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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 21, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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she does not which i regret. she does not understand the policy that my party has on the environment, she should go and read our manifesto, but we have a right to speak for the northern ireland and in this parliament, we will. the speaker: let me just say two things in response to the sincere point of order from the right honourable gentleman. first of all, the use of the word in question is not unparliamentary. it's a matter of taste as to its desirability or otherwise and secondly and i know how robust a character the honourable gentleman, the right honourable gentleman is, i would say that the word in question refers to a species that survive for many, many millions of years. thank you, mr speaker. as i said, the queen's speech is about putting fairness at the heart of our agenda. that's about building a stronger economy, delivering a modern industrial strategy that that all parts of our country and all parts of our society share in the benefits of our society share in the benefits of economic growth, investing in the world leading infrastructure, that
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can unlock growth in our economy and improve the quality of people's lives across the country and building afairer lives across the country and building a fairer society. increasing the national living wage so increasing the national living wage so people on the lowest pay see their wages go up as the economy strengthens and ensuring that every child has access to a good school place. i will make more progress before i give way again, creating a world —class before i give way again, creating a world—class system of technical education so all young people have the vital skills they need to do the jobs of the future. acting to make market fairers, by tackling unfair practises wherever they are found. the prime minister mentions opportunity, does she agree one of the opportunities we must deliver is to allow more young people to get on the housing ladder? will she increase house building to 250,000 homes a year which is a bolder and a much more ambitious commitment than the party opposite?
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i have to say to my honourable friend he is incredibly pressient because the next sentence that i was going to say in my speech is tackling the housing crisis that locks so many young people out of the housing market. we recognise the significance of the housing problem in this country. it is about building more houses and keeping schemes going which help people to get on the housing ladder and seeing a greater diversity in the housing market, rent to buy, shared ownership, a variety of opportunities for young people. and also, we will be tackling discrimination on the basis of mental health, sexuality, faith, disability, gender or race. i will give way to the honourable gentleman. how is the interim prime minister going to convince the country that she can negotiate a successful brexit within the time limit with 27 other eu countries when they hasn't been able even to negotiate a deal with ten democratic unionist party
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members of this house in this time limit before the queen's speech? cani limit before the queen's speech? can i thank the honourable gentleman for giving me the opportunity to welcome the work that the right honourable member my secretary of state for exiting the european union has under taken in relation to preparing our negotiations and starting those formal negotiations on monday of this week. and i will be in the brussels for the eu council later this week taking that further forward. council later this week taking that furtherforward. mr speaker, building... i'm gratefulthat furtherforward. mr speaker, building... i'm grateful that the brexit talks have now started. as pa rt of brexit talks have now started. as part of those talks, the ability for those people who have come from the other 27 countries to live and work in the uk and for uk citizens living and working within the other 27 countries is going to be vitally important. they will be waiting to learn of their future. will she give a guarantee to this house that she
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will come to this house as quickly as possible, not waiting until the discussions have finished in order to give them the assurance that they will be able to live and remain in the countries where they have decided to live and work? i'm grateful to my right honourable friend. we have always said from the beginning of this, that we want to address this issue at an early stage in the negotiations and that's the agreement that's been reached. this is one of the very first issues that will be addressed in the negotiations and i will make every effort and will guarantee to my right honourable friend that i expect to come to this house to show the opportunities that the united kingdom will be setting out for those eu citizens who live here in the eu. we, of course, want to see uk citizens in the european union being treated fairly as well, but we will soon be setting out our offer in relation to european union citizens living here in the united kingdom. the fact is the gracious speech has
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been given today and the prime minister can't tell us how her government will be composed or how it will be supported and given she asked for a personal mandate during the general election campaign and didn't get one, the only question is why is she still here? let mejust point why is she still here? let me just point out a few facts to the honourable gentleman. i mean which party was it that got the highest percent share of the vote? labour or conservative? conservative. which party was it that got more votes, 800,000 more votes tha n that got more votes, 800,000 more votes than the other party? labour oi’ votes than the other party? labour or conservative? conservative. and which party was it that got 56 more seats than the labour party? the speaker: order. order. iwill not have the prime minister or the leader of the opposition or any memberof
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leader of the opposition or any member of this house shouted down. order. mrcamble, i'm member of this house shouted down. order. mr camble, i'm sure you — order. order. you're witering away from a sedentary to obvious benefit or purpose. order. i'm sure you mean well, but i don't require your assistance at this time. the prime minister. thank you, mr speaker. i was merely pointing out that the conservative party got 56 more seats than the labour party. we are doing, we are doing what is in the national interest which is forming a government to address the challenges that face this country at the moment. it is a critical time. it's important that we have a government committed to the national interest. i give way to my honourable friend. mr speaker, the prime ministerjust mentioned making markets work better and for everybody. she knows that the energy price cap had wide cross party support from all sides of this
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house. so i was delighted to see energy price protection and pi’ocoi'isuitiei' energy price protection and proconsumer switching and transparency measures in the queen's speech. can she confirm that those measures mean the price cap to deliver 17 million customers the £100 savings which we promised on our manifesto rather than the narrower proposals from the big six energy firms instead? ican energy firms instead? i can confirm to my honourable friend that we do indeed intend to ta ke friend that we do indeed intend to take action on this issue. we recognise the problem that there is in relation to energy bills. we want to ensure that we get the best measure in place that is going to deliver what we all want which is to see people no longer being ripped off by the high energy tariffs that they are given. so strengthening... i'll give way. they are given. so strengthening... i'll give waylj thank the prime minister for giving way. the prime minister has talked about the national interests and the need for cross party support. does the prime minister agree with me that in her excellent proposal to have a commission for tackling
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extremism for that to work, it really does require the engagement, notjust of really does require the engagement, not just of members really does require the engagement, notjust of members on really does require the engagement, not just of members on this really does require the engagement, notjust of members on this side, but of members on the other side of the house if we are to stamp out the evil ideology of extremism that drives terrorism in this country? my drives terrorism in this country? my honourable friend is absolutely rightment we talk, we have spoken a lot about the need to deal with terrorism and of course, we do need to look at the powers we have to deal with the terrorists, but we also need to end sure that we are dealing with the extremism and hatred that fuel that terrorism. and that's why the commission for countering extremism is so important andi countering extremism is so important and i hope it is a measure as i said earlier that can be supported across all parts of this house because it is important, if we are going to ensure that we drive this extremism and hatred out of our society. i have already taken three times as many interventions as the leader of the opposition. soi
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the opposition. so i will make mode gres on my speech. mr speaker, we also want to build a more secure united kingdom. investing in our defence and national security and enhancing our leading role on the world stage. strengthening the social, economic and cultural bonds between england, northern ireland and scotland and wales. delivering on our commitment to devolution by working in co—operation with all the devolved administrations and working with all the parties in northern ireland to support the return of devolved government. building a country that is stronger, fairer, safer and more secure for all our children and grandchildren, a country that works for everyone. that is our ambition and that is what this queen's speech will help to deliver. the first part of this queen's speech is, of course, about brexit. a brexit deal that works for every part of the country and commands the greatest possible public support. over 80% of the electorate backed two major parties, bot of whom campaigned on
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ma nifestos, parties, bot of whom campaigned on manifestos, that said we should honour the democratic decision of the british people. so this government will respect the will of the british people and see brexit through. we will build, we will seek to build a wide consensus as we do this and as we take bills through this and as we take bills through this house which will include a trade bill, a repeal bill and an immigration bill as have been referred to and also bills to deal with control of access to our waters, forfishermen with control of access to our waters, for fishermen and with control of access to our waters, forfishermen and greater stability to farmers with a new bill on agriculture. i will make a little more progress and then i will take some more interventions but if we're going to grasp the opportunities as we leave the european union, we need to build a stronger economy. that's right, we have always understood as conservatives on this side of the house that sound money and fiscal credibility is the foundation for everything else. that's why it was right to take the tough decisions we
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did after the financial crash and it has paid off. the deficit is down by three—quarters. employment is up by 2.9 million. and because of policies like the national living wage and taking four million of the lowest paid out of income tax altogether, inequality has been reduced to its lowest level for 30 years. so, in this queen's speech, we will continue to improve the public finances and work towards getting our country back to living within its means. we will also invest in the world leading digital infrastructure we need to benefit from the opportunities of new technology and we will encourage businesses to grow and create jobs by continuing to cut corporation tax because that's how you raise more money, not less. i thank the prime minister for giving way. does the prime minister
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recognise that the economy is evolving and changing and can the prime minister confirm that the government is committed to securing the right for people in the gig economy, who are on different types of co nt ra ct economy, who are on different types of contract than has been historically the case? we have asked matthew taylor to do a report on the changing workplace, the changing struck steward of employment that we see particularly as my honourable friend referenced to the gig economy and when that report is published, we will obviously look at the steps that the government needs to take to support people with their rights, but as i've said in the past few weeks, we will enhance workers' rights. we believe in protecting those rights and enhancing them. i will give way to my honourable friend. i thank the prime minister for giving way. will my right honourable friend ensure that legislation such as providing for next phases of the project and other infrastructure
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investment means that we can rebalance investment means that we can re balance the investment means that we can rebalance the economy to make shur that the whole country benefits?m is good to see my honourable friend in his place and to have seen him out on the campaign trail during the general election campaign and i confirm we will put the legislation through for the next stage of hs2 and we will ensure that we are continuing to invest as the chancellor set out in the autumn statement last year in infrastructure projects around the country because what i want to see isa country because what i want to see is a country that works for everyone and every part of the united kingdom and every part of the united kingdom and infrastructure is an important pa rt and infrastructure is an important part to delivering that. can i take her back to what she was saying about making brexit work for the entire united kingdom? can she tell the house if a consent motion will be required in the scottish parliament for the great repeal bill? that is a matter which is
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currently being considered both here and in scotland. there is a possibility that a legislative consent motion maybe required in the scottish parliament, but that is a matter that is being considered currently between the westminster and the scottish government. no, i'm not going to, mr speaker, i'm conscious that i have taken a significant number of interventions. and i will make progress so that other members are able to rise to speak. one thing that we will not do, i have said that we will protect rights and protect people at work as we leave the european union and indeed, as we see changes in the employment structure in our economy. what we won't do is follow the economic prescriptions of the party opposite because there is absolutely nothing fair about punitive tax rises that lead to fewerjobs, lower wages and higher prices for ordinary working families. and there is
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nothing fair about wracking up debts for our children and grandchildren to pay. the only government you can trust to build a stronger and fairer economy is a conservative government. and mr speaker, i've mention add fairer society and i wa nt mention add fairer society and i want britain to be a genuine great merit to being crassy where everyone has a chance to go as far as their talent and hard work will take them. that is about ensuring everybody plays by the same rules. it's about ensuring every child has access to a good school place. it's about ensuring that that right technical technical education is there and the measures in the queen's speech will help to do that, but they will also deal with some of the injustices in our society. the draft domestic abuse legislation, ensure protective orders are available and that
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victims get the justice that they deserve. i willjust say victims get the justice that they deserve. i will just say this victims get the justice that they deserve. i willjust say this — this isa deserve. i willjust say this — this is a measure that i hope will be able to command support across the whole of this house. there are many in this house who have champ beyond the cause of dealing with domestic violence for many years and i hope they will be able to join us in supporting this legislation. mr speaker, as the prime minister is very mr speaker, as the prime minister is very aware , mr speaker, as the prime minister is very aware, victim of domestic violence are the direct victims, but the forgotten indirect victims such as children. can she reassure us that steps will be taken to support those indirect victims too? my honourable friend makes a very fair point and honourable friend makes a very fair pointandi honourable friend makes a very fair point and i think one of the problems over the years people have looked at the immediate victim or survivor of domestic violence and forgotten survivor of domestic violence and fo rg otte n if survivor of domestic violence and forgotten if there were children involved in a house, that it is not just a question of whether they have seen something happen, they know what is happening and they will have
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been affected by it and we will look at thash uof children. i will give way one time more. rightly this house prized the prime minister for the hillsborough inquiry. today, i met with the victims of contaminated blood. will she take this opportunity now to have a full public inquiry to those affected and their families? i will, i their families? iwill, i note their families? i will, i note the point the honourablejoint i will, i note the point the honourable joint has made about contaminated blood and i will speak to the secretary of state for health. i think this has been looked at and other ways of dealing with this issue have been looked at and addressed. mr speaker, we are building opportunity and aspiration. i want to sayjust one more. we will also deliver a more secure united kingdom because of the choices we're make to go prioritise our defence and national security. our armed
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forces bill will give those who put their lives on the line in the service of our country the proper respect they deserve with more security in the way they live and work. our commitment to renew trident means this country maintains its continuous at sea nuclear deterrent. as the ultimate guarantee of our safety and a prime minister who is prepared to use it. and we will continue to play a leading role in international efforts to tackle mass migration and climate change, to alleviate poverty and end modern slavery. we have always looked beyond europe to the wider world and we will continue to do so. no, i am actually able to say this is in conclusion. this has been a difficult time, mr speaker. mr speaker, this has been a difficult time for our country. i know there are many parents who worry about the kind of world their children are growing up in. and i recognise that
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and understand it. it has been an unsettling time which tested the spirit of our country, but we are a resilient country. our response to disaster and acts of terror which ta ke disaster and acts of terror which take the lives of inspect people must be this — compassion, unity, resolve. for we're a great nation and a great people. we have been through and survived the toughest of times before and we thrived. once again, we can and will grow stronger from the challenges we face today. the queen's speech on its own will not solve every challenge our country faces, not every problem can be solved by an act of parliament. but it is a step forward to building
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a more compassionate, more united and more confident nation. that's what this government will aim to achieve. it's what this queen's speech will deliver and i commend the queen's speech to the house. the speaker: mr ian blackford. so a longer than expected statement there from the prime minister. but worth pointing out that she took many interventions, took many questions, in marked contrast tojeremy corbyn who took only six interventions and albeit grudgingly, but a number of issues discussed in those two speeches. the prime minister also talking about tour for and apologised before the response, she said it was a failure of the state, local and national, and i apologise for that failure. there were light hearted moments. she congratulated
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jeremy corbyn on come ago good second in the election, but a rather testy at times battle for the prime minister to get through that speech and following inaugural speeches which introduced with some leferity the session this afternoon. well, let's go back quite a while now to that queen's speech. let's take a look at some of the government's key proposals outlined in the speech. brexit has dominated the legislative programmes of the bill, with eight of the 27 bills relating to our future withdrawal from the european union and a host of proposed new laws designed to pave the way for a smooth and orderly exit from the european union. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. no golden carriage and no horses. this is a dressed—down queen's speech. the crown not worn, but travelling to parliament in a car of its own. with a crowded calendar and little time for preparations,
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the full pomp and ceremony has been slimmed down. lock the door. following centuries of tradition, black rod sent to summon mps to the lords. theresa may had hoped to be commanding a strong majority. instead she's been left turning to the dup for support and it's the labour leader who has been left looking the more confident of the two. the duke of edinburgh, normally a constant at the queen's side, today ill in hospital as her majesty delivered the queen's speech for the 64th time. my government's priority is to secure the best possible deal as the country leaves the european union. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. brexit is the central theme. eight bills devoted to the complex process of leaving the eu, covering areas like immigration,
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agriculture and trade. my government will seek to maintain a deep and special partnership with european allies, and to forge new trading relationships across the globe. but this is a moderated version of theresa may's manifesto. no mention of tory plans to expand grammar schools, and controversial proposals to overhaul social care funding, reduced only to a consultation. there are 27 bills and draft bills in theresa may's first queen's speech including measures for a review of counter—terrorism to deal with extremists and protect the public. a draft domestic violence and abuse bill to bring in new protection and sentencing powers, and legislation to update and strengthen data protection laws giving people more control over their data. the queen's speech itself looks at what we need to do in order to deliver brexit, which is clearly something we have to do.
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the country voted on it. but also it is about delivering economic prosperity and fairness through society. but labour said not enough was mentioned about investing more in public services. we've had seven years of this conservative austerity and i think this was a very big factor in the general election. it's why theresa may did not get the majority she wanted and yet we have seen no recognition of that. the snp accused the government of hollow words over brexit. we've heard the same tired language, securing the best deal possible, but no detail on what that means. the speech says that the government is committed to working with devolved governments and business but we need action on this, not words. after failing to win a majority at the general election, theresa may has said her government will respond to the message from voters with humility and resolve, but the lack of support means delivering this two year plan for government will be a day by day fight for survival in parliament. the queen has now fulfilled her duties, but the tasks
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for the prime minister are stacking up. 11 days on, there is still no deal with the dup. and theresa may knows that having effectively lost the tory crown, delivering this programme for government will be difficult. joining me now is our chief political correspondent vicki young. the prime minister's speech, she put up the prime minister's speech, she put up with a lot of interruption, perhaps the toughest intervention was from wes streeting who said, "why are you still here?" another person addressing her as the interim prime minister. when jeremy person addressing her as the interim prime minister. whenjeremy corbyn came into the chamber he got cheers from his own mps. that shouldn't be unusual, but the last two years it has been unusual for theresa may really the opposite to the atmosphere before she went off and called that election. so things have changed. even though jeremy called that election. so things have changed. even thoughjeremy corbyn didn't win the general election he achieved above expectations and you could see the confidence in him
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there. he talked about labour being a government in waiting. a lot of his speech was really going over the ground from the general election talking about austerity, really saying people have had enough of it, saying people have had enough of it, saying it's not enough to praise our emergency services after all the terrible things that happened in the last few weeks. he says they need decent pay and better working conditions and better living standards and they need to be properly funded and not surprisingly, he was disparaging about the queen's speech. a threadbare legislative programme from a government that's lost its majority and apparently ran out of ideas altogether. this would be a thin legislative programme even if it was for one year, but for two years? two years? there's not enough in it to fill up one year. mr corbyn talked about the deepening divisions within society in this country and i think the mood was more sombre than you'd normally
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expect. even the warm up speeches if you like, they're normally full of gags. there were a few, but listening to richard bennion the conservative mp and former minister talking about how this country doesn't seem to be at ease with itself and that thread and that thought went through the speeches today including theresa may's as well. she talked, of course, about the two three terror attacks that we have had actually since the election was called and she talked too about the fire in kensington and chelsea, in grenfell tower. the support on the ground for families in the initial hours was not good enough. people were left without belongings, without roofs overtheir without belongings, without roofs over their heads, without even basic information about what had happened, what they should do, and where they could seek help. that was a failure of the state, local and national. to help people when they needed it most. as prime minister, i apologise
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for that failure. and as prime minister, i've taken responsibility for doing what we can to put things right. she has come under a lot of personal criticism. she seemed more co mforta ble criticism. she seemed more comfortable today in the surroundings today of the house of commons. what will be interesting is whether that terrible event will be a turning point. many mps looking at that and they feel that it will signal some big changes to come. thank you very much. let us speak to clive lewis who was re—elected to become labour mp for norwich south. during the campaign you got married? it almost didn't happen, but yeah. good result times two. in terms of the queen's speech today, what did you make ofjeremy corbyn and theresa may? very different in tone and you could be forgiven for
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thinking thatjeremy corbyn was behaving as if he had won the election? it was almost a kind of flip from where they were before the last session ended. theresa may was riding high in the polls. her party thought they were going to come back with more mp5. no, we didn't win, but the sense in the chamber is clear, there is a genuine feeling that something has moved, something has shifted and you can see that in today's queen's post it note, it's short and thinner and thinner than my mum's cooking. it's very thin and i think ultimately, what you can see now in what's in there, the dementia tax out and the cut to winter fuel payments out, grammar schools out, it isa payments out, grammar schools out, it is a thinned down queen's speech andi it is a thinned down queen's speech and i think what it does for us, it gives us an opportunity now to give to lead the political mood. there is a mood, ithink, that to lead the political mood. there is a mood, i think, that people want to change, they want to see and to austerity and they want to see something replacing that with hope.
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they want brexit. they want people to get on and start talking and sort it out. is your party united in it's approach to brexit particularly when you seem to have frontbenchers from your party at odds over still the single, the single market and also customs agreements. what is your position? do you differfrom customs agreements. what is your position? do you differ from that? you have to be very clear here, europe is a divisive issue across the political spectrum, no two ways about it, there is... both you and the tories were clear in your manifesto,... the tories were clear in your manifesto, . .. except the tories were clear in your manifesto,... except we have put the economy first, and the priority of getting access to the manifesto, making sure that —— access to the single market. making sure the priority is the economy. the tories have placed semi—caveats, annoyed the people that they are negotiating with and theresa may by calling the election and bombing so badly has now undermined her own position and the country's position in negotiation talks. our position has
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been clear, it is about the economy, about making sure that the change in mood, brexit, when we leave the european union we will have a good close working relationship. nobody argues that. well, if you listen to where the conservatives were before the election, talking aboutjumping offa the election, talking aboutjumping off a cliff unless you give us what we want, they were not talking economy first, they were bragging about how ha rd—core economy first, they were bragging about how hard—core they were going to be in negotiations and it has backfired. i don't think you will get any labour backfired. i don't think you will getany labourmp backfired. i don't think you will get any labour mp that will say it is wrong, putting the economy first. there are differences, of course, dealing with europe. in terms of the wider issue, exit negotiations, do you see a wounded prime minister as someone where you circle around and you are ready to go in for the kill, or do you say, these talks are important, perhaps we need a team that will get on with its. what would be good as a start is the government access that they need to come back to parliament, when we had
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the debates in parliament, about article 50, the key issues for us we re article 50, the key issues for us were to make sure that there are meaningful votes in parliament, make sure you keep parliament informed, every opportunity to do that on the amendments we put down, they said, no, the executive will decide it. if they want to negotiate in the national interest, and have to come back and make sure they keep the house in form from every decision, people say that is not practical in negotiation, but you can make sure that you bring the house and the country together on this. if they mess up, if they don't involve parliament in the process, if they try to do what is in the best interest of the conservative party as they have done for so long, we will make sure they are held to account and we will take advantage. jeremy corbyn came a good second, you are talking as though you are in a good position, you are quite a way behind but you are behaving as though with the flick of a switch you could take them on. there has been a change, we understand we did
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not win the election but the whole setup of where the conservatives wa nted setup of where the conservatives wanted to head, where they wanted to go in, the hubris with which they we re go in, the hubris with which they were heading, has been knocked from underneath them. that means there is a political opportunity based on a ma nifesto a political opportunity based on a manifesto of hope that there is a different way to do this, we are offering this, are you, that is why we are confident, we feel better tapped into the public mood. my constituents in norwich south don't wa nt to constituents in norwich south don't want to see school children in schools without enough teachers, without enough fire brigade and police officers... we are beginning to relive the election campaign. we have an opportunity to live up, step up have an opportunity to live up, step up and deliver. their manifesto bombed, what is left of it, you probably could not fit on a post—it note at the moment. clive lewis, thank you very much. going to oxford, joining us, andrew dilnot, former chair of the care funding commission. iam i am guessing that on the post—it note analogy, nothing about what was
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in the tory manifesto, were you disappointed by what you heard today? not particularly, manifesto when it first came out was disappointing but by the end of the campaign, all three major political parties were committed to a system for social care where we shared response ability across the whole population and people knew there was a maximum amount that they would pgy- a maximum amount that they would pay. the queen's speech today did not say very much, cindy said there would be consultation going ahead. my would be consultation going ahead. my understanding is there has been a commitment to deliver the caps. we don't know exactly what form the consultation will take, would be nice to know more details, but most things are open, and after the election campaign, pretty clear in which direction we must go. the discussion has started, you welcome that? yes, the conservative government recognises something has to be done, that people are frightened and angry about social care. angry the system has not been sorted out, frightened by a system as we have at the moment which
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leaves them without any way of managing their own future. i think we will see change. of course people will not like it, but what the tory ma nifesto will not like it, but what the tory manifesto pointed out was at some stage, this is going to be painful, and do you want young people to pay for it or those that benefit from it more directly to pay for it? that is a completely legitimate compensation, there are arguments that many older people would except that many older people would except that older people as a whole can perfectly legitimately be asked to pay for it, what people do not want to have to do is pay for it themselves in full, if they happen to be one of the unlucky ones that has very high care needs. most of us will not, most of us will need some care, but it is a relatively small minority that have high care needs, they want to be able to share the risk across the population as a whole, or at least the population of older people. question is about the sharing of risks rather than imposing the full burden of any particular risk on the individuals
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unlucky enough to have very severe arthritis, dementia, so need care for a long time. where do you feel the line should be? all kinds of arguments, not for me to make a judgment, it is reasonable to expect that older people as a group should make some contribution here, but also for individuals, right to set a cap on what any individual should have to pay. the commission worked on by was six years ago reported that it should be between £25,000 and £55,000, inflation since then would take it to £65,000. the coalition government legislated for a cap at £72,000 and that seems like a cap at £72,000 and that seems like a natural starting point for discussions which will begin. thank you very muchjoining us. earlier i spoke with angela rayner, shadow secretary for education, i
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ask her if party was being bloody—minded about brexit negotiations. we are not, we are about making sure we get the best possible beautiful britain, we had a ma nifesto possible beautiful britain, we had a manifesto which resonated with the general public, making sure we did not have a hard brexit, recently stood on a platform of even "no deal is better than a bad deal", of course that is a bad deal! we do not wa nt to course that is a bad deal! we do not want to see a hard brexit, we have a mandate to hold the government to account. david davis has already curled over and let them tickle his belly this week. i am worried about the weekend wobbly government we have. isn't your party split even more than the tories. jeremy corbyn saying, no single market, no customs union, earlier today, chuka saying, no single market, no customs union, earliertoday, chuka umunna saying, we must stay on the single market. you are as divided as the tories ever have been. interesting, philip hammond did he speak as —— speech as the chancellor and stole
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from the shadow chancellor, talking aboutjobs from the shadow chancellor, talking about jobs and living from the shadow chancellor, talking aboutjobs and living standards, they are really important. we have to make sure british businesses have... isn't your party as split? that is the question. no, we have been really united, we are as united as we have been for years, the plp gave jeremy corbyn as we have been for years, the plp gavejeremy corbyn a standing ovation, we were clear we did not wa nt to ovation, we were clear we did not want to see a hard brexit and we have the mandate from the during the election campaign, the public... they want the government get on with it, they want it to be unified with other parties as possible, the time for old tribal politics has gone, particularly, no party has a majority? you are right on brexit, going on the doors it was clear people had made the choice, coming out of europe, get on with it. but also, hang on a minute, we did not vote for us to be worse off, we we re did not vote for us to be worse off, we were told we would get £350
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million for the nhs every week, i took that away, now it has been made the "strong and stable" bus, the public do not want that, the public wa nt public do not want that, the public want us moving on but they also want to see education funding. national health service. police. we have seen the public sector and austerity, what has that done to the public services and the prosperity of britain? they want an end to that and they want to see investment. britishjobs and they want to see investment. british jobs available in the future and supporting businesses going forward. joining me now, nicky morgan former education secretary. on the doorstep, more money for schools, does that chime? yes, my conservative colleagues would say the same thing, school funding was a big issue. in the manifesto we have a next £4 billion, today was the queen's speech, not a budget, we wait to hear about what extra money, what will happen with the national funding formula, whether there is a
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minimum per—pupil amount. we funding formula, whether there is a minimum per—pupilamount. we all ee, minimum per—pupilamount. we all agree, hugely important. a lot of waiting going on, particularly in terms of the primers to's future, talks with the dup, what is going on? waiting is an inevitable conclusion from... inaudible question can set all the deadlines you want in politics but negotiations will continue, the dup have been broadly supportive of conservative votes in the last parliament, not to take them for granted but that is to say that we want to get the negotiations right. votes are not on the queen's speech and till next week. as i say, we have an inconclusive election result, conservatives were the largest party, i heard what you were saying to clive lewis about labour assuming they have won but they have not. the result of that is that is why the prime and is the hat a different tone today and it is about what we can do on a cross—party basis, issues like mental health as well. jeremy corbyn's pete got a
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fantastic reception from his own party, theresa may, difficult. —— jeremy corbyn's speech. over the top, rather it seemed he had all the a nswe rs top, rather it seemed he had all the answers and had one, i absolutely have not. —— had won. the prime minister talked of them coming a good second and that is right. as a conservative party it was not the result we wanted, there are parts of the manifesto which the parliamentary arithmetic means the party will not be able to get through. that is also presenting an opportunity, the backbench mps like me, working with the government to get things through, a lay the concerns of constituents, and a party of business managers will have to listen to that. you would say that, wouldn't you, i wonder if you we re that, wouldn't you, i wonder if you were watching theresa may and in your heart of hearts thinking, the game is up. i certainly did not think that, the message i am getting back from doorsteps is that constituents and others want us to get on with government, that is why
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it is important brexit negotiations started early this week. i don't know what will happen in terms of the long—term future of the leadership, of my party, but i think theresa may is the right person to get brexit negotiations started, have the queen's speech, show a programme for government. there are issues we can sort out in this country, they need to be addressed. extremism, mental health, housing, just three of the top of my head. that is what people want politicians in westminster to do now. and kieran thank you very much forjoining us us. we are keeping one eye out for demonstrators, scheduled to be arriving in the neck down or so. of course, following the tower block fire at grenfell tower, a lot of angen fire at grenfell tower, a lot of anger, some of that expressed on the streets of kensington and chelsea council. some protest is expected to be here a little later on. in terms of politics and ceremony, today was a strange day. —— protesters. estate opening without robes and ceremony that we are used to. and without the
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duke of edinburgh. —— the state. one has to wonder what the queen was thinking as she arrived here today, knowing he went into hospital last night, knowing this was a day where she wanted to be at the races, rather than the state opening of parliament, and having to be accompanied by prince charles rather than her husband. arriving by car, ina hat, than her husband. arriving by car, in a hat, that on twitter, a lot of comment, because many people think it rather looks like the european union flag. we know that the queen has a wonderful sense of humour. i don't know how far it goes. talking more about the content of the speech. we mean out, rachel, and caroline, rachel, iwonder, jeremy corbyn, seems to have a new lease of life, swanning around as though he won the vote! i know this is aggravating for the conservatives but the reality is that he is right
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to feel so confident, the labour party has secured 40% of the vote, there has been a surge, 13 million people have voted for them, they did not win, they are not the majority in parliament but they have been given a new lease of life and more importantly, the politics that the labour party has been proposing has resonated with people, there is vision for a country that the labour party has the labour party has presented, in the manifesto, that has resonated with people... you still came second. theresa may made the point to jeremy still came second. theresa may made the point tojeremy corbyn, he had come a good second. if the election was held today, he would win, that is what they are afraid of, that is why they are holding onto this zombie government with a zombie leader, they can barely govern, a com plete leader, they can barely govern, a complete mess but they would rather have this period of political instability, then run the risk of holding another election which the labour party would then win. caroline wheeler, zombie government, zombie prime minister?|j caroline wheeler, zombie government, zombie prime minister? i think that
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is the risk that she runs at the moment, we have seen a set of proposals put up for legislative change in this country, stopped far short of what was promised in the manifesto. head scratching today, will the triple lock be abandoned in favour of a double lock? winter fuel allowa nce ? favour of a double lock? winter fuel allowance ? a fairly favour of a double lock? winter fuel allowance? a fairly tetchy meeting of the lobby early on, when these questions were put to the prime minister's spokesperson. the response came, this is only set for a two—year period, that they fully intend this government will run for five years, so there is an opportunity further along the line to bring forward some other proposals in the manifesto. in all honesty, when pressed on the subject, how much of your manifesto have you put into this queen's speech, the answer can only be, very little. rachel, how united is labour on brexit, the major issue, of easily, still some confusion, chuka umunna has said, stay in the single
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market. that is not the manifesto pledge, what is going on? the labour party is no more disunited on brexit than any other party, obviously it is an issue that has thrown the entire political spectrum into uncertainty. but there is a very clear difference in the offer that the labour party has, with regards brexit. that is another thing that engage with people on the doorstep, they are the party that is trusted to deliver a brexit that for the majority of the population rather than a tiny elite. they are trusted with delivering a brexit that will put people's lives and economies first, ina put people's lives and economies first, in a way that the conservative government, now that they have this image of being for they have this image of being for the few, for the elite, serving rich people, not really having a vision for how this country can get out of the recession that it is mired in, labour's brexit proposal is gaining traction. we are out of time, thank
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you very much forjoining us. plenty more to come a little later on. back to you, ben and rebecca. studio: ina studio: in a moment, all the latest business news, rachel standing by. and a look of the financial markets and how they closed the day in europe. the main headlines: the government has set out a range of measures it hopes to bring into law over the next two years, with brexit at the top of the agenda. other measures include the introduction of an advocate for the victims of disasters, and a review of counterterrorism laws. the duke of edinburgh has been admitted to hospital as a precautionary measure. he is said to be up and about in hospital and in good spirits. there we gone from the grenfell tower tragedy, the funeral has taken place of the first of the victims to be identified. a 23—year—old, a syrian
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refugee. britain is experiencing its hottestjune refugee. britain is experiencing its hottest june day since 1976, refugee. britain is experiencing its hottestjune day since 1976, the temperature hit 34.4 degrees at heathrow. let's look at the numbers. pretty red. world wide stocks have been dragged down as the oil price stays at a seven—month low. banking stocks were doing badly and that pulled down the european markets altho a good performance from energy stocks stopped them sliding too much. —— although. here in the uk we're back on the sterling roller—coaster, it fell, it recovered, it's currently sat just above $1.27. we've had uncertainty over the dup
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deal, this mornings queen's speech, and perhaps most significantly the bank of england's chief economist seemingly contradicting the bank's governor on interest rates. one of the biggest fallers on the markets today was provident financial, a sub—prime lender that specialises in consumer credit and car finance. you might think they would be doing well as the uk's spenders bank record levels of debt, in fact their shares fell almost 20% this morning as the company issued a profit warning,in a moment we'll find out why. and have you heard of the msci emerging markets index? even if you haven't your pension fund might have. over 200 chinese companies listed on the chinese mainland have been approved for inclusion on the msci, three times in the last four years. —— approved for inclusion on the msci. three times in the last four years, msci said no to china over concerns
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that its financial markets aren't transparent enough. this week they have said yes, but what does that mean for uk based investors? well lets ask richard marwood, senior fund manager, royal london asset management. for the uninitiated, what is it and what is the significance of these chinese stocks being included ? the significance of these chinese stocks being included? they are a very large index provider, they decide what is a certain benchmark index. —— msci. they have decided they will include these chinese companies and once you are in an index, you will find passive tracker funds will have to buy whatever you have put in the index. historically, there has been a shining away from being exposed to chinese companies because there is uncertainty about the governance of the companies and also whether the markets are fully transparent. if there is too much government intervention. once that has been included in the benchmarks,
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you will get investors forced to by the companies. ordinarily invest investors. what is happening in sterling?l little bit of a roller—coaster, as you say, mixed messages out there, winding back a few weeks, the last vote of the monetary policy commission, it was surprising that the vote was as close as it was. —— monetary policy committee. the decision was to leave interest rates unchanged, the vote was 5—3, closer than expected, now on top of that we have had, as you say, contradictory messages, mark carney saying actually, he doesn't think interest rates will be rising any time soon. andrew hel buying, chief economist, has said that there will be a good case for rates having to rise. little bit of confusion on what was already a more balanced argument
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than what people had been expecting. the one thing to remember, looking back one year ago from today, actually, sterling is much weaker thanit actually, sterling is much weaker than it was one—year ago, one year ago we had not quite gone through the brexit vote. as we move forward over the next days and weeks, we will be back in a situation where the year—on—year comparison is a bit more balanced. —— andrew haldane. we will have gone through the step change one year ago. what that means in terms of inflation may be a little more straightforward, comparing like with like. provident financial, lending money to consumers who need credit, on car finance, you would think, when so many of us are racking up debt at record levels, business would be booming, they have issued a profit warning. what the company is saying, it is not an underlying problem with the market they are in, it is the way they have restructured the workforce. previously, they had a network of self—employed agents, who
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did the lending to the customers, and then did the collections of the payment, and they are going to now have a directly employed workforce, and they said, the change there is actually causing a lot of disruption. they are not able to collect as efficiently and not able to make new loans as efficiently as they would before. the nervousness is going to be the people concerned about the state of the uk economy. investors are probably keeping an eye out to see how much this is a stock specific issue, or it is a bit of deterioration in the underlying consumer credit area. thank you very much for your time. before we go, a quick peek at wall street, markets open and trading, markets a bit up, bit down, tech stocks up in the states, bit like europe, low oil prices... pulling down energy producers. seven—month
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low price for a barrel of oil, concerning some investors. they worry if points to week economic growth. hundreds of people today attended the funeral of 23—year—old mohammed alhajali who died in the grenfell tower fire. mohammed came to the uk in 2014 and was studying civil engineering while living in north kensington. the syria solidarity campaign has said he "undertook a dangerous journey to flee war and death in syria, only to meet it here in the uk, in his own home." he was the first victim to be formally identified by police. the number of people dead or missing and presumed dead has risen to 79, although that could still change. meanwhile some of the survivors are to be permanently rehoused in a housing development where some private homes
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start at more than £1.5 million. the 68 properties are "newly built social housing" in upmarket high street kensington. the government also confirmed that a public inquiry will also be held into the fire, and announced an independent public advocate to help bereaved families after major disasters. prince charles has visited the site of the sunday night's terror attack near to the finsbury park mosque in north london. he's been meeting members of the local community. let's go to our correspondent lisa hampele who's in north london for us. iamat i am at the welfare house in the courtyard , i am at the welfare house in the courtyard, people shouted out to him as he arrived, thank you for coming
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to visit us, thank you. he is inside but he did pause outside to look at the mounting flowers and messages, so many left over the last few yea rs. so many left over the last few years. messages of support, stand by me, we love you. a big roll of paper where children have written messages of love and hope. he met the imam, from here, mohammed matthew, one of those who helped when the van careered into the people after worship here on sunday night. he has met him. —— mohammad mahoud. he is inside, talking to interfaith community leaders. we have been told he has delivered a message from the queen. he said that the queen has specifically asked me to tell you how shocked she was by what happened, particularly as the victims were worshippers, who had been attending ramadan prayers, and
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her majesty's thoughts and prayers are with you all, that is what community leaders have been told. also meeting schoolchildren from the local secondary school, all in the courtyard around me. he will be coming out very soon to have a chat with them. he has been talking to people from part of the princes trust, an organisation that helps put role models for young people into deprived areas, particularly muslim communities, helping them. meeting a lot of people, talking about what happened, showing support. on monday, we have heard that he will be going to manchester to show support for victims of the terrorist attack. we will pause to look at the weather, all sorts of records being broken. yes, they are gone, hottest day of
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the year, hottest june yes, they are gone, hottest day of the year, hottestjune day for 40 years, 34.5 degrees recorded at london's heathrow airport, and numberof london's heathrow airport, and number of towns and cities have seen temperatures go above the 30 degrees mark, into the 90s, in terms of fahrenheit. we will see another warm night following tonight, temperatures 10pm, still up to 26 degrees. another uncomfortable one. change is on the way. hot air we have with us, cooler air running over the top, creating very energetic atmosphere, massive thunderstorms over the next 24 hours, and although they will be hit and miss in nature, not everyone will get a storm, one or two storms particularly nasty bringing torrential rain, gusty wind, hail as well. exact position and timing of storms, open to uncertainty, because of the amount of atmospheric energy around at the moment. first batch going in across scotland, wales,
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maybe across the midlands, through thursday, another clutch of storms, and to eastern counties. then the risk areas, fresh air following, temperatures coming back down, looking closer to normal. it's 5pm. our main story. the queen's speech in westminster — it's dominated by brexit as the government sets out its agenda for the next two years. in a dress—down state opening, the queen delivers a speech dominated by the uk's departure from the european union. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. in total, 27 bills have been announced with eight on brexit. the prime minister said her government was up to the challenge. a we are doing what is in the national interest which is forming a government for the country to face
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the challenges we have at the moment. with many key manifesto plans either axed or delayed after the election

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