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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 21, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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the queen's speech in westminster is dominated by brexit as the government sets out its agenda for the next two years. it was a scaled state opening, the queen arrived by car instead of carriage for the first time since 1974, to deliver the queen ‘s speech with key m essa 9 es the queen ‘s speech with key messages on terrorism and brexit. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others, to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. 27 bills have been announced, eight concerning brexit. among the other proposals on terror legislation and domestic violence. prince charles accompanied the queen after the duke of edinburgh was admitted to hospital last night for precautionary treatment. very little p°mp precautionary treatment. very little pomp and ceremony because of the timing of the state opening, squeezed in before the queen's engagement at royal ascot. get your skates on. the first race is at
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half—past two! skates on. the first race is at half-past two! not mentioned in the queen's speech, conservative pledges from their manifesto on social care and grammar schools and no mention of donald trump's state visit. the survivors of the grenfell tower fire disaster will be rehoused in an upmarket developed in kensington. it's officially the hottest day of the year with temperatures in parts of the uk expected to hit a 40 year high. this year's queen's speech which
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cove rs a this year's queen's speech which covers a two—year period instead of the usual one year, finally went ahead after it was postponed following the groenefeld tower block fire. the main focus of the government's plans was brexit, with the announcement of other proposals covering extremism, the grenfell tower fire and industry. covering extremism, the grenfell towerfire and industry. but covering extremism, the grenfell tower fire and industry. but many of the prime minister's general election pledges were not included after the conservatives lost their overall majority in the house of commons. we can take a look at the key proposals outlined. the main focus of the speech was brexit and the great repeal bill, with the government claiming it wants to build the widest possible consensus. there were also proposals for new national legislation covering immigration, trade, agriculture and fisheries. there will be a new extremism commissioner to help tackle the growth of extremism in society and online, as well as a
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review of the counterterrorism strategy and the laws and penalties covering terror offences. there will be new measures to deal with disasters such as the fire at a groenefeld tower in london. a new public advocate will be introduced to act on behalf of the bereaved. industry was also mentioned, with an announcement of new bills for investment in electric cars, the space industry and hs2. there will bea space industry and hs2. there will be a new bill to help protect the victims of domestic violence. and mental health treatment will be prioritised within the nhs. brexit has dominated the legislative programmes of the bill, with eight of the 27 bills relating to our future withdrawal from the european union and a host of proposed new laws designed to pave the way for a smooth and orderly exit from the european union. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. no golden carriage and no horses. this is a dressed down queen's speech. the crown not worn but travelling to parliament in a car of its own. a little time for preparations, the full pomp and ceremony
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has been slimmed down. bar the door. following centuries of tradition, black rod sent to summon mps to the warrants. theresa may had hoped to be commanding a strong majority. instead she's been left turning to the dup for support and it's the labour leader who has been left looking more confident of the two. the duke of edinburgh, normally a constant at the queen's side. today, ill in hospital as her majesty delivered the queen's speech for the 64th time. my government's priority is to secure the best possible deal as the country leaves the european union. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. brexit is the central theme. eight bills devoted to the complex process of leaving the eu, covering areas like immigration, agriculture and trade.
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my government will seek to maintain a deep and special partnership with the european allies, forging new trading relationships across the globe. but this is a moderated version of theresa may's manifesto. no mention of tory plans to expand grammar schools, and controversial proposals to overhaul social care funding, reduced only to a consultation. there are 27 bills and draft bills in theresa may's first queen's speech including measures for a review of counter—terrorism to deal with extremists and protect the public. a draft domestic violence and abuse bill to bring in new protection and sentencing powers, and legislation to update and strengthen data protection laws giving people more control over their data. the queen's speech itself looks at what we need to do in order to deliver brexit, which is clearly something we have to do. the country voted on it. but also its about delivering economic prosperity and fairness. but labour said not enough
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was mentioned about investing more in public services. we have had seven years of this conservative austerity and i think this was a very big factor in the general election. it is why theresa may did not get the majority she wanted and yet we have seen no recognition of that. the snp accused the government of hollow words over brexit. we have heard the same tired old language, securing the best deal possible, but no detail in what that means. the speech says that the government is committed to working with devolved governments and business but we need action on this, not words. after failing to win a majority at the general election, theresa may has said that her government will respond to the message from voters with humility and resolve but the lack of support means delivering this two year plan for government will be a day by day fight for survival in parliament. the queen has now fulfilled her duties and the tasks for the prime minister are stacking up. 11 days on, still no deal with the dup. theresa may knows that having effectively lost the tory crown, delivering this programme
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for government will be difficult. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. tim lawton, the concept of mp for east worthing and shoreham joins me. not the state opening you would have wanted. what was the erection like on your tory colleagues? it was a bit downbeat at the moment. —— what was the reaction like costa we have been dealt with the cards we have, whatever those may be. we need to rally round the prime minister, get on with the legislation we need for brexit. i don't think any great surprises there. you are not blaming the prime ministerfor surprises there. you are not blaming the prime minister for this surprises there. you are not blaming the prime ministerfor this mess? the prime minister admits she takes some of the blame. she says she got us some of the blame. she says she got us into the mess and she will get us out of it. we need to give her the benefit of the doubt. we need a working government, which is why we have to do a deal with the dup to
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get on with the business of government. i don't know how it's going, but clearly the dup are smart and see the opportunity to get a good dealfor northern ireland. they know it's in their interests to have a robber working government. the figures only add up with a conservative led government. the figures will happen, but it will ta ke figures will happen, but it will take longer than we would like. but the figures of the queen's speech, there's nothing in it. the manifesto has been shredded. the queen's speech was always going to be dominated by brexit, the next two yea rs dominated by brexit, the next two years in this place will be working overtime on brexit legislation. all the news today is about what's not in it from the manifesto. that's fine, but there is quite a lot in it, lower ticket stuff but still important, around mental health, domestic violence, victims of the g re nfell tower domestic violence, victims of the grenfell tower tragedy. these are really important things, actually, so let's not underplay them by talking about the things that aren't
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in it. this is a golden age for this place because every debate will matter. how will you deal with that pressure for the next two years?” have been in politics for 20 years and when we came in at first we had all—night sittings and all sorts of fun and games. if you come into politics you are serious about getting legislation through, having proper debate and getting a programme through. i have no problem with staying long and late to make sure we have properly scrutinised bits of legislation and bills we need to go through. that's not going to bea need to go through. that's not going to be a problem and every mp who signs up for this job should be signing up for that as well. at what point do you decide the prime minister hasn't got two out of the mess she got you into and it's time to find someone else? that's not a question for now. we need a working government led by the prime minister we have, particularly with the sensitive negotiation stage we are
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at with brexit, to see us through the coming months and years. at a later stage, if we think we need to have a change of leader, that is something to contemplate them. it does nobody any good to start contemplating our naval and start thinking of leadership challenges now. it's not appropriate. let's get on with having a working government. we can talk to chief political correspondent vicki young now. the criticism of labour is that they are as divided as the tories ever were on europe because they are giving different messages today. the point is now that the queen's speech has been dominated by brexit and brexit bills, so we will really see where the parties stand on all of this. it will be decision time for labour, what they do about all this. there isa what they do about all this. there is a lot of chat about how it will now be a different kind of brexit. but there are tory brexiteers who say, conservative and labour mps
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both stood on a manifesto to leave the single market, to leave the european union. so what's different does it make? it still means the bills will have to go through. no question brexit will dominate. quite often when you have a government in a hung parliament situation, it doesn't have a clear majority, it tends to not do too much, and not much legislation. but the problem for the conservatives now is they are having to get through several bills because of brexit. for example, we will need a whole new immigration system. all those things, line by line, will have to go through this place. tim louden is right when he says they will be here long and late. just a small group of people in this house can have an awful lot of power, and that's what can grind governments down and grinding toa can grind governments down and grinding to a halt. we can talk to shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry now. vicki young saying the fear is everything can get
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grounds to a halt. you're all determined to bring the government down one way or another and the result will be further deadlock. hanged on a minute. where did we start from? we start with a prime minister who wanted a general election to have a mandate for the sort of brexit negotiations the public didn't want. she wanted a mandate for austerity and the government to leeds the public have said no. if she is properly humbled, which she claims to be, then she would give up on fox hunting and grammar schools. they were not mentioned in the queen's speech. that's a good start, but she has not given up on austerity all this nonsense on cutting back on funding for public services. not a single mention on what we will do about the lack of police officers we have. no mention on what she will do in terms of the national health service. she has not listened. it's not ourfault as the opposition that this
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government has no legitimacy. they are barely holding onto power and they have nothing to say. what will you do about brexit, though? the great repeal bill that was in the queen's speech today, do you accept that's the way forward or will you try to make difficult? all we know at the moment are the titles of the bills. you know it's to bring eu law into the legislative chamber here so you can vote for it in the future. yes and no. it's called the great repeal bill, so they want to repeal lots of laws, and they call it that is to keep the hard right of the tory party happy, so she will have tension with tory backbenchers, we can have these rights for a little time but there will be a sunset clause, so at some stage in the future we can sneak in and get rid of it. we want to make sure the rights we have that come from the european union, the red tape as the
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tories call it, we want to keep that so it means people have proper rights in britain. if they are doing it properly, then fine. but if they are not doing it properly, we have no reason to trust them with the great repeal bill. what about the new build a claim about the customs union? they say they will bring in a new bill about a customs union. we have no idea what it means. what does the dup make of that, how will it affect ireland ? does the dup make of that, how will it affect ireland? labour appears to be split on this. jeremy corbyn says out of the single market and customs union. chuka umunna about an hour ago said we need to stay in a single market. where is the unity there?” have said the same thing for the last year, during my time as shadow foreign secretary, we have a 6—point test that is agreed. we have a subcommittee that doesn't have arguments. we understand where we are going. safety and security of our citizens is primary and then the economy. the public said he wanted
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to leave the european union, and we need to make sure any other decisions made are made in the light of what is best for the economy. that's our principal and that has been our guiding light. some tories are starting to sound more like that. interestingly, philip arend sounds more like labour as time goes on. “— sounds more like labour as time goes on. —— philip hammond. but he doesn't speak for the rest of the tory party. we are clear on where we stand. there is disagreement on whether we stay in the single market or not, but we as the leadership have made it clear that if we are leaving the european union... but disagreement on such an important issueis disagreement on such an important issue is a problem. disagreement is on form, not outcome. can a journalist tick a box, is this person wanting to stay in the singer market or not? we want red tape free unencumbered access to the supermarket while leaving the european union. we want the same outcome as those who want to stay in the single market. this is semantics. 0ur principles are
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important and the principle is, economy and jobs are first. nobody voted to be poorer or lose their job. in the hour before the queen's speech, an announcement from buckingham palace that the duke of edinburgh had been taken to hospital last night. we can get more from royal correspondent daniela relph outside the hospital where he is being treated. we had a statement from buckingham palace and the wording and tone of the statement was clear. no alarms and no panic here. they say the duke of edinburgh came to king edward vi! hospital last night because he had an infection. he was driven here. they say it was linked to a pre—existing condition. as a precautionary measure they felt it was better he was treated at hospital rather than at the palace. there is a medical staff linked up to the royal household. hugh thomas is the
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physician to the queen and he will have been part of the decision to admit the duke of edinburgh. he also practices here as a doctor. there is a medical staff surrounding the royalfamily a medical staff surrounding the royal family sublease decisions will not have been taken lightly. but the duke of edinburgh is 96 years old. he's had a busy couple of days in the heat. trooping the colour at the weekend, royal ascot with the queen yesterday. you can take those into account to see how this thing might happen at his age. we are told he's in good spirits in the hospital here. he's up and about. there should be no need for concern the. you get the sense buckingham palace didn't want to make an announcement, but he was supposed to be standing next to the queen at the opening of parliament today. that's right. i think their hand was forced by the fa ct think their hand was forced by the fact it would be pretty obvious something was amiss when he wasn't at the queen's site today. the announcement he was admitted to
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hospital came halfway through the morning when the queen was on her way to the queen's speech. when he has been admitted to hospital on other occasions we have tended to know because immediately there are a couple of police officers outside the door of the hospital. that is picked up pretty quickly because we are in central london in marylebone. it's hard to keep it a secret. in terms of his condition, the message is, there are no alarms, a precautionary measure, and he's getting the treatment they felt was needed for his infection. we can return to the queen's speech. liberal democrat foreign affairs and brexit spokesperson tom brake and the snp's pete wishart. eight out of the snp's pete wishart. eight out of the 27 bills are to do with brexit. it is clearly the priority. you're not going to argue with that. it is clearly the priority. you're not going to argue with thatm clearly is the priority. the prime minister made the general election
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about brexit and those bills are a priority for the government. we want to make sure those bills do the least damage possible to british jobs. we want to fight to make sure the economy stays in the single market. that's down the road. but you will not cause problems overall? we wa nt you will not cause problems overall? we want to ensure the great repeal bill is not an opportunity for the government to scrap huge swathes of legislation without parliament having it safe. the whole point of it is to allow these laws and the government to have a say. we want to make sure the governments doesn't do this ina make sure the governments doesn't do this in a way that, for instance, using secondary legislation, stopping parliament and members of parliament having the say we are entitled to in this critical legislation that will affect us for decades to come. pete wishart,
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underlining all of this at the moment, theresa may still in talks with the dup. talk of £1 billion promised for health in northern ireland. what would your view beyond that? it's a queen's speech without any carriages and a majority. all sorts of deals being done. we look enviously at what the dup have secured and achieved when it comes to the negotiations. what we are determined to do is mitchell scotland is left behind. we will demand proper rights when it comes to funding across the united kingdom. —— determined to make sure scotland isn't left behind. we have the current barnett formula. looking at what the dup have tried to secure, but it's the whole united kingdom. its important devolved administrations are centrally involved in what's going on here, especially when it comes to issues related to brexit, we demand to be at the top table and make sure the scottish voices are heard. what do you say to members of the public who
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have just been through a referendum, another election, and just saying, get on with it. we voted for brexit, just do it. we are going to do it. we have seen eight of the 27 bills being brexit related. it's important we get the right deal for the united kingdom and for scotland. we heard from the queen herself in the speech that this as to involve all the devolved administration and the scottish government will see how that's achieved. there are critical issues for scotland and we need to make sure we at the top table and making sure scottish interests are properly represented and progressed. in terms of theresa may's position, do you agree with some labour mps we have spoken to, sensing blood and thinking we could be weeks away from the demise of this particular prime minister. is that something you would encourage? that's something the conservative party will do when they think is necessary. may find that by the summer, perhaps it's
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time for a new conservative leader to be anointed at their party conference in the autumn. there might bea conference in the autumn. there might be a new leader of the conservative party and therefore a new prime minister. that is possible. and it's also possible theresa may could see the next two yea rs theresa may could see the next two years out? i think she could struggle. she went into this election calling for a large mandate and she has now a minority government that will be or not to be propped up by the dup. the way she needs to respond to this is in a consensual manner. she needs to talk to the other political parties perhaps for the first time and see what we have to say and what we have to contribute to ensure that some of the other bills she wants to get through make safe passage. the prime minister says she presented this speech with humility. she had to. she went to the country to increase her mandate and majority and was diminished and humbled as a result. there has to be a degree of
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humility. i agree with tom, this is now the time to speak to other parties. nobody has a majority in this house and parliament any longer. it's incumbent on this government to speak to us, particularly on the brexit issues, and other domestic issues and legislation. we have to work together to make sure we get the best result for the country. thank you both forjoining us. a lot of people looking at what the queen had to announce and what it means in terms of brexit. not much of the tory manifesto appears to have survived in terms of that queen's speech. just to let you know that on twitter there is a photograph of the queen in her hat standing in parliament. a lot of people remarking on how the hat has remarkable similarities to the flag of the european union. that is trending on twitter at the moment. we will have plenty more from
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westminster. at 2:30pm the debate gets underway. we understand there will be a minute's silence at the start of that following the grand felt tower block fire. smack the trend felt tower —— the grand felt tower as we can speak to a representative from the think tank, the institute for government. this is a remarkable moment in parliamentary history. it's a historic moment. it will be known as the brexit parliament. that is in the queen's speech, brexit dominates everything else. the other interesting thing, it's clear it's from a minority government. in terms of this sort of queen's speech you would normally see after an election, it's incredibly modest apart from the brexit bills. queen's speech for a country withdrawing from the european union,
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the biggest thing we will see for a generation, is the balance right? there is an interesting question of how much space the other bills take up. we always said that with this big, massive brexit legislation to get through, there wouldn't be much space for other controversial bills. what was clear when the prime minister didn't get the big majority she sought, is that spending loads of parliamentary time and effort on things other than brexit wasn't a luxury she could afford. how damaged is she, do you think? only time will tell as parliament proceeds, but her position is and what she wanted when she called the election. it's remarkable how little of the ma nifesto remarkable how little of the manifesto made an appearance in the speech. reading the list of the bills, it's a motherhood and apple pie speech, bills that are quite nice to do. it's the sort of list you get when private members make a list to get cross—party support. things like domestic abuse,
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important issues, but not the sort of thing you normally see headlining an immediate election queen's speech. it's a big opportunity to make an impact. in terms of the prime minister's position, talk us through what could happen in the next couple of weeks, could she survive any vote in this building behind us that didn't support her? there are now processes laid down under the fixed—term parliaments act. theresa may was going to repeal that in the manifesto but it wasn't in the queen's speech. it still applies. if she goes down on a confidence vote then we trigger a process of seeing another possible government under a conservative leader, or is there a feasible minority government? if that is resolved then we go to another general election possibly. the first big signifier will be the votes at
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the end of the queen's speech debate. that's happening in the next few minutes. we will go to the house of commons for that with mps already filed in to the chamber. many new mps. we can talk to vicki young, chief political correspondent, inside the lobby. there is a tradition, we hear a couple of speeches first. that's right. they have what are supposed to be funny speeches where they have two mps who get up and say a few words, speeches of about ten minutes each. this year it will be conservative backbencher richard benyon. and quasi—boateng, a relatively new mp. they talk about their predecessor. and they make somejokes. their predecessor. and they make some jokes. that's the
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their predecessor. and they make somejokes. that's the idea, anyway. in the past some of them have been pretty funny. the expectation level is always quite high for this. then we have the leader of the 0pposition, jeremy corbyn, then the prime minister and then it's open to everybody. in the context of where we are with the hung parliament and queen's speech, it's important to say the big vote on all of this comes next week, a week tomorrow will be the vote when theresa may is effectively testing the will of the house. she went to see the queen after the election and said she thought she could form a government. that's what she has decided to do, she has put forward her queen's speech and she will see if she can get that past. talks are still going on with the dup. it is interesting that they have taken longer than many thought and hoped they would. we don't know for sure when that will be resolved. talking to some conservative mps, there is some anxiety this maybe hasn't been handled that well and right from the outset the government made it clear
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that we are going to do a deal with the dup, and they will support us. days later it seems to have slightly run into the ground. they are now worried that it will look like they have failed in some way. interesting that seniorfigures like have failed in some way. interesting that senior figures like john have failed in some way. interesting that senior figures likejohn major we re that senior figures likejohn major were saying and advising theresa may saying, you do not need to do this deal. he and many others here believe that the dup would never vote down the conservatives government. many oppose jeremy corbyn being prime minister. they wouldn't allow that to happen. they will take their seats in the house of commons and they will have a minute's silence reflecting what everybody has been talking about, and uncertain and difficult time that there has been in recent weeks, during the general election campaign when there were two terrorist attacks and then the dreadful fire
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in grenfell tower in kensington and chelsea. vicki young, we will join the commons. colleagues, let us begin by standing for a minute of silence as we rememberthe for a minute of silence as we remember the terrible events that have occurred in manchester and at london bridge, grenfell tower, and finsbury park. order. thank you, colleagues. the house has directed the speaker to make a statement at the beginning of each session about the duties and responsibilities of members of this house. i begin by reminding members that our duty to observe the code of conduct agreed by the house and to behave with civility and fairness in all their dealings. in our proceedings, every member should be heard courteously, whatever their views. the house asserts its
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privilege of freedom of speech so that we can represent our constituents, without fear or favour. we must exercise that privilege responsibly. it applies only to our work in this house, as private individuals, we are equal under the law with those who we represent. parliament must be open to those whom it represents, we must continue to make our constituents welcome. the security of this building and of those who work and visit here depends upon all of us. we have a duty to be vigilant, and to assist those whose job it is to maintain this place as a safe place to work. i ask you all to wear your passes wherever you are on parliamentary estate. i remind you that you should not usual mobile phones or any other device to film
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orto phones or any other device to film or to take photographs in or around the chamber. before moving to the first business of the new parliament, i would like to express my very best wishes for the forthcoming session to all members, both new and returning, and to all those who work here. i also send best wishes to those former members not returned at the election, and thank them for their service to this house. cheering and to the democratic process. finally, colleagues, i remind members that the coat of arms of our departed friend and colleague, jo cox, will be unveiled this saturday, june 24. if you would like to attend, and have not yet so
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indicated, please get in touch with my office. the leader of the house to move a motion on temporary deputy speakers. i beg to move that the speaker may nominate no more than three members as deputy speakers to serve until the house's elected deputy speakers in according with the provisions standing order number2a in according with the provisions standing order number 2a and the members so nominated will exercise all the powers vested in the chairman as ways and means. the question is that the speaker may nominate no more than three speakers to serve as deputy speakers until the house has elected deputy speakers in according to —— accordance with standing order 2a and the members so nominated will except. —— accept. the ayes have it.
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i have two acquaint the house has this day attended with her majesty and the house of peers and her majesty was pleased to make a most gracious speech from the throne to both houses of parliament, of which i have for greater accuracy obtained a copy. i shall direct that the terms of the speech be printed in the votes and proceedings, copies are available in the vote office. before i call the mover and second, i would like to announce the proposed pattern of debate during the remaining days on the loyal address. thursday, 22nd june, housing and social security. monday, 26june, brexit housing and social security. monday, 26 june, brexit and housing and social security. monday, 26june, brexit and foreign housing and social security. monday, 26 june, brexit and foreign affairs. tuesday, 27june, 26 june, brexit and foreign affairs. tuesday, 27 june, education 26 june, brexit and foreign affairs. tuesday, 27june, education and local services. wednesday 28 june, health, social care, and security.
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thursday 29 june, economy and jobs. i shall first call an amendment, richard benyon, to move, and then quasi—kwa tang to second the address. mr rich at benyon. —— kwasi kwarteng. a humble address be presented to her majesty as follows, most gracious sovereign, we, your most gracious sovereign, we, your most loyal subjects, the commons of the united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland, in parliament assembled, beg leave to offer humble thanks to her majesty for the graces speech that a magistrate has addressed to both houses of parliament. it is an honour to have been asked to move the loyal address. —— gracious. it is important we recognise we meet in the shadow of some of the most terrible tragedies of modern times. nothing we say can undo what has
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happened in the kensington, or, forthat matter, on the streets of london or manchester. what we can, in this house, do, is tojoin our sovereign in leading the nation in mourning the dead, caring for the injured and the dead, caring for the injured and the bereaved, and uniting in an absolute determination to prevent any such tragedies and outrages happening again. our tone any such tragedies and outrages happening again. ourtone in any such tragedies and outrages happening again. our tone in this and future debates in the coming days and weeks must reflect the nation's horror and sadness at such awful tragedies. the country expects our debates and arguments to be a bust. there is room for consensus too. at times like this we should reflect onjo cox's too. at times like this we should reflect on jo cox's words about there being more that unites us than divides us. mr speaker, i am the not first richard benyon to have been asked to move the loyal address. laughter.
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my great—great—grandfather was the mp for berkshire between 1860 and 1876. cheering laughter though, in many ways, a great man, there is no record, no record of him ever troubling hansa rd with there is no record, no record of him ever troubling hansard with any speech... (!) laughter even a speech... (!) laughter evena maiden speech... (!) laughter even a maiden speech. but he was asked by benjamin disraeli to move the loyal address in 1869 but replied, as a matter of principle, he never spoke in parliament(!) laughter as you know, my father was one of your predecessors, as member for buckingham, and told that story to speaker thomas, who clasps the hand to his head and said, howl speaker thomas, who clasps the hand to his head and said, how i wish there were more like him in the house! laughter mr speaker, house! laughter mrspeaker, i house! laughter mr speaker, i still think of myself as young... laughter cheering of course you are! being asked to do
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this senior honour reminds me that i am as golfers put it on the back nine...! in the election we have all just endured or enjoyed, whatever your perspective, i faced a labour candidate that was born a year after i was selected to fight the seat i now hold! teams of therapists will be needed to help me to overcome the brutal reality that i have gone straight from being young thruster to old codger with nothing in between(!) i wrestled the newbery constituency from the liberal democrats at the third attempt... cheering and in doing so, i want to get it on the record that i reduced the number of members of house who were educated at eton by one! laughter —— newbury. this may be the reason why some members opposite consider me something of a working—class
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hero(!) laughter newbery is a constituency which is no stranger to controversy. —— newbury. greenham common and the atomic weapons establishment have made it a regular destination for the leader of the opposition, and others... laughter he will be pleased that one particular sword has been beaten into a plough shared, the runway at any now decommissioned airbase, taken up and crushed to form the new and infamous bypass. the only other memberfor and infamous bypass. the only other member for newbury to have moved it was william mount, 1905, a year later he lost his seat, due to a combination of negative campaigning by the liberal candidate... i know, thatis
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by the liberal candidate... i know, that is hard to imagine(!) laughter and, crucially, because he was not a champion of free trade. the latter, a fa ct champion of free trade. the latter, a fact not lost on a champion of free trade is great grandson, david cameron. the areal free trade is great grandson, david cameron. the area i now represent is by all measure the areal cameron. the area i now represent is by all measure the area i represent is by all measure a prosperous and... somebody once said to me that deprivation in west berkshire was when waitrose runs out a balsamic vinegar. laughter totally wrong, i should say. —— we all know areas of need, not on the scale of deprivation and poverty that i witnessed in years as a soldier in belfast in my early 20s, a memory that still has a great impact on my political beliefs today. in all constituencies, there are areas of humanity that have missed out on the prosperity of the fifth largest economy in the world.
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a rising tide of economic prosperity should lift all boats in the harbour. that is not happening everywhere. this queen 's speech has at its heart the words of the prime minister on the steps of number ten one year ago, where he spoke of socialjustice and one year ago, where he spoke of social justice and equality one year ago, where he spoke of socialjustice and equality of opportunity. cheering the part of england i represent combines so much of what makes me positive about britain's future, sitting alongside some of the most breathtaking countryside exists an economy a boost ordinary excitement and dynamism, in 1985, a small group of people started working on mobile telecommunications, in a 1—room office above a curry restaurant in newbury and that company, vodafone, still based in newbury employs 108,000 people worldwide, and is
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worth £59 billion. west berkshire remains one of the most exciting places to start or to grow a business. it attracts companies and investment from around the world, and it is a model for the kind of outward looking, engaged, modern society that works for britain today. but businesses are notjust entities or institutions, separate from real life. they are first and foremost about the people who work in them and those families who in turn depend upon them. as we tackle the big challenge of this parliament, let's remember what really matters to our constituents. too often, this place and those that report on it are obsessed with the politics of brexit. our constituents are concerned about the realities of brexit. that means the reality for places in west berkshire, part of a
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new generation of creative entrepreneurs, in manufacturing, intech, in life sciences and the service sector, they need to be able to sell their goods and services and expertise in europe and in the world. and they need to be able to recruit the best people to keep them competitive. like the majority in my constituency, i voted to remain in the eu. but like the majority of people i represent, and most people in this house, i recognise the result of that referendum. i want to be positive about the future, i want to look back at this time and say, i was part of a parliament that rose to the challenge, and with a great unity of purpose helped ensure that britain's successfully reset its relationship with its european neighbours. successfully negotiated access to key markets for its businesses, whilst controlling
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immigration, stillallowed businesses, whilst controlling immigration, still allowed people to come to britain to study and contribute to the economy and society. the referendum was in part about parliamentary sovereignty, so we in parliament can reflect that, by immersing ourselves in the detail of what we can all agree is a great national endeavour. let our eyes not only be on europe, as the united states takes a particular route on the environment and climate, we should grasp the opportunity to ensure the uk becomes the leader in clean tech, green innovation and resource efficiency. i welcome, for example, legislation in this speech, which will promote the development of electric vehicles. this will ensure that we are building the cars of the future, maintaining our strength in motor manufacturing, while making towns and cities better places in which to live and work. at
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times, the problems we face seeing massive, and there are times when we made think that it is all too difficult. just when all seems bleak, we as members of parliament have a means of keeping ourselves grounded in the realities of life. in our constituencies, we can visit a charity, a school, or a business that inspires us. we can have a quiet conversation as i have recently... with a veteran, coping with life changing injuries. these experiences lift our eyes to the extraordinary humanity and strength that exist in this country, never more so than in this most sombre of times. it is the quiet but determined doers, individuals, in public services, in industry, in volu nta ry public services, in industry, in voluntary organisations, that we meet on an almost daily basis that makes me optimistic britain's
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future. 27 years ago, john major spoke of his desire to build a nation at ease with itself. it was a phrase that resonated with me. a nation at ease with itself would present its population with the same opportunities, whatever part of the country, whatever background they came from. such a society would be one that was enjoying greater prosperity, one where its citizens enjoyed longer and more satisfying lives, it would be one where inequality between the richest and the poorest was narrowing. by every independently produced a statistic, we live at or at the threshold of such a time. those measured indicators are steadily, if too slowly, if too slowly being achieved. but none of us, none of us can claim that our united kingdom is
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a nation at ease with itself. last year 's referendum, and the recent election has shown that divisions remain wide and potentially harmful. the gracious speech holds firm to the prime minister's deeply held belief in having an economy and a society that works for everyone. these are values that matter to her, they matter to me, and they actually matter to every single member of this house. those we represent deserve to live at a country at ease with itself and with the world. i commend this to the house. voices of agreement. kwasi kwarteng. before i proceed i want to declare an interest, i have ransacked my family vaults, i have found no letter from
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mr benjamin disraeli, to my great grandfather... orany mr benjamin disraeli, to my great grandfather... or any other member of my family... (!) mr speaker, grandfather... or any other member of my family... (!) mrspeaker, it isa of my family... (!) mrspeaker, it is a great honour to be invited to second humble address, proposed so eloquently by my honourable friend, the member for newbury, eloquently by my honourable friend, the memberfor newbury, he eloquently by my honourable friend, the member for newbury, he was both charming and funny, that is a much rarer quality than you can expect, mr speaker. it is wonderful to see everything in its place. we have you, mr speaker, we have the government, and... cheering we have a government... laughter we have a government... laughter we have a government... laughter we have the leader of the opposition... cheering in its place. all is well with the world. i'm even delighted to see our
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old friends, special friends, the liberal democrats, in their place... albeit, without a leader, but we can live with that for a while. still brimming with in these years. election day, as we all know, was full of surprises. when the exit poll was revealed, when the exit poll was revealed, when the exit poll was revealed, there were casts of anguish, despair, poll was revealed, there were casts ofanguish, despair, and poll was revealed, there were casts of anguish, despair, and deep bitter disappointment. and that was only the members of the parliamentary labour party...! cheering we all know, we all know how hard the business, we all know how hard the business, we all know how hard the business, we all know how hard the business of putting together a government has been, we all know how tortuous the process has been, the debates, the tensions, the difficulties, and we were able to follow every detail closely in the highly objective scrupulously fair
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pages of the evening standard. laughter isa laughter is a great privilege for me, it is a great privilege for me, the son of ghanaian immigrants, who came to this country in the 1960s, to perform this duty today. my mother lived in liverpool, where her elder brother was studying medicine. she remembers sir winston churchill's funeral and liverpool winning the fa cup. she certainly would never have believed that her only son would become a british member of parliament. this is one of the strengths of this country. now, i know, i know, people are wondering, the custom is for this speech to be delivered by a young, thrusting mp. after seven years in this house, i was slightly confused about this description... one of my honourable
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friend, a former whip, description... one of my honourable friend, a formerwhip, said, oh, you are meant to be the young one...? in my intake of 2010, i have seen such meteoric high—flyers as a business secretary, a home secretary, and even a lord chancellor. and then there is me. laughter may i wish to reassure members, may i reassure the prime minister, i am still young! laughter still thrusting(!) laughter the occasion is also a great honour for my constituency, spelthorne. but as an mp, we can all reflect that politics is not all about set piece occasions and big speeches, when first i walked down the high street in ashford, i wondered howl first i walked down the high street in ashford, i wondered how i would be treated. an elderly woman came up to me and said, rather surprisingly, lam going to me and said, rather surprisingly, i am going to vote for you. then i
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made the fatal mistake. i ask the question, no candidate should ever ask, why? laughter i don't know, she said, i like seeing your smiley face in the newspaper. we must never attempt to second—guess at every stage of vote rs second—guess at every stage of voters motivations. the borough i have the honour to represent has so many political and historical associations. staines, of course, was where the barons assemble before forcing king john to sign the magna ca rta, forcing king john to sign the magna carta, in runnymede, it was in stains that sir thomas more one of my less breeders rafael june revisited, was tried before his execution on tower hill, may you avoid that fate. —— it was in staines that sir thomas moore, one
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of your less successful predecessors. small start—ups, global companies, like shepperton studios and bp, spelthorne has a thriving business community, which is of course greatly helped by our location with excellent links to london and heathrow airport. i should suggest, to you... do you, mr speaker. there is also a great innovative spirit in my constituency, a study in 2015 concluded stains upon thames was the numberone concluded stains upon thames was the number one town concluded stains upon thames was the numberone town in concluded stains upon thames was the number one town in the country, to start a new business with three times as many start—ups every year as the uk average. despite changes in the way that we do business and the technology we use, the traditions of this house have withstood the onslaught of time. —— staines—upon—thames. you uphold the great traditions of the house and
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the parliamentary system, these traditions have evolved and remain, i was at traditions have evolved and remain, iwas ata traditions have evolved and remain, i was at a loss for words, i was thinking of a phrase, of course, "strong and thinking of a phrase, of course, " strong and stable " ! thinking of a phrase, of course, "strong and stable"! laughter cheering lam i am delighted, i am delighted i am delighted that the government row graham is ambitious. that the government programme is ambitious, we have brexit, and when we look at the great repeal bill, we have do consider what a great and significant piece of legislation it is. the original european community 's act was passed in 1972, feelings we re 's act was passed in 1972, feelings were so strong at that time that it took 300 hours of parliamentary debate before that bill was passed. feelings are no less strong today, because the future of the country is at stake. the complexities of the great repeal bill will be debated extensively in the next few years, it will be a great landmark, a great
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landmark in the parliamentary and constitutional history of this country. a new immigration bill will seek rightly to reduce migration to sustainable levels and once past, both these acts, both these acts will shake britain very considerably in the years ahead. in conclusion, mr speaker, in the years ahead. in conclusion, mrspeaker, i... in conclusion, mr speaker, the last few months have been, by any standards, horace —— horrific. i never thought that i would see barriers on westminster bridge, the attacks on innocent people, even within the parliamentary estate or most re ce ntly parliamentary estate or most recently at the finsbury park mosque have overwhelmed and disgusted the
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majority of people in this country, neither did majority of people in this country, neitherdidl majority of people in this country, neither did i think i would see a tower with 500 people in their homes go tower with 500 people in their homes 9° up tower with 500 people in their homes go up in flames. the appalling scenes of devastation in west london la st scenes of devastation in west london last week can never be forgotten. we can talk of tradition, we can talk of history, art at a time like the present, we must be mindful of human suffering. it was at times like last week that we in this house are reminded of the solemn duties and grave responsibilities we have been called upon by our constituents and the whole country to discharge. the re ce nt the whole country to discharge. the recent terror terrible events remind us of the awe—inspiring trust with which we have been endowed, and it in this sombre and reflective mood that i commend this gracious speech to the house. —— the recent terrible events remind us. the question is, the humble address presented to her majesty as follows, most gracious sovereign, we, your majesty is most dutiful and loyal subjects, the
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commons of the united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland in parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble flanks to your majesty for the grateful speech that your majesty has addressed to both houses of parliament. —— humble thanks. the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn. by tradition, at the beginning of each parliamentary session, commemorate the members we have lost in the last year, sadly, this year must also mark the passing of those we have lost in horrific events in recent days and weeks. the fire at grenfell tower in west london has killed at least 79 people. what makes it both a tragedy and an outrage is that every single one of those deaths could have been avoided. something has gone horrifically wrong. the north kensington community are demanding answers. they are entitled
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to those answers. thousands of people living in tower blocks around the country need urgent reassurance. the emergency services, especially fire and rescue services in this case, deserve our deepest respect and support. i also want to pay a very and support. i also want to pay a very warm and support. i also want to pay a very warm tribute to my honourable friend, the member for very warm tribute to my honourable friend, the memberfor kensington, who in recent days has demonstrated so clearly why her local community put their faith so clearly why her local community put theirfaith in her, her determination to ensure that every family is re—housed locally is an example rework of a dedicated member of parliament. and we welcome her to this house. lessons must be learned, mr speaker, in the public enquiry, and the disaster that never should have happened should never happen again. the terrorist attacks in manchester, london bridge and finsbury park took innocent lives. causing dozens of injuries. and
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traumatised hundreds of people. with wilful and callous disregard for human life. the attack in the early hours of monday morning in my own constituency is a reminder to us all that hate has no creed, that violence has no religion, and that we must stand up to hatred, whoever the target, and stand together against those who would drive us apart. last night, hundreds of people assembled alongside finsbury park mosque, to givejust people assembled alongside finsbury park mosque, to give just that message, from all communities and faiths. our communities and country are strongest when we are united. as our late colleague, jo cox, said, we have far more in common than that
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