. everyone is still shocked by what happened. there is a little bit of fear, but at the same time no one is staying away or hiding because of what happened. everyone is coming out to pray. of course we're coming. it is a mosque. we have to pray. we cannot run away from our prayer. it is after midnight and about this
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time last night the attack took place. people have come from other parts of london to pray here in the mosque tonight in a show of solidarity. they have been embracing in the street. the leaders told me that despite it being one of the busiest times in ramadan it has been quiter tonight. some have stayed away. earlier, the community held a vigil attended by the commissioner of the metropolitan police, cressida dick. and the mayor of london, who spoke of communities fighting division. what you have seen in the last 2a hours is muslims, jews, christians, hindus, sikhs, those of organised faith and those that are not, rich, poor, old and young and coming together and saying, not in our name. officers continue to hold a man arrested under terror law, who the bbc understands to be 47—year—old darren osborne from cardiff. his family are said to be in shock and disbelief. in a moment, we'll speak to our correspondent tomos morgan,
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who is outside the suspect‘s house in cardiff. but first let's go to our correspondent lisa hampele, who is at the scene in finsbury park. how are people feeling there today? we had that vigil last night. the police said there will be a strong presence at other mosques. what is the mood today? this is a proud multicultural part of london. maybe less gentrified than other parts, but where communities have lived happily side—by—side, multi—faith communities, for years. everyone is pulling together. see the flowers and messages behind me, a lot of them are from other communities, saying things like, stand by me and not in my name. everyone is pulling together. they are doing what the mayor blood and asked them to do yesterday, staying calm and being vigilant. there is anxiety. we have
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heard from muslim leaders, saying islam phobia has got worse. there have been four terror attacks in three months and there are concerns. at prayers last night people were getting on with life and quietly doing what they have always done. and showing defiance by doing things as usual. we have had many people this morning walking along the flowers a nd this morning walking along the flowers and under the bridge, quietly reading the messages, women with babies, people coming from other parts of london to see what is happening. life is going on as normal but you can feel people are unsubtle. lisa, thank you. -- people are not settled. we know that darren osborne's family have been talking about their shock at his arrest. what more do we know about him and what are his family saying? we
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understand the police are continuing their investigation with what they believe to be the residents of darren osborne. this is where they believe he lived. —— home. they are continuing the investigation. we have seen police cars and officers coming and going throughout the morning here, as they change over shifts and different officers carry on the investigation inside the house. we know the rented van was from a a village around 15 miles to the north—west of cardiff. i was speaking to some of the people who live in this area, in this cul—de—sac, and they were telling me the overwhelming feeling is one of shock, that someone in their community could have committed such a horrible incident in london. you mentioned a statement from the family. as you say, they are
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completely shocked by the news. they say it is unbelievable. they said they feel devastated for the families involved in the incident. and they have no indication he displayed any racist views. the police are continuing their investigation in cardiff and will pass on any information to the metropolitan police in london in june of course, i am sure. 0k, thank you. —— shortly, i'm sure. sir vince cable will stand as a candidate for the leadership of the liberal democrats, replacing tim farron, who is standing down. let's talk about that with norman smith now. norman, he has been deputy leader and acting leader. is this his time to formally take the hot seat? i think many people in the party would view him as a natural
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person to take over from tim farron. he isa person to take over from tim farron. he is a name, known among the wider public, he has experience in government. he is very much of the political centre at a time when there is a hole in the political centre. that is in his favour. against him is the fact he was in coalition with the conservatives. many liberal democrats would hold that against him. there is the age factor. he is now 7a. i spoke to him this morning. he said there is no reason why he could not do a gladstone. gladstone served as prime minister well into his 80s and beyond. jeremy corbyn has shown there is no reason why somebody getting on and cannot still be active and energetic in politics. but he did not rule out the possibility of maybe only serving for two years until the brexit
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process has completed. and then standing down for a younger leader. that is a few steps away. he hasn't been elected yet. but if he is, maybe he could be a caretaker leader. he has not confirmed that but that is an option on the table, he might only serve two years, then stand aside to allow younger leader to ta ke stand aside to allow younger leader to take over. but he is the first person to formally throw their hat into the ring. it was thoughtjoe swinson, anotherformer into the ring. it was thoughtjoe swinson, another former liberal democrat minister might stand, but she is going against it and running for the deputy leadership. another name floating around is norman lamb, who stood against tim farron in the last contest, and certain ed davey, anotherformer liberal last contest, and certain ed davey, another former liberal democrat cabinet minister. we will not let you go yet because we have a lot more to talk about. the chancellor has promised to keep taxes as low as possible... and to strike a brexit trade deal that safeguards british jobs.
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giving his annual mansion house speech this morning, philip hammond pledged to keep the border between northern ireland and the republic "open and free—flowing". meanwhile, the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, warned brexit was likely to slow income growth. let's get norman's thoughts on that. mark carney saying brexit is likely to make people poorer. he has already said income growth has slowed. at the chancellor in a similarvein said slowed. at the chancellor in a similar vein said people did not vote for brexit to become poorer. is this a sign of a lessening of austerity heading into brexit? and if so, is the chancellor is setting himself on a collision course with other members of the government? honestly, we do not quite know. because we seem to get conflicting signals from the chancellor today. at one point he said how people were wearing of seven years of austerity.
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that would be a sentiment chime in with the views of many conservative mps who take the view one of the reasons they did not win the general election was because they had to campaign ona election was because they had to campaign on a message of more austerity. the chancellor seem to acknowledge that. but a little later in his speech he signalled the government would stick by plans to balance the books, get rid of the deficit, by 2025. that would mean carrying on the existing pay caps in the public sector, continuing the freeze to the working age benefits, and other benefit cuts. in other words, existing plans for austerity. that is what the chancellor seemed to signal. just have a listen. the conservative party will remain committed to keeping taxes as low as possible. and higher discretionary borrowing to fund current consumption is simply asking the next generation to pay for something that we want to consume but are not prepared to pay for ourselves, so we will remain committed to the fiscal rules set out at the autumn statement, which will guide us via
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interim target in 2022 a balanced budget by the middle of the next decade. he was more clear on his stance on brexit. it was hardly a raising of the remain standard, but we got a sense of his armies at the potential economic impact of the so—called ha rd economic impact of the so—called hard brexit. —— worries at the potential economic impact. he was talking about a transitional process so talking about a transitional process so that businesses do not face a cliff edge on leaving the union, and although we are going to leave the union, he said we might have to retain customer union rules for some time to make sure we still have a
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frictionless trade, as he called it. interesting also, stressing the need for continuing immigration. we are not going to clamp down on immigration, even though we want to ta ke immigration, even though we want to take back control. and stressing the need for a flexible and pragmatic approach in securing a deal with the eu when it comes to the city and ensuring the future prosperity of the city when we leave, he said, was vital to the prosperity of the british economy. this is his approach to brexit. how do we achieve this brexit for britain? firstly, by securing a comprehensive agreement for trade in goods and services. secondly, by negotiating mutually beneficial transitional arrangements to avoid unnecessary disruption and dangerous cliff edges. thirdly, by agreeing frictionless customs arrangements to facilitate trade across our borders, and crucially, to keep the land border on the island of ireland open and flowing. all of this comes at the same time
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as we had david davis beginning his brexit negotiations. he insisted nothing has changed as a result of the general election and nothing has changed as a result of the week and position of theresa may. from his perspective the government is standing by the lancaster house speech and white paper mrs may unveiled before the election, setting out her route map to what's leaving the eu. when you listen to mr hammond you think he in visages a rather different approach. norman smith, thank you. the headlines, it is 18 past 11, ba rclays the headlines, it is 18 past 11, barclays and four former executives charged with fraud over their actions in the 2008 financial crisis. the former liberal democrat
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cabinet minister sir vince cable will stand for the leadership of the party. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are shocked and devastated. the lions have warmed up for the first test against the all blacks with the most in classic win of their new zealand tour so far, defeating the chiefs in hamilton 34-6. defeating the chiefs in hamilton 3a—6. two tries forjack nowell. andy murray bids for his sick title at queens today. he plays on centre court today and he said another winner would be a big boost to his wimbledon preparation. frankie dettori will miss all of royal ascot, which starts today, after a fall at great yarmouth last week. he has an arm injury and he will miss out on a number of well fancied rides. i will be backjust after half past 11. more than £200,000 has now been handed out to 180 families affected by the grenfell tower fire in west london. the payments were recorded by the government's newly formed
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grenfell response team. it said 78 families had been rehoused either locally or in neighbouring boroughs, and that 126 hotel places had been secured. let's go to richard lister. he is in west london for us. before you tell us more west london for us. before you tell us more about the re—homing of families affected by this, bring us up families affected by this, bring us up to date with what is happening in terms of the examination of the tower. you might be able to see behind mejust tower. you might be able to see behind me just underneath the tower, there are red vans at the —— of the various there are red vans at the —— of the various emergency there are red vans at the —— of the various emergency services. search and rescue teams are still working, of course. we know the recovery operation will take weeks and weeks, according to the authorities. the police had not given any updates
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this morning about what is happening in the tower today. and neither have they amended the figure of 79 confirmed or presumed dead in this disaster. the sense i think is the emergency teams are doing theirjob and in this community, i must say, things are very quiet this morning. as you would expect there is a sombre tone about the events of the past week. and people are exhausted with the trauma they have had to suffer in the last seven days. for many, the aim is to try and restore as much normality as they possibly can, given the appalling impact this tragedy has had on everybody here. you gave some figures earlier about the number of people being re—homed. there is a rehousing commitment for all of affected by the disaster and no longer have a place to live as far as possible locally. there are still many loose ends. i was speaking to a volunteer a moment
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ago. she said she had heard they we re ago. she said she had heard they were still people living on the floors of relatives and friends and have not yet have an offer of a hotel plays, even. things are not fully on track. —— hotel room, even. but the response team is keen to give the impression they are working as hard as they can and they have made significant progress compared to where we were days ago in making sure that everybody needing a place to live is at least being dealt with properly. one update this morning from nhs england, they said 14 people are still being treated in london hospitals, who were injured last week, of whom eight are in critical care. the numbers are slightly down on previous figures we had. about three people released and won a few person now in critical care. things are progressing. —— and fewer people now in critical care. if you come here today you will find
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a community determined to rebuild and get on with it again. richard, thank you. richard lister reporting. the funeral of a teenager who was killed in the manchester terror attack is to be held later today. 15—year—old olivia campbell was among 22 people who died in the suicide bombing at manchester arena on 22nd of may. her family said they wanted today to be about celebrating her life as a fun—loving teenager. we're not calling it a funeral. yeah, we know we have the official bit to do, but afterwards, we are calling it her party. she was 15 years old, she was full of life, we want to give her prom, her 16th, her 18th. we want to give her the best possible sendoff we can possibly give her. charlotte campbell, mother of olivia campbell. some of today's other
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developing stories now. a van driver has been killed after migrants put tree trunks onto the motorway to stop traffic near the french port of calais. the incident happened in the early hours of the morning after the van, registered in poland, hit one of three lorries which had been blocked by the tree trunks. authorities say it was the sixth time injust over six authorities say it was the sixth time in just over six weeks that the road has been blocked in this way. nine migrants were found in one of the lorries. a teenage boy has drowned in a reservoir in rochdale in greater manchester. he was reportedly swimming with friends at the greenbooth reservoir at around six o'clock last night. a police spokesman said there are not thought to be any suspicious circumstances surrounding his death and his family have been informed. for a full summary of all the news, you can go to our website, where you can get more detail on all those stories. the usual address at the bottom of the screen...
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the number of tests carried out in england to identify if people have issues such as sleep apnoea, has doubled in the last nine years. it's believed one and a half million people across the uk have the condition, which can cause sufferers to stop breathing periodically whilst asleep. david rhodes has more. most of us have a routine when it comes to bedtime, but for those with sleep apnea, getting a good sleep can involve a mask. hi always fall asleep at work. i needed to do something about it. the exhaustion was getting difficult to deal with. it got to the stage i wanted to kill myself. looking back now, i can't believe it got that bad. but at the time, i was wondering what the point of going on was with such a terrible life. it happens when muscles in the throat relax and block airwaves. sufferers consistently wake up during the night. it is often linked to
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obesity and can cause and stroke problems. last year, there were 147,000 diagnoses. i will ask you to hold it in place. 1.5 million of us in the uk are believed to have sleep apnea, though it's thought 80% of us have no formal diagnosis. to establish if someone has the condition, patients are monitored during their sleep. when it is red, you are still breathing. in this ten—minute window you can see how many times it is happening. doctors say treating those with the condition will make everyone overall more healthy and could save the nhs millions of pounds. i guess the weather is not helping with sleep issues for some people.
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the second—highest heatwave alert has been issued for britain has some parts of the country go into the fourth day of temperatures above 30 celsius. simon king, how are things looking? and tomorrow will be the fifth day where temperatures are above 30 celsius. we have not seen that in june for about above 30 celsius. we have not seen that injune for about 20 years. very hot weather around today. it will be hot particularly in southern parts of england, that is where temperatures will get up to about 32 celsius. the hot weather is not for all of us. a subtle change in conditions across the north and east of england. this weather front is moving south. it is bringing cloudy skies across parts of yorkshire, lincolnshire and through to the wash. some showers here this morning, as well. in this part of the world, a good 10 celsius less than yesterday. 17 celsius. the
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hottest in the south and south—west, where we could reach 32 celsius. on tuesday evening, this evening, one two shells in wales and the midlands, more showers moving into scotland, and northern ireland, but on wednesday, more hot and sunny weather across england and wales. a foundry breakdown in proceedings in scotla nd foundry breakdown in proceedings in scotland and northern ireland, a sign of things to come for many of us. “— sign of things to come for many of us. —— thundering breakdown. wednesday will be hotter still. temperatures in the south—east potentially 3a celsius. if we reach 34, it potentially 34 celsius. if we reach 34, it is the first time injune since 1976. goodbye. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... barclays bank and four of its former top executives have been charged with fraud and other offences at the height of the financial crisis in 2008. the bank says it is considering its position, while the lawyer for one of the individuals says he will vigorously defend himself. the former liberal democrat cabinet
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minister sir vince cable is to stand for the leadership of the party. he's the first lib dem mp to enter the contest and hasn't ruled out serving as a caretaker leader until after brexit. the family of the man alleged to have carried out the finsbury park mosque attack say they are devastated and massively shocked. 47—year old darren osborne was restrained by worshippers and arrested at the scene. the chancellor philip hammond has called for a smooth brexit to avoid a "cliff edge" for businesses as the uk leaves the european union. mr hammond also said that immigration would be managed but not shut down. president trump has blamed what he described as north korea's brutal regime for the death of an american student. otto warmbier, who had been detained in north korea for more than a year and a half, died on monday. people are advised to seek shade and
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stay hydrated as the heatwave continues. another very latest sport. hello. the lions have won their final match before the first test against the all blacks on saturday. warren gatland insists there are still places up for grabs in his squad for auckland. so there was plenty of motivation for the so—called midweek side in hamilton this morning agianst the chiefs. jack nowell spotting a gap to score the first try of four tries. the lions dominated up front again. then in a slightly more expansive move, jack nowell again found space for his second try of the match. jared payne went over to complete a 34—6 victory.
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the lions' most emphatic of the tour so far. we understand that andy murray has pledged to donate any winnings from this week's queen's tournament to families of the victims of the grenfell fire tragedy. and that could be as much as £350,000. the world number one is going for a sixth title in london. it has been by far my most successful tournament. i love the courts here, i like the conditions, it is very close to where i live so i get to stay at home. play has started on day two of the aegon classic in birmingham. johanna konta plays ukraine's lesia tsurenko later, but two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova is on court at the moment. we're still in the early stages of her match against tereza smitkova.
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this is her first grasscourt season since she suffered a career—threatening knife attack to her hand if you remember. the winner of this match will face britain's naomi broady in the second round. england are well—placed to reach the european under—21 championship semi—finals after coming from behind to beat slovakia 2—1. swansea's alfie mawson scrambled in this goal to bring the scores level. then just ten minutes later, southampton's nathan redmond completed the turnaround to send england top of the group. a win against hosts poland on thursday would send them through. breaking piece of football news. it has been confirmed real madrid star cristiano ronaldo will testify in his tax fraud case on the 31st of july. what about this for a hero's welcome? the pakistan captain has arrived back in karachi after they beat india to win cricket's champions trophy. he's in that car, i promise you.
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even after the special convoy escorting sarfraz ahmed from the airport got within sight of his karachi home in the early hours of the morning. it took the skipper nearly half an hour to get from the vehicle to his house as he was surrounded by adoring fans. many of whom had waited through the night to welcome their hero — who had led their country to a win against the odds. frankie dettori will miss the whole of royal ascot which starts today after a fall at great yarmouth last week. he has an arm injury and will miss out on a number of well—fancied rides. that's all sport for now. thank you very much. last night members of the community in finsbury park in north london held a vigil for those affected when a van was driven into a muslim worshippers in the early hours of monday morning. talking earlier on bbc radio 4, a former commissioner of the metropolitan police, lord blair, said the spate of terror attacks meant the government should think again about further cuts to the police. i think they are under an
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enormous amount of pressure, but i do not think it is a pressure they have never been under before because we have no idea how longer this series of events will go on for and cressida dick is right, if their weapons are this easy, we can see possibilities of it continuing. the crucial point is to understand the cuts being considered, certainly for the met police, they need reconsideration. as far as i understand, they are supposed to lose a further £400 million by 2021 on top of 600 million in the last few years. it must be a quarter less in size than when i left. joining me now is the chair of the police federation of england and wales. thank you forjoining us. when you consider the announcement that there will be a greater police presence at mosques, the aftermath of manchester, london bridge, the
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finsbury park attack, events like the disaster at grenfell tower, can you recall a period when police forces have been under such sustained demand ? forces have been under such sustained demand? no, absolutely not. this is not something that had just come to fruition in the last few months following the awful attacks. policing has to continue. up attacks. policing has to continue. up and down the country, the cuts of over 21,000 officers, even before these events, we were beginning to seep cracks appearing. i have been hearing anecdotal evidence in the last few days of officers being sent home after double shifts because of exhaustion. if this goes on for much longer, if it goes on at all, to be brutally frank, we have got to a place which is a very grave situation for policing in this country. we have been warning about the lack of resilience over the past four years and it has been falling on deaf ears. i am encouraged that our chief officers and ex—commissioner is expressing deep
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concern and i think every chief across england and wales and pcc now needs to take the message to the heart of government to make sure something has got to happen now. the trouble is, if we start trying to replace the resources we have lost, we will not see the benefit for at least two, three years. you cannot snap yourfingers least two, three years. you cannot snap your fingers and have trained resources there. tell us more, you mentioned stories of officers being sent home suffering from exhaustion, give us a little bit more of that daily impact these demands are having, presumably lots of people have had to leave cancelled, perhaps just regular days off cancelled? absolutely. it is notjust the places in north london, manchester, south london, they have required an uplift in relation to reassurance for the public, it is across the country. in every major city, in
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every place of worship, for example. forces are having to uplift officers. you cannot just forces are having to uplift officers. you cannotjust open a new box, you have to use existing resources . box, you have to use existing resources. for short periods of time, it can bejust resources. for short periods of time, it can be just about resources. for short periods of time, it can bejust about managed. we saw in 2010—11, in relation to the riots, for a short period of time, it is achievable, but that was before we lost the 21,000 500. over a prolonged sustained period of time which is what the public and we all believe is probably going to be the case, to provide that level of reassurance, the resources have got to come from somewhere. it is getting to the point where we will have to say, there are certain things the service is no longer able to deliver, to prioritise this level of policing. after the manchester arena attack, the government said more resources were going into counterterrorism policing, specifically. but are you saying those resources need to go into policing right across the board?
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absolutely, no shadow of a doubt. of course there needs to be investment in counterterrorism policing, but there needs to be an investment in front—line policing. the face of british policing, the bit that gives the reassurance, the bit that actually responds first to these awful incidents in addition to the continuing level of rises in violent crime we have seen, despite the terrorist threat. that is what the public expects. it is all very well investing in intelligence and counterterrorism, from that perspective, and that is important of course, but it is not the be all and end all. the first officers on the scene of terrible events are largely unarmed, not specialist counterterrorism officers, and they need support in numbers, as well as resources , need support in numbers, as well as resources, to be able to deal with it, and that is before we have the debate with neighbourhood policing and strong links that need to be built with difficult to reach communities. have you seen any indication from government that it is prepared to reconsider these cuts
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or reverse any of the cuts?|j is prepared to reconsider these cuts or reverse any of the cuts? i spoke to the home secretary this morning by telephone, in particular in light of the announcement of the uplift of taser in the met and what i'm saying is very simple. these things cost money, the protection for officers and resources, and we are looking to the government to provide that, not just for the met, but for every force in the country, because while there have been terrible incidents in london, there was manchester, and i dare say there will be other incidents before long, i hate to say it. what did amber rudd say to you? she is listening and she is taking away what we are saying to see what can be done and what can be —— i am looking forward to what the government says. speed is of the essence, we need to stop talking about it and get on with it. did you feel she was sympathetic to your call for the cuts to be reversed?” was pleased she had the phone call
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with me this morning and i am sure the home secretary and the prime minister are thinking very hard as to where they will put resources to give the public reassurance around policing. chair of the police federation of england and wales, thank you very much for your time today. president donald trump has denounced north korea as "a brutal regime" in reaction to the death of a us student who was released by the reclusive country last week. otto warmbier spent nearly 18 months in detention in north korea. the 22—year—old was medically evacuated to the united states, suffering from severe brain damage. he died six days later. peter bowes reports. otto warmbier was travelling in north korea as a tourist when he was arrested injanuary of last year. he had attempted to steal a propaganda sign from a hotel as a souvenir. before his trial, at a news conference arranged by the north korean government, he tea rfully confessed to trying to take the sign as a trophy for the us church. poor, innocent scapegoat...
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a month later, the economics student from the university of virginia was paraded through the halls of north korea's supreme court. he was found guilty and sentenced to 15 years of hard labour after a one—hour trial. it was soon after the trial that otto warmbier fell into a coma. north korea said he had contracted botulism. but on his return home, his american doctors said there was no evidence to support that diagnosis. they said he had suffered extensive brain damage. the circumstances of his detention in north korea and what medical treatment he received there remain a mystery. the warmbier family blamed otto's death on what they called the torturous mistreatment he had received at the hands of the north koreans. "no other outcome was possible, beyond the sad one we experience today," they said in a statement. otto warmbier was freed after senior officials from the us state department travelled to pyongyang to demand his release on humanitarian grounds.
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president trump spoke shortly after hearing the news of his death. ijust wanted to pass on word that otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea, a lot of bad things happened, but at least we got him home to be with his parents where they were so happy to see him, even though he was in a very tough condition, but he just passed away a little while ago. it is a brutal regime and we will be able to handle it. in a written statement, the president added that "his administration was determined to prevent such tragedies from befalling innocent people at the hands of regimes that do not respect the rule of law or basic human decency." peter bowes, bbc news. with me is our correspondent, celia hatton. first of all, it will be really
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difficult for the family of otto warmbier to get the answers it wants from north korea and they have many questions. absolutely. the statement the north koreans gave when otto warmbier was flown back to the us, it was really difficult to understand, frankly. it said he had contracted botulism, a very rare in all this —— a very rare illness you can get from a toxin. they said he had been given a sleeping pill and he had never woken up. that statement alone raises many questions and it is frankly unlikely more information will be released from the north koreans. american officials who had negotiated for otto warmbier to be released said the north koreans had never mentioned once anything was wrong with him. it does not seem more a nswe rs with him. it does not seem more answers will come from pyongyang any time soon. a lot of tour companies like the one that took him to north
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korea are now reevaluating whether they would continue to do so. tell us about that and also on a more official level, what the us is considering in response to the death of the student. a few days ago, us secretary of state rex tillerson said donald trump was considering an outright travel ban against americans going to north korea. but even since then, yes, tour companies, including the tour company which otto warmbier used, they have issued a statement saying they have issued a statement saying they will no longer take americans, other companies are being a little bit more cagey, they are considering a plan to stop taking americans into north korea. frankly, 90% of tourists who go to north korea are chinese, 90,000 chinese tourists go to north korea every year, and i do not think they will stop any time soon. there are some south koreans currently in north koreanjails and other american citizens, presumably
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the pressure is on to get answers on their well—being. the pressure is on to get answers on their well-being. just today south korea had issued a statement saying it had asked north korea for an update on the sixth south koreans currently being held in north korea, most of those are thought to be christian missionaries who were caught trying to do their work in north korea but north korea rejected requests from south korea for an update on those six. there are three americans and one canadian being held in north korea. very little information available on their condition as well. thank you for that. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. berkeley is an four former executives are charged with fraud over their actions in the 2008 financial crisis —— barclays bank. so vince cable is to stand for the leadership of the party, saying he has the energy and enthusiasm to
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succeed tim farron. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near london mosque say they are shocked and devastated. in the business news... four former bosses of barclays have been charged over allegations of fraud — after the bank raised £7bn from qatar at the height of the financial crisis. the serious fraud office is investigating payments made to qatar and a loan facility it offered the country. "the time is not right for an interest rate rise," so says the bank of england governor, mark carney. in a speech at the mansion house, in london, he said that wage growth was falling and the impact of brexit on the economy is unclear. the pound fell sharply after mr carney‘s comments. britain's car industry does not think the uk will be able to strike a full and comprehensive brexit deal with the european union during the course of two—year negotiations. the society of motor manufacturers
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and traders believes that if the government fails to reach a final agreement with the eu by the march, 2019, deadline, carmakers could face a cliff edge in which tariff—free trade would be sharply pulled away. good morning. more on the news ba rclays bank and good morning. more on the news barclays bank and four individuals including the former chief executive, john varley, have been charged with conspiracy to commit fraud and provide unlawful financial assistance. the charges relate to the bank's emergency fundraising at the height of the financial crisis in 2008, when rival banks rbs and lloyds sought government bailouts. ba rclays instead opted to seek money from qatar. but there are questions over how the funds were raised and what barclays offered in return. our business editor, simon jack, has more. two bits of that transaction, of that fundraising, in qatar which prompted this five—year investigation, the first one was advisory fees that were not disclosed at first
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and eventually it was disclosed £332 million was paid to qatar holdings, who supplied the investment, as i say, in advisory fees, and there was a question mark over whether that advice was really nonexistent and this was reallyjust, if you like, a bung to their new benefactors in the middle east. the second was a loan that was made from the bank to qatar holdings around the same time of this investment and the charge there is that, essentially, the bank was lending qatar money to buy shares in barclays bank and that is what is known as unlawful financial assistance, a big no—no for regulators. those are the two charges. but possibly the most interesting thing is this is the first time senior executives at a british bank have been personally charged with criminal conduct for their role in the financial crisis. our business editor speaking to me earlier. in other news...
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day two of brexit negotiations and more calls from business to protect their interests. the latest is from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. it says the government needs to make sure there's a transitional brexit deal to protect the car industry. the boss of the smmt — mike hawes — told us a full deal can't be done quickly. we need to be brutally honest, the chances of getting the bespoke and comprehensive new relationship that we need for future growth is unlikely within three, four, five yea rs. we unlikely within three, four, five years. we need a back—up plan, something to give as part of the customs union and ideally the single market so we can maintain the success market so we can maintain the su ccess we market so we can maintain the success we are enjoying. we have a trading relationship with over 160 countries around the world, we benefit from some of the existing trade agreements the eu already has with europe, so that has to be part of the arrangement. what happens with those existing arrangements and the new deals currently being negotiated. we really want the uk
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trading and being successful around the world, but not at the jeopardy of what we currently have. not quite sure what is going wrong with this this morning. i cannot quite show you the edge of the numbers, but it looks like it is a bit stretched. the ftse 100 numbers, but it looks like it is a bit stretched. the ftse100 is up, i promise you, i can see it, up 0.1%. ba rclays promise you, i can see it, up 0.1%. barclays bank, promise you, i can see it, up 0.1%. ba rclays bank, falling, promise you, i can see it, up 0.1%. barclays bank, falling, but not by anything as much as people thought initially, the launching of the investigation into the bank. not denting the shares. the market taking it in its stride. the pound falling almost a full percent at the comments by mark garnier about a potential rate rise, that is off the cards because of the uncertainty of brexit. —— mark carney. more for you in the next hour. never letting a
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glitch get in the way of telling a story! thank you. campaigners are launching an inquiry into the dubs scheme. the consultation process by which an around cut related how many should be admitted was fundamentally flawed, they say. clive coleman has been at the royal courts ofjustice. today's judicial review concerns the so—called dubs amendment to the 2016 immigration act, an amendment allowing child refugees unaccompanied child refugees, those without family ties in the uk, to come to the uk, originally it was envisaged some 3000 children would come under the dubs amendment, but the home secretary has limited that effectively to 480. today's judicial review is scrutinising whether the consultation with local authorities that got the number of 480 was
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lawful either not. campaigners say local authorities were willing to ta ke local authorities were willing to take far more. joining me as lord dubs and the actress, juliet stevenson, a patron of a charity help refugees. why is this so important? there are children in desperate plight in northern france, in the camps in greece, and in italy, and these children are vulnerable, suffering from abuse, living in appalling conditions, and any child we can bring over is a child's life worth saving. now, if we win thejudicial child's life worth saving. now, if we win the judicial review, the government will have to open up consultation, local authorities are willing to step up to the mark waugh we know, and more children will be able to come to safety and a decent life, and that is why it is important —— stepped up to the mark. you were a child refugee from nazi
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germany, you came on the famous kindertransport, you germany, you came on the famous kindertra nsport, you know germany, you came on the famous kindertransport, you know something of the plight of these children?” think i do. i was six when i came to this country, but this country gave mea this country, but this country gave me a decent life, safety. i would like to feel other children can come to britain and have the same opportunities i had, that is why it is important. juliet stevenson, why this 480 figure and what figure would you like to see? these of course are unaccompanied children who do not have ties. actually, the figure in the original dubs amendment was 3000 and that did not go through but under the law that did pass last year in government, it was an did pass last year in government, it was an unspecified number, but so far only 200 have come here and they we re far only 200 have come here and they were children from calais when the cab was closed last autumn. not a single child has come from italy or greece. we have only had places offered for 200 children. i have
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just been to athens to visit the refugee camps and i cannot describe the conditions in which these children are living. it is blisteringly hot, living in shanty towns, makeshift camps, some not even in proper tents, without families, parents, these unaccompanied children, living without running water, access to much food, without health resources, no education, no where to play. and significantly endangered by things going on in and around those camps in the form of traffickers and all kinds of other risks. just to remind everybody, the amendment is specifically for children identified as the most vulnerable because of psychological trauma on difficult journeys to the camps from their countries of origin, many of the children i saw were from syria, afghanistan. i think if people could see them, could see the conditions in which these young children are living, they would be moved to support this today. it is one of the biggest unanswered
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mysteries of the universe. is there life out there beyond this planet? well, if there is, it might be found on one of ten new earth—sized planets which have been discovered in the milky way. nasa scientists say data from the kepler space telescope has shown a set of rocky planets orbiting their suns at a similar distance to our earth and sun, meaning they could support water and life. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. pretty hot already across southern parts of england. one more day of it, including tomorrow, of the hot weather before it starts to break down on wednesday and thursday. lovely scenes in devon this morning, lots of sunshine. you can see from the satellite picture, down to the
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south—west, but towards lincolnshire, more cloud along the eastern areas and that cloud produced a few showers this morning, even the odd rumble of thunder around the wash early on. the cloudy weather coming in from the north sea, a bit of a breeze making things cooler, and the weather front moving south bringing fresh conditions. to the south of it, this is where we will have the hottest of the weather. this afternoon, temperatures up to 32 in parts of bristol, the west country, north devon. 31 possible in london. the odd shower later on this afternoon in parts of east wales and the midlands. along the north sea coast, the good 10 degrees cooler than it was this time yesterday. north—west england, wales and much of scotland, sunny spells here, much better day for north—west scotland with sunshine, but again, a little bit cooler along the north sea coast. this evening, the showers may continue across parts of wales, the midlands, in the northern ireland as
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well. fairly uncomfortable night for sleeping once again because hot air is continuing to move north but as it moves north, we will start to see a breakdown of this weather, thunderstorms starting to develop during wednesday across the northern half of the uk. most of those in near across scotland, northern england, but they will edge gradually further south. for much of england and wales, another hot day, hotter than today. temperatures could reach 34 across the south—east of england the warmer air goes further north. newcastle will be warmer than today. wednesday night, more storms and we will start to see the real breakdown of the weather. storms moving in from the west, could affect any one of us. they will be hit and miss. but they could be intense, heavy rainfall. frequent lightning, hail and gusty winds. gradually during thursday, it will move away. there will be brighter skies, sunny spells, feeling
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fresher. still fairly warm in the south—east. temperatures about 23, 206 south—east. temperatures about 23, 20 6 degrees. more details on the website, but that is it from me. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday... barclays and four former executives are charged with fraud over the way they raised funds in the 2008 financial crisis. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". in cardiff police continue to search this home, for any clues into the background of darren osborne. chancellor philip hammond insists the economy must be a priority in brexit talks, saying that people "did not vote to become poorer". iam i am confident we can do a brexit deal which putsjobs i am confident we can do a brexit deal which puts jobs and i am confident we can do a brexit deal which putsjobs and prosperity
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first. that reassures employees they will still be able to access the talent that they need. the former liberal democrat cabinet minister sir vince cable says he has the energy and enthusiasm to succeed tim farron as party leader. donald trump denounces north korea as "a brutal regime" after an american student who had been imprisoned there dies. and it's another hot one — temperatures rise over 30 degrees in some areas for the fourth day as the uk's heatwave continues. good afternoon. it's tuesday the 20th ofjune. i'm anita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the serious fraud office
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has charged barclays and four former executives — including former chief executivejohn varley — with fraud over the bank's dealings with qatar at the height of the financial crisis. barclays raised emergency funding from qatar in 2008 to avoid a government bail out. now barclays has become the first bank to face criminal charges for actions during the financial crisis. simon, good afternoon. barclays did not seek a bailout. that very fact is what has led to these charges. not seek a bailout. that very fact is what has led to these chargesm is what has led to these chargesm is how it went about raising the money needed to avoid having to be rescued by the taxpayer. in 2008, at the height of the financial crisis, it is so long ago, these investigations took a very long time, they raised to £12 billion in two fundraising episodes, with a lot
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of the money coming from investors in the oil rich states of the golf. principally qatar. the charges relate first of all the payments made to qataris, they were called advisory fees, in the process of negotiating the deal. there are questions about the transparency of these payments. that people were not told who should have known. and secondly, a loan of over £2 billion, paid to the state of qatarjust afterwards. if you think about it, they were buying shares in barclays, shoring it up, and barclays were loaning them money at the same time. so questions are being asked about that. the fraud charges are very serious. there is the potential of a ten year prison sentence for those individuals. companies can face a very high financial penalty. it is a
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very high financial penalty. it is a very serious outcome, albeit years after the financial crisis. any response from a bank or the individuals charged? the bank is considering its position while it waits for more information from the serious fraud office related to the charges. there are four people charge. john varley, the former chief executive, he faces charges of conspiracy to commit fraud over the two money raising episodes, and along with him, rogerjenkins, a senior figure, along with him, rogerjenkins, a seniorfigure, and along with him, rogerjenkins, a senior figure, and they also face a charge over the loan given. two others, tomas claris and richard bohus, who face one charge of conspiracy to commit fraud. roger jenkins's lawyer said he will vigorously contest the charges. these are the first charges to be brought against senior managers for alleged activities happy times of the financial crisis. -- at the time. a lotta people will see it as
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ironic that this is the bank that saved itself. questions being asked about how it did it. there have not been charges over other banks rescued by the taxpayer at the time and the taxpayers shelled out billions of pounds. simon converts, thank you. —— simon, thank you. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a london mosque say they are "shocked" and "devastated". father—of—four darren osborne, was held on suspicion of attempted murder and terror offences after a van hit muslim worshippers in finsbury park. last night a vigil took place near the scene of the attack. simon clemison reports. they came to break their fast with prayer. just as they had 24 hours earlier. a demonstration that nothing has changed. ramadan too important to miss. everyone is still shocked by what happened. there is a little bit of fear, but at the same time no one is staying away or hiding because of what happened. everyone is coming out to pray.
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of course we're coming. it is a mosque. we have to pray. we cannot run away from our prayer. it is after midnight and about this time last night the attack took place. people have come from other parts of london to pray here in the mosque tonight in a show of solidarity. they have been embracing in the street. the leaders told me that despite it being one of the busiest times in ramadan it has been quiter tonight. some have stayed away. earlier, the community held a vigil attended by the commissioner of the metropolitan police, cressida dick. and the mayor of london, who spoke of communities fighting division. what you have seen in the last 24 hours is muslims, jews, christians, hindus, sikhs, those of organised faith and those that are not, rich, poor, old and young coming together and saying, not in our name. officers continue to hold a man arrested under terror law, who the bbc understands to be 47—year—old darren osborne from cardiff. his family are said to be in shock and disbelief. in a moment, we'll speak
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to our correspondent tomos morgan, who is outside the suspect‘s house in cardiff. but first let's go to our correspondent lisa hampele, who is at the scene in finsbury park. what is the mood like there today? this is a proudly multicultural part of london. maybe less gentrified than other areas of london, but multi faith communities have been living here side—by—side quite happily for many years. they have been coming together. you can see the flowers and messages behind me. like at grenfell tower, people are writing messages going across the wall. some of the things here, not in my name. let's find the courage to love. we stand by you. some of the messages here. and like the mayor of london was saying, it is telling people it is best to be calm and vigilant. is happening. there is
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and vigilant. is happening. there is a feeling that although everything is calm, there is a feeling of people not feeling settled. they are concerned about islam phobia. that has increased and there is worry. lisa, thank you. let's go to thomas morgan in cardiff. the family have been reacting saying they are very shocked by all of theirs. what else have they said about him? -- all of this. i have been speaking to local people were darren osborne has his home. the overwhelming feeling from people i have spoken to is mostly shock that somebody who lives in this community could possibly have committed such an atrocious incident. the police have been searching this premises since mid afternoon yesterday. there has been afternoon yesterday. there has been a police presence this morning.
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offers is coming in and out and an exchange of vehicles, as well. the vehicle itself was hired from a village around 60 miles north—west of cardiff. —— 16 miles. what the family said in their entirety was they were completely shocked by the news they heard. they said it was unbelievable. they said they were devastated and they felt devastated to see families affected by what happened. they said darren osborne had not displayed any racist tendencies at all to the families, to them. the police in cardiff continue to search this property here to find any information about the background of darren osborne. 0k, the background of darren osborne. ok, thank you. the chancellor has promised to keep taxes "as low as possible" and to strike a brexit trade deal that safeguards british jobs. giving his annual mansion house speech this morning, philip hammond pledged to keep
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the border between northern ireland and the republic "open and free—flowing". how do we achieve this brexit for britain? firstly, by securing a comprehensive agreement for trade in goods and services. secondly, by negotiating mutually beneficial transitional arrangements to avoid unnecessary disruption and dangerous cliff edges. thirdly, by agreeing frictionless customs arrangements to facilitate trade across our borders, and crucially, to keep the land border on the island of ireland open and flowing. the chancellor did not rule out tax rises, but said his party would aim on keeping taxes and borrowing down. the conservative party will remain committed to keeping taxes as low as possible. and higher discretionary borrowing to fund current consumption is simply asking the next generation to pay for something that we want to consume but are not prepared to pay for ourselves, so we will remain committed to the fiscal
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rules set out at the autumn statement, which will guide us via interim target in 2020 to a balanced budget by the middle of the next decade. chancellor philip hammond. sir vince cable has become the first liberal democrat mp to throw his hat into the ring to become the party's new leader. the former business secretary won back his seat of twickenham in the general election. he said he had energy and experience. it comes after tim farron resigned last week. let's speak now to norman smith, in westminster. in the sunshine, norman. vince cable has been the acting leader, the deputy leader. do
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you think he is set to become the leader formally?” the leader formally? i think he has a very good chance. not least because he brings to the job a lot of experience. that is his pitch. he said he is the leader to help the party through chronically uncertain times. meaning in particular brexit. he is also pointing to the fact the party failed to make much progress in the general election at a time when many thought it might benefit from a backlash among remain voters. did not really happen. i suppose he is the experienced safety candidate and more than that, he is a name known to the public. he has a profile. he would get a hearing and have a presence in the political debate. the weaknesses he faces are to some extent the fact that he was pa rt to some extent the fact that he was part of the coalition. for a lot of liberal democrats that is now viewed
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asa liberal democrats that is now viewed as a significant black mark and one of the reasons why tim farron was chosen as leader because he was not pa rt chosen as leader because he was not part of it. the other witness, do not shy away from it, is his age. —— weakness. he is 74. by the next election he would be heading towards haiti. —— election he would be heading towards haiti. -- 80. election he would be heading towards haiti. —— 80. he points to another great liberal leader, william gladstone. he formed i think his last government when he was 82. his point is that age is not a barrier. you can look at the example of jeremy corbyn, a good age and south. but seemingly reinvigorated taking over the leather leadership. —— a good age himself. —— labour leadership. it is not rule out the possibility of leading in the interim. he might serve two years until brexit and potentially hand
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over to a younger leader. he is not committing to that but leaving it open as an option. when is the deadline for any contenders to say that they are challenging? we do not actually have one yet! i'm afraid not. apparently the party will decide this weekend what the timetable will be. we do have a deadline for the deputy leadership. five o'clock today. so far only one contender. interestingly it is josephine swinson, viewed by many as considered to have a good chance of getting the leadership. she is a much younger generation and also a woman. the liberal democrats have massively suffered when it comes to women representation. i do not think they had any female mps elected in they had any female mps elected in the previous general election. she decided to go for the deputy leadership and so far is the only contender. she looks like she is on course to become the deputy leader.
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we will see who else enters the ring for the leadership. norman, thank you. norman smith at westminster. more than £2000 has been handed out to families affected by the fire in g re nfell tower to families affected by the fire in grenfell tower in west london. the payments were recorded by the government's newly formed grenfell response team. it said 78 families had been rehoused either locally or in neighbouring boroughs, and that 126 hotel places had been secured. the funeral of a teenager who was killed in the manchester terror attack is to be held later today. 15—year—old olivia campbell was among 22 people who died in the suicide bombing at manchester arena on 22nd of may. her family said they wanted today to be about celebrating her life as a fun—loving teenager. we're not calling it a funeral. yeah, we know we have the official bit to do, but afterwards, we are calling it her party. she was 15 years old, she was full of life, we want to give her prom, her 16th, her 18th.
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we want to give her the best possible sendoff we can possibly give her. charlotte campbell, mother of olivia campbell. the headlines and barclays and four former executives are charged with fraud over their actions in the 2008 financial crisis. the family of a man arrested after a terror attack near a mosque in london say they are shocked and devastated by his actions. the chancellor philip hammond has told financial leaders he would like britain to leave the eu ina he would like britain to leave the eu in a way of boosting british business and jobs. —— that will boost british business and jobs. sport again. hello. jose mourinho has been accused of tax evasion from his time at real madrid. spanish
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prosecutors say he owes just under £3 million, dating from 2011 and 2012. cristiano ronaldo intends to testify in a tax fraud case, leading to him claiming he would like to leave real madrid. he is accused of hiding income from spanish authorities. he denies the charges. he will appear on the 31st of next month. the british and orange lions have won their last match before the first test match against new zealand. —— irish lions. warren gatland said places are still up for grabs. a lot of motivation for the mid week match. jack nowell spotted a gap to score the first of four tries. they dominated up front again. in henderson tried to drive over and the referee decided to award a penalty. the second in as many games for the lions. jack nowell again found space for his second in the matter. jared payne going over haswell, completing a 34
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— six victory. the most empathic win of the tour so far. we understand andy murray has pledged to donate any winnings from the queens tournament to families of the victims of the grenfell via tragedy. it could be as much as £350,000. —— tragedy. he is going for title number six tragedy. he is going for title numbersix in tragedy. he is going for title number six in london and a third in a row. he said he has played some of his best tennis in the tournament. he plays on centre court this afternoon. it is where i won my first professional mad. i have a lot of memories of it over the years. it has been my most successful tournament. —— professional victory ihad. tournament. —— professional victory i had. in birmingham johanna konta plays later after the two time wimbledon champion petra kvitova has finished. she hasn't taken the first
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set 6—2. it is the first grass court season since a career threatening knife attack to her hand. —— has taken the first set. the winner will face naomi broady in the second round. that is all these board for now. i have more in the next half an hour. studio: thank you. president donald trump has denounced north korea as "a brutal regime" in reaction to the death of a us student who was released by the reclusive country last week. otto warmbier spent nearly 18 months in detention in north korea. the 22—year—old was medically evacuated to the united states, suffering from severe brain damage. he died six days later. peter bowes reports. otto warmbier was travelling in north korea as a tourist when he was arrested injanuary of last year. he had attempted to steal a propaganda sign from a hotel as a souvenir. before his trial, at a news conference arranged by the north korean government,
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he tea rfully confessed to trying to take the sign as a trophy for a us church. poor, innocent scapegoat... a month later, the economics student from the university of virginia was paraded through the halls of north korea's supreme court. he was found guilty and sentenced to 15 years of hard labour after a one—hour trial. it was soon after the trial that otto warmbier fell into a coma. north korea said he had contracted botulism. but on his return home, his american doctors said there was no evidence to support that diagnosis. they said he had suffered extensive brain damage. the circumstances of his detention in north korea and what medical treatment he received there remain a mystery. the warmbier family blamed otto's death on what they called the torturous mistreatment he had received at the hands of the north koreans. "no other outcome was possible, beyond the sad one we experience today," they said in a statement.
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otto warmbier was freed after senior officials from the us state department travelled to pyongyang to demand his release on humanitarian grounds. president trump spoke shortly after hearing the news of his death. ijust wanted to pass on word that otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea, a lot of bad things happened, but at least we got him home to be with his parents where they were so happy to see him, even though he was in a very tough condition, but he just passed away a little while ago. it is a brutal regime and we will be able to handle it. in a written statement, the president added that "his administration was determined to prevent such tragedies from befalling innocent people at the hands of regimes that do not respect the rule of law or basic human decency." peter bowes, bbc news. military units are trying to contain
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a fire military units are trying to contain afire in military units are trying to contain a fire in portugal which has killed more than 60 people. the national route has been dubbed the road of hell after 47 died, most of them trapped in their vehicles. authorities believe dry thunderstorms sparked the blaze, which is 150 kilometres north east of lisbon. james reynolds is there and he has the latest. we understand from the authorities they believe they have 70% of the fires under control. the portuguese president is cautiously optimistic things are now under control. it is difficult to tell the scope of the fires so far this morning, given the morning mist. a number of planes have been taking off and landing, suggesting they are still carrying out operations dumping water from the airto dampen down
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operations dumping water from the air to dampen down the fire. beyond the initial relief effort are the huge questions this country faces after its worst disaster in over a quarter of a century. portugal normally suffers from more forest fires than any other country in southern europe. it knew something like this might happen but still prevention measures, many people feel, are simply inadequate. one specific point, why was that road, 236, not closed? that is what a lot of people would like to know. families had to make terrible decisions. families who had to take that road were caught by the claims. the authority said they did everything they could. the president said nobody could have imagined the speed at which the fire started. it was thought to have started from a lightning strike on saturday afternoon and changes in wind direction caught many people by surprise. but it leaves the underlying point is that people were afraid to stay in their homes. no
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instructions were given to them as far as we instructions were given to them as faras we can instructions were given to them as far as we can tell. and their homes did not have safe areas, refuges, which people suggest should have been built. that would have allowed people to stay home and not make that fateful journey along road 236. james reynolds. authorities say this accident was the sixth time in just over six weeks that the road has been blocked in this way. nine migrants were found in one of the lorries. we will go to simonjones in calais. they are putting down these roads to slow down traffic so they can climb on—board vehicles. down traffic so they can climb
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on-board vehicles. absolutely. what they want is to stop the traffic and bring it to a whole. especially in the early hours of the morning when it is dark and use the opportunity to try and get on board lorries bound for britain. the latest incident happened at around 345 this morning. on the a16 behind me. what happened is the motorway has partly reopened. you have a lane of traffic which is going but another lane is cordoned off. and beyond the cones you can see is scorch marks on the road from where the van burst into flames. the sixth time this has happened since made. the van driver hit the back of stationary lorries and inside one of the lorries they found nine migrants. we are told two from afghanistan and the rest from eritrea. motoring organisations and groups representing british lorry drivers have said for a long time it
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is only a matter of time before somebody is killed. the migrants have used increasingly desperate tactics to try and get on board lorries bound for britain. we have seen blockade set up where they put trees in the road and set them on fire. we do not think last night there was one but it is simply that lorries came to a halt in front of the van, leading to the van driver hitting the back of the lorries. i have spoken to the calais authorities this morning and many people are particularly worried about this, lorry drivers have predicted this, and it is worrying for tourist traffic with the holiday season coming. authorities say they have hundreds of police officers in calais but admit this is a long stretch of road to police. this main road leads to the port of calais and the eurotunnel. they said they will review security here. motoring organisations say that is not good enough and they want more. they want
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the french authorities and government to step up and even call for the army to patrol this section of road. because it can be as you have seen, extremely dangerous. simonjones in have seen, extremely dangerous. simon jones in calais, have seen, extremely dangerous. simonjones in calais, thank you. scientists have begun human trials of a cholesterol—lowering vaccine to help prevent heart disease. the injection is designed to stop fatty deposits from clogging the arteries. it would offer patients an alternative to taking daily pills to cut their risk of stroke, angina and heart attacks. our health correspondent, michelle roberts, has more. heart disease and stroke are the world's biggest killers. millions of people in britain take cholesterol—lowering drugs to reduce their risk. although statin pills are cheap and very effective, they don't suit everyone. some people dislike taking daily medication or forget doses. a few have to stop them because of side—effects. now scientists from the netherlands organisation of applied scientific research believe they may have found an alternative treatment. it is a vaccine that helps the body's immune system get rid of bad cholesterol from the blood.
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studies in mice show it helps stop the buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries. the first human trials are now under way but researchers say it will take six years before they know if the jab is safe and effective enough to get regulatory approval. if it does become available, they say it shouldn't be seen as an excuse for people to eat lots of high—fat food and that eating a healthy diet, taking regular exercise and quitting smoking can help lower cholesterol and your risk of heart disease. it is hot out there again for the fourth day in a row with temperatures of more than 30 degrees. the latest with chris fawkes. perfect weather for a nice woolly suit! another couple of days
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of hot weather in parts of england and wales, with a lot of sunshine dick campbell stop for some of us that means high uv. —— sunshine. for some of us that means high uv. pushing into the low 30s, around 32. fresh conditions in north east england, their bridges dropping by 10 degrees compared with yesterday. and partly cloudy skies. —— temperatures. as we go on tours ten o'clock, people thinking of getting their heads down for a sleep, 25 celsius for some. another uncomfortable night for sleeping. tomorrow, northern parts of the uk will have thunder and rain and in the south, across much of england and wales, hot and sunny. could be the hottest day of the heatwave with figures up to 34 and if it is 34 it will be the hottestjune day in over 40 yea rs.
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will be the hottestjune day in over 40 years. it will end in a bank because big thunderstorms swinging right across the british isles on wednesday night. that is your weather. good afternoon. this is the bbc news. the headlines... barclays and four of its former top executives have been charged with fraud and other offences at the height of the financial crisis in 2008. the former liberal democrat cabinet minister, sir vince cable, is to stand for the leadership of the party. he's the first lib dem mp to enter the contest and hasn't yet ruled out serving as a caretaker leader until after brexit. the family of the man alleged to have carried out the finsbury park mosque attack say they are devastated and massively shocked. 47—year—old darren osborne was restrained and arrested at the scene. the chancellor, philip hammond, has called for a smooth brexit to avoid a cliff edge for businesses as the uk leaves the european union. mr hammond also said that immigration would be
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managed but not shut down. president trump has blamed what he described as north korea's brutal regime for the death of an american student. otto warmbier, who had been detained in north korea for more than a year and a half, died on monday. he had been flown back to the us in a coma. and for the fourth consecutive day, the temperature is set to rise to over 30 degrees in some parts of the uk. some breaking news coming to us in relation to charges brought against the former professional football coach, the crown prosecution service saying today the 20th ofjune, 63—year—old has been charged with 14 cou nts 63—year—old has been charged with 14 counts of non—recent child sexual
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abuse, historic child sexual abuse charges against boys aged 11 to 14 yea rs charges against boys aged 11 to 14 years old. the cps says he will appear by video link at south cheshire magistrates' court on wednesday, 28th of june, cheshire magistrates' court on wednesday, 28th ofjune, in relation to these charges. former professional football coach, charged with 14 counts of historic child sexual abuse against boys aged 11 to 14. that just sexual abuse against boys aged 11 to 14. thatjust came into us from the crown service. following the recent terror attacks in london and manchester, there has been a rise in hate crimes targeting muslims. london's mayor, sadiq khan, says islamophobic attacks in the capital have increased five—fold since the london bridge attack. there has also been a sharp increase in manchester following the concert bombing. but nationally, the figure isn't exactly clear. that's because the home office, which monitors hate crimes, doesn't specify which religions
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are targeted when offences are committed. our reality check correspondent, chris morris, has been looking at the official numbers to try to gauge how big this problem is in britain. hejoins me now. chris, take us first of all through the official figures. as you say, religion is one of the categories nationally the home office collates asa nationally the home office collates as a hate crime but it is not broken down, we do not know how many of the tax based on the religion of the victim are people who are muslims —— the attacks. we know the overall number of attacks based on religion rose by 34% last year, significant increase. some areas and police forces do break it down into specific religions. london is one of them. we know from figures in london islamophobic attacks have ridden tee risen from 1136 in the year to
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january, 2016, and as you mentioned, sadiq khan, has given figures, based on police numbers, suggesting that in the aftermath of the london bridge attacks, the numbers rose fivefold on a daily basis compared to the average so far this year. there seems to be pretty clear evidence numbers are on the increase and of course these are the attacks that get reported, not all attacks get reported, not all incidents of abuse get reported. there is an u pwa rd abuse get reported. there is an upward trend, it seems, even though the way in which the attacks recorded varies between different forces in different parts of the country. something we also look at is anecdotal evidence of hate crime, what is that telling us? we have heard an interview —— in interviews done on the street at finsbury park and elsewhere, people are concerned, they are more worried than for some
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time. if you look at what happened in manchester, a project which monitors anti—muslim attacks, it says that in the seven days before the manchester bombing, there were 15 street —based incidents of islamophobia reported to them from across the uk, 15, nationwide. in the seven days after the manchester bombing, there were 83 and 26 were in manchester. again, fairly clear evidence that when there are terrorist attacks, correspondingly hate crimes go up at the same time. one of the difficulties sometimes it is difficult to know how these crimes or classified because it is on the perception of the victim. some people sometimes not sure, are they being targeted because of their religion or the colour of their skin? getting an overall exact figure even in specific locations but certainly nationwide is difficult, but overall, the idea these incidents are going up, we know the vast majority of people do
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not take part in them, but it is pretty clear they are going up. chris morris, thank you for explaining that. let's cross to finsbury park and speak to our correspondent, lisa hampele. can you give us a sense of how people are feeling there? multi faith communities have been happily living side—by—side here for many yea rs. living side—by—side here for many years. now they are pulling together, as you can see behind me, there are flowers, loads of posters here, let's find the courage to love, some of them say. not in my name. we stand by you. as in g re nfell tower, name. we stand by you. as in grenfell tower, there is a long list of names and messages on a piece of paper going down the wall here and the flowers are growing and we have seen people come and read them, slow —— slowly showing their children, writing on the board. even though there is calm and vigilance, people
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do feel unsettled. i am joined now by doctor pauljackson from northampton university who is an expert on far right groups and prevention. we have been hearing before this about how difficult it is to tell if there is a rising islamophobia, but there is a feeling on the street that people are u nsettled ? on the street that people are unsettled? there is a lot of data to show islamophobic incidents have increased in the last few years and also specific terrorist incidents can lead to a specific rise ined too. that is something we have become increasingly aware of. is it becoming the norm ? become increasingly aware of. is it becoming the norm? we have seen elements of islamophobia developed in different ways. there are lots of casual islamophobia which is different to the very extreme motivations that seem to have motivated attacks like this one. islamophobia takes many forms and we need to think in different ways about how to tackle more casual or
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extreme forms of prejudice. what do you think? how can it be prevented? in terms of monitoring and dealing with far right groups, the state security services need to do more to think about how much resource they put into that, including in things like the prevent severe, how that might develop, in schools, education strategies, these sorts of things. a wider role for civil society to do more, become more aware, worked at what is acceptable and unacceptable too and maybe events like this will cause a rethink. i understand you say the media has a lock to do with it as well? this is something academics wrestle with. it is difficult to seek direct causal links between some of the more populist print media reporting of issues and how that might feed into violent extremism, but certainly we can talk about the media creating a more permissive environment and legitimising views that maybe even a few years ago would have been seen
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as quite taboo and problematic. exactly how that directly links to an individual act and incident is very difficult to demonstrate but it is again something we ought to think about. thank you very much. from here in finsbury park where the flowers are growing and the messages of support which can be summed up m, of support which can be summed up in, we stand by you, they are growing. back to you in the studio. lisa at finsbury park, thank you. a teenage boy has drowned in a reservoir in rochdale in greater manchester. he was reportedly swimming with friends at the greenbooth reservoir at around 6pm last night. a police spokesman said there are not thought to be any suspicious circumstances surrounding his death and his family have been informed. as we've been hearing, the military have joined the fight to try and contain a wild fire in central portugal that has killed more than 60 people. authorities believe dry thunderstorms sparked the blaze on saturday in pedrogao grande, which is 150 kilometres northeast of the capital lisbon.
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let's get an update on the emergency relief effort. diana araujo is from the international department of the portuguese red cross. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. give us your assessment of the situation in the area affected. thank you very much for having me. unfortunately, we have had recent developments in the last hour or so had recent developments in the last hourorso and had recent developments in the last hour or so and two fronts of the fire havejoined, so more villages have been evacuated by the red cross, by the portuguese red cross, in the last hour. we have evacuated 57 people from a nursing home. a front was active this past evening. we are currently also evacuating civilians from another village nearby. so, yes, in the latest hour,
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we have had this development and the fire is still ongoing and it is affecting other areas around pedrogao grande and other municipalities around. how many people are you talking about that you have had to move to safety? well, we had to evacuate 57 people from the nursing home, mainly elderly people. some of them in wheelchairs. and currently, i still do not have the numbers, the evacuation which is ongoing now in a nearby village. it is interesting i think for people to hear you are at the red cross is actually involved in the evacuation process, people might perhaps assume it is something done by the military, for example. well, to maybe give you a little bit of feedback on that, the portuguese
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red cross has been involved in the operations from day one. we were mobilised at 630 on saturday with a big operation, so we have had first aid, mobile clinics, psychosocial support, we have been active in supporting authorities in the effo rts supporting authorities in the efforts from the beginning. in terms of evacuations, we have been involved in evacuations because we have the means to do it and support authorities in that role. and clearly, this is having a devastating impact on the area and on the people. what have they been saying to you, the people you have been helping to move to safety? well, as you know, the number of casualties is very high, one of the worst incidents we have had in recent yea rs. currently, worst incidents we have had in recent years. currently, the number
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of fatal casualties is 64 and the number of injured people has risen in the past 24 hours because the fire has continued. now we have 157 injured people, seven of them critically injured. so there is the possibility of the number of casualties rising. people, of course, are very casualties rising. people, of course, are very upset, casualties rising. people, of course, are very upset, some casualties rising. people, of course, are very upset, some of them are still missing family members because only about 50% of the people who have died have been identified by authorities. so we have, the portuguese red cross, been working on psychosocial support to the victim ‘s. much as the victims were looking forfamily victim ‘s. much as the victims were looking for family members, victim ‘s. much as the victims were looking forfamily members, and victim ‘s. much as the victims were looking for family members, and also doing tracing on their behalf, but also in terms of the support which has been provided for people who
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have lost their homes and nearly everything they have built throughout their lifetimes. diana, thank you for talking to us and we wish you and your team is well with the very difficultjob you have a head. thank you. diana from the portuguese red cross. saying that two fronts of the fire have now joined and they are having to evacuate more people away from those flames. some breaking newsjust coming into us in relation to the news we have been telling you today that the sfo has brought fraud charges against barclays bank and fourformer charges against barclays bank and four former senior executives. one of those, richard both has issued a statement, saying the decision to charge him is based on a false understanding of my role and the fa cts . understanding of my role and the facts. he says, i was not a decision maker and had no control over what the bank did in 2008. these charges relate to the way money was raised
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in the 2008 financial crisis to avoid the bank having to ask for a bailout from the taxpayer. the statement from richard both, one of those charged. i repeatedly raised concerns of decisions taken by the bank with senior management and lawyers and was reassured those decisions were lawful. i have cooperated fully with the sfo throughout the investigation and the evidence i have supplied is very clear, there is no case for me to a nswer clear, there is no case for me to answer and i will contest these charges vigorously. the first detailed statement from one of those fourformer detailed statement from one of those four former senior executives who has been charged. campaigners are launching a high court challenge over the number of unaccompanied child refugees accepted into the uk under the dubs scheme. the charity help refugees claims the consultation process, by which home secretary amber rudd calculated only 480 should be accepted, was fundamentally flawed. our legal affairs correspondent, clive coleman, has been
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at the royal courts ofjustice. today's judicial review concerns the so—called dumps amendment to the 2016 immigration act and that was an amendment allowing child refugees unaccompanied, those without family ties in the uk to come to the uk. —— dubs amendment. originally it was envisaged 3000 children would come but the home secretary amber rudd has effectively limited that the 480. today's judicial review is scrutinising whether the consultation with local authorities that got the number, arrived at the number of 480, was lawful or not. campaigners say local authorities we re campaigners say local authorities were willing and able to take far more than the 480 figure. joining me as lord dubs who gives his name to the amendment and the actress, juliet stevenson, a patron of the
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charity help refugees. why is this so important? there are children in desperate plight in northern france, in the camps in greece, and in italy. these children are vulnerable, suffering from abuse, living in appalling conditions. any child we can bring over is a child's life worth saving. now, if we win the judicial review, the government will have to open up consultation, local authorities are willing to step up to the mark and more children will be able to come here toa children will be able to come here to a decent life and to safety. that is why it is important. you yourself we re is why it is important. you yourself were a child refugee from nazi germany, you came to this country on the famous kindertra nsport. germany, you came to this country on the famous kindertransport. you know something of the plight of these children? i think i do. i was six when i came to this country but this country gave me a decent life, safety. i would like to feel other children can come to britain and have the same opportunities i have had, that is why it is important.
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juliet stevenson, why this 480 figure and what figure would you like to see? how many children would you like to see come to this country? unaccompanied children who do not have ties here. the figure in the original dubs amendment was 3000 and that was altered. that did not go through. under the law that passed last year in government, it was an passed last year in government, it was an unspecified number, but so far, only 200 children have come here under the far, only 200 children have come here underthe amendment far, only 200 children have come here under the amendment and they we re here under the amendment and they were from calais when the camp was closed last autumn. not a single child has come from italy or greece. we have only had now places offered for 200 children and i have just been to athens to visit some of the refugee camps and i cannot tell you, i cannot describe the conditions in which these children are living. it is blisteringly hot. they are living in shantytowns, is blisteringly hot. they are living in sha ntytowns, makeshift is blisteringly hot. they are living in shantytowns, makeshift camps, some not even improper tents, they are without families, parents. these unaccompanied children. living without running water, access to
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much food, without health resources, no education, nowhere to play. and also significantly in danger by things going in around the camps in the form of traffickers and all kinds of other risks. just to remind everybody, the dubs amendment is specifically for children identified as the most vulnerable because they have had psychological trauma on very difficult journeys to these camps from third countries of origin and many of the children i saw from syria, afghanistan and so on. i think if people could see them, could see the conditions in which these young children are living, they would be moved to support this today. juliet stevenson and lord dubs. the number of tests carried out in england to identify if people have issues such as sleep apnoea has doubled in the last nine years. it's believed 1.5 million people across the uk have the condition, which can cause sufferers to stop breathing periodically whilst asleep. david rhodes has more. most of us have a routine when it comes to bedtime,
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but for those with sleep apnea, getting a good sleep can involve wearing a mask. i always fell asleep at work. i needed to do something about it. the exhaustion was getting difficult to deal with. i got very depressed and anxious. it got to the stage i wanted to kill myself. looking back now, i can't believe it got that bad. but at the time, i was wondering what the point of going on was with such a terrible life. it happens when muscles in the throat relax and block airwaves. sufferers consistently wake up during the night. it is often linked to obesity and heart and brain problems. last year, there were 147,000 diagnoses. twice as many as there were nine years ago. i will ask you to hold it in place. 1.5 million of us in the uk are believed to have sleep apnea, though 80% of us have
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no formal diagnosis. to establish if someone has the condition, patients are monitored during their sleep. when it is red, you are still breathing. in this ten—minute window, you can see how many times it is happening. doctors say treating those with the condition will make everyone overall more healthy and will save the nhs millions of pounds. more now on the chancellor's mansion house speech this morning. he has plans to keep taxes as low as possible and to strike a brexit trade deal safeguarding british jobs. more reaction with norman smith. the chancellor is sounding more warning noises about the impact on the economy of brexit and also suggesting he may still seek to meet his deficit reduction target in
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2025, despite the backlash from many tory mps who believe austerity was one of the reasons they did not win the general election or did not manage to form a majority government. joining me is the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell. we heard the chancellor say people are tired, fed up of austerity. that does suggest that although he is not abandoning it, there may be some easing off. it looks as though there has been warm woods but nothing in terms of policy, he clearly has not got the message about how concerned people are about the rundown of public services, the pay freeze of the last ten years, he has not got the last ten years, he has not got the message because he is not translating it into policy. is there any longer any majority in the commons to pass austerity legislation? i think he will have real difficulty. he will only have a budget in the autumn, he has said. all of the astarte measures are now running for —— all of the austerity
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measures. a large number of conservative mps are saying, this is impacting upon our constituents, you have to think again. philip hammond is not the safe pair of hands everyone thought he was, he has destroyed the last budget within a week, now he seems to... soft soap, one woods, but no implementation of the lessons of the general election. a large numberof the lessons of the general election. a large number of conservative and labour mps a large number of conservative and labourmps are a large number of conservative and labour mps are saying, you have to change tack. you have said you were going to put down an amendment in the queen's speech calling for an end to austerity. is there any cross— party end to austerity. is there any cross—party agreement, arrangement, alliance to try to topple the government at this queen's speech? no, we are not into discussions like that. we will put forward what we think is in the best interest of the country and we would hope conservative mps and other mp5 will vote for it because as philip hammond this morning does not seem to have got the message, maybe
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parliament has got to impose this message on the government. we have got to end austerity, we cannot go on with the scale of cuts in our public services and this continuing pay freeze, people have had enough. given that, do you think there is any prospect you can defeat the government on this queen's speech? you can never tell what happens in parliament, but even if we do not defeat them, when it comes down to individual austerity measures, i cannot see this government having a majority and increasingly we are seeing the conservative party fall apart and! seeing the conservative party fall apart and i think we will see this government fall apart. we had the start of brexit negotiations yesterday, the chancellor today sounding a warning about the potential hit to the economy of so—called hard brexit. where does labour stand in the debate because you too are in favour of leaving the single market and the customs union? let us be clear, we respect that decision of the referendum but we wa nt decision of the referendum but we want access to the single market, we
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have said with regard to the customs union, leave it on the table, that will be part of the negotiations. but whatever we do, we have to protectjobs and but whatever we do, we have to protect jobs and the economy. but whatever we do, we have to protectjobs and the economy. again, philip hammond this morning made some recognition of that but it is not what is happening in the negotiations. we have hard brexiteers controlling the negotiations at the moment. philip hammond seems to be shouting through the letterbox at number 10 and not being listened to. his position is untenable. he has to challenge theresa may if he wants to remain as chancellor. no use shouting through the letterbox. john mcdonnell, thanks. big day tomorrow when we get the queen's speech which of course will be packed, one imagines, with brexit legislation. thank you, norman smith. in a moment, the news that one. first, the weather forecast. a couple of days left of the current
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heatwave, plenty of sunshine, very high levels of uv, this was the scene sent to us showing the sunny skies in devon. the hot air still with us across much of england and wales. pressure conditions coming in across parts of scotland and north east england as well. —— fresher conditions. not much change in the temperature in greater london. but north—east england will see temperatures dropping by 10 degrees from yesterday or today. a big change on the way for some behind the front. to the south, the hot air. wales, much of the midlands, at east anglia and southern counties of england, another hot and humid day with temperatures into the low 30s. could be enough to trigger one or two late day storms although many of us will have a dry day. fresher and cloudy conditions in the north—east. fine weather for scotland. a fresh fields of the weather. similar
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conditions for northern ireland. showers working in from the west. these could be thundery but perhaps not too much in the way of heavy rain. probably coming down in some fairly big blobs though. uncomfortable night's sleep ahead for sure. marvellous. temperatures at10pm, 25 for sure. marvellous. temperatures at 10pm, 25 degrees —— for sure. of us. it stays very warm across england and wales with plenty of sunshine. some thundery bursts of rain across the northern half of the country. these are the temperatures we are looking at wednesday afternoon. probably the hottest day of the heat wave. if we see highs of 34, that would be the hottestjune day we have seen for 40 years. as we go through wednesday evening, it ends ina go through wednesday evening, it ends in a bang, thunderstorms will break out fairly widely, with gusty winds, torrential bursts of rain and pretty hefty hail as well. the stormy weather still with us in eastern parts to start thursday.
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spain quite warm. but fresher air in the atlantic. —— staying quite warm. similaron the atlantic. —— staying quite warm. similar on friday and we can. more co mforta ble similar on friday and we can. more comfortable weather for sleeping. the chancellor uses his mansion house speech to say he wants to make the economy the first priority in brexit negotiations. iam i am confident we can do a brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first. that reassures employers and they will still be able to access they will still be able to access the talents they need. his tone was notably different to the prime minister. the governor of the bank of england warned brexit could make people poorer. is lunchtime... barclays bank and four of its former senior executives are charged with fraud — the first criminal charges against a bank arising from the financial crisis of 2008. call from the community
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