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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 20, 2017 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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this bbc news, the headlines at 8: the chancellor says jobs and prosperity must come first in any brexit deal. speaking in the city of london, phillip hammond said that while the public voted to leave the eu, they didn't vote to become poorer. i'm confident we can do a brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first, that reassures employers they will still be able to access the talent they need. the democratic unionist party says talks with the conservatives are not proceeding as planned, and that the dup shouldn't be taken for granted. police have been given additional time to question a 47 year—old man arrested, after a terror attack near a london mosque. as the authorities say accommodation has been found for around 80 families who need it at grenfell tower, some are finding it's far from permanent. they throw me out from the hotel, because it was fully booked from today. what are you going to do?
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they give us another hotel in earl's court. barclays and four former executives have been charged with fraud, in connection with financial support received from qatar during the financial crisis in 2008. also, experts say it could be the hottest heatwave in june for 20 years. but, as the temperature soars to above 30 in many places, a health warning is issued to those struggling to stay cool. one of the greatest upsets that queens has seen. the man who has ruled this place so many times. tennis and the world no 1 andy murray has suffered a shock defeat in the first round at queens. he lost in straight sets to the world number 90. good evening and welcome to bbc news.
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the chancellor, philip hammond, has put britain's future economic prosperity centre stage in any brexit deal. in particular, mr hammond called for a "jobs first" settlement. he also wants immigration to be managed, but not shut down altogether. labour says the chancellor is distancing himself from the prime minister's tough line on brexit, accusing the cabinet of being in disarray over the issue. the chancellor's comments come on a day when the governor of the bank of england has warned of the risks of the brexit negotiations. here's our economics editor kamal ahmed. a year on from the referendum, and cars waiting in sunny southampton for a journey to the continent of europe. exports to the european union like these are a key driver of our economy, an economy that the chancellor said would now be at the heart of those complicated brexit negotiations. speaking at the mansion house in central london, philip hammond said without a flexible deal with the eu, the economy could be at risk.
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when the british people voted last june, they did not vote to become poorer or less secure. they did vote to leave the eu, and we will leave the eu, but it must be done in a way that works for britain. in a way that prioritises british jobs and underpins britain's prosperity. alongside mr hammond today, the governor of the bank of england. he said that brexit was likely to make people poorer and that they would need to be a transition period after the completion of the brexit process in 2019. the monetary policy committee cannot prevent weaker real income growth that is likely to accompany the transition to new trading arrangements with the eu. it can support households and businesses as they adjust such profound change. the two great economic offices of state — here is the bank of england, and about two miles down the road that way the treasury,
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and the leaders of those two institutions, i think, came together today to make a big point about brexit put the economic wealth of britain first, they both said, even if that means some sacrifices on those controversial issues of sovereignty and strict controls on immigration. another port, another city, belfast. mr hammond and mr carney spoke about struggling consumers are weary of austerity, and shoppers today admitted that they were feeling the pinch. i think things maybe are going up in price a wee bit, and obviously if wages aren't going up, people will be feeling the pinch that bit more. at the moment, i haven't really seen much of a difference, there is a lot more offers and things in supermarkets. i think they have gone up, they don't match wages, to be honest. higher prices, brexit, the need for a good deal. there were plenty of warnings today but the economy has been far
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stronger than people expected since the referendum. i don't think there is any doubt that since the brexit referendum, the pound has fallen. now, it is a glass half full or half empty. clearly, that has meant there is higher inflation, and that has had a knock—on effect for real incomes, but on the other hand it has been a much—needed boost to exports, we really needed that boost because the currency was overvalued. it was a day for stepping back and taking the wider view on the economy. an economy for consumers so uncertain, mr carney said there would be no interest rate rises in the near future. sunny today, yes, but there could be more squally weather ahead. kamal ahmed, bbc news. with me now is ruth lea, an econonist at arbuthnot banking, who was pro—brexit during the referendum campaign. does it make sense this idea of a
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transitional period to allow the economy to adjust to the changed circumstances of brexit? it makes a lot of sense, even in the white paper, dave davis talked of an interim period and the eu were talking about that as well. it is most unlikely that the new relationship will all be sorted out by march 2019 when we leave. assuming it is not sorted by then, to have a transitional arrangement makes a lot of sense. i thought philip hammond's was a constructive speech. it depends how long it ta kes, speech. it depends how long it takes, we are talking about getting a trade deal with the eu for a country that has just left the bloc, that's never happened before. some suggest it could take five or six or seven years. that means we will be subject to european court of justice, and all its rulings, for
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that time. even though the british people voted to get out of brexit. that time. even though the british people voted to get out of brexitlj would be more optimistic than that. the first thing is that it has been said the negotiations on the new relationship can start when there is process on the first phase. they could discuss the new relationship at the end of year and have 12 or 15 months to discuss it and the second thing is we are compliant, you don't have to argue about standards, we are already compliant. that should make it easier. i think after two or three years the new trade relationship could be agreed and we would go into that. at that point it would go into that. at that point it would be out of single market no, question, out of the customs union, and out of transitional arrangements. what about the situation with the customs union? philip hammond is suggesting we are going to need some other kind of
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arrangements, customs union point two zero or what ever, but that means we are still subject to european rules. i think during the transitional arrangement you help we are ina transitional arrangement you help we are in a half way house situation. that doesn't worry me, it is better to have that for business than not have it, rather than just to have that for business than not have it, rather thanjust fall off the cliff as people talk about. philip hammond talks about a slope not a cliff. businesses would welcome the idea you continue with still the tariff—free trade or the common external tariff. we don't know what it will be during that transitional period. but once that's over we are out. completely. so i can't see why we should object to it. but it is that thing, once that's over, how long could that be? you're suggesting two to three yea rs, you're suggesting two to three years, others suggest it could be longer and the fear one suspects
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from elements within the conservative party is that this trannal period goes on — transitional period goes on longer and the people who want to remain use it to stop it happening at all. i have no doubt there will be political problems, but when it comes to the eu maeve that — they have made it clear they see the transitional period as being two or three years. i repeat, iwould be reasonably optimistic that some new relationship could be agreed in that time table, because we are all will be starting it before we leave. so i think there is good will on all sides. i would like to say this, that i think barnier, the chief negotiator strikes me as sensible and he said, we want a deal, its mutually beneficial. it is notjust for us it is for them as well. we
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trade with them and they trade with united. let's get on with it. thank you. talks between northern ireland's democratic unionists and the conservatives to help suppor theresa may's minority government are apparently not going as expected, according to the dup. they want the government to give ‘greater focus' to the negotiations, and they're warning they shouldn't be ‘taken for granted'. the already delayed queen's speech, outlining the government's legislative agenda for the next parliament, takes place tomorrow. 0ur northern ireland political editor, mark devenport, says it's not clear why the deal has been held up so long. we can't be absolutely certain, what we do know is they have been looking for funding proposals for northern ireland, whether it be in health or education funding, or possibly aallowing northern ireland to cut its local rate of corporation tax to compete with the low rate south of the irish border in the irish republic. it may well be there has been some resistance from the treasury to some of the dup demands. so that might be behind it. but beyond that the dup
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have been complaining about what they claim is a chaotic approach by downing street to the negotiations and they say it certainly was not what they had expected. the dup are past masters in negotiations, obviously, dealing with power—sharing in northern ireland, how much of this could be them simply playing for time or trying to extract as much as they can? well you have to factor that in that it could be part of a tactical game, because the dup have been used to negotiating with the british and irish governments and the other parties at stormont over the course of many years and it may well be they see sending out a bit of a negative briefing as a tactic to try to secure more concessions from both downing street and the treasury. i should say that other westminster sources remain confident that a deal will be reached, they point out that the dup are not going to vote for jeremy corbyn to become prime minister and they think that the deal could be announced as soon as thursday. 0ur political correspondent
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ben wright is at westminster. ben, mark suggesting a deal could be in the works, is there a possibility there might not be a deal? of course there might not be a deal? of course there is. this has taken longer than we expected. the assumption was the friday after the general election and theresa may made her intention clear to strike a so—called confidence and supply arrangement with the dup. she wanted that done quickly. we were expecting it perhaps that weekend. were now ten days on and it still has not been nailed down. i think there will be an agreement, in fact i'm certain there will be. it is not in the conservative party's there will be. it is not in the conservative pa rty‘s interests there will be. it is not in the conservative party's interests nor the dup's not to go ahead with this. but it is clearly proving more problematic than many of us expected. it means that the government goes into tomorrow's queen's speech with no guaranteed majority nailed down. no dealfixed.
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i should say the government will get its queen's speech through when it comes in fronts of house of commons i think comes in fronts of house of commons ithinka comes in fronts of house of commons i think a week on thursday for a vote, because arlene foster, the leader of the dup, has said her ten mps will back the government on that. there is no danger of the government collapsing, but it doesn't look particularly strong or stable, does it? going into a queen's speech without an agreement having been sorted out. and going on to the mansion house speech from the chancellor, are we now seeing the tougher line that theresa may has been taking towards these talks with brussels, are we sighing that jetsoned now? i'm not sure, i was looking back at theresa may's lancaster house speech injanuary, which she madejust lancaster house speech injanuary,
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which she made just before the white paper was published and the way she describes brexit ideally sort of panning out for the uk is what philip hammond was saying, leaving the single market, leaving the customs union. she talks about in that speech a transitional phase that speech a transitional phase that shouldn't last for a long time, but that would be needed to soften the impact of brexit. and philip hammond was echoing those sentiments today. but i think there has been a tonal change. that is hard to dispute. prioritising the economy over anything else, immigration barely got a mention in the speech. i think he was certainly talking the language of business. far more than we have heard in the last two or three months. saying jobs, we have heard in the last two or three months. sayingjobs, business, the economy must be the paramount concern and if that requires an implementation phase that could mean
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the continuation of european court of justice rulings the continuation of european court ofjustice rulings and perhaps free movement, that could be a sticking point, that is something that fill philips hammond is prepared to think of for the sake of having a smooth brexit that in the long—term doesn't significantly damage the uk economy. ben, cheers for that. and we'll have a special programme on the queen's speech, that's tomorrow from 11 o'clock, here on the news channel. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10.40 this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are the political commentatorjo phillips and the political editor sunday mirror and sunday people, nigel nelson. the top stories. the chancellor says jobs and prosperity must come first in any brexit deal. the dup says is talks
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with the conservatives are not proceeding with plans and the dup shouldn't be ta ken proceeding with plans and the dup shouldn't be taken for granted. police have been given more time to question a 47—year—old man arrested in connection with the terror attack in london. time for a look at the sport. thank you. we start with a huge shock in tennis. where the defending champion, andy murray is out of queens, beaten byjordan thompson of australia. thompson was already playing because because the original opponent was injured. a familiar reception for andy murray at queens. even if the opponent
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wasn't who he was expected. jordan thompson brought in at short notice. plenty would have been daunted by the task. andy murray is a five—time champion at queens f thompson was daunted it didn't show. forcing and a tie—break. this is not the andy murray 2345 the crowds were used to. his brilliance only in brief flashes. this was long and thompson had the first break of the match. the world no 90 would find another before his chance to serve for the upset. nerves nowhere to to be seen. this was jordan upset. nerves nowhere to to be seen. this wasjordan thompson's moment. and he does it with an ace. what a win, but what a shock. 0ne and he does it with an ace. what a win, but what a shock. one of greatest upsets that queens has
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seen. greatest upsets that queens has seen. the man wh has ruled this place so many times, the world no 1, the wimbledon champion, the olympic chofr yon. i took each point at a time. ididn't chofr yon. i took each point at a time. i didn't expect to win straight sets. i wanted to enjoy myself and stay calm. i had a good preparation and felt good and i didn't howl preparation and felt good and i didn't how i would like today. that is something that i will speak to about my, about with my team. try and work out the reasons why and get back to work and prepare for wimbledon. so the turf may have been familiar, the result anything but. not the best prep ragss for wimbledon —— preparations for wimbledon. soaring is temperatures meant a warm start to royal ascot, things became so hot that gentlemen in the royal enclosure were allowed
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to ta ke in the royal enclosure were allowed to take off theirjackets in the royal enclosure were allowed to take off their jackets for the first time in history. there were record times and a shock in the the big race as tim hague reports. when it comes to pomp and ceremony, there is nothing like this meet. the 0ver 50,000 people were there, they soon fell silent for the many victims of g re nfell tower fell silent for the many victims of grenfell tower fire and the london and manchester attacks. 0nce grenfell tower fire and the london and manchester attacks. once the racing started we saw something special from lady aulalia. racing started we saw something specialfrom lady aulalia. the horse dominated. but what could churchill come with? the big favourite, but even the best can have an off day
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and he didn't come close to fighting them on the beaches, but this was all about barney roy. the godolphin sta ble all about barney roy. the godolphin stable in red hot form on a red hot day. that is all the sport for now. more in the next hour. thank you. police have been given more time to question a 47—year—old man after a van was driven into a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london on sunday night. darren 0sborne, from cardiff, is being held on suspicion of terror offences, including murder. nine people are being treated in hospital — some with potentially life changing injuries. here's our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford — his report contains some distressing images. he was underneath, we have to lift the van, we have to lift the van! the chaos caused by the attack on sunday night was captured in these dramatic new pictures acquired by the bbc. the hired van had,
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apparently deliberately, ploughed into a group of people marking the muslim holy month of ramadan. nine ended up in hospital, and one man died. among the people in the crowd, abdul matin chowdhury and his 13—year—old son. today they were recovering at home in their garden. abdul matin injured his shoulder. his son narrowly escaped injury himself. as his father has little english, he spoke for both of them. i saw an angry driver in a van, in a company van. he looked at the muslims gathered around, he just drove through, and then he hit like seven or eight people, and one was underneath the van. my dad got hit on the shoulder and next to his legs.
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and my dad's friend got hit in the stomach. witnesses have told us that the van came down seven sisters road at speed, turning into this cul—de—sac and knocking down the worshippers as it came through. it then came to a rest between those two bollards. the bollard that it hit has been removed, and when it came to a stop, a young man was trapped underneath the van, though he has survived. today, with north london in shock, the head of one of the affected mosques called for calm. islamophobia, unfortunately, is on the rise, and hate crime is also on the rise, and we have to do something to stop this madness. the cycle of violence will lead us nowhere. after a day of crime—scene investigation, the van was eventually taken away yesterday evening. the suspected driver was arrested at the scene. darren 0sborne is still in custody,
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being held on suspicion of murder, attempted murder, and of preparation and commission of terrorist acts. daniel sandford, bbc news. the emergency response team dealing with the aftermath of the grenfell tower fire has said all the survivors who need it have been found temporary accommodation. by noon today it said a third of a million pounds had been given to families. nearly a week on from the disaster in which at least 79 people were killed, our special correspondent, lucy manning, has been talking to families getting their side of the story. last week, grenville was home. this time last tuesday, meals were being eaten, tv watched, homework done. now it's a place where families are lost, where those who survived can't return. and they are still searching for help. will thompson helped
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save his neighbourfrom the fire. he's been given a hotel room to live in. a hotel is a hotel, and a home is a home, they are not the same thing, no matter how good it is in a hotel, my home is over there in the ashes. and what have they said? sorry, will. this is a week, almost a week after the fire, and i'm really angry. i don't want to be there. i want to be at home with my family. yesterday we met miguel alves in his hotel room. today it's no longer his family's home. they threw me out from the hotel because it was fully booked from today. oh no, what are you going to do? they gave us another hotel in ravens court, and now we have to move everything back to there. we need to find somewhere more permanent state,
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to get back to some more normal life, and give us some time to mourn over the friends we have lost in the grenfell tower fire. this woman walks with her suitcase — she lived in the estate underneath the tower. besides being a refugee in my own community, i am taking my suitcase home to go and get some clothing, some more school—uniform bits for my children. so i am now in a hotel with my children, who are studying, who are going through exams and going through a lot of trauma. they are having counselling themselves. is it safe? we need somebody categorically to tell us, yes, it's safe for you to return. the help now seems better organised, but it's taken a week to get here, and there are still major concerns about housing, about safety and about trust especially. and everywhere here the pictures that are too much to bear.
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the children and their teacher of ravensdale park primary — nadia, zainab, fatima and others, so proud in their uniforms. lucy manning, bbc news, west london. some breaking news from brussels for the local police are saying the central railway station has been evacuated after a local media reported a small explosion had taken place. the police have cordoned off the area in the middle of city. a spokesman for the police has said the situation is under control. we do have a reuters report which is saying, quoting belgian media,
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saying, quoting belgian media, saying the police neutralised a person wearing an explosive belt at brussels central station. the police in belgium are saying they have the situation under control, but that they have cordoned off the central railway station which runs underground as well as overground in the city of the city. it has been pretty hot in belgium and a lot of people will be out in that area, it isa people will be out in that area, it is a great central square of the city. police have cordoned off the area after local media reported a small explosion. belgian media quote the police say they have neutralised a person with an explosive belt. we will have more on that when we get it. stay with us for that. we are currently on course for the longestjune heatwave in 20 years — with tomorrow predicted to be
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the hottestjune day since 1976. in some parts of the uk, it's been hotter than the maldives, as temperatures nudged into the mid—30s. the met office has issued a health warning for those most vulnerable, to ensure they keep hydrated and cool. with me now with a little more detail on the heatwave is our weather presenter, tomasz schafernaker. pretty hot today and a picture suggesting a lot of heat right across the country? it has been mostly southern areas. in the north the folks are wonder what the fuss is about. there is no heat in scotla nd is about. there is no heat in scotland and northern ireland. you see scotland and northern ireland in the yellow colours and the coastal areas of northern england only 17 degrees. not that warm. but southern areas up degrees. not that warm. but southern areas up to 31. not as hot as yesterday that was 33. it will get
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hotter than that tomorrow, potentially at least with the hot air originating from france it could be up to 34 degrees. if it does, it will be 41 years since we had that attempt. the o' —— temperature. the amazing thing it is unusual to get such high temperatures so early in the summer and you could argue summer has not begun. officially it begins tomorrow at the summer solstice. but extreme. it is funny, because as you say, it is getting this heat so early in the summer. i rememberjust this heat so early in the summer. i remember just about i this heat so early in the summer. i rememberjust about i have to say 1976 the last time the temperatures we re 1976 the last time the temperatures were this hot and that was july and august. that was a sustained period of heat. right across. you don't remember. no, i don't. but the
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hottest we had was back in 2003, so it has been a while. last year we had hot weather in cement and it was —— september and it was 34. but it is just so early in the summer. we have to stay cool and see what the rest of the summer brings. because it isa rest of the summer brings. because it is a bit too hot for me. and for a lot of people as well. thank you. hello. this is bbc news. the chancellor says jobs and prosperity must come first in any brexit deal. phillip hammond says while the public voted to leave the eu, they didn't vote to become poorer. the democratic unionist party says talks with the conservatives are not proceeding as planned, and that the dup shouldn't
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be taken for granted. police have been given more time to question a 47 year—old man, arrested in connection with the terror attack near a mosque in finsbury park in north london. the authorities say around 80 families affected by the grenfell tower fire disaster, have been given accommodation, but some are still experiencing problems. they threw me out from the hotel because it was fully booked from today. what are you going to do? they give us another hotel in earl's court. barclays and four former executives have been charged with fraud, in connection with financial support received from qatar, during the financial crisis in 2008. and the world number one andy murray, has suffered a shock defeat in the first round at queens. he lost in straight sets to the world number 90. four of the most senior executives at barclays in 2008 have been
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charged with fraud over the way they dealt with the banking crisis that year. it is the first time criminal charges have been brought in the uk against a bank and its former executives. the charges follow a five year investigation by the serious fraud office and relate to the way they raised billions of pounds to keep the bank viable. those charged include barclays' former chief executive, john varley. our business editor simon jack has the story. there's some flash photography in his report. charged with criminal conduct, barclays and four members of the bank's top brass, including former chief executive john varley and former head of barclays' middle eastern business, rogerjenkins. this is the first time senior executives of any british bank have faced criminal proceedings for their conduct during the financial crisis. while the uk government was busy using taxpayers money to rescue rbs and lloyds, ba rclays came here, the state—owned investment fund.
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for advisory services, payments that weren't disclosed. not only that, but barclays lent £2 billion to qatar holding allegedly to buy shares in barclays, lending others money to buy your shares is illegal. so why did barclays turn down government money? the chief executive at the time, and one of the people charged today, said this to mps in 2009. the circumstances were very far from normal. we needed speed, we needed certainty and we needed size. looking back on it i have to say, given the extreme fragility of the sentiment in the markets at that time, i'm very glad indeed that we managed to raise the capital that we did raise at that time. government ministers at the time have a different explanation. barclays did not want to have anything to do with uk government money. i believe that was partly because of a political view that this would look like creeping
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nationalisation and also, quite frankly, because the uk government's money came with quite strong restrictions on bonuses. now, if it's proven that crimes were committed here to some it still won't be clear who the victims were. customers weren't affected. the taxpayer didn't have to shell out. shareholders in barclays did better than shareholders in rbs or lloyds, but others will say rules are rules and if this approach of prosecuting individuals as well as institutions helps change a stubborn culture throughout banking of not following those rules then that is no bad thing. now we're starting to move to a more american approach where individuals are in the frame for doing things wrong within the business world. that is likely to concentrate people's minds and make them think about — is what i'm about to do a really sensible thing if it's going to be me standing in the dock? fraud convictions can carry sentences of up to ten years, but these are only charges.
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rogerjenkins and another defendant, richard boath, have said they will defend themselves vigorously. john varley is yet to comment and barclays the company said it was considering its position. simon jack, bbc news. some more on the breaking news considering —— concerning the situation in brussels. the police have cordoned off the main railway station, central railway station in the city and it has been evacuated. local media are reporting a small explosion has taken place. the police are suggesting that the situation is now under control. the reuters news agency states that the police neutralised somebody wearing an explosive belt at the central station. that area has been cordoned off and traffic in that area has been halted. it is not farfrom
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off and traffic in that area has been halted. it is not far from the big central square in brussels and ona big central square in brussels and on a warm evening like this, they will be lots of people out. this happened in the nearby central station in the centre of brussels. police are apparently saying, according to local media, there was according to local media, there was a small blast at the station and the area has been cordoned off. we will bring more to you when we get it. more now on chancellor philip hammond's speech today at mansion house in central london saying he would put britain's future economic prosperity centre stage in any brexit deal. mr hammond called for a "jobs first" settlement and also wants immigration to be managed but not shut down altogether. the future of our economy is inexorably linked to the kingdom brexit deal that we reach with the eu over the next 20 odd months. i am confident we can do a brexit deal
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that puts jobs and prosperity first. that reassures employers that they will still be able to access the talent that they need. that keeps markets for goods and services and capital open. that cheese early agreement on transitional arrangements so that trade can continue flowing smoothly and businesses up and down the country and across the continent can move on with investment decisions that they wa nt to with investment decisions that they want to make but that had been on hold since the referendum. the chancellor's comments come on a day when the governor of the bank of england — speaking at the same event in central london — has warned of the risks of the brexit negotiations. during this negotiating period, the economy will be influenced by the expectations of household firms and financial markets. the natures of both the transition and the longer term economic relationships with the eu and rest of the world. markets have already anticipated some of
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this adjustment. depending on whether and when any transitional arrangement can be agreed, firms on both sides of the channel will soon need to activate contingency plans. and before long, we will all begin to find out the extent to which brexit is a gentle stroll along a smooth path towards the land of cake and consumption. whatever happens, monetary policy will be set to return inflation sustainably to target. and making necessary adjustments as best it can the economy. liam fox is on a trade mission to america and spoke on the bbc‘s 100 days. he welcomed the speech and said there was each —— denied there was a split in the cabinet. there is no conflict. what the chancellor
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said was that we were leaving the single market and customs union. we need to transition time to help businesses adapt. we do not have a problem with that. what the chancellor has set out is a very sensible idea, we need to look at the economic benefits to maximise that. that is what we are doing with discussions with the united states. what he is talking about is customs arrangements that are similar to what we have at the moment within the customs union and a much longer slope, rather than this cliff edge, does it complicated for you when you're trying to soak up these global trade deals. if we have a longer transition bound by custom union rules? we have to what kind of condition it will be and that is a long way off. we are leaving the customs union and that gives us the opportunity to be able to do what is known as the transitional adoption of agreements that the eu already has. it gives us the ability to make
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agreements with developing countries about the sort of tariffs that we apply to the goods and may be able to help developing countries more. and it enables us to talk about new future of free trade agreements. all of that is dependent on leaving the customs union and we have agreed to do that. what we are talking about is what sort of customs facilitation agreement that they will be to make sure we have frictionless borders and do not apply extra costs to either uk businesses exporting to europe or european exporters coming to the uk. it is in everybody‘s interest to reach such an agreement. with me is vicky pryce, chief economist for the centre for economics and business research, who was pro—remain during the referendum. thank you for coming in. one suspects getting your stance and a referendum that philip hammond's words make sense? what he has done,
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he has assessed the economic situation pretty well. he is warning about the implications of brexit, the sort of things that mark carney spoke about in his mansion house speech as well. stating that brexit brings with it a number of concerns about the way that growth will move over the next couple of years. and he would not want to see interest rates rise. we have heard from both of them that they have worries about where we will be going towards the cliff edge that people have been warning about, and that is something they want to avoid. we see that in terms of suggestions that philip hammond has made with the transition, at least a practically any single market and customs union more of less over a period of time, possibly for many years to come. we are negotiating whilst this is going on. you say maybe for many years, this transitional arrangement, the
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chief economist for the capital firm that i spoke to stated it would be 2-3 that i spoke to stated it would be 2—3 years. who knows? she was on the other side. she would say that. we need to make sure that our civil service is equipped to do the trade negotiations. at the moment we are ina weak negotiations. at the moment we are in a weak position and we have not started talking about trade agreements. we might talk ourselves about transition but we have not heard anything from the eu to say they will accept it. what is going on right now is we are focusing on other things like the eu has said rather than having parallel trade discussions to have some sort of progress towards getting a trade agreement when we leave, we are focusing on eu citizens, there are groups set up to look at that. what happens to our own citizens abroad? we are looking at the divorce bill, how much will that be? and there are worries about northern ireland and
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the border with ireland. the last bit is very crucial. if we are part of the customs union, however we define it, that problem goes away. if we are not then that is a serious issue... if we are not then that is a serious issue. . . and if we are not then that is a serious issue... and having some kind of custom union ‘s arrangement even if it is not the one we have now, any transitional deal will have to allow this country to try to create trade deals with people outside the european union. for the moment, we would not. even during a transitional period? i very much doubt we will be able to have a proper deal. why we're in a customs union, we are still under the control under the jurisdiction of european union —— the european court ofjustice. we are still subject to all of those rules. there are trade agreements that the eu has with other countries and we will be part
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of those trade agreements as well. it is probably going to be rather difficult to go ahead to have any trade agreements jedinak period. difficult to go ahead to have any trade agreementsjedinak period. who knows what we can extract from the europeans? i would say that right now we add in a week session and it is us that our following what the europeans want us to follow in terms of process. if we get an extension as we have been discussing now, it will have to be the terms that we have to accept. thank you for joining us. jo swinson has been appointed the deputy leader of the liberal democrats and she was unopposed. the first candidate to stand to become the party leader is vince cable. he managed to regain his twickenham seatin managed to regain his twickenham seat in the recent election, declaring his candidacy he said he would work to secure a second
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referendum on any brexit deal and he has been explaining why he wants to be the lib leader. the central railway station in brussels has been evacuated after a small explosion. police say the situation is under control. the chancellor says jobs and prosperity must come first in any brexit deal. phillip hammond says while the public voted to leave the eu, they didn't vote to become poorer. the democratic unionist party says talks with the conservatives are not proceeding as planned, and that the dup shouldn't be taken for granted. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. let us bring you the latest on the
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situation in brussels. belgian troops are patrolling brussels central station and said they neutralised one person after a small explosion this evening. this is according to a police spokesman. he said that they were no other casualties and that the situation is under control. this spokesman could not confirm media reports that the person who they claim who has been a neutralised, has been wearing an explosive vest. it was not clear that the person who has been shot is still alive. the station is adjacent to the historic downtown area with the main square. on a warm summers evening, lots of people, including many tourists would be out and about. that area has been evacuated and police have set up a security cordon. that is still in place. any
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more on that and we will bring it to you when get it. hundreds of people today attended the funeral of 15—year—old olivia campbell—hardy, who was killed in the manchester arena terror attack. the teenager, from bury, was called a "true friend with an amazing smile." olivia was one of 22 people, who lost their lives in the suicide bombing last month. her parents asked that the service be a celebration, and thanksgiving for her life, as abbiejones reports. outside the church where olivia came for re lessons they gathered in solidarity, silently watching her blue coffin arrive. mourners were also wearing blue, the teenager's favourite colour. amongst them in a wheelchair, olivia's friend adam lawler, with her on the night of the attack. his injuries clear to see. some here have known olivia since she was in primary school. it is sickening, she is such a happy and bubbly girl. really down to earth. she was happy, she was never causing any trouble. she was the best person that anyone could ask for. for others, it was a chance
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to show olivia's family that their town was with them. it really affects me, it is like i have to be here. it is my town and my people. draped over the teenager's coffin, a flag with a b, the symbol of manchester since the attack. unity was a key message of the service. running through every element in it, are the threads of hope and love. the exact opposite of meaninglessness and hate. she was a girl with character and vitality. the order of service for olivia's service says it all, her family and parents wanted this to be a celebration of her life. a celebration and thanksgiving. she was 15 and full of life. we want to give her a prom, the 16th, 18th, 21st, everything that she is going to miss out and that is what is getting us through.
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we want to give her the best sendoff that we can possibly give her. olivia was a talented singer and her school choir sang during the service. then there was applause. as the coffin was carried out. a time for comfort for those who must live with their loss. in portugal, more than a thousand firefighters are still tackling a huge wild fire in the centre of the country. officials say although 70% of the fire is under control, there are fears that soaring temperatures could re—ignite the forest fire. at least 64 people have died since saturday and in the last hour we've heard that a firefighting plane has crashed. our correspondent james reynolds has travelled to the village of varzesh, one of those worst affected by the blaze. this afternoon, portugal despatched more planes to fight its forest fires.
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the government is yet to make this region safe. the relief effort is too late for the village of varzeas, it's lost one in five of its residents. sisile tina told me she knew all the victims. she tried to count the dead. "two lived here", she said. "three, four, five and more." on saturday afternoon, the village watched the forest catch fire. "there was a massive noise", amal told us, "and then we saw the flames." "we'd never seen anything like it", said valdemar, "it all happened in just a few seconds." residents were then forced to take an immediate,
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terrifying decision — stay here and risk getting caught by the flames or drive off in search of safety. many drove, it proved to be a fatal mistake. on this road, flames engulfed many in their cars. mario pinhal told portuguese tv that his family tried to escape in two vehicles. his wife, suzanna and their daughtersjoanna and margarita drove ahead, but they died in the fire. translation: i regret leaving home. everyone has been kind, but i just want my wife and my daughters back. mario and his parents barely escaped in the car behind. "we should have died", mario mother's cries, "nobody would miss us." mario pinhal‘s home remains standing, it is a shattering
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monument to his family's decision to flee. if they'd simply stayed put, they would have all survived. james reynolds, bbc news, central portugal. the two—year—old was killed in fife and 2014 by his mother, rachel, and her partner after they subjected him to sustained physical and mental abuse. liam fee's short life was marked by escalating abuse and neglect. when he died, he had more than 30 injuries, including a ruptured heart. the first to raise the alarm over the toddler's wellbeing was his childminder, heather farmer. she contacted the authorities three times with her concerns. she spoke to the bbc for an upcoming documentary about child protection in fife.
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to me, i done myjob as best as i could. but someone in social work didn't do theirjob as best as they could. i think it could have been done better and maybe the wee boy would still be here today. she wasn't alone in her concerns over what was happening at liam's house. a nursery the little boy went to raised the alarm with social services, so too did a woman who saw liam covered up in his pushchair in the street. she said she had a gut wrenching feeling that something was wrong, but she didn't know if he was drugged or dead. today's review said that the authorities missed opportunities to potentially prevent the harm liam suffered. it stated there was a lack of professional curiosity, that explanations provided by reachel and naomi fee were at times accepted without challenge and when concerns were raised about liam the incidents
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were dealt with in isolation. we fully accept the doctor's findings in her significant case review and we acknowledge we could have done better to protect him. i think however it's important to point out when we're working with devious and manipulative people, such as liam's mother and her partner, that sometimes services can't actually understand what's happening in the household. the review said the extraordinary measures rachel and naomi fee took to disguise their abuse did hinder attempts by the authorities to help. the two are now serving life in prison for liam's murder. lorna gordon, bbc news, fife. these are live pictures in brussels around the central train station.
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the area has been cordoned off after police claim they have neutralised one person following a small explosion in the area. but this is right in the heart of the city. our correspondent gavin leek and bring us more correspondent gavin leek and bring us more of an update. tell us what happened and what your understanding is? this is in the last hour or so. about 8:50pm. suddenly people were evacuated from brussels central station, the main station in the city centre. people have been moved away from the street, including the main square in brussels. in the past few minutes the foreign affairs ministry in belgium have said that they have neutralised an individual inside the station and said that the situation was under control. to go
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back one hour, people have been tweeting, one person in particular, who happens to be walking past when this happened and took a picture. you can see small flames, a contained explosion in a quiet area at the time inside the station. one person is walking past. at this time at the moment there is no sense of any injuries. the prime minister of belgium and acknowledged that this involved an individual in central station. the security services will remain in place. right now in the immediate part of brussels said the centre, it is not quite on lockdown but it is difficult for people to move. “— but it is difficult for people to move. —— inside brussels city centre. in brussels there has been a sense of being alert, not dissimilar
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to london going back to march the 27. gavin, iwill to london going back to march the 27. gavin, i will have to interrupt. ido 27. gavin, i will have to interrupt. i do apologise. thank you very much for that update. it remains very hot. the on course to be the hottestjune day. in the south east of england at least, at 441 yea rs, south east of england at least, at 441 years, since 1976. it is yet to be realised, it is the forecast. —— 441 yea rs. be realised, it is the forecast. —— 441 years. thunderstorms will follow the heat, especially in northern and western areas. for the course of this evening, very warm and hot, temperatures in the mid and high 20s in southern areas. pressure along
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the north sea coast and in scotland and northern ireland. the weather is very quiet as bad as the evening is concerned. we are seeing some showers and thunderstorms to the west of us. into tomorrow, there could be some storms across northern and western areas but we are talking about showers. the temperatures are shooting up like a rocket across southern areas in the morning. further north, it is still pleasant at 14 degrees but compared to the south, it is fresher. this region could be thunderstorms across the north west of england. the heat comes out of the continent during the course of wednesday. it will be as far north as northern england, just drop you can see the blue on the screen where thunderstorms are.
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it is not often that we get these sorts of temperatures. even injuly or august. some thunderstorms coming in from the atlantic. that will push through into thursday. they will be some hit and miss storms around. temperatures down to 26 degrees which are still above the average for this time of year. 16 in glasgow. at the weekend, it will freshen up. temperatures are tumbling. in the short term, that tremendous hit in the south east tomorrow up to 34 degrees and then we will see some thunder and lightning. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source.
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some breaking news from belgium, the central railway station in in brussels has been evacuated after a small explosion. we start with another incident in the sky over syria. the us coalition have shot down an iranian made drone. this comes just a day after russia said they would view coalition jets as targets. the head of the un is calling for calm. we hope that there will be a de—escalation of the situation, because these kinds of incidents can be very dangerous in a conflict situation. the us has responded furiously to the death of otto warmbier — the american student held captive in north korea and returned home in a coma last week. the president has called it a disgrace.

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