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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 21, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may sets out her two—year plan, with brexit at the top of the agenda. but with no commons majority, the prime minister is expected to scrap several key manifesto promises in a delayed queen's speech. good morning, it's wednesday the 21st ofjune. also this morning: one of britain's top police chiefs warns services could be stretched to breaking point, as ministers put terrorism officers on an emergency footing. a suspected suicide bomber is shot dead in brussels as he sets off an explosion in the city's main railway station. there is lots in the queen's speech the interest business leaders and
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consumers. more on those plans are little later. in sport, andy murray's preparations for wimbledon suffer a blow as he is knocked out of queens in the opening round. the defending champion was beaten in straight sets by the world number 90 jordan thompson, who was only there as a late replacement. he's won three oscars, but daniel day lewis says he's calling it a day and retiring from acting. and it is set to be another scorcher. good morning, carol! good morning from brighton beach. it is going to be hot today. temperatures in england and wales into the high 20s and for some it could hit 34. if we do it will be the warmestjune day since 1976. there are also thunderstorms in the forecast and tomorrow's weather will be quite different. thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may's agenda for the next two years of government will be revealed later in a queen's speech, which is likely to be dominated by laws preparing
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the country for brexit. the conservatives are still attempting to negotiate a parliamentary deal with the democratic unionist party and several of its manifesto commitments are expected to be dropped, as our political correspondent eleanor garnier now reports. it is the ultimate show of pomp and ceremony, it marks the formal opening of parliament. the queen's speech might be read by the queen but it is written by ministers. a list of legislation the newly elected government aims to bring in. but this year it is going to be a scaled back event, just like in 1974 and ted heath's snap election. with a crowded calendar and little time for preparations, there will be no gold carriage and it will be day dress rather than robes for the queen. it is significant, it does reflect that this is a snap election, this wasn't planned. that of course, it is very close to the tropping of the colours so the two ceremonies together would be too much.
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and it's quite menaingful because we were expecting to see the full pomp and circumstance next year but next year's the queen's speech has been cancelled so we are not going to see a queen's speech until 2019. so that's some way away for the queen to exercise what she sees as her key role outside of state. when theresa may set out her party's manifesto she proposed scrapping free school meals for all but the very poorest. there were plans to reform social care funding and to expand grammar schools. but without a conservative majority and a lack of support, expect a moderated version of mrs may's manifesto. brexit will be the central theme. it is likely there will be a great repeal bill which will turn all eu laws that effect us into british laws. look out for legislation to tackle terrorism, with powers to deal with extremists and protect the public. there could also be measures to protect workers rights, with worker representation on company boards as well as protection of pensions.
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theresa may is still trying to put together a deal with northern ireland's democratic unionist party. she will need their support to see her queen's speech voted through parliament. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. we can speak to eleanor in westminster now. eleanor, a stripped—back ceremony and stripped back speech? good morning. perhaps the less pomp going on this time, i think the queen's speech this time will be as closely scrutinised as ever before. as you say, macs —— brexit will dominate the agenda, to talk about agriculture, fisheries, all the main areas where it you oversight will end will need to be legislated for. sawicki is a pretty —— so it's a vast task. mrs may didn't win a majority at the general election. she said it wasn't the result she
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hoped for, but the government would respond with humility and resolve. after ten days of talks with the dup the conservatives still haven't secured a deal. there are no signs that the dup will not back the queen's speech, but we should remember delivering this two year plan for government is going to require a day by day fight for parliament for theresa may. thank you. see you later. bbc news has learned counter—terrorism policing in england and wales has been placed on an emergency footing following the recent series of terror attacks. as a result, senior police officers say they're having to switch resources from other areas which they claim may create "significa nt" risks to public safety. it's understood mark rowley, who's in charge of counter—terrorism policing nationally, has written to the home secretary, amber rudd, about the issue. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. the murderous assault at westminster
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in march was the first in a series of deadly terror attacks that have put a huge strain on the police. it was followed by the suicide bombing at manchester arena and the van and knife attack at london bridge and thorough market. after that police put a three—month emergency planning to affect, known as operation rosette. it is designed to intensify counter—terrorism activity, in particular the capacity of police to investigate plots. but with staff looking into many enquiries, police are having to find resources from elsewhere. bbc news understand that as part of operation roset some staff will be temporarily removed from the public enquiry into undercover policing. some war crimes investigations will be suspended. and officers will be transferred from regional organised crime teams to work on counterterrorism policing. mark rowley says the policing. mark rowley says the policing network isn't able to operate at full strength because of
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the demand for detectives investigating other crimes, including child abuse. in a letter to amber rudd mark crowley says that in order to prioritise counter—terrorism work, difficult choices must be made about where to put resources. he says that will create risk in other areas, potentially with significant impact. the home office says it promised in 2015 to increase cross government spending on counter—terrorism by 30% over five years. soldiers have shot dead a suspected suicide bomber in brussels as he triggered a small explosion in the main railway station. authorities say the man was wearing what appeared to be a bomb vest. no—one else is believed to have been injured. frankie mccamley reports. brussels central station evacuated shortly after police say a man triggered a small explosion. eyewitnesses say they heard gunfire and multiple explosions. just minutes later smoke can be seen
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inside. as the station was evacuated, flames were caught on camera inside. translation: went down the stairs to go back to the platform and there i heard someone shouting and then at one point he shouted, allahu akbar and blew up as a casey hayward. i carried on down trying to evacuate as many people as possible and just behind me two metres behind the stairs he still had the belt on him. outside, moved back by police officers, people gathered together, making their way to safety and is trying to come to terms with yet another attack on the city. the country's military, already on high alert, were on the scene within minutes, shooting dead the suspect. bomb disposal units we re the suspect. bomb disposal units were also sent into make sure the area was safe. belgian prosecutors 110w area was safe. belgian prosecutors now say this is being treated as a terrorist attack. failures in care are one of the main
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causes of still—births and brain injuries in newborn babies in the uk according to a report out today. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists found the most common mistakes related to the monitoring of foetal heart rates during labour. it wants to cut the number of neo—natal errors by 50% by 2020. prince harry has said his time in afghanistan was the trigger for him to get help in dealing with his mother's death. harry, who served on two front line tours with the army, told forces tv that setting up the invictus games for wounded service personnel had also been a "sort of cure". prince harry admitted that asking for help had been a significant decision. when you meet other lads, who have had a similarjourney, or there are similarities and it could help them and have a bit of banter and the moment you have that banter you can see them relax. once they realise,
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hang on, i'm not the only person here, there are so many people who suffered and recovered, i'm going to go and sort this out. i'm going to go and sort this out. i'm going to go and sort this out. i'm going to go and get help. the three—time oscar—winning actor sir daniel day—lewis has announced his retirement from acting. his career has seen him tackle a huge variety of roles and gained him international acclaim, as simon clemison reports. daniel day—lewis as christy browne who, with cerebral palsy, learned to paint with his left foot. who, with cerebral palsy, learned to paint with his left footlj who, with cerebral palsy, learned to paint with his left foot. i know who it is. and this is the same actor. and again... still, daniel day—lewis. and again... still, daniel day-lewis. i am president of the united states! now 60, daniel day—lewis is famous for putting huge amounts of effort into perfecting
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the party has played, creating a cast of very different characters. the portrayal of the former us president won him his third oscar for best actor, something still no other leading man has achieved. he has chosen his role is extreme carefully, before immersing himself in them. i think! am carefully, before immersing himself in them. i think i am definitely out of character at this moment. but if i sleep at into it by mistake, you can do and intervention of some kind. —— slip. the heimlich manoeuvre 01’ kind. —— slip. the heimlich manoeuvre or whatever you do the characters out of character. i'm definitely out of character now. there is one more move in the pipeline, the daniel day—lewis weren't quite disappear from the screen yet, what he is retiring. he has given no reason why, the statement italy said it was a private decision. —— simply said. we will speak more about that later. iam not we will speak more about that later. i am not sure dan can talk at the moment. let's be honest, you have
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been eating too much toast! i was getting caught out by the crumbs. good job sally is here. you keep getting caught out by the crumbs? iam you keep getting caught out by the crumbs? i am here to rescue the day. it is the peanut butter that does it. it isa it. it is a bit claggy! we have already said claggy! you've still got more toast to go. just carry on, sal. this bloke we are about to talk about had a claggy day yesterday. if you thought your morning started badly, andy murray had a shocker yesterday. he didn't play at all well. was it the heat? sometimes one of those days. do you know what? we've all had them, haven't we? i think haven't we? ithink i'm haven't we? i think i'm having one at the moment! we will enjoy watching it for the next three hours! there was a major shock at queens where the five—time champion andy murray was knocked out in the first round. he was beaten in straight sets
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by the world number 90 jordan thompson who was only there as a late replacement. there's better news for britain's best female player though, as world number sevenjohanna konta is through to the second round of the aegon classic in birmingham. she won in straight sets against ukraine's lesia tsurenko. spanish prosecutors say they've filed two claims of tax fraud against the manchester united managerjose mourinho, totalling around £3 million. the alleged offences date back to 2011 and 2012 when the portuguese was in charge of real madrid. and there was a big upset on day one of the royal ascot meeting, as barney roy won the st james's palace stakes. odds on favourite churchill, who had won his last seven races, could only manage fourth. and i can tell you, i wish i could have commentated through the bulletin. the entire time i was talking, dan walker was eating more toast. this is not going to go well. it's going to be fine!
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you are making me hungry. can i at least have the last bite? you can't share toast, can you? of course you can! we don't want cross pollination at this early stage of the morning... honestly, sal! iam going honestly, sal! i am going to get you some toast. thank you! it is a poster be another hot day today. we have said carol out and about. good morning, carol! gorgeous! good morning, carol! gorgeous! good morning. it is lovely. quite mild already. we have a gentle breeze. it is currently 18 celsius in brighton. the temperature is set to rocket today. we could hit 34 celsius somewhere around london. if we do it will be the warmestjune day since 1976. it will also be the fifth consecutive day we've had temperatures somewhere in the uk being over 30. after today things
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are going to turn a little bit fresher and we will have a thundery breakdowns, which isn't unusual in the uk at all. the forecast for todayis the uk at all. the forecast for today is one of heat and also thunderstorms. some of them will be hit and thunderstorms. some of them will be hitand miss, but thunderstorms. some of them will be hit and miss, but if you catch one you could see an inch of rain in a very short amount of time, coupled with gusty winds and some large hail. this morning we've got thunderstorms in the northern half of the country. for most of the rest of the country. for most of the rest of us it is dry. some low cloud over the hills in the south that will clear through the morning. we will have further sunshine. by the time we get to 4pm across scotland there will still be some reduced all showers, but equally sunshine around. —— residual showers. temperatures getting up to about 20 in glasgow, about 13 in aberdeen. across northern england there will be some residual thunderstorms again. the areas most likely are leeds, manchester, cheshire, something to watch out for. sunshine in between and it will be warmer
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thanit in between and it will be warmer than it was yesterday. coming south we are back into the sunshine and really blue skies. a bit of cloud developing. high is possibly up to 34 in london. as we drift across southern counties again a lot of hot sunshine, feeling quite muggy. on the coast there is a lovely sea breeze. for wales again we have high temperatures, a lot of dry weather. thunderstorms in cheshire. something fresher in northern ireland with a few showers left in the west. through the evening and overnight we will still have some of those thunderstorms across north—east england and lincolnshire, still the potential for them to be severe. we have a dry slot and some mist and fog coming in from the west across the irish sea. then we have some severe thunderstorms coming in again. a lot of water coming out in again. a lot of water coming out in a short amount of time. tomorrow morning we start off with those. but they will clear as we go through the morning into the north sea. then for
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many of us it will be a dry and sunny day and a fresher feel as well. but it is also going to be windy across the north—west, with local gales, and we have rain later coming in across the north—west of northern ireland. that rain on friday will continue to move steadily towards the east in the south, weakening as it does so, but look at the temperatures. we will be quite different compared to what we have been used during the few days. change is thought! —— is coming! it looks lovely out there. we know that you are out there. there are other beaches available, if you would like to go to the seaside today. yesterday i mentioned to you that in arizona it was so hot that it grounded planes. you did mention
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that. it has been so hot, 49 celsius, so hot that a local paper, the phoenix new times decided to cook a frozen pizza in a car park but they left it there for 2.5 hours and it looked and people tried it and it looked and people tried it andi and it looked and people tried it and i will read you the reviews. it is not as poisonous as i expected. i'm not taking the pollution. if you eat just achieves i'm not taking the pollution. if you eatjust achieves it is really good. and still better than any fully cooked frozen pizza i have had in my life. have you ever tried to fry an 999 life. have you ever tried to fry an egg on a car before? you know... i tried but it did not work. my husband was not happy. it didn't work. it was very hot at the time. show we have at the papers? yes. alike that insight into your world. let's have a look starting with the telegraph. sean joins us as well.
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loads of the papers have pictures from royal ascot yesterday where sophie wessex had a stumble in the royal carriage. the duchess of cambridge caught her. good catch. most of the main stories are about the queen ‘s speech today. the daily telegraph says that theresa may clings onto brexit lifelike. the front page of the mirror discusses the fact that despite it being several days since the result of the general election, a deal is yet to be finalised with the dup. the front page of the mail also has that shot of the princess... the duchess catching sophie. and this story as well, far left protesters, there are plans for protests today and, apparently, victims of the grenfell tower fire are asking for the grief not to be hijacked. we will be
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talking to the deputy labour leader about that later on. de p3 to walk out from talks with tories and we will speak to a formerjunior minister about that. the guardian, pressure on theresa may as the dup says to show some respect. their picture is... look at that. an impressive line up of fascinator ‘s and sunglasses from royal ascot their. very good, sally. you have yours ready, sally? i might. now, yours ready, sally? i might. now, you cannot wear a fascinator, you must wear a hat. there is a strict protocol. a ten centimetre wide had at least. —— had at least. —— hat. for anyone saving or has a house,
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and interest blow for savers. the monetary policy committee, there are a people now than he is one of them, he is one of the top and he says it is not think interest should rise now. audibly be one of the main things that came out. good for mortgages, however. people are variable, they don't want a rate rise. this is brilliant for them. it difficult for people who are saving. in the mail, hotels threaten to ban british people from all—inclusive holidays. there is a reason. we spoke about this, the claims for food poisoning that people are making has gone up 500%. on the basis that they can win a pay our of up basis that they can win a pay our of up to £5,000. someone from thomas cook says that hoteliers. at british customers coming into their hotels. and, quickly, iwillshow customers coming into their hotels. and, quickly, i will show you one newspaper. this is sport section
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from the daily telegraph with a bit of andy murray from queens yesterday that it quite shocking, that result. and the lines had their hotel swept for bugs, just in case. many bugs in new zealand but, yeah, just in case anyone is listening to them. here inside, the telegraph have done this fantastic split page of thing who would have ever thought that george north's place in the team may be up for debate. that the player who played yesterday, elliot daly, the only player in the starting lineup and he was subbed. they were decent bite, yeah... after the match, the coach said just watch the match and said no, i do not know who was selected, i will go home and watch the video. would you like to know, the video. would you like to know, the last one... do you have one? are we talking about the fact boast? no.
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we talk about dogs. labradors are the number one norske breed, followed by jack russell ‘s and then cocker spaniels. —— number one naughty read. they eat things they should not including batteries and important documents. more than one third of owners had to cancel plans because of escapades of their dogs, according to a poll. we have a golden retriever on the sofa later. they are well—behaved. golden retriever on the sofa later. they are well-behaved. the dog ate a whole cheese, we had accused other people. that should jobs, cause a few issues at the other end. let's move on. a major study is under way.
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to find out more about the problems faced by patients taking a large number of different medicines. keeping track of what and when to take various pills can be extremely difficult and it's a particular issue for elderly people with several health complications. it's believed issues with medication lead to almost 6,000 deaths a year and cost more than £1—billion pounds. breakfast‘s john maguire reports. on my left is one bush and my lawn we re on my left is one bush and my lawn were walking on. grain price is pride of his garden. he is pointing out the features and the plants from memory, because he is blind. imagine how difficult it was for him to give his late wife in 11 different types of medication every day. graham struggled for four years until he decided he could no longer cope. you cannot see. you are trying to find somebody‘s case that i was exhausted. i cannot leave someone like me, who is assertive, strong and confident and got to point where
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i felt... and confident and got to point where ifelt... i and confident and got to point where i felt... i felt this was wobbly on my ability to cope and i couldn't. i rang the clinician and said that if you do not want to people on your workload, i need help. a major study is trying to now determine just how big this problem is to get doctor geoff wong is a researcher at the university of third and a gp in london. he says that medicines are not necessarily of the prescribed, but believes sometimes there are alternative approaches. is more because you are trying to do the best for that individual. that each time you try and do the best for them you may just time you try and do the best for them you mayjust add a little more and then some of these medications are much more about risk reduction. risk reduction may be very useful for a younger person, someone risk reduction may be very useful for a younger person, someone who has had a heart attack in net if these. they will probably want to have something that will keep them going into the next couple of decades. if you had one in your mind is... you may or may not want to
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think about whether you want another medication. medicines are more advanced and more effective than ever before. they have to be. as our population becomes increasingly older and medical conditions are more complex, people will take an increasing range of medications. problems with medication is believed to bea problems with medication is believed to be a factor in almost a thousand deaths in the uk every year. and at a cost of over £1 billion. so aston university of birmingham is looking for answers, gathering evidence from a range of sources including doctors, pharmacist and, a range of sources including doctors, pharmacistand, crucially, patients. we need to listen to the patients. we need to listen to the patients and understand what we can do to improve their quality of life that they get from medication. is possibly some technology. possibly integrating social care and healthcare. we need a whole system wired new approach to it will take
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place over the next 20 months, identifying problems and solutions is one thing but as the doctor says, this was an issue when he first qualified as a pharmacist 30 years ago. and he argues the problem is getting worse. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. thousands of demonstrators are expected to take part in a series of protests in central london later today to coincide with the state opening of parliament. one of them, called the "day of rage" will march on downing street to protest against the government handling of the grenfell tower disaster. some members of the north kensington community say they do not want their grief used as an excuse for an rest.
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the metropolitan police say they have the resources needed. we have experienced people and excellent commanders. needed. we have experienced people and excellent commandersm needed. we have experienced people and excellent commanders. it was seen and excellent commanders. it was seen the last weeks just how good, professional and courageous they are. we deal with protest, sometimes with difficult protests. i have every confidence in my team that they will be able to respond to whatever is planned. the ambulance service is warning that the hot weather is putting an increased strain on its resources they say they've seen a 40% rise in calls because of the heat wave. temperatures are expected to reach record levels later today. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line as parts of suspended. that is because of signal failures. a reminder that the circle, hammersmith & city lines are still partly closed. on the road,
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this is the a 12 in romford. eastern avenue this is the a 12 in romford. eastern ave nu e west this is the a 12 in romford. eastern avenue west is closed because of a burst water main. you can expect long delays they are. on the m25 we have two lanes closed anticlockwise and one lane closed clockwise after and one lane closed clockwise after a lorry went through the central reservation. singh: bromley road means it is closed. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. it was another warm night that this morning feels a little fresher than it has done for the last few mornings. it is another hot and sunny day that it got richer today is likely to be the hottest this week. we look at maximum of 33, 30 four celsius so it does get high and it looks like the hottestjune day since 1976. a lot of sunshine, not a cloud, a lot of cloud around so the uv levels are high as if the pollen
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count. and looks like the last of the hot days this a change for. overnight still warm and muggy, 19— 21 the minimum that tomorrow will see this cloud moving in and with it the potential for thundery and see this cloud moving in and with it the potentialfor thundery and heavy showers. clearing away in the afternoon, the temperature is still likely to reach 25 celsius but after those showers clear it will introduce fresh air. gradually becoming cooler through thursday. another cold front heading our way for friday, again, fresher still. like our wrecks of drizzle with some rain into saturday morning but again that will clear the way. gradually the temperature is going to fall. will be another warm one warm night tonight that route tomorrow onwards, things getting much cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. it's 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning:
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it's the first big test for theresa may's government since the general election. her new right—hand man damian green will be here to tell us what we can expect from the queen's speech and whether it can make it through parliament. also, prescribing pets — the first national guidelines are being drawn up for animal therapy in hospitals. ‘jonny b goode‘ plays i bet you're tapping something this morning! he pioneered rock and roll in the 1950s and had a career that spanned over 60 years. now chuck berry's new album has been released, following his death in march. his son will be here to tell us about it. he will indeed. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may's agenda for the next two years of government will be revealed later in a queen's speech, which is likely to be dominated by laws preparing the country for brexit. the conservatives are still
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attempting to negotiate a parliamentary deal with the democratic unionist party and several of its manifesto commitments are expected to be dropped, as our political correspondent eleanor garnier now reports. it is the ultimate show of pomp and ceremony, it marks the formal opening of parliament. the queen's speech might be read by the queen but it is written by ministers. a list of legislation the newly elected government aims to bring in. but this year it's going to be a scaled back event, just like in 1974 and ted heath's snap election. with a crowded calendar and little time for preparations, there will be no gold carriage and it will be day dress rather than robes for the queen. it is significant, it does reflect that this is a snap election, this wasn't planned. that of course, it is very close to the trooping of the colours so the two ceremonies together would be too much. and it's quite menaingful because we were expecting to see the full pomp and circumstance next year but next year's queen's speech has been cancelled, so we are not going to see
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a queen's speech until 2019. so that's some way away for the queen to exercise what she sees as her key role outside of state. when theresa may set out her party's manifesto she proposed scrapping free school meals for all but the very poorest. there were plans to reform social care funding and to expand grammar schools. but without a conservative majority and a lack of support, expect a moderated version of mrs may's manifesto. brexit will be the central theme. it is likely there will be a great repeal bill which will turn all eu laws that effect us into british law. look out for legislation to tackle terrorism, with powers to deal with extremists and protect the public. there could also be measures to protect workers' rights, with worker representation on company boards as well as protection of pensions. theresa may is still trying to put together a deal with northern ireland's democratic unionist party. she will need their support to see her queen's speech voted through parliament.
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eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. bbc news has learned counter—terrorism policing in england and wales has been placed on an emergency footing following the recent series of terror attacks. as a result, senior police officers say they're having to switch resources from other areas which they claim may create significant risks to public safety. the home office said it had promised in 2015 to increase spending on counter—terrorism by 30% over five years. soldiers have shot dead a suspected suicide bomber in brussels as he triggered a small explosion in the main railway station. authorities say the man was wearing what appeared to be a bomb vest and are treating the incident as a terrorist attack. no—one else is believed to have been injured. failures in care are one of the main causes of stillbirths and brain injuries in newborn babies in the
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uk, according to a report out today. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists found the most common mistakes were relating to monitoring heart rates during labour. it wants to cut the rate of neonatal errors by 50% by 2020. head teachers from 17 council areas in england are writing to parents urging them to put pressure on their mps to address what they call the growing funding crisis in schools. the joint letter, to almost 2 million families, warns that there could be job losses and cuts in subject choices. the government says it will continue to invest record levels in education. the actor sir daniel day—lewis has announced his retirement from acting. the 60—year—old star is the only man to have won three best actor oscars, which were awarded for my left foot, there will be blood and lincoln. he gave no reason for the decision, calling it a "private" one, but said he was "immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences". remember him in the last of the
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mohicans? what a fabulous actor he is. we will talk about him later, because he is mr method. in one of his films he lived in a tent for a period of time. and in another film period of time. and in anotherfilm he refused to speak to anybody else out of character. don't look at me! we aren't allowed to look at her any more! i'm joking. good morning, sally. i'm the grumpy one! someone who might be feeling a little bit grumpy is andy murray. he played in the heat at queens yesterday. he loves playing there, but he had a bit of a shocker. a really off day. there was a huge surprise at queens where the defending champion andy murray was knocked out of the aegon championships in the first round byjordan thompson.
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thompson, who is ranked number 90 in the world, was only a last minute replacement as murray's original opponent pulled out injured. but he went on to take the first set in a tie—break, before breaking murray's serve twice in the second set for the biggest win of his career. obviously i had a good french open and good preparation. ifelt good coming in. that something i will speak to with my team, try and work out the reasons why. get back to work and prepare for wimbledon. out the reasons why. get back to work and prepare for wimbledonm was a day of shocks at queens as the man who andy murray beat in last yea r‘s man who andy murray beat in last year's final and even the final at wimbledon is out. milos raonic lost in straight sets to australia's thanasi kokkinakis both sets going to tie—breaks. and to complete the upsets, second seed stan wawrinka was beaten in straight sets by spain's feliciano lopez. the swiss was playing his first match since losing in the final of the french open to
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rafa nadal nine days ago. there was better news for britain's women's number one, johanna konta. she has made a winning start to the aegon classic in birmingham. the world number seven found it difficult at times, but came through against ukraine's lesia tsurenko in straight sets. two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova played herfirst match on grass, her favourite surface, since returning to the sport after the injuries she suffered in a knife attack last year. kvitova beat fellow czech tereza smitkova in straight sets and now faces britain's naomi broady. the manchester united manager jose mourinho has been accused of tax fraud in spain. the authorities believe he owes almost £3 million from his time as manager of real madrid. the portuguese has denied the accusation, saying the government had ratified his tax affairs. with the queen in attendance, the first day of horse racing's royal ascot meeting took place yesterday. and there was a shock in the big race, the st james' palace stakes, as the heavy favourite churchill, who had won the english and irish 2000 guineas already this season,
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was well beaten in fourth. second favourite barney roy was the winner, trained by richard hannon and ridden by james doyle. england's men beat south korea 7—2 in their final pool game of the world hockey league semi—final in london last night. the result means england finish second in pool a behind olympic champions argentina on goal difference and will now face canada in thursday's quarter—finals. sam ward scored four of england's seven goals. but scotland have missed out on a world cup place after a 1—1 draw with canada. the scots needed a win to progress ahead of pakistan. the british and irish lions will name their starting line—up later for the first test against new zealand on saturday. warren gatland says the selection meeting will be one of the toughest ever, especially after their finalwarm—up game, a convincing 34—6 victory over the chiefs in hamilton yesterday. england wing jack nowell scored two of the four tries. we are
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we a re pretty we are pretty happy with where we are at the moment and the place we are at the moment and the place we are in as a group of players. yes, the selection meeting with the coaches tomorrow will be tough and that's the way you want it. the guys put up their hand tonight and they have no doubt there will be some healthy debate about the test side. i think is suggesting that he isn't quite decided on who the starting lineup might be. i think it goes. do you? of course. we will talk about that later as well. thank you. you can't take us for granted. that's the stark warning to the government from a senior democratic unionist party source ahead of today's queen's speech. and after ten days of talks, there is still no deal to secure the conservatives' majority in parliament. alastair ross is a former dup junior minister in northern ireland and joins us from our belfast newsroom. thank you very much for coming on this morning. there are lots of
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stories in the papers this morning, the front page of the times, the dup threatened to walk out of talks. how close is that the truth? i think there's definitely a surprise that it has taken so long to reach an agreement with the party who should be sharing many of the issues that the conservatives want to progress in this parliament. i think there is also a frustration amongst people in the uk, that perhaps the support has been taken for granted, perhaps the government are dragging their feet on key issues. so while i suspect the dup will back the queen's speech, the conservatives could find themselves in a difficult position u nless themselves in a difficult position unless they can tie together something that means they are able to get other pieces of legislation to get other pieces of legislation to parliament. it only took five days for the conservatives and lib dems to hammer out their deal in the last coalition government and we've had ten days already on this one. you said we don't think we will get toa you said we don't think we will get to a situation where the dup doesn't
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back the queen's speech today?” think the dup have been quite clear during the campaign that they aren't going to support a jeremy corbyn labour party. nor do they really wa nt labour party. nor do they really want another general election. so i don't think they will be against the queen's speech. they may vote for an amendment, as they can get some guarantees, but i think the main difference between these sets of negotiations and what happened with the lib dems is this is not a full coalition negotiation, this is a much less formal arrangement. and you are also dealing with a different base. the dup have been negotiating at a very high level for decades in northern ireland. not a gear goes past when they don't have to negotiate some sort of deal. so i think the dup have perhaps been underestimated by the government and are finding it very difficult to deal with some of those people the dup have had for years and years.” bear red lines for the dup? —— are
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there. if you look at what arlene foster has been saying there are three main areas. one of them is about securing northern ireland's base in the uk and playing a role in politics and acting in the national interest. secondly they will look for some advantages in terms of government spending in northern ireland and infrastructure projects, but also potentially looking at other powers that could be devolved if the assembly gets back up and running. i think the third area will be around except, ensuring that there is a frictionless border between the irish republic and northern ireland and that something all the parties in northern ireland and the irish republic agree on. how much traction, in those concerns from some, but a potential deal puts the peace process at risk in northern ireland ? the peace process at risk in northern ireland? the belfast agreement makes no prohibition on any deals being done in dublin or london. i actually think this could we any incentive for those who have
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been dragging their heels in northern ireland to get back into government. the only party that won't go back on the government is sinn fein. i think the prospect of a direct minister with dup influence isn't something their supporters would relish and i also think if there's any sort of concessions or economic and that from a deal between the dup and the conservative party it would make it easier for political parties to get back on a devolved government as well, if they have more money to spend on vital services like health and education and infrastructure. one final one, do you think it harms the dup, if it comes that they have been accused of playing political games and not serving the national interest? no, i think they will serve the national interest. i think the conservatives have more to lose, if a deal is done. the conservatives won't want to find themselves in a position where they are having to negotiate on an issue by issue basis, because the cost will be higher if they do that. i think the conservatives have
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more to lose than the dup. i think any party who find themselves in this position would be pushing to get as much advantage for their local constituents as they can and i think the dup are actually standing up think the dup are actually standing upfor think the dup are actually standing up for what they want out of this negotiations and not running over end of the government. thank you very much. it will be interesting to see how the talks continue over the next few days. the uk is said to experience its hottestjune the uk is said to experience its hottest june day for over 40 the uk is said to experience its hottestjune day for over 40 years. temperatures in some parts forecast to soar to 34 degrees later today. it means it could be hotter than the maldives, dubai or los angeles — but while most people have been enjoying the sunshine — it's been causing problems for others as holly hamilton reports. 75, 80, 86 and the temperature still rises. a heat wave hit written.
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time—honoured tradition. as temperature raises, britain embraces the heat. well, for a few days. the fashion of the briefest of brief swimsuits. today wearing jeans but, yeah, ithink swimsuits. today wearing jeans but, yeah, i think it makes you feel great. quite beautiful. it makes a change from the rain. i love it did in the hotter the better. so we're now the fifth day of 30 plus temperatures here in britain. some are finding it too hot to handle. just can't cope when the heat is humid and especially at this time of year when it is the pollen count high as well. it can get too much and too hot and sticky so it is like i would rather be at home than go out wide. it has been over 20 years since britain has enjoyed these temperatures for this long but how did we cope in 1995 without twitter to share our struggle to sleep in the heat? hospitals and emergency services have been put on high alert while guidelines have been issued to
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encourage staff to do djs shirt and tie. no top and tail that are scots. for the first time, organisers have relax the strict dress code. and while we may be familiar about the pets in hot cars on the advice, scorching pavements are now an issue for 4—legged friends. scorching pavements are now an issue for 4-legged friends. they can burn and blister on their feet. for 4-legged friends. they can burn and blister on theirfeet. take for 4-legged friends. they can burn and blister on their feet. take your dog ‘s ray walker early in the morning, or late in the evening so the pavement has cooled down and temperatures have dropped and your pet... it then reduces the risk of hip overheating and having problems with hot pavements. love it or hate it, like every edition summer it is not set to last. parts of the country can expect heavy downpour this afternoon and the tab richer is said to fall. business as usual and we will still be complaining about the weather. that is what we like to do. we love
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the weather, mostly because we like to complain, whatever the weather. too hot, too cold, too we come to dry. we will not complain about carol. we sent out to enjoy the weather at the seaside. good morning. this morning it is beautiful here in brighton and the temperature is about 18 celsius with a gentle breeze and we have orally seen a gentle breeze and we have orally seen swimmers a gentle breeze and we have orally seen swimmers go a gentle breeze and we have orally seen swimmers go by, heading off into the sea into the english channel. this report says the sunshine is lovely, take the usual precautions if you plan on being outside franey length of time. water, a shade breaks, we had and sunscreen. it will still be a lovely day and in fact richer protected equity of 34 celsius. 93.2df. if that happens, it will be the warmest june date since 1976. lovely and warm here in brighton and the forecasted for most of the uk is one of heat and also thunderstorms. but
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eve ryo ne of heat and also thunderstorms. but everyone will see the thunderstorm, but we do have some at the moment across scotland, northern england and northern ireland. they will be with us for a while yet. there will be sunshine in between and we have low cloud in the hills in the south. that will turn to clear as we go through the course of the morning and then for most it will be dry, sunny and it will be hot. hotter across northern england and was yesterday. of the highest temperatures will be in the south—east. this afternoon in scotla nd south—east. this afternoon in scotland still looking at sunshine around but a lot of dry weather, equally. . temperature about 20 in glasgow, 13 in aberdeen. in northern england, thunderstorm still around manchester and leaves, and across chests the —— across cheshire. a lot of sunshine in the south with the highest temperatures around the london area. on the south coast
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there will be sea breezes and that will keep it pleasantly fresher. still, it will be hot. as we drift towards the south—west, sunshine on offer. into wales with a lot of sunshine and temperatures again around 28 or 29. a fresh day for northern ireland compared to the rest of england and wales. there will be what to showers in the west. we still have showers across north—east england and lincolnshire is well and we will see low cloud, mist and fog coming in from areas adjacent to the irish and english channel. another batch of thunderstorms coming in across england and wales. some of those will produce as much as an inch of rain ina will produce as much as an inch of rain in a small amount of time. with large hail and gusty winds. that will drift towards the south—east, clearing the south—east by early afternoon, leaving us with another dry and sunny day and a fresher feel to the day. that we will pick up across the north—west with coastal gales and thereby the afternoon that
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will be rain showers on its land —— hands in northern ireland. there will be a lot of dry weather around and the temperature far more co mforta ble and the temperature far more comfortable for most of us. we look at into the mid—20s instead of the mid— 30s. changes afoot. at into the mid—20s instead of the mid- 30s. changes afoot. can you see the swimmers that went in, carol? where are oh, look about! they are just getting ready to go in. they are putting their flippers on at the moment. a gentleman just coming in. good morning! 0h, moment. a gentleman just coming in. good morning! oh, it is like prison break! it is lovely and warm and feels beautiful here this morning.” am sure that man was hearing it plugs, iam am sure that man was hearing it plugs, i am sure that is why he ignored you. magnificent tattoos. we will be returning a little bit
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later. it was like prison break with the map... amazing. plans to bring down costs for renters and drivers are expected to be included in the queen's speech to parliament later this morning. sean's got more on what we know so far when it comes to plans for business and consumers. yes, it's not all about brexit — some issues that have become problems for a lot of people are going to try to be tackled in the queen's speech today. there are plans to protect consumers by reducing motor insurance premiums and to tackle widespread abuses across the claims management sector. there's also plans to give renters more rights when moving house. which are now to an economist from cranfield. there are a lot of different things on this but let's kick off with a more consumer issues. there were necessarily at
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the front of the conservative party ma nifesto the front of the conservative party manifesto but tackling nuisance calls, reducing insurance premiums. why they trying to put that high up on the queen speech? it is an element of wanting to reduce nuisance calls and things that are inconvenient to the consumer. what we also want to insurers when we engage in any transaction, the amount of service that is provided to us is reflected in the fee that we pay. seletar is a renter is concerned, we want to pay for services that our landlords provide us services that our landlords provide us with but we don't want to be paying money that reflects the fact that there is a shortage of housing and people taking advantage of that situation. if we look at infrastructure, there is also going to be quite a bit about that. the government has made plans in the past with roads and when it comes to electric cars there will be something in there about trying to encourage us something in there about trying to encourage us to do more. more charging points around the country. isa charging points around the country. is a big policy to be kidding on within the next parliament? there area of within the next parliament? there are a of issues he. in terms of
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general infrastructure we need to make sure the general infrastructure supports our economy to. goods and people need to move around the economy freely to allow the innovative. power points electric cars, is that as a technology we wish to promote for environmental reasons and also because we have an emerging capability in that sector, then we have to make sure that the infrastructure is in so plays the support. how about the railways? high—speed too needs to be kicked on in parliament of the government wa nts to in parliament of the government wants to get it done. railways are slowing congested, there are as twice many travelling by train as there were 25 years ago. we have to make sure we have an appropriate amount of investment. it takes is to the next level as far as infrastructure is concerned. and we are yet to mention brexit isn't really going to be what the queen speech is about the government's job
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over the next two years... is this really tinkering around the edges? these are issues that need to be dealt with front and centre for the next two years will be brexit. the nature of the deal but we will sign. wallet behind, will be so, the issue of managing the process of negotiation to make sure that the uncertainty that will exist around those negotiations does not impact the economy. when it is a bit like brexit does a delay trying to carry out all those other things that you mentioned, other laws and bills that the government want to get through? exactly. it takes time in terms of legislative time and negotiating and debating and the nature of the agreement and the danger is that important legislation around social welfare and the health service is kicked further down the road. big decisions that we have to make are not made in respect to the sectors. thank you very much. we will be speaking to you at 11:30 this morning, the queen speech then.
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ve ntu ra morning, the queen speech then. ventura match and we will have more in the queen speech later. it is toned down with not nearly as so much pomp and ceremony as we are accustomed to seeing. damian green coming up at ten minutes past eight. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. a man has been tasted after attacking pete people at a mosque in the early hours of this morning. police are not treating the incident as terror related and will call to the area or 20 minutes past one. man was waving an object which turned out to be 80 shoe horn. he was arrested on suspicion of affray. the first funeralfor a arrested on suspicion of affray. the first funeral for a victim of the
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grand saltire will take place later. dashmac the first funeral of the victims who died during the grenfell tower block fire will take place later today. 23—year—old syrian refugee mohammad alhajali was with his brother on the 14th floor when the fire took hold but got separated while being evacuated. his brother omar survived. police say seventy—nine people died in the blaze. the ambulance service is warning that the hot weather is putting an increased strain on its resources they say they've seen a 40% rise in calls because of the heat wave. we re were standing with londoners during these difficult times. we are busy and proud of the response that our staff have provided. we are now asking people in london to help us. do not call the ambulance unless you need one. if you call 111 your gp or pharmacist can maybe help in an on the road, this is the a12 in romford.
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on the m25 we have two lanes closed anticlockwise and one lane closed clockwise after a lorry went through the central reservation. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. it was another warm night but this morning feels a little fresher than it has done for the last few mornings. the temperature today is likely to be the hottest this week. we look at maximum of 33, 34celsius so it does get high and it looks like the hottestjune day since 1976. a lot of sunshine, not a cloud, a lot of cloud around so the uv levels are high as is the pollen count.
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and looks like the last of the hot days. overnight still warm and muggy, 19— 21 the minimum that tomorrow will see this cloud moving in and with it the potential for thundery and heavy showers. clearing away in the afternoon, the temperature is still likely to reach 25 celsius but after those showers clear it will introduce fresh air. gradually becoming cooler through thursday. another cold front heading our way for friday, again, fresher still. light outbreaks of drizzle with some rain into saturday morning but again that will clear the way. gradually the temperature is going to fall. will be another warm one warm night tonight that route tomorrow onwards, things getting much cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker.
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theresa may sets out her two—year plan, with brexit at the top of the agenda. but with no commons majority, the prime minister is expected to scrap several key manifesto promises in a delayed queen's speech. good morning, it's wednesday the 21st ofjune. also this morning: one of britain's top police chiefs warns services could be stretched to breaking point, as ministers put terrorism officers on an emergency footing. a suspected suicide bomber is shot dead in brussels as he sets off an explosion in the city's main railway station. there is lots in the queen's speech to interest business and consumers,
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from transport infrastructure to tackling nuisance calls. more on those plans a little later. in sport, andy murray's preparations for wimbledon suffer a blow as he is knocked out of queens in the opening round. the defending champion was beaten in straight sets by the world number 90 jordan thompson, who was only there as a late replacement. he won three oscars, but daniel day—lewis says he's calling it a day and retiring from acting. and it's set to be another scorcher for many. carol's at the seaside with the weather. good morning from brighton beach. it's a beautiful start of the day. temperatures could hit 34 in parts of the south. if that happens it will be the warmestjune date since 1976. a lot of sunshine, but in the north we have some storms. more in 15 minutes. it looks fabulous! i
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love that you have your own tent and everything. we will be back on the beach a little bit later. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may's agenda for the next two years of government will be revealed later in a queen's speech, which is likely to be dominated by laws preparing the country for brexit. the conservatives are still attempting to negotiate a parliamentary deal with the democratic unionist party and several of its manifesto commitments are expected to be dropped, as our political correspondent eleanor garnier now reports. it is the ultimate show of pomp and ceremony, it marks the formal opening of parliament. the queen's speech might be read by the queen but it's written by ministers. a list of legislation the newly elected government aims to bring in. but this year it's going to be a scaled back event, just like in 1974 and ted heath's snap election. with a crowded calendar and little time for preparations, there will be no gold carriage and it will be day dress rather than robes for the queen. it is significant, it does reflect that this is a snap election, this wasn't planned.
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that of course, it is very close to the trooping of the colours so the two ceremonies together would be too much. and it's quite menaingful because we were expecting to see the full pomp and circumstance next year but next year's the queen's speech has been cancelled so we are not going to see a queen's speech until 2019. so that's some way away for the queen to exercise what she sees as her key role outside of state. when theresa may set out her party's manifesto she proposed scrapping free school meals for all but the very poorest. there were plans to reform social care funding and to expand grammar schools. but without a conservative majority and a lack of support, expect a moderated version of mrs may's manifesto. brexit will be the central theme. it is likely there will be a great repeal bill which will turn all eu laws that effect us into british law. look out for legislation to tackle terrorism, with powers to deal with extremists and protect the public. there could also be measures
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to protect workers rights, with worker representation on company boards as well as protection of pensions. theresa may is still trying to put together a deal with northern ireland's democratic unionist party. she will need their support to see her queen's speech voted through parliament. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. we can speak to eleanor in westminster now. eleanor, a stripped—back ceremony and stripped back speech? what are we going to hear in terms of what has been written for the queen by the conservatives? will it be stripped back in terms of policy as well? there might be less pomp this time around. i think the political circumstances mean this queen's speech will be as closely scrutinised as ever before and it is brexit that's dominating the agenda. expect legislation on immigration, agriculture, environment, all the
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things where the eu currently has oversight will need to be legislated for and it's a pretty vast task. remember, theresa may didn't get a majority at the election. she said it wasn't the result she hoped for by the government would respond to voters with humility and resolve. despite ten days of talks with the democratic —— dup, a deal still hasn't been done. all signs are the dup will back the queen's speech, but for the reason may in delivering this two—year government agenda it will require a day by day fight for political survival in parliament. thanks for that. we will be speaking to damian green, the first secretary of state, about the queen's speech ina of state, about the queen's speech in a couple of minutes. bbc news has learned counter—terrorism policing in england and wales has been placed on an emergency footing following the recent series of terror attacks. as a result, senior police officers say they're having to switch resources from other areas which they claim may create "significa nt" risks to public safety.
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it's understood mark rowley, who's in charge of counter—terrorism policing nationally, has written to the home secretary, amber rudd, about the issue. soldiers have shot dead a suspected suicide bomber in brussels as he triggered a small explosion in the main railway station. authorities say the man was wearing what appeared to be a bomb vest. no—one else is believed to have been injured. frankie mccamley reports. brussels central station evacuated shortly after police say a man triggered a small explosion. eyewitnesses say they heard gunfire and multiple explosions. just minutes later smoke can be seen inside. as the station was evacuated, flames were caught on camera inside. translation: i went down the stairs to get back to the platform and there i heard someone shouting and then at one point he shouted,
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"allahu akbar", and blew up the suitcase he had. i carried on down, trying to evacuate as many people as possible, and there he was, just behind me, two metres behind the stairs and he still had the belt on him. outside, moved back by police officers, people gathered together, making their way to safety and trying to come to terms with yet another attack on the city. the country's military, already on high alert, were on the scene within minutes, shooting dead the suspect. bomb disposal units were also sent in to make sure the area was safe. belgian prosecutors now say this is being treated as a terrorist attack. failures in care are one of the main causes of still—births and brain injuries in newborn babies in the uk according to a report out today. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists found the most common mistakes related to the monitoring of foetal heart rates during labour.
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it wants to cut the number of neo—natal errors by 50% by 2020. our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan reports. this is barnaby, a four—month—old happy, bouncing baby. he should have an older brother who would now be 18 months but medical mistakes made at birth meant that alfie, died within hours of being born. despite concerns about his health, stuff failed to perform a caesarean section, leaving him with fatal brain injuries. —— staff. it's a life that did not need to be taken, that's been taken. kind of a whole future for everybody, for our family, for alfie, just taken in an instant because medics who are paid to do a job did not do it correctly that day. too many otherfamilies have suffered similar heartache. today's report says that in 2015 three quarters of babies who either died at birth or suffered severe brain injury could have had a different outcome
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with better care. a failure to properly monitor the fetus and poor teamwork in labour wards were common problems. no death of a baby is acceptable but we must be able to take the lessons we have learnt from the very robust and detailed analysis and turn the situation around. experts think that many more healthy babies can be born in the uk if nhs maternity units improve. the field family hope they're right, and that other families do not suffer as they have. michael buchanan, bbc news. jeremy hunt says he wants to make the nhs one of the safest places in the nhs one of the safest places in the world, by halving deaths because of stillbirth and brain injuries by 2030. head teachers from 17 council areas in england are writing to parents urging them to put pressure on their mps to address what they call the growing funding crisis in schools. the joint letter to almost 2
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million families warns that there could be job losses and cuts in subject choices. the government says it will continue to invest record levels in education. the three—time oscar—winning actor sir daniel day—lewis has announced his retirement from acting. yes, his career has seen him tackle a huge variety of roles and gained him international acclaim, as simon clemison reports. # looks like an angel...# daniel day—lewis as christy browne, who, with cerebral palsy, learned to paint with his left foot. and this is the same actor. and again... still, day—lewis. i am president of the united states! now 60, daniel day—lewis is famous for putting huge amounts of effort into perfecting the part he has played, creating a cast of very different characters. the portrayal of the former us
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president won him his third oscar for best actor, something still no other leading man has achieved. he has chosen his roles extremely carefully, before immersing himself in them. i think i'm definitely out of character at this moment. but if i slip back into it by mistake, you can do an intervention of some kind. the heimlich manoeuvre or whatever you do with actors who get stuck in character. but, no, i'm definitely out of character now. there is one more movie the pipeline, so daniel day—lewis won't quite disappear from the screen yet, but he is retiring. he has given no reason why, a statement simply said it was a private decision. we will be talking to our entertainment correspondent about that a little later in the programme. nearly a fortnight after theresa may lost a parliamentary majority, the government will today try to get back on track with a
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queen's speech revealing a legislative programme for the next two years. however, reports suggest many of the conservatives' manifesto commitments will be dropped as it attempts to reach a deal with the democratic unionist party. newly—appointed first secretary of state damian green joins us from westminster. good morning and thanks forjoining us. good morning and thanks forjoining us. there is so much to talk about. let's talk about some of those ma nifesto let's talk about some of those manifesto promises and get a bit of clarity on what will be in the queen's speech. for example, this triple lock on the state pension. will that stay? the triple lock was a lwa ys will that stay? the triple lock was always going to stay until 2020. it didn't require legislation. inevitably the queen's speech. or. the biggest chunk is of bills relating to brexit. that is the overwhelming issue facing the government and parliament over the next two years, so we will have a great repeal bill, but a lot of other issues, including agriculture and trade. but we are determined to press ahead with a domestic agenda as well, so there are bills that
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will our infrastructure, bills to help people reduce bills, tenants in particular, housing is clearly a big issue at the moment. so there will bea issue at the moment. so there will be a big range of bills. it is a two—year session and there will be more bills and draft bills proposed in recession than in the two—year session at the start of the 2010 coalition government. let's mention one other thing mentioned in the ma nifesto one other thing mentioned in the manifesto about social care. have you changed your policy on that? will there be a cap on care costs? there will be a consultation. we will consult and that will include the suggestion of a cap. clearly this is, as we all know, a hugely complex issue, is the right thing to do is to produce a consultation which we will in the next few months, so we can have a proper national debate about how we deal with this issue, which is hugely important to many families and will only get more important as we have an increasingly ageing population.
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you mentioned, as we all know, the prime minister saying ahead of the speech she promises to work with humility and resolve. has she taken on—board criticisms humility and resolve. has she taken on—boa rd criticisms over the humility and resolve. has she taken on—board criticisms over the last few weeks? yes. clearly the election result wasn't what we had hoped for, but we are by a mile the largest single party in parliament and we won more votes, so we are presenting a queen's speech. yesterday the prime minister will learn the lessons, has learnt the lessons, of what happens during the election. but the other part of that statement is she has great resolve. she wants to get on with the job. she knows there are big issues about spreading prosperity around britain, about making sure that everyone can benefit from rising prosperity in this country. and that's the big domestic task of this government, along with negotiating a successful brexit that will lay the foundations for a successful economy for years to come. you are also negotiating a
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deal with the dup. what is the sticking point? there's no individual sticking point. talks are progressing. all negotiations of this kind can take a long time. there's a lot the two parties have in common, we are both committed to unionism. we both want to sort out the problem of the irish border. and we are both concerned with fighting the scourge of terrorism. so we have a lot in common, but we are different parties and so it will ta ke different parties and so it will take some time to reach a deal. different parties and so it will take some time to reach a dealm you can't do a deal on this, what about a deal on brexit? that's more complicated. brexit talks started this week and the first session was quite constructive. michel barnier has said that he, like us, want to begin
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with the issues of the citizens. i know that exercises many people, the 3.5 million citizens in this country, the over 1 3.5 million citizens in this country, the over1 million brits living abroad. we want to sort that out as soon as possible so we can reassure people. we want to sort out the irish order issue and he does as well. he said that later this year he wants and expects us to move on to the trade talk, which we obviously think are very important for our future prosperity. negotiations have gotten off to a good start. how about the recommendations made previously, before grenfell tower? we will
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produce interim findings as soon as possible and the terms of reference will be the residence will be consulted on them so that their voice will be heard. and we will provide money for legal representation for those residents at the public enquiry. so if we can get to the facts, we can learn what needs to be done as quickly as possible and implement it because, clearly, we owe that to the residents and the survivors of that terrible event. one final question, about counterterrorism, saying today that prioritising counterterrorism will push risk to other areas of policing, potentially with significant impact. will you change resources ? significant impact. will you change resources? we are facing as big a terrorist threat as we have done for many years. does that mean more
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money for the police?. it means more money for the police?. it means more money for the police?. it means more money for counterterrorism and we are admitted to that. we are spending 30% more during this parliament on counterterrorism and we have before. 1900 and extra officers are dealing with counterterrorism. .. there is a difference here, isn't there? between the money you spend on counterterrorism and local policing on the streets? it is all part of a web and that is why in the 2015 spending settlement we said, explicitly, that we would protect police spending as well so spending extra on counterterrorism while protecting police spending so on both sides that we are able to devote both sides that we are able to d evote m o re both sides that we are able to devote more resources to counterterrorism because that is sadly necessary in the current climate. thank you for your time. the weather looked quite nice they are at westminster and it is meant to bea are at westminster and it is meant to be a hot date for many of us
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although we had a text from sunderland saying it was 17 degrees yesterday. carol has been telling us about the weather or in the uk and look, she is dipping her toes in at brighton this morning. catch! , you missed! a lovely start to the day and you can see these swimmers out. plenty out this morning as well as people jogging plenty out this morning as well as peoplejogging and plenty out this morning as well as people jogging and enjoying the fine weather. a nice start and the temperature will rocket we are looking at 34 celsius. if we get that it will be the warmest spring day since 1976. let's look at the forecast for today. one of heat and thunderstorms. currently we have thunderstorms. currently we have thunderstorms across parts of northern ireland, northern england and also scotland. you are likely to see quite a lot of rain coming out of them in a short amount of time, some large hail and gusty wind. some
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will tail off over the day but not all of them. we also have cloud across the hills in the south. through the dalian through the morning that will ease and it will bea morning that will ease and it will be a lot of sunshine around. as we head off into the afternoon, especially across scotland, we are looking at lower temperatures, 11— 13. there will be sunshine and showers, highs of 20 in glasgow. across northern england, still a lot of sunshine and hotter than was yesterday. white muggy as well and the thunderstorms are still around manchester and cheshire for example. we are back under blue skies in the south with a high temperature. high pollen levellers well. very high and uv levels as well. don't forget to drink plenty and get into the shade when you can. where some pretension and cover—up. south—west england and wales that extends to as well. and
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wee bit cooler with some release before northern ireland you will enjoy some to sunshine this afternoon with a few showers in the west to. the showers across north—east england and lincolnshire will continue into the evening and overnight and then we see that low cloud and hell for coming in from the irish sea and the english channel. a new set of thunderstorms then and severe ones, will cross parts of england and wales. a lot of water and a small amount of time. gusty wind and large hail. first thing in the morning, they have cleared the south—east by early afternoon. so before the racing at royal ascot, it should be done but will be wed in the morning. as it clears, sunshine will come out for most of the uk. the wind will pick up most of the uk. the wind will pick up across most of the uk. the wind will pick up across north—west scotland and then we will see rain coming to northern ireland. that rain will move west to east through the course of friday but the other thing you notice is the feel of the weather
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and you will lose the martinus on the high temperature. the temperature will still be lovely, in the high teens to mid—20s. you are saying earlier that there is nobody here... well, if! saying earlier that there is nobody here... well, if i can ask the cameramen to swing around we have people swimming and people all around as well. look at this! good morning! i told you people would come and visit! you could not ask for more, carol. it is lovely that dog belongs to ian and charlotte. watch out for the waves, carol! a major study is under way to find out more about the problems faced by patients taking a large number of different medicines. keeping track of what and where to take various bills can be difficult and it is an issue for elderly people with several health complications. it is believed dishes of medication with
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almost 6000 deaths a year and cost over £1 billion. we have filed out more big —— found out more. on my left is one bush and my lawn we are walking on. graham price is pride of his garden. he is pointing out the features and the plants from memory, because he is blind. imagine how difficult it was for him to give his late wife 11 different types of medication every day. graham struggled for four years until he decided he could no longer cope. you cannot see. you are trying to find somebody‘s face, but i was exhausted. i cannot believe someone like me, who is assertive, strong and confident and got to point where i felt... i felt this was well beyond my ability to cope and i couldn't. i rang the clinician and said that if you do not want two people on your workload, i need help.
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a major study is trying to now determinejust how big this problem is. doctor geoff wong is a researcher at the university of oxford and a gp in london. he says that medicines are not necessarily the prescribed, but believes sometimes there are alternative approaches. it's more because you are trying to do the best for that individual. that each time you try and do the best for them, you mayjust add a little more. and then some of these medications are much more about risk reduction. risk reduction may be very useful for a younger person, someone who has had a heart attack in their 50s. they will probably want to have something that will keep them going into the next couple of decades. if you had one in your 90s... you may or may not want to think about whether you want another medication. medicines are more advanced and more effective than ever before. they have to be. as our population becomes increasingly older and medical conditions are more complex,
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people will take an increasing range of medications. problems with medication is believed to be a factor in almost a thousand problems with medication is believed to be a factor in almost 6000 deaths in the uk every year. and at a cost of over £1 billion. so aston university of birmingham is looking for answers, gathering evidence from a range of sources including doctors, pharmacistand, crucially, patients. we need to listen to the patients and understand what we can do to improve their quality of life that they get from medication. is it possibly some technology? possibly integrating social care and healthcare. we need a whole system—wide new approach. the research will take place over the next 20 months, identifying problems and solutions is one thing but as the doctor says, this was an issue when he first qualified as a pharmacist 30 years ago.
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and he argues the problem is getting worse. you are watching breakfast on bbc news fool ‘s still to this morning, out of control. that is how the association of british travel agents has described the level of fraudulent sickness claim on holiday. could british people be banned at european resorts of the number of complaints keep rising? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. a teenager has been stabbed and police pelted with bottles during a
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large site in north london last night. riot police were called to the scene following reports of youths armed with knives. one man has been arrested in connection with the disorder which scotland yard said began after a block party. the first funeral of the victims who died during the grenfell tower block fire will take place later today. 23—year—old syrian refugee mohammad alhajali was with his brother on the 14th floor when the fire took hold but got separated while being evacuated. his brother omar survived. a man has been tasered after attacking people at regent's park mosque in the early hours of this morning. the man was waving an object which later turned out to be a shoe horn. he was arrested on suspicion of affray. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes as well as the closures related to the grenfell tower fire, the district line is part suspended between parsons green and wimbledon and between turnham green and richmond because of signal failures. on the roads this is the a12
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in romford, eastern avenue west is closed between whalebone lane north and mawney road due to burst two lanes are closed on the m25 and one lane closed clockwise after a lorry went through the central reservation. and in about 15 minutes, roads will start closing around westminster and head of the state opening of parliament. roads around buckingham palace, whitehall and parliament are all affected. it was another warm night but this morning feels a little fresher than it has done for the last few mornings. it is another hot and sunny day. the temperature today is likely to be the hottest this week. we look at maximum of 33, 34 celsius so it does get high and it looks like the hottest june day since 1976. a lot of sunshine, not a cloud,
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a lot of cloud around so the uv levels are high as is the pollen count. and looks like the last of the hot days. there is a change afoot. overnight still warm and muggy, 19— 21 the minimum but tomorrow will see this cloud moving in and with it the potential for thundery and heavy showers. clearing away in the afternoon, the temperature is still likely to reach 25 celsius but after those showers clear it will introduce fresh air. gradually becoming cooler through thursday. another cold front heading our way for friday, again, fresher still. light outbreaks of drizzle with some rain into saturday morning but again that will clear the way. gradually the temperature is going to fall. will be another warm one warm night tonight that route tomorrow onwards, things getting much cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may's agenda for the next two years of government will be revealed later in a queen's speech, which is likely to be dominated by laws preparing the country for brexit. the queen will outline the legislative plans for the next two years in a low—key version of the state opening of parliament ceremony. measures on domestic violence and car insurance are likely to feature but several conservative manifesto pledges are expected to be dropped after the party lost its majority at the election. within the past few minutes damian green, the first secretary of state, told us the priming have learnt lessons from the election result. clearly the election result wasn't what we had hoped for, but we are by a mile of the largest single party
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in parliament and we won more votes, so we are in parliament and we won more votes, so we are presenting a queen's speech. but, yes, the prime minister will learn the lessons, has learnt the lessons, of what happens during the lessons, of what happens during the election, but the other part of that statement is she has great resolve. she wants to get on with thejob. she knows there resolve. she wants to get on with the job. she knows there are resolve. she wants to get on with thejob. she knows there are big issues about spreading prosperity around britain, about making sure eve ryo ne around britain, about making sure everyone can benefit from prosperity in this country. bbc news has learned counter—terrorism policing in england and wales has been placed on an emergency footing following the recent series of terror attacks. as a result, senior police officers say they're having to switch resources from other areas which they claim may create significant risks to public safety. the home office said it had promised in 2015 to increase spending on counter—terrorism by 30% over five years. soldiers have shot dead a suspected suicide bomber in brussels as he triggered a small explosion in the main railway station. authorities say the man was wearing what appeared to be a bomb vest and are treating the incident
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as a terrorist attack. no—one else is believed to have been injured. analysis of data from all midwifery units shows three—quarters of cases in which babies died or suffered brainjury during birth could have been avoided with better care. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists found the most common mistakes related to the monitoring of foetal heart rates during labour. it wants to cut the number of neo—natal errors by 50—percent by 2020. the health secretary, jeremy hunt says he wants to make the nhs one of the safest place in the world to give birth. head teachers from 17 council areas in england are writing to parents urging them to put pressure on their mps to address what they call the growing funding crisis in schools. the joint letter, to almost 2 million families, warns that there could be job losses and cuts in subject choices. the government says it will continue to invest record levels in education.
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prince harry has said his time in afghanistan was the trigger for him to get help in dealing with his mother's death. harry, who served on two front line tours with the army, told forces tv that setting up the invictus games for wounded service personnel had also been a sort of cure. prince harry admitted that asking for help had been a significant decision. when you meet other lads, who have had a similarjourney, or there are similarities and it could help them and have a bit of banter and the moment you have that banter you can see them relax. once they realise, hang on, i'm not the only person here, there are so many people who suffered and recovered, i'm going to go and sort this out. i'm going to go and get help. the actor sir daniel day—lewis has announced his retirement from acting. the 60—year—old star is the only man to have won three best actor oscars, which were awarded for my left foot, there will be blood and lincoln. he gave no reason for the decision, calling it a "private" one, but said he was "immensely grateful to all of his
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collaborators and audiences". on sunny days like this we're often warned about the dangers of playing around water. but it seems the message hadn't got through to hope the baby elephant at seoul grand park zoo in south korea. as you can see, she takes a tumble into the deep end of the pool in her enclosure and seems to be struggling until her mum and aunt come to the rescue, first with their trunks and then by shepherding her back to dry land. elephants to the rescue! that's absolutely brilliant. yes, i didn't see her fall absolutely brilliant. yes, i didn't see herfall in. i think it was right at the start.
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is she safely out? thank goodness for that! next time we will show you that again and we will try to make sure we get your attention before we show you. do you think they took off and had a stern word with her. do not ever do that again! they may well have done that, dr doolittle. you saw the speed... when they couldn't get her out with their trunks, they were going on. will! you need to see what dan's doing. that the elephant walk. good morning. a really bad day at the office for andy murray. he was really disappointed. he couldn't really explain it. in his interviews after he lost he said it might damage his chances at wimbledon.
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queens is his thing as well. there was a huge surprise at queens where the defending champion andy murray was knocked out of the aegon championships in the first round byjordan thompson. thompson, who is ranked number 90 in the world, was only a last minute replacement as murray's original opponent pulled out injured. but he went on to take the first set in a tie—break, before breaking murray's serve twice in the second set for the biggest win of his career. obviously i had a good french open and good preparation. ifelt good coming in. that's something i will speak to with my team, try and work out the reasons why. get back to work and prepare for wimbledon. it was a day of shocks at queens as the man who murray beat in last year's final and in the final at wimbledon is also out. milos raonic lost in straight sets to australia's thanasi kokkinakis both sets going to tie—breaks. and to complete the upsets,
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second seed stan wawrinka was beaten in straight sets by spain's feliciano lopez. the swiss was playing his first match since losing in the final of the french open to rafa nadal nine days ago. there was better news for britain's women's number one, johanna konta. she has made a winning start to the aegon classic in birmingham. the world number seven found it difficult at times, but came through against ukraine's lesia tsurenko in straight sets. two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova played herfirst match on grass, her favourite surface, since returning to the sport after the injuries she suffered in a knife attack last year. kvitova beat fellow czech tereza smitkova in straight sets and now faces britain's naomi broady. manchester united manager jose mourinho has been accused of tax fraud while he was manager of real madrid. it's claimed mourinho didn't declare £3 million from image rights. he has denied the accusation, saying the government had ratified his tax affairs. with the queen in attendance, the first day of horse racing's royal ascot meeting took place yesterday. and there was a shock in the big race, the st james' palace stakes,
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as the heavy favourite churchill, who had won the english and irish 2000 guineas already this season, was well beaten in fourth. second favourite barney roy was the winner, trained by richard hannon and ridden by james doyle. england's men beat south korea 7—2 in their final pool game of the world hockey league semi—final in london last night. the result means england finish second in pool a behind olympic champions argentina on goal difference and will now face canada in thursday's quarter—finals. sam ward scored four of england's seven goals. but scotland have missed out on a world cup place after a 1—1 draw with canada. the scots needed a win to progress ahead of pakistan. the british and irish lions will name their starting line—up later for the first test against new zealand on saturday. warren gatland says the selection meeting will be one of the toughest ever, especially after their finalwarm—up game, a convincing 34—6 victory over the chiefs in hamilton yesterday. england wing jack nowell scored two of the four tries. we are pretty happy with where
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we are at the moment and the place we are in as a group of players. yes, the selection meeting with the coaches tomorrow will be tough and that's the way you want it. the guys put up their hand tonight and they have no doubt there will be some healthy debate about the test side. interestingly, overnight in the papers, it has been suggested the british and irish lions have had their hotel rooms swept for listening devices. interesting, they think the opposition might be trying to... maybe listen to what's going on, because warren gatland is saying he doesn't know, but i think he probably does! falling ill on holiday can turn a much needed break into an expensive and inconvenient nightmare, and if it's due to the food or conditions at your resort you may feel
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you deserve compensation. since 2013 the number of claims for holiday sickness has increased by more than 500%. that's despite the fact the number of people reporting illness in tourist destinations during the same period has remained stable. the problem seems particularly associated with british holidaymakers. so what's going on? brea kfast‘s tim muffett has been having a look. genuine illness can ruin a holiday. two operators often provide compensation if they believe their resort was responsible. but the associations of british travel agents says fraudulent claims for sickness are out of control. people are coming back from their holidays and making claims against their uk travel companies that they fell ill on holiday and are looking for compensation. these are seeing to be largely unsubstantiated claims. we've got tens of thousands of claims, tens of millions of pounds.
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it says its members have reported a 500% increase in holiday sickness claims since 2013. one tour operator, which asked to remain anonymous, said since 2014 it received a number of claims and last year it went up to 447. how do you know it is an increase in fraudulent claims? there is no evidence of a change in 4d went change. it has coincided with very aggressive marketing by the companies on the radio, through social media and we are sure that's what is encouraging people to make that substantiated claims. the alliance of claims companies told the bbc it was hoping to encourage principles that would help drive out rogue companies. it wa nts to help drive out rogue companies. it wants to work with the travel industry to make sure genuine claims are dealt with effectively. spanish resorts as a sickness claims cost than 60 million euros last year,
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around £53 million. the resorts from spain and turkey say they will ban british tourists unless things change. let's talk about that now. it is holiday season. victoria bacon is from the association of british travel agents and clare campbell works in travel law for leigh day solicitors. kind of fascinating. what kind of illnesses are people trying to get compensation for? it is food poisoning, basically. they are saying they've been typically on an all—inclusive holiday and they've eaten at the bath a and they've become sick as a result —— the buffet. i wasn't even aware of the fa ct buffet. i wasn't even aware of the fact that you could claim compensation for that kind of thing. the cases are rare but they do occasionally happen. over many yea rs, occasionally happen. over many years, the system worked reasonably well. you have a handful of cases every year and people with a genuine claim could put forward their case.
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what we've seen, as your report showed, in the past year or so is this absolute explosion in the number of claims, while in resorts the number of cases haven't been reported. so we know they are fraudulent because the number of cases hasn't increased and it is also british holidaymakers that are in fact. what does it say about as a british holidaymakers? as you say, the number of cases have stayed steady, at the claims have gone up by 5%? steady, at the claims have gone up by 596? one of the things -- 50096? one of the things we are raising the wariness of is the whole issue around what the claims companies are doing. they are encouraging people and telling them it's a risk—free venture. it is not risk—free. if you put forward a fraudulent claim and are found to be guilty, you could end up facing jail either here in the uk or overseas. and there are some counterclaims happening from firms who have been claimed against and are coming back against those
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who have made the fraudulent claim? that's right. if there has been a fraudulent claim then i fully support that the legal consequences should follow from that. at what i would say is that there are genuine claimants. ipad over 15 years experience of dealing with these types of cases. they range from a family whose holiday has been ruined because of a bout of food poisoning, all the way up to serious conditions which can lead to debilitating lifelong injuries. a dose of selman eller caused by a hotel can lead to serious effects. —— salmonella. eller caused by a hotel can lead to serious effects. -- salmonella. what are the serious ways forward? we have talked about some of the serious issues it can cause were people and perhaps others who don't have any issues at all. what should people do if they have been badly affected ? people do if they have been badly affected? i fully support the campaign to try to eradicate fraudulent claims and unscrupulous cm cs fraudulent claims and unscrupulous cmcs who are trying to bully people into making claims. but if you
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genuinely have but poisoning and thatis genuinely have but poisoning and that is being caused by a hotel you should contact a solicitor. speak to someone should contact a solicitor. speak to someone who has got the experience, who has the reputation in that area and who will be able to lead you on the right direction with your claim. the advice we would give is different. we believe part of the problem is the middleman and solicitors would be included in that. what we are calling for today is when we saw this issue if you yea rs is when we saw this issue if you years ago with whiplash the government introduced a law to fix the cost is around whiplash that legal firms could charge. the cost is around whiplash that legalfirms could charge. that massively basically solve the problem. what we are saying now is if the government can close the loophole, there is a loophole in that same law which means that overseas claims aren't subject to the same fixed costs, we would like the same fixed costs, we would like the government to basically bring the government to basically bring the travel sector into line with other sectors. that would make it less attractive to claims management companies two law firms as well. if you've got a genuine case you can pursue your case and pursue... let your hotel operator know and also if
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your hotel operator know and also if you aren't satisfied with that response you can pursue your claims. from my point of view as a solicitor, if somebody has been on holiday in contract had selman eller asa holiday in contract had selman eller as a result of bad hygiene at the hot till they should be entitled to compensation. i would fully endorse taking up the fraudulent keynes but there are genuine claimants out who deserve to be represented. doing this impedes access to justice and thatis this impedes access to justice and that is not right. we may have somebody e—mail on this but if something happens to you, what evidence do you need? at the time you reported to the resort, report to the tour operator obviously the that you then go home and do not have access to the records. but the hotel does. they have all the
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documentation to hand and the claimant doesn't which is why when you see a solicitor they would have the experience to know what to ask for. it is far more straightforward than that. if you are in a resort and think you have contracted an illness, see a doctor immediately and makea illness, see a doctor immediately and make a record. it is very straightforward. it is holiday season so straightforward. it is holiday season so thank you very much. a horrible thing to happen. thank you very much indeed. at the moment you don't need to go away, why would you? the uk is set to experience its hottestjune day for more than 40 years with temperatures in some parts forecast to soar to 34 degrees later today. it means it could be hotter than the maldives, dubai or los angeles — but while most people have been enjoying the sunshine — it's been causing problems for others as holly hamilton reports. 75, 80, 86 and the temperature still rises. a heat wave hit britain. a time—honoured tradition. as the temperature rises, britain embraces
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the heat. well, for a few days. the fashion — the briefest of brief swimsuits. today wearing jeans but, yeah, i think it makes you feel great. quite beautiful. it makes a change from the rain. i love it. the hotter the better. so we're now at the fifth day of 30 plus temperatures here in britain. some are finding it too hot to handle. just can't cope when the heat is humid and especially at this time of year when the pollen count is high as well. it can get too much and too hot and sticky so it is like i would rather be at home than go outside. it has been over 20 years since britain has enjoyed these temperatures for this long but how did we cope in 1995 without twitter to share our struggle to sleep in the heat? hospitals and emergency services have been put on high alert while guidelines have been issued to encourage staff to do ditch a shirt and tie.
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no top and tails at ascot. for the first time, organisers have relaxed the strict dress code. and while we may be familiar about the advice about pets in hot cars, scorching pavements are now an issue for 4—legged friends. they can burn and blister on their feet. take your dog for a walk early in the morning, or late in the evening so the pavement has cooled down and temperatures have dropped and your pet... it then reduces the risk of hip overheating and having problems with hot pavements. love it or hate it, like every british summer it is not set to last. parts of the country can expect heavy downpour this afternoon and the temperature is set to fall. we are out and about today with
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carol on brighton beach who is collecting things. she has a dog and a guitar this is the official breakfast dog. she has been on before, haven't you? this is connie. connie. to catch the ball. she disgraced herself and we ended up in the papers. she is better behaved today and we have days on the guitar. it is lovely here on brighton beach this morning with the sun out. it is warm and gentle breeze. the temperature is now 20 celsius so it is very nice. temperature is set to soar today and we could hit 34 in london. if we do, that will be the warmestjune day since 1976. it is not dry everywhere. the forecast for today is one of heat and thunderstorms. we
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currently have thunderstorms across parts of northern ireland, northern england and also scotland. around those storms there are gusty wind, torrential rain, a lot of rain and a small amount of time, and hail. it will ease off as we go through the course of the day. in the south there is low cloud, across some of there is low cloud, across some of the hills but that will lift and for most of us there will be sunshine around. it is still thunderstorms even into the afternoon across parts of scotla nd even into the afternoon across parts of scotland but, equally, a lot of dry weather in sunshine. fresher here and we will look at highs of about 20 celsius cooler as you go north. across northern england there will be thunderstorms with gusty winds and torrential rain. in between there will be sunshine and it will film idea and hotter than it did yesterday. the midlands, east anglia on the southern counties, much sunshine. greater london and london itself where we are likely to
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see 33 or 44. —— 34. as we drift towards the south—west were still into the sunshine and high—temperatures as we are in wales. for most of england and wales today the pollen levels and the uv levels are high. norther ireland has pleasa nt levels are high. norther ireland has pleasant conditions. through this evening we still hang on to some thunderstorms across north—east england and lincolnshire. there will bea england and lincolnshire. there will be a lot of low cloud, mist and fog coming in across areas next to the channel and the irish sea. more thunderstorms, severe ones across england and wales overnight so once again there is a risk of some local issues due to the torrential nature of those. tomorrow morning the will is often a direction for the south—east and then queue early afternoon. by the time play at the royal scot or of the racing starts at it should have cleared. any sense sunshine with the wind picking up across north—west scotland and we end up the day with rain. we are
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looking at generally into the high—end, amid 20s or high teens as the maximums. to return to the fact that it would be a very hot day, if you go to anything our daughters they do not forget your usual precautions drinkwater, where a hat, wear sunscreen or cover yourself up and have some shade breaks as well. is glorious here and i wish you were here. oh, i will have is glorious here and i wish you were here. oh, iwill have a is glorious here and i wish you were here. oh, i will have a shade breaks later! i have never had one before. tell dad he can change the court on the guitar now! —— day is —— dave.”
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was trying to work out what song he was trying to work out what song he was playing but... he'sjust sitting on the beach, relaxing. as we've been hearing, plans to bring down costs for renters and drivers are expected to be included in the queens speech to parliament later this morning. sean's got more on what we know so far. we know that a big name of the next parliament will be getting that brexit negotiation done. that will ta ke brexit negotiation done. that will take upa brexit negotiation done. that will take up a lot of time. the government wants other stuff done as well, particularly in the consumer world. we had a few things like that. in the motor insurance claims we know that premiums have gone up, generally, a lot over the years, because whiplash claims. the government wants to clamp down on those. those claims will be a big pa rt those. those claims will be a big part of it and the next thing, claims management companies, which spoke about earlier. big growth
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industry in the uk and on the back of that, if you have ever received a ppi call, that is because a claims management calls are they trying to get you to put into a compensation application. tenants rights as well. they want to try and put a ban on letting agents fees as well, to try and give rangers a few more right. the ppi, that is the nuisance call, a massive issue. whenever we discuss it on the programme people say they have experienced so many problems, not just them that have experienced so many problems, notjust them that members of their family as well. it is huge and interesting to see how government policy can change because when a claims management companies are beginning to edge towards other industries like holiday illness claims that it is the government say give regulator power to cap these, will have a effect will theyjust run around? thank you very much. i'm slightly distracted because i am
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watching a shot where carol is this morning and all she is doing is taking selfies. there are people turning up... i can shouldn't say that, it will only encourage more people. can we have a look? we have two deckchairs are they now! is getting a baby involved now! 34 degrees, the hottest here today but in arizona it is currently 49 and it has been so hot that a local paper in phoenix, arizona wanted to see if they could cook a pizza on a parking lot. they managed to do it. it took 2.5 hours. who cares about pizza when you have a baby and a dog... you know how they have on television shows... competition shows, they have a picture of a reaction on the corner of the screen. maybe we should have that on the corner of bbc breakfast today just a beach shot. carol cam date with his
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guitar, what more could you want? time now to the news, travel and weather where you are right now. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. a teenager has been stabbed and police pelted with bottles during a large fight in north london last night. riot police were called to the scene following reports of youths armed with knives. one man has been arrested in connection with the disorder which scotland yard said began after a block party. the first funeral of the victims who died during the grenfell tower block fire will take place later today. 23—year—old syrian refugee mohammad alhajali was with his brother on the 14th floor when the fire took hold but got separated while being evacuated. his brother omar survived. a man has been tasered after attacking people at regent's park mosque in the early hours of this morning. the man was waving an object which later turned out to be a shoe horn.
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he was arrested on suspicion of affray. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes as well as the closures related to the grenfell tower fire, the district line is part suspended between parsons green and wimbledon and between turnham green and richmond because of signal failures. on the roads this is the a12 in romford, eastern avenue west they're in romford, eastern avenue west south—eastern s suspended they're south—eastern services are suspended after an incident at heather green. lane closed on park royal. finally, roads are losing around westminster ahead of the state opening of parliament. , square, whitehall and buckingham palace are all affected. our project on the weather. it was another warm night but this morning feels a little fresher than it has done for
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the last few mornings. it is another hot and sunny day. the temperature today is likely to be the hottest this week. we look at maximum of 33, 34 celsius so it does get high and it looks like the hottest june day since 1976. a lot of sunshine, not a cloud, a lot of cloud around so the uv levels are high as is the pollen count. and looks like the last of the hot days. there is a change afoot. overnight still warm and muggy, 19— 21 the minimum but tomorrow will see this cloud moving in and with it the potential for thundery and heavy showers. clearing away in the afternoon, the temperature is still likely to reach 25 celsius but after those showers clear it will introduce fresh air. gradually becoming cooler through thursday. another cold front heading our way for friday, again, fresher still. light outbreaks of drizzle with some rain into saturday morning but again that will clear the way. gradually the temperature
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is going to fall. will be another warm one warm night tonight that route tomorrow onwards, things getting much cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may sets out her two—year plan with brexit at the top of the agenda. but with no commons majority, the prime minister is expected to scrap several key manifesto promises in a delayed queen's speech. inevitably, the biggest chunk of bills relating to brexit, that's the overwhelming issue facing government and parliament over the next two yea rs. good morning, it's wednesday the 21st ofjune.
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also this morning. one of britain's top police chiefs warns services could be stretched to breaking point as ministers put terrorism officers on an emergency footing. a suspected suicide bomber is shot dead in brussels as he sets off an explosion in the city's main railway station. the boss of the taxi—booking app uber has resigned this morning after a run of scandals at the company. i'll have more on that shortly. in sport, andy murray's preparations for wimbledon suffer a blow as he is knocked out of queens in the opening round. the defending champion was beaten in straight sets by the world number 90 jordan thompson who was only there as a late replacement. he's won three oscars for his efforts, but daniel day lewis says he's calling it a day and retiring from acting. and it's set to be another scorcher for many. carol's at the seaside with the weather. she's got some more friends with her
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ex—mac aren't they gorgeous? she's got some more friends with her ex-mac aren't they gorgeous? this is henry, and it is a lovely day for the family at the beach, with the usual protections, it will be hot and humid, highs of 34 in london but in the north, thunderstorms from the word go and some will be torrential. they are gorgeous! do not eat the stone! it's all very friendly. measures to implement brexit will dominate the queen's speech. newly—appointed first secretary of state damian green has told bbc that leaving the european union is the biggest issue for the country. several conservative manifesto commitments are expected to be scrapped, as our political correspondent eleanor garnier now reports.
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it is the ultimate show of pomp and ceremony, it marks the formal opening of parliament. the queen's speech might be read by the queen but it's written by ministers. a list of legislation the newly elected government aims to bring in. but this year it's going to be a scaled back event, just like in 1974 and ted heath's snap election. with a crowded calendar and little time for preparations, there will be no gold carriage and it will be day dress rather than robes for the queen. it is significant, it does reflect that this is a snap election, this wasn't planned. but of course, it is very close to the trooping of the colours so the two ceremonies together would be too much. and it's quite meaningful because we were expecting to see the full pomp and circumstance next year but next year's queen's speech has been cancelled, so we are not going to see a queen's speech until 2019. so that's some way away for the queen to exercise what she sees as her key role outside of state. ——as head of state.
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when theresa may set out her party's manifesto she proposed scrapping free school meals for all but the very poorest. there were plans to reform social care funding and to expand grammar schools. but without a conservative majority and a lack of support, expect a moderated version of mrs may's manifesto. brexit will be the central theme. it is likely there will be a great repeal bill which will turn all eu laws that affect us into british law. look out for legislation to tackle terrorism, with powers to deal with extremists and protect the public. there could also be measures to protect workers' rights, with worker representation on company boards as well as protection of pensions. theresa may is still trying to put together a deal with northern ireland's democratic unionist party. she will need their support to see her queen's speech voted through parliament. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. we can speak to eleanor in westminster now. it's a pared down queen's speech,
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pared down pub and circumstance. what are we most going to see? we heard from the first secretary of state is short while ago on brea kfast, state is short while ago on breakfast, and he admitted there we re breakfast, and he admitted there were some things that were not gain to be in the queen's speech that had beenin to be in the queen's speech that had been in the conservative party ma nifesto. been in the conservative party manifesto. so it's going to be pruned down. some elements have even been scrapped, for example, that key policy on social care reduced to a consultation. brexit dominates the government agenda so expect legislation on immigration, agriculture and trade, the key areas where the eu's oversight will end with brexit, so they will need to be legislated for. that's a pretty huge task. theresa may did not win a majority at the general election and she's said that it wasn't the result they hoped for, but the government would respond to the message from voters with humility and resolve.
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short while ago, the first secretary of state damian green told us theresa may had learned the lessons of the election. clearly the election result wasn't what we hoped for, but we are by a mile the largest single party in parliament and we won more votes so we are presenting a queen's speech. so yes, the prime minister will learn the lessons, has learned the lessons of what happened during the election. after ten days of talks, the conservatives are still not secured with a deal with the gratitude newness party of northern ireland. all of the signs are they —— with the democratic unionist party of northern ireland, but all of the signs are that they will back the speech. by delivering this two—year queen's speech is going to be a day by day fight for theresa may as she survives politics in parliament. we will be speaking to the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell about labour's position ahead of the queen's speech in around 10 minutes' time.
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the boss of ride—sharing app uber has stepped down this morning, after a series of scandals at the american firm. sean is here with more. he's never been far from controversy. particularly over the last few months. his name is travis kalanick, people may not have heard of him but he would have heard of track uber. it's now worth £50 billion. the big clients on the —— it isa billion. the big clients on the —— it is a big influence on the taxi market in the uk. even though it has been successful on the face of it, but behind the scenes, lots of controversy. travis kalanick himself, there was a video that went viral of him swearing at a uber driver himself. that was shared massively. then the culture he created within the company, uber has sacked 20 people, many more have been going through disciplinary proceedings on the back of sexual
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harassment and bullying claims. and they are currently being sued by google for possibly stealing some of their intelligence. so it has not been a great place. investors wanted him out, he's gone. very simple. big business story, worth more than £50 million. isaid big business story, worth more than £50 million. i said ten, big business story, worth more than £50 million. isaid ten, sorry, i had one of those moments that! some more news now. bbc news has learned counter—terrorism policing in england and wales has been placed on an emergency footing following the recent series of terror attacks. as a result, senior police officers say they're having to switch resources from other areas which they claim may create significant risks to public safety. the home office said it had promised in 2015 to increase spending on counter—terrorism by 30% over five years. but the labour mp and former shadow policing ministerjack dromey says cuts are putting the public at risk. the four most senior police officers
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in britain have written to the home secretary saying they have had to put the police service on an emergency putting to cope with the biggest threat to national security ina biggest threat to national security in a generation, warning that 20,000 cuts to our police service, the largest of any country in europe, is putting the british people at risk. belgian officials say they have established the identity of a suspected suicide bomber who was shot dead by security forces after he set off explosives at brussels central station. authorities say the man was wearing what appeared to be a bomb vest but his name wouldn't be released to the public for the present. no—one else is believed to have been injured. frankie mccamley reports. brussels central station evacuated shortly after police say a man triggered a small explosion. eyewitnesses say they heard gunfire and multiple explosions. just minutes later smoke can be seen inside. as the station was evacuated, flames were caught on camera inside. translation: i went down the stairs
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to get back to the platform and there i heard someone shouting and then at one point he shouted, "allahu akbar", and blew up the suitcase he had. i carried on down, trying to evacuate as many people as possible, and there he was, just behind me, two metres behind the stairs and he still had the belt on him. outside, moved back by police officers, people gathered together, making their way to safety and trying to come to terms with yet another attack in the city. the country's military, already on high alert, were on the scene within minutes, shooting dead the suspect. bomb disposal units were also sent in to make sure the area was safe. belgian prosecutors now say this is being treated as a terrorist attack. three—quarters of cases in which babies died or suffered brain injury during birth could have been avoided with better care, according to new analysis of data
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from all midwifery units. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists found the most common mistakes related to the monitoring of foetal heart rates during labour. it wants to cut the number of neo—natal errors by 50% by 2020. the health secretary, jeremy hunt says his aim is to make the nhs one of the safest place in the world to give birth. the actor sir daniel day—lewis has announced his retirement from acting. the 60—year—old star is the only man to have won three best actor oscars, which were awarded for my left foot, there will be blood and lincoln. he gave no reason for the decision, calling it a "private" one, but said he was "immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences". we will be talking a little bit more about his career in the next half an hour or so. after leading his party to a shock election result, which eradicated the conservatives' majority in parliament, labour leaderjeremy corbyn
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told his mps they were now "a government in waiting." that statement faces its first test today, as theresa may attempts to pass a queen's speech, which would keep her in power. shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell joins us from westminster. good morning. thank you for coming onto the programme. given what we've seen onto the programme. given what we've seenin onto the programme. given what we've seen in recent times, the terror attacks, grenfell tower fire, the scale of the issue and the size of theissues scale of the issue and the size of the issues facing the uk, isn't this the issues facing the uk, isn't this the time to be working together with the time to be working together with the government to get things done in the government to get things done in the national interest? yes, there are some issues where we can work together and i'm hoping on the lessons of g re nfell tower, together and i'm hoping on the lessons of grenfell tower, we can work together and try and resolve some of these issues very quickly. i'll give the example about the need to invest in safety, particularly in regard to sprinklers in high—rise flats. there's issues like that, i'm sure we'll be able to, whoever is in
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government, cars all the conservatives, we'd want to work on a cross—party basis. but there are some fundamental issues, something about the royal art of steroids and about the royal art of steroids and a roll—out of austerity in particular. we seem issues on the cuts in police numbers, the fb saying about cuts to firefighters, all of the austerity measures are falling out, we've got to say to the government that this is unacceptable and we have got to stop them. i wonder how much attention you will pay to what the queen says by the conservatives, there could be things about workers' rights and public sector pay freezes, and things about the tenant fees bill which would be in line with your own thoughts. the tenant fees bill a chilly comes from the labour party originally, so if it's drafted well and the way we want to see it, we will support it, if not, as the opposition, we will amend it
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so as the opposition, we will amend it so it works effectively. and it's the same on those other matters. but to be frank, the bulk of the austerity measures that were agreed in the budget are rolling out at the moment and we've got to hold that. if the message came through the general election to all political parties, actually, people have had enough of the austerity measures and the pay cap in particularfor public sector workers has forced for example our nurses, 14% pay cut over seven yea rs. example our nurses, 14% pay cut over seven years. we will be trying to demonstrate the government needs to go further and that there is an alternative. one of the other m essa g es alternative. one of the other messages that came from the general election is that the conservatives are 156 more seats than the labour party. from much —— the conservatives gained 56 more seats than the labour party. do you have a problem accepting that you lost the general election? no party won the general election? no party won the general election, i'm disappointed that the labour party didn't get a
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majority, of course. we're in interesting times, because we have a government which never secured a majority but in addition to that, under our constitutional conventions, do go to the electorate with a manifesto, you fight an election on that, if you win that, you implement the manifesto. what's happened here if they've torn up their own manifesto so we've got a situation where we have a government thatis situation where we have a government that is formed without a majority or a manifesto, and doing deals behind the scenes which none of us have been privy to. but that's politics, isn't it? debate and discussion, they're trying to manage the power there have, even though they don't have the majority they thought they may have. what's politics also it is the opposition saying, we can put forward our own views and policies, and majority support within parliament themselves, and we will put ourselves forward as an minority government. we feel our policies are
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based upon a manifesto on which we stood, which people voted for, we have a government which doesn't have a majority and has ripped up the ma nifesto a majority and has ripped up the manifesto which it stood on. i don't figure democratically legitimate. on another issue, talking about things being done in a parliamentary fashion, they could be, and the fact that there are headlines in the papers this morning from some of the g re nfell papers this morning from some of the grenfell family's victims, saying don't hijack our grief. you said recently, you encouraged union leaders to take to the streets. do you regret that, given now what has happened, and is it a day of rage that could take place today? let's be accurate about first and not what you have read in some of the right—wing press. ispoke you have read in some of the right—wing press. i spoke at a conference before grenfell, and said there was a motion saying calling upon the tuc to organise a
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demonstration in the normal way, and there is a demonstration organised saturday week. there are 6 million trade unionist out there, we should try to get a million people in the streets in the normal way, to try and influence government policy but also to try and change the government but that has to be peaceful. i support the grenfell residents, they should not have their cause hijacked by any small group or whatever. any protests that ta ke group or whatever. any protests that take place have to be peaceful, otherwise while you are putting more strain on the emergency services, the police in particular, but in addition you are undermining the very cause addition you are undermining the very cause we are addition you are undermining the very cause we are campaigning for. you can't get your message across. so the important thing is, yes, there is a democratic right to demonstrate and protest but it must be peaceful. sojust demonstrate and protest but it must be peaceful. so just ask you another one on that, you don't regret what you said? the manner in which you said it, it seemed he were encouraging people to get out there, and when people do that it can easily turn violent, and that is what we may see later today? only
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eight weeks ago i was in a demonstration of over 150,000 people in london with the nhs. it was a peaceful protest. it made sure that the nhs was debated during the election campaign. we have a long history of peaceful demonstrations and process and that is what we have to adhere to. if there are others who try to cause violence, they have to be condemned for that and we said time and time again it is our democratic right to process, but the only right is for peaceful process. we hope that happens today, john mcdonnell, thank you very much. you are watching bbc breakfast. if you have been watching this morning you will know that carol is by the beach, and i think she is having a lovely time. shall we see what she is up to this time? good morning, all. it is fabulous in brighton this morning, look at my view. the lovely peen morning, look at my view. the lovely peer, lots of people down in the beach ready, dogs, children, adults all paddling and swimming. the
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temperature at the moment is 20 celsius, dc tim butcher is 15 or 16 so celsius, dc tim butcher is 15 or 16 so it is perfect with gentle sea breezes but it will get hotter, not just here but across most of england, wales in particular. we could have temperatures easily into the high 20s, even as high as 34 in london. if we hit 34, it will make its the warmest day injune since 1976 was to if you are out in the sun, enjoy it but of course take the usual sensible precautions, drink plenty of water, get shade rakes, slap yourself in sunscreen, have a cover and a hat. today's forecast is one of heat and thunderstorms was top we currently have some thunderstorms across the north of the country, parts of northern ireland, parts of scotland and northern england. with the thunderstorms today and the night, they could be torrential, there could be some large hail and gusty winds. a lot of rain in a small amount of time. away from the thunderstorms, a lots of sunshine. low cloud on some of the hills in
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the south will lift and we will see sunshine where we have that cloud at the moment. the temperature is going to rocket, it is already rising. the highest temperature in the uk currently is in the isle of wight 23 celsius. for scotland, some residual thunderstorms, 20 celsius, a bit fresher in the north. the northern england, it will be a muddy ed davey you, it will also be higher temperatures, and there still will be some thunderstorms. ijust, leeds, cheshire, that kind of area. into the south—east, it is favoured for the highest temperatures but it will still be hot in the south—west and in wales. if it is too hot for you, head towards the beach because there will be some onshore breezes. for northern ireland, you too will have some sunshine around, rather like wales, there will be one or two showers left across the west of northern ireland and temperatures would be as high as they are across england and wales. through the evening and overnight they could
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still be some thunderstorms banging away across northern england, lincolnshire for example, a lot of low cloud, mist and fog coming in. then we will have a new set of thunderstorms moving across and lynn and wales. some of those will be severe and may lead to some local issues, something to bear in mind. tomorrow morning we start, continuing to push through the south—east. shouldn't affect the racing at royal ascot, though it will be wet in the morning. it should clear by about 11. in glastonbury it should not be as severe, and then we're looking at an sunshine. the wind picking up across the north west of scotland, more rain coming in across northern ireland at the end of the day, which will move eastwards during friday. behind it, we will see some brighter conditions but one thing we will notice is that it will feel fresher. temperatures weren't any more be in the mid—30s, more likely the mid—20s at best, so more comfortable for sleeping in and also just going about your daily tasks. before i go,
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the pollen levels are very high across england and wales, northern ireland and low or moderate across scotland. carol, what is going on behind you, is it bring your baby to the beach day? laughter the babies are so cute, aren't they? teeny—weeny batons. i don't know what is going on behind me but they look like they are having fun. they are all giving us a wave, they are all massive carol fans. who wouldn't go and see carol if she was at the beach near you? charles babbage and the computer, john logie baird and the television — just a couple of engineers whose inventions changed the world but how many others could you name? a special series of bbc regional documentaries is celebrating the unsung pioneers of science, and their life—changing discoveries. let's have a look how one ingenious modification helped win the battle of britain. the spitfire, one of the most iconic
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flying machines. but more than just a plain, it has become a symbol of the british fighting spirit, a reminder of the brave men and women who defended our country during the battle of britain. but the course of history could have been very different. as the battle of britain began in 1940, different. as the battle of britain began in1940, a different. as the battle of britain began in 1940, a fatalflaw different. as the battle of britain began in 1940, a fatal flaw was discovered with these famous planes, which meant their engines cut out when they dived. with the fate of the country hanging in the balance, beatrice came up with an idea that would help to win the war. well, thank goodness for that! i don't know what to say, really! we're joined now by professor danielle george, who you just saw. she's looked into inventors in the north west. that really is something very important that was invented, tell us a little bit more about it. her name is beatrice shilling and she was a
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pioneer in ceremony ways. what she did for world war ii and the battle of britain was, when spitfires went into a nosedive, at engines cut out. so they would go down, sometimes they would have to do a roll, and that was to make sure that their engines did not cut out because their engines flooded. what beatrice shilling did was invent basically and over in, a piece of metal that had a hole in the middle, put into the engine carburettor, that stopped the engine carburettor, that stopped the engines from flooding, so it restricted the amount of fuel that went into the engine, so it didn't have to go into a nosedive, so it could change the german counterparts just as quickly, and it had a huge effect on world war ii. is it true that on the form there was not enough space to put mrs beatrice shilling, so they had to put mr? that's right. she studied electrical
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engineering at the university of manchester, and women didn't do that at that time, she was one of the first. it says mr beatrice shilling because there was not a mrs or ms choice. and do you think we don't celebrate conventions enough? we have so much modern technology, we just take it to much for granted. we really do. it is a little bit sad that we can name more celebrities than we can invent is. there are so many inventors out there. the great thing about inventors is you don't need this high—tech laboratory, you could be sitting in a shed in the swimming pool, on a ship, and you could be inventing. these people are very normal people. the people you see on shows will be very normal people. did it open your eyes? how much did you know about the likes of beatrice and the others?”
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much did you know about the likes of beatrice and the others? i knew a little bit about beatrice, but not a lot. the other people we saw about the north—west, i didn't know anything about. i am sort of in the field, an engineer, and i didn't know about them, so it is right to know about them, so it is right to know that more people will get to know that more people will get to know about them with these shows. do you think it is important that there are still more to to be done to encourage young women like you to go into technology, engineering, whatever it is? absolutely. we are doing more. as a country we are trying to do more, but there are still so much more to do. we have to start at a really young age, primary school, even before. we need some female role models, notjust the girls, but the boys as well. that is a very good point, thank you very much indeed. the "invented in england" series, including danielle's programme "invented in the north west" is broadcast in each bbc region this friday at 7.30 pm and on bbc one. it will be available on iplayer shortly afterwards. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. good morning. today is the summer solstice. one of our weather watchers was up at 4:15am, capturing the beautiful summer solstice. for many of us, the story is a hot one. it is not the whole story, there are some thunderstorms this morning across parts of northern england and scotla nd across parts of northern england and scotland and northern ireland, thundering rain moving north and east as we go through the course of
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the morning. further south, we have got sunshine and it is going to stay sunny into the afternoon. temperatures up to 34 degrees celsius in the south—west of london. widely across southern england, with that sunshine, temperatures up into the high 20s and low 30s. that sunshine, temperatures up into the high 20s and low 305. quite an the high 205 and low 305. quite an impressive day. lots of sunshine across wales and the midlands, but we could catch a few showers trying to start to develop across the northwest in the afternoon. thunderstorms across much of scotland, particularly the north. it will be dry in northern ireland and southern scotland, and even here, temperatures 22. a thundery breakdown will be coming, cooler air coming from the atlantic, and overnight tonight, there will be some sort of storms moving west to east. there will be light winds and hail. fairly uncomfortable for sleeping again tonight, 17 to 19
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degrees. the fresh air will be spreading eastwards throughout thursday, with its some thundery rain pushing towards east anglia, the south east of england, showers to four northern england. during the afternoon, bright and sunny, but temperatures are much reduced. still quite hot across the south—east. highs potentially up to 29th. —— 29 celsius. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. taxi for kalanick! uber‘s troubled chief executive travis kalanick quits the company after a revolt by major shareholders. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 21stjune. kalanick has been underfire after the firm faced a series of scandals including complaints of sexual harassment. last week he said he was taking an indefinite leave of absence.
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also in the programme. britain's government gets ready to unveil its legislative plans for the coming year. but can it really force through economic reform without a parliamentary majority?

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