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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  June 21, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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it's 5pm. our main story. the queen's speech in westminster — it's dominated by brexit as the government sets out its agenda for the next two years. in a dress—down state opening, the queen delivers a speech dominated by the uk's departure from the european union. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. in total, 27 bills have been announced with eight on brexit. the prime minister said her government was up to the challenge. a we are doing what is in the national interest which is forming a government for the country to face the challenges we have at the moment. with many key manifesto plans either axed or delayed after the election result the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, went on the attack. a threadbare legislative programme from a government that's lost it's majority and run out of ideas all together. i'm clive myrie, the main news
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on the bbc news at five. and in the victims and grenfell tower disaster have taken place. theresa may apologised for the official response, saying it wasn't good enough. the duke of edinburgh has been admitted to hospital but is said to be in good spirits. and parts of the uk are basking in the hottestjune day since 1976 with a temperature of 33.9c recorded at heathrow. good afternoon from westminster. our main story at 5pm. new measures to prepare britain for brexit have dominated the government's legislative the government's legislative
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priorities set out in the queen's speech. of the 27 bills that were announced by her majesty, eight were linked to brexit. there were also announcements on terror and security legislation and domestic violence, but there was little mention of the more controversial elements of the conservatives‘ manifesto, such as grammar schools. so what was in it? the main focus was brexit and the great repeal bill, with the government saying it wants to build the ‘widest possible consensus‘. there were also proposals for new national legislation covering immigration, trade, agriculture and fisheries. there will be a new counter—extremism commissioner to help tackle the growth of extremism in society and online, as well as a review of the counter—terrorism strategy and the laws and penalties covering terror offences. there will be new measures to help deal with disasters such as the fire at the grenfell tower in london. a new public advocate will be introduced to act on behalf of the bereaved. industry was also mentioned, with an announcement of new bills for investment in electric cars, the space industry, and h52.
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there will be a new bill to help protect the victims of domestic violence. and mental health treatment will be prioritised within the nhs. with the latest from here in westminster our political correspondent, gary o‘donoghue, reports. no carriage, no horses, no prince philip who was admitted to hospital yesterday for an infection. he is said to be up and about and in good spirits. some things don‘t change. the commons slamming the door in the face of black rod reminding them on the privacy of the lower chamber.
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theresa may hoped to lead a bigger number of mps today but it wasn‘t to be. it was the labour leader left smiling. this is the 64th time the queen has done this. theresa may, her 13th prime minister. queen has done this. theresa may, her13th prime minister. my government‘s priority is to secure the best possible deal as the country leads the european union. brexit dominated this speech. eight separate bills covering areas such as agriculture, immigration and trade. we wish to maintain a deep and special partnership with european allies and good trading relationships across the globe. there are 27 bills and draft bills including measures for a review of counterterrorism to deal with extremism and protect the public. a
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d raft extremism and protect the public. a draft of domestic violence and abuse bill to bring in new protections and sentencing powers. plus legislator —— legislation about data protection. equally obvious was what was left out of the speech. grammar schools, the cap on energy bills downgraded to a consultation and no mention of the reduction of benefits for the elderly. with the queen gone, labour lost little time tearing into the prime minister‘s programme for government. at their legislative programme from a government whose lost its majority and ran out avoided altogether. this would be a thin legislative programme even if it was the one year, but the two years? there‘s not enoughin year, but the two years? there‘s not enough in its fill up one year. year, but the two years? there‘s not enough in its fill up one yearlj call the prime minister. when the
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prime minister got to her feet, call the prime minister. when the prime minister got to herfeet, a rousing cheer from her prime minister got to herfeet, a rousing cheerfrom her own side. after sending her condolences to the victims of the recent terror attacks, she had this to say that the grenfell tower tower fire and the grenfell tower tower fire and the response to it. the support on the response to it. the support on the ground for families the response to it. the support on the ground forfamilies in the response to it. the support on the ground for families in the initial hours were not good enough. people were left without belongings, rooms over their heads, and basic information about where to go and where to seek help. that was a failure of the state, local and national to help people when they needed it most. as prime minister, i apologise for that failure. on the thrust of her programme, she said she would work every day to win the trust of british people with humility and resolve. this is about grasping opportunities for every
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community in our country to benefit as we leave the eu. it‘s about delivering the will of the british people with a brexit deal that works for all parts of the united kingdom which raises importance for public support. the snp said theresa may had failed to deliver any stability and people felt uneasy knee. —— uneasy. these are uncertain and u nsta ble uneasy. these are uncertain and unstable times that the country is now facing. i can‘t imagine anyone is feeling secure. there's still no deal finalised between the conservatives and the democratic unionist party. the prime minister still can‘t be certain that she has the votes to get it through. i am joined now by peter dowd, labour‘s shadow chief
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secretary to the treasury. the queen didn‘t take the carriage so that centre message. there was a tone of it that indicated it perhaps wasn‘t a real queen‘s speech. it had no substance. a huge repeal bill amongst it, isn‘t that the government‘s right to make that the prime —— priority. government‘s right to make that the prime -- priority. no 1's denying that because of the wealth needed for the economy, but whatever happened in the general election, we knew brexit would be the dominant element for the next 4—5 years. that apart, what's left there that is what we are going to be doing the
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next two years? it's pretty scrappy. yet, on brexit, your party feel split over the way forward. some suggesting we should stay in the single market, while the manifesto says no, we are out of that and the customs union. how united is your party? it is united in the fact that we once the exact same benefits in relation to the single market and the customs union, though we may well be out but that is where you negotiate with the eu, and i think, we, as the labour party, are in a better position to discuss. they have been using a megaphone tone with this. now they have to try and change their time again. just looking at what was not in the speech today. social care, the
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so—called dimension attached, —— the so—called dimension attached, —— the so—called dimension attached, —— the so—called dimension attacks. —— demnetia tax. there was a discussion about the finance bill, regarding tax cuts but there are holes in it. do you think corbyn is either playing? he was walking around speaking as though they had. —— has overplayed it. around speaking as though they had. -- has overplayed it. ithink around speaking as though they had. -- has overplayed it. i think he got the time right in terms of sending a
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message of hope to the country and i think that resonated throughout the election, as opposed to the government who went on with business as usual, more austerity, shouting johnny foreigner, so i think it is tone. it was a more hopeful tone today. let's find out what is going on in the central lobby in the house of commons. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at the house of commons. it was not the result anyone thought. neither the conservatives nor labour. so whenjeremy corbyn comes in, there is a big cheer, and when theresa may comes in, it‘s more muted. this has been about the fire in west london, even the warm up of speeches which are supposed to be
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the comic turns, although there were somejokes, we heard various mps talking about a country which is not at ease with itself. we heard theresa may talking about division, and how she hoped she could overcome those rather than deflecting them, and jeremy corbyn too, saying that labour were a government in waiting, focusing very much on austerity. saying it‘s all very well to praise the emergency service in times of crisis but they need to be properly funded. but there is no doubt that brexit is dominating. although it jeremy corbyn is saying it‘s a threadbare speech, what they are trying to achieve with brexit is absolute huge. they need to bring in absolute huge. they need to bring in a whole new immigration system, these are massive challenges before you even begin to think that this is
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a government that does not have a majority. they are still trying to get the dup onside. there are lots of people not happy about this. i don‘tjust mean of people not happy about this. i don‘t just mean opposition of people not happy about this. i don‘tjust mean opposition mps, i also mean conservatives who think she was too quick to say they would have a deal with the dup which has not yet been signed up. we have heard over the last week or so about the idea that more money might be put into northern ireland, rumours that they are demanding billions to go into infrastructure in northern ireland and great concern from tory mps, having said about divisions and austerity, that in other parts of the united kingdom, people will be very upset about the idea of all of that. there is uncertainty that the government sounds confident. it went necessarily be a coalition, it will bea necessarily be a coalition, it will be a much looser arrangement. the
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first test at that will come one week tomorrow, in this place. the queen‘s speech votes is next week and that‘s when we‘ll know whether theresa may has the acting of the government. —— the king of the government. —— the backing of the government. in the light of the recent attacks, the queen has also announced a review of the governments counter terror strategy. it comes as britain‘s most senior counter—terror officer delivered a stark warning to ministers over the impact on the police force as they attempt to contain the unprecedented threat. our correspondent, jonny dymond reports. behind the soldiers in their crisp dress uniforms, shirtsleeved armed police stand guard. spotters keep watch over the palace of westminster from every vantage point. everywhere, reminders, if they were needed, of the heightened state of alert. this is the police response to terror, from inside the palace came the response of the government. in the light of the terrorist attacks in manchester and london, my government‘s counterterrorism
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strategy will be reviewed to ensure that the police and security services have all the powers they need and that the length of custodial sentences for terrorism related offences are sufficient to keep the population safe. but the police have more urgent concerns. britain‘s top counterterror police officer, mark rowley, wrote to the home secretary last week. he told her that prioritising counterterror would involve difficult choices. he warned of a potentially significant impact on other police operations and he asked the home secretary to avoid uncertainty over funding so that the police could plan properly. from the head of london‘s police today, an admission that policing terror was stretching the met. we are shifting resources
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and people across the met. it does have an impact on other investigations. we have had to pause some and slow down on some. and that is just a necessity. the government says it has boosted money to counter terror but the police say they are stretched. to all the challenges, police chiefs have added another. the resources to keep crime under control. johnny dymond, bbc news. let‘s now speak to boris johnson. and be as brief as i can. did you sense after this afternoon‘s proceedings that theresa may can get through the next few weeks, months,
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absolutely. what was striking about the debate was that labour said there‘s nothing much in the queen‘s speech, but there‘s an opportunity to get brexit done and right. the challenge for labour and the people who oppose the government, when you look at stuff like tackling domestic violence, measures to tackle fees, do you really want to oppose that stuff? the only things that were announced today. what about the things that weren‘t there? announced today. what about the things that weren't there? there we re things that weren't there? there were measures to put the uk in the lead on electric vehicles, green vehicles, space flights. you've mentioned space before in one of the
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speeches... i‘m not going to hide it from you that we didn‘t do as well in the election as we hoped to do, and everybody understands that. but, the fact is we are 56 seats ahead of the fact is we are 56 seats ahead of the nearest party, that is labour. so that we have a duty, theresa may has a duty to deliver the priorities of the people, which includes getting a great brexit deal, global trade and all the rest of it. the economic things we need to get this country‘s position is strong. economic things we need to get this country's position is strong. she's looking ahead. does she need to look around at what is going on behind her back? of course... people will wa nt to her back? of course... people will want to talk about this sort of
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stuff, but there is no appetite whatsoever in the governing party for anything like that. we want to just get on... you haven't got a tea m just get on... you haven't got a team together looking at... there is no desire in the tory party or in the country... lets face it. we have had the general election in 2015, then a referendum in 2016, then brenda from bristol said another election? people have had it with political shenanigans and electioneering so they will look at that queen‘s speech barely. there will be a lot of things that we can ta ke forward. will be a lot of things that we can take forward. the trouble is you have got to get a team together, you
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had a leadership bid and it didn‘t work. we talking about a country where you go to the pub on a saturday night and meet michael fallon... genuinely... you can talk to any of us in the tory party, we are united behind... getting through this period, a great queen‘s speech. trying to get the bills forward. the question is for labour, when they look at this stuff, what is it that they don‘t like? i will give you an example. there is a bellevue are bringing in —— there is a bill we are bringing in to deal with whiplash claims. it‘s massively increased. i don‘t know if you have tried to get car insurance for your kids, but it is very expensive, and
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the reason it is, is because of all these bogus claims for whiplash. and actually... i don't. .. these bogus claims for whiplash. and actually... i don't... this these bogus claims for whiplash. and actually... i don't. .. this affects millions. are you saying it's a minuscule number? people here are not losing sleep over their car insurance. they are paying a lot of money for it. they and losing sleep over social care, demnetia tax... people in front of you people are saying that austerity is an issue. 0n housing, let‘s see what labour says about our plans to cap deposits the tenants, to make sure that letting agents do not continue to
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charge unnecessary fees, running into hundreds of pounds. that‘s a progressive measure. it will help people with rental accommodation. it's people with rental accommodation. it‘s the right thing to do to the country club. —— the country. we expect to build a million homes in 2020, and then another 500,000 in the following year. can may resist this? they should get behind us. i wa nt this? they should get behind us. i want theresa may to get on with the job and be supported in her work. there is no... shouting
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i think this is a kind of...|j i think this is a kind of... i feel i have one supporter there! there area i have one supporter there! there are a lot of people being egged on by momentum, corbyn‘s activists. to ta ke by momentum, corbyn‘s activists. to take a very direct approach. i think the abuse and the name—calling and all that... the abuse and the name—calling and all that. .. but... i the abuse and the name—calling and all that... but... ithink all that is turning people of politics. i'm going to let you go but what‘s the naughtiest thing you have ever done? it would be difficult for me to nominate any particular thing and
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now is not the moment to do it. thank you very much,. you will have heard some shouting there. there you are. helicopter getting a site of a number of protesters. a day of rage being held to coincide with the queen‘s speech. protesters march into downing street this afternoon, and as you can see, heavy police presence there to keep an ion. presence there to keep an eye on. some people also demonstrating against the government and local government following the grenfell tower fire. down in government following the grenfell towerfire. down in parliament square, some of them heading over,
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and some of them telling boris johnson what they think of him! if you did hearany johnson what they think of him! if you did hear any of their words, i do apologise, unfortunately, there are some things we just cannot control. i am joined now by max hill qc, an independent reviewer of terrorism legislation. borisjohnson has said how important this new bill would be. what is your impression of where the government wa nts to impression of where the government wants to go with this? what has been announced in the queen‘s speech is a review of powers that the police and security services have and potential sentencing provisions. there may be new statutory offences created, however it could also mean a mature reflection on maximising the use of the current statutory powers. i have said previously, that i cannot
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identify, and have not identified, the need for fresh terrorism offences, and i know this from working on cases that we do not a lwa ys working on cases that we do not always need to charge people under terror acts, we can use other legislation. what about sentencing? it may or may not need legislation. tweaking powers can mean primary and secondary legislation, but i think there are offences put on the statute book 17 years ago that and now right for review. we are seeing activity coming for the courts where there is always, because parliament imposes it, the necessity for maximum sentences. imposes it, the necessity for maximum sentences. we need to see whether courts can impose the correct offences that some of the activity we are now sadly seeing.
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the difficulty is that when you are talking about people who are prepared to die in the process, it doesn‘t matter. prepared to die in the process, it doesn't matter. it won't matter to people like that, who are not charged under terror acts but common law, such as murder which carry life sentences. we need to look at the precursor, lesser offences, criminality of the terrorist mindset, and see whether in some of these cases, deterrent sentences are not high enough. brexit is crucial, is it to this? the uk have taken the lead in the field of security as our time as members of the eec, and it is vital that when we approached leaving, that lead, that experienced
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the authorities here have in dealing with terrorism isn‘t lost, and the one thing i hope is that all our partners abroad will continue to share intelligence and allow us to keep ourselves safe and make sure that they do that each and every time. prince philip was not at the queen‘s side this morning. buckingham palace had been admitted to —— have said he has been admitted to —— have said he has been admitted to hospital. it is a precaution, but do we have any more information? we only have the statement from earlier today. he has been admitted to king edward vi! hospital under a precautionary measure, because he had an infection linked to a pre—existing condition. they have given indication that there is no
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need for alarm. but at the age of 96, it is betterfor him to be treated in a hospital environment. he came by carfrom treated in a hospital environment. he came by car from windsor castle to central london last night and this is where he is being treated. the idea of no alarm, no panic, the prince of wales was on a visit to finsbury park mosque, when asked how his father was doing, he said, he is getting better. but it was decided at the age of 96 it was better for him to come to hospital. we don‘t know whether he was bender second night here, because nothing has come from buckingham palace, we imagine he would like to return home but there is no confirmation on that one way or another. he may be in hospital taking advantage of the air conditioning! i don‘t think there is
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any in buckingham palace! it‘s been the hottest day for a0 years. let‘s get you weather now. it's it‘s been over 90 in terms of fahrenheit. another warm evening. temperatures, 26 celsius in the centre of town. another uncomfortable night‘s sleep ahead. cooler at atlantic air arriving, and conditions for huge thunderstorms. not everybody will see them, but over the next 2a hours some may bring torrential rain. the storms at the moment are travelling across scotland. some of those could be torrential, and storms breaking out
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over other parts of the uk. chaotic in nature. some of the timing could make it difficult. that‘s your weather. this is the bbc news at 5pm, the headlines: the government has set out a range of measures it hopes to bring into law over the next two years, with brexit at the top of the agenda. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others to build the widest possible consensus on the country‘s future outside the european union. mp‘s debated the speech
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in the commons. the prime minister said her government could tackle the challenges the country faces, while the labour leader jeremy corbyn went on the attack. we are doing what is in the national interest which is forming a government to address the challenges that face this country at the moment. app for ed baird legislative programme from a government that lots its majority and apparently run out of ideas altogether. a week on from the grenfell tower tragedy the funeral has taken place of the first of the victims to be identified. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, was among the mourners at the service for mohammad alhajali, a 23—year—old syrian refugee. in the commons today theresa may apologised for the failures by local and national government in their response. meanwhile, survivors of the fire are to be rehoused in a luxury development
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in the heart of kensington. 68 one, two and three—bedroom flats have been acquired at the kensington row development. this report from vishala sri—pathma. family and friends following the hearse of 23—year—old in east london today. the civil engineering student was one of the first named victims of the grenfell tower fire. some of his family were granted permission to travel from syria to be at the funeral. they paid tribute to a caring son who came to the uk in search of a better life. he was a loving and caring person, always showing support and solidarity with his friends and family stuck back in syria. members of the wider muslim community attended the funeral including london mayor sadiq khan. community attended the funeral including london mayor sadiq khanlj will do everything i can as mayor of
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london to support the family and all the families who have lost loved ones, those families struggling to cope with the aftermath of the fire. just a few miles away is a luxury development, kensington row, where some of the survivors will be re—homed from july. the apartments are re—homed from july. the apartments a re newly re—homed from july. the apartments are newly built social housing in a complex with a price of private homes start at £1.5 million. inquests into the first few victims have been opened and adjourned today as the long process of identifying the missing residents continues. breaking news coming into us in the last few minutes, this comes from police in crewe, saying they are dealing with an incident, a crane has apparently collapsed trapping three people and the emergency services are at the scene. a p pa re ntly
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services are at the scene. apparently one person has been airlifted to hospital. this is from police in crewe. reports one person has been airlifted to hospital, any more on this we will bring to you when we get it. the prince of wales has been to finsbury park, where a van drove into a group of people on saturday who had been attending prayers outside the mosque. prince charles went to the muslim welfare house in finsbury park, to meet members of the local community and hear about the community response following the recent terrorist attack. among others he met local imam mohammed mahmoud, who witnessed saturday‘s attack. tesco has announced it‘s to close a call centre in cardiff — with the loss of more than a thousand jobs. a planned re—organisation would see the site close in february next year. the call centre operation will move to dundee, where 250 jobs will be created. 0ur wales correspondent, sian lloyd is in cardiff now. 0bviously
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obviously a bitter blow for people in the area, was this on the cards? no, this announcement came out of the blue. tesco house has been here in cardiff since 1990. it‘s a call centre but also i am told they handle some payroll accounts and financial services from here as well and we understand that this was a shock announcement really for a lot of people who work here. it‘s been described by the unions as devastating blow notjust for the workers but for the wider economy here. tesco have said they want to focus customer services operations on their base in dundee in scotland we re on their base in dundee in scotland were the already employ 900 people and they say they are going to create an extra 250 jobs. we have had a statement from tesco today, the chief executive mark davis
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saying the retail sector faces unprecedented challenges and they have to ensure they run their business in a sustainable and cost—effective way. whilst still meeting the challenging needs of customers. he did say this was a very difficult decision, that they wa nt to very difficult decision, that they want to support the staff here. unions will now be entering into a consultation period with the company, this has been described as a devastating blow for staff. the welsh government were not told about this until a5 minutes before the announcement was made public, since then the first minister of wales ca rwyn then the first minister of wales carwyn jones has then the first minister of wales carwynjones has spoken two davis and said he expressed his concern about this announcement and is calling for a generous packages for the staff and also offering help and financial help towards retraining. thank you.
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let‘s return to westminster now, simon. thank you. new measures to prepare britain for brexit have dominated the government‘s legislative priorities set out in the queen‘s speech. eight of the 27 bills are linked to brexit — including ending the free movement of eu citizens to the uk. reality check‘s chris morris looks at the scale of the task ahead. it was billed as the brexit election. even though it didn‘t always feel that way. but now the uk‘s departure from the eu is set to dominate the next parliament. inevitably the queen‘s speech, the biggest chunk is of bills relating to brexit, that‘s the overwhelming issue facing the government and parliament over the next two years. and as the government embarks on the most daunting set of negotiations this country has faced in decades, so too this new parliament, with no strong governing majority, will have to deal with an unprecedented legislative challenge. the main piece of legislation has been named by the government
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as the great repeal bill. and yes, it will repeal the european communities act and take us out of the eu. but its main purpose is really to transpose thousands and thousands of eu rules and regulations into british law, potentially as many as 20,000 pieces of legislation. the idea is to avoid a legal and financial vacuum when we leave. you‘re also going to be hearing quite a bit about this guy. henry viii. a henry viii clause allows the government to repeal or amend primary legislation without further parliamentary scrutiny, you can sneak it through when no one is looking. and in the brexit process, that could prove controversial. and then there are a series of bills which will need to be passed as a result of brexit. we need a new immigration policy, a new trade policy, there will be a customs bill. new policies on agriculture and fisheries. then we need a new international sanctions policy and there will be a nuclear safeguards bill because we‘re going to be leaving the eu‘s nuclear agency.
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right now we know very little detail on any of these bills. but they are going to be the nuts and bolts of brexit. and they will keep this parliament extremely busy. it will be a really big task to not only manage the great repeal bill, but these other bills that will be really important to shaping life after brexit. and there‘s the rub, the government has to push all this through with the most unstable majority imaginable. expect rebellions, threats and uncertainty. chris morris, bbc news. so mentis day here, in the last few minutes, ken clarke has said this in the house of commons. minutes, ken clarke has said this in the house of commonslj minutes, ken clarke has said this in the house of commons. i spoke and voted against the indication of article 50. i accept that the majority in favour of invoking it
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was quite overwhelming, and so i accept the matter is settled, we are definitely going to leave the european union. lets talk more about the day. i am joined now by the labour mp hilary benn and, for the conservatives, john whittingdale. thank you gentlemen. you are not actually cheer of the brexit committee at the moment but you have been, how big a task is this? we have just had been, how big a task is this? we havejust had some idea, people need to start working hard. it's enormous. we have both been on the brexit select committee and the more we have enquired into things the more i think we have come to realise the scale and complexity of the task. this is a parliament which will be dominated by brexit for the next two years, not just a great repeal bill but the new legislation announced today. for the regulation and decisions which are currently directly applicable in the uk the
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objective, which is to save the day after we leave, regulations should be the same as the day it was before so we all know where we stand. that‘s the right objective. it will bea that‘s the right objective. it will be a complex process but there is the follow—on legislation on agriculture and immigration and customs. lots and of legislation. we are doing all this against a ticking clock which is running down. with a prime minister who will struggle? the prime minister set out clearly our objectives and those objectives i think our objectives and those objectives ithink are our objectives and those objectives i think are very widely shared in both parties. everybody accepts the british people voted to leave the european union. we accept we need to get control of our borders and to be able to reach trade agreements but at the same time they want to maintain as close relations with europe as we can. that's generally common ground. it's a difficult task and the committee on which i hope both we will both be rejoining, will
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have a job overseeing that process. talking about united, is your party as united as is suggested? chuka umunna standing here saying we must stay in the single market a few hours ago and that was not a ma nifesto hours ago and that was not a manifesto pledge. there is a range of views within the party but the issueis of views within the party but the issue is disunity within the government because the prime minister has been saying for quite awhile that no deal is better than a bad deal but the chancellor said on sunday when asked about no deal, that it would be a very, very bad outcome for britain. i think he‘s right and if you‘re going to achieve tariff and barrier free trade which asjohn knows was the number one request put to us during our hearings, it is the policy of the it‘s also the policy of the labour party to ensure that. the quickest way to do that is to remain within the customs union and it deals with the customs union and it deals with the problem in northern ireland. i think what this election result which is not just think what this election result which is notjust taking away the
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prime minister‘s majority but also her authority, it means parliament will determine the brexit we have andi will determine the brexit we have and i think the idea we will leave without a deal is dead and buried. john whittingdale, in terms of where it goes from here, the prime minister is going to face a struggle pretty much with every vote you will see in house of commons, we could be infora see in house of commons, we could be in for a very long slog. do you believe there is a time—honoured on how long she can do that with authority? i think that's something we will find out in due course. my first parliament was john major's government in the late 905 when fir5t parliament wa5 john major'5 government in the late 905 when he continued for quite some time without a majority. but equally it wa5 without a majority. but equally it was a fairly miserable experience because as you say every vote was uncertain and it meant every mp had to be here every night. i feel that'5 to be here every night. i feel that's going to be the case. but nobody wants that's going to be the case. but nobody wa nt5 an that's going to be the case. but nobody wants an election, i don't think anyone in the country want5
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nobody wants an election, i don't think anyone in the country wants to go through that process again, we wa nt go through that process again, we want to make this work for the time being. did you bump into any mps from the dup and ask what is going on? not today, but! from the dup and ask what is going on? not today, but i know a few of them well and we have common view5. so why is this more drawn out? 0bviou5ly negotiations are still ongoing but it's not the end of the world that is not a formal agreement, governments have continued as minorities in house of commons in the past and i don think there'5 commons in the past and i don think there's any reason this one could not do the same if that becomes nece55a ry. not do the same if that becomes necessary. i think it's going to be a hand to mouth government in a very uncertain parliament. that‘s the consequence of the result we‘ve seen and the there is no agreement, with the dup, despite several days of negotiation, i don‘t know what the reason is behind that but it‘s going to be hard. 0ne reason is behind that but it‘s going to be hard. one thing i do welcome is that the election result has seen the end of the return of selection, a vote on fox hunting, the removal
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of winter fuel payments, meals for younger children, all that has disappeared and are not to be found in the queen‘s speech because that‘s what the election result... jeremy corbyn was behaving at times as though he had won election and he hadn‘t, you were still some way behind. indeed, and it is indeed for the leader of the largest party to attempt to a government which is what the prime minister has been doing but be in no doubt the election result itself has changed politics in this country and the fa ct politics in this country and the fact the prime minister today had to leave out of the queen‘s speech a whole load of things she fought the election an is a sign of the defeat she suffered even though the tories ended up is the largest party because she knows she can get us through the house of commons. the prioritie5 facing the government are in the queen's speech and priorities facing the government are in the queen's speech and the biggest one is brexit and getting it right. social care was mentioned in
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the queen's speech but it also said we needed to consult and talk to people before coming forward with final proposals, i don't think these things are off the agenda. talks continue with the dup about them supporting theresa may‘s government. a downing street spokesman said it was confident the queen‘s speech could "command the confidence" of the house of commons in a vote next week. joining me from belfast is nelson mccausland, a former dup member of the northern ireland assembly. i suspect you are perhaps not surprised these talks have still yet to reach fruition? well, i think there are a number of reasons for that possibly first of all the focus of attention for theresa may‘s government has been a whole range of things over the last number of days. 0bviously things over the last number of days. obviously the queen‘s speech but also the horrific events in various parts of great britain. the start of the brexit negotiations, there needs to bea the brexit negotiations, there needs to be a period of focus to get to a conclusion. the dup negotiators are experienced, seasoned in that
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regard. 0ver experienced, seasoned in that regard. over the years in northern ireland not only negotiating with westminster but also internally in northern ireland and with the irish republic. i would northern ireland and with the irish republic. iwould be northern ireland and with the irish republic. i would be quietly hopeful we will see something emerge over the next number of days.|j we will see something emerge over the next number of days. i can see the next number of days. i can see the smile, you clearly think there is an element of a know what they are doing and they will push it to the limit? clearly, if this parliament runs now for a number of yea rs parliament runs now for a number of years there are going to be many occasions when the government would be reliant on those ten dup seats andi be reliant on those ten dup seats and i think it‘s imperative therefore that the conservatives come to the best possible arrangement. i don‘t think anyone is trying to overplay their hand or trying to overplay their hand or trying to overplay their hand or trying to do anything that would be detrimental to the united kingdom, the dup is a unionist party, it wa nts the dup is a unionist party, it wants the best for northern ireland and also the united kingdom. and stability is important going into
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the brexit negotiations. we will not get that if the dup say we want such and such but england scotland and wales will say what about us? there are particular circumstances which need to be taken into account. some encouraging things in the queen‘s speech, a particular reference to strengthening the social and economic bonds between england, northern ireland, scotland and wales. that will be extremely popular with unionists and also with the conservatives in scotland and wales. there is also a reference to delivering the armed forces covenant across the united kingdom, that is interesting because up until now there has been difficult regarding northern ireland, and there is also reference to dealing with terrorism. iam reference to dealing with terrorism. i am encouraged because there are some tweaks to legislation i think would make it easier to deal with displays, particularly by dissident
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republican paramilitaries. displays, particularly by dissident republican pa ramilitaries. there displays, particularly by dissident republican paramilitaries. there are intriguing things in there. the mention of a financial package for northern ireland, when you start talking about billions of pounds, people in order murray life like ourselves, our eyes glaze over at about the amount bet in the scheme of budgets, whether it is the northern ireland budget or of the government budget, it would be over a number of years. investment in the health service could be seen as investment to save because the investment to save because the investment will enable northern ireland to have a more effective and efficient service and deliver better outcomes. the eyes glaze over and the smile widens slightly. outcomes. the eyes glaze over and the smile widens slightlylj outcomes. the eyes glaze over and the smile widens slightly. i am a lwa ys the smile widens slightly. i am always a happy person. thank you for joining us. let‘s talk more about the queen‘s speech and where we go from here. i‘m joined now by heather stewart, joint political editor
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of the guardian and kate proctor, political correspondent at the london evening standard. what did you think today has done for theresa may, we or strengthened her position? i think it has underlined how hemmed in she is on all sides by her own mps who are flexing their muscles, policies they might have been concerned about in the manifesto she has asked to be dropped and revisited. labour are also on the march so whilst she thinks she can get support from the dup for this queen‘s speech, what we don‘t know is if she has got the deal which will allow her to command. i was thinking about last july command. i was thinking about last july when we sat through her reshuffle and she was sacking george 0sborne, sending mickey morgan to the backbenches, an extraordinary display of power and now she is having to turn to every mp for every little bit of backing for every single policy and so many controversial bits of the manifesto
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are gone. george osborne is now your editor, what tone do you think the coverage of today will take, not just your paper but others tomorrow, will there be any sympathy for theresa may that this was a difficult day? i don't think so. it felt very uneasy, it feels as if she is onlyjust clinging on and in the chamber today we heard people cheering onjeremy chamber today we heard people cheering on jeremy corbyn for the first time, we've not had that for about a year or so. theresa may today defended it as best as she could put so much has been dropped, so could put so much has been dropped, so much conservative social policy and her own vision is completely absent so i don't think the coverage is going to be too pleasing. you will of course, there is a lot to chew over in terms of brexit, a numberof chew over in terms of brexit, a number of bills, she eat out all the areas, not entirely sure anyone expected, a few areas to look at. what was quite clear is the huge
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task facing everybody. what about the labour party? even here today different views on brexit against the manifesto, chuka umunna calling for us to stay in the single market, disunity there as well. yes, you still don't think labour are singing from the same hymn sheet, you have chuka umunna against jeremy corbyn, labour not quite united on brexit andl labour not quite united on brexit and i think they need to sort that out quickly. what do you make a jeremy corbyn today, he was behaving as though he had won? it was an extraordinary turnaround, he was on his toes, more importantly his backbench, where i sit in the press gallery it looks down on the labour benches and it was populated with new faces and even old faces who would sit there through clenched teeth, they were applauding and absolutely mind him. the speech
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jeremy gave felt like a victory speech and he made it clear labour are going to fight any measure they possibly can, do what they can to make theresa may... boris johnson standing where you are not long ago said any talk of a leadership challenge is ridiculous, what is really going on? part of it i think is now one is particularly keen on thejob at this is now one is particularly keen on the job at this point, right? is now one is particularly keen on thejob at this point, right? these negotiations are going to be really tough, we have already caved in on the timetable in, it‘s going to be a very tough period and i think mp‘s on both sides of the party will feel they can imprint their vision on theresa may and the way she conducts those negotiations without having to ta ke those negotiations without having to take over the leadership. we have seen take over the leadership. we have seen philip hammond saying he did not like the campaign and we need to dojobs fast in not like the campaign and we need to do jobs fast in brexit, not like the campaign and we need to dojobs fast in brexit, be open not like the campaign and we need to do jobs fast in brexit, be open to immigration. she is there but they are able to control her and get more
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of what they won because she is a diminished figure. would boris want to ta ke diminished figure. would boris want to take over at this point, i am not sure. there is chatter about david davies but i think in terms of boris johnson it's been very quiet and thatis johnson it's been very quiet and that is from backbenchers i know who really like and support him. david davis is going to be quite busy isn‘t he? davis is going to be quite busy isn't he? great to talk to you, thank you very much for your time. just want to give you a quick update on another breaking story, three people trapped after a crane collapsed in crewe. a spokeswoman saying they are dealing with an incident, emergency services are working at the scene, the driver has been airlifted to hospital, that the latest from there. it is hot, so hot, we have been here all day and it got hotter and hotter. the uk basking in its hottestjune day in
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a1 yea rs. the uk is basking in its hottest june day in a1 years, with a temperature of 33.9c recorded at heathrow. the reading from the met office at the london airport makes it the warmest day on record since 1976, surpassing 33.8 on 30 june 1995. time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. if it's if it‘s too hot to handle things will be cooling down over the next few days, we have recorded 3a.5 at heathrow airports all those temperatures going up by a few tenths of a degree, the full data coming later this evening. these temperatures could change but the hottestjune temperatures could change but the hottest june day we temperatures could change but the hottestjune day we have seen in over a0 yea rs. hottest hottestjune day we have seen in over a0 years. hottest day of the year as well. temperatures will be slow to fall away, 26 degrees in london still at 10pm, another
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uncomfortable night but one of our weather watchers got some interesting clouds earlier today, this is the type of cloud you often see before outbreak of summertime thunderstorms and that is exactly what we will be seeing because of changes on the way. hot air near the service and colder air in the atmosphere creating unstable conditions which are going to be perfect for making big thundery downpours. not everyone will see the thunderstorms, they will be scattered in nature but were they do a car there could be one or more which brings torrential rain, gusty winds. storms working across scotland, some of them looked to be savage at the moment, another batch of storms could break out across northern ireland and the midlands as we get onto thursday the rest of storms transferring into eastern parts of england. by this stage more fresh air across most parts of the
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uk so temperatures getting that bit closer to normal but it was doubly pretty warm across east anglia and south—east england, temperatures of 26 in london still warmer than it should be. further west with bright traditions, a fresher feel to the weather, temperatures in cardiff 30 today, 20 tomorrow. similar conditions for northern england, fresher feel to the weather. sunshine for a time in northern ireland before things cloud over, and bright weather forecast for scotland. by that only get to friday, might still get a fresh wind picking up, temperatures close to average, rain pleasing to showers, most average, rain pleasing to showers, m ost a cross average, rain pleasing to showers, most across north—western parts of the uk, 25 degrees in london but otherwise tempters back to normal and that of course means more co mforta ble and that of course means more comfortable conditions for sleeping overnight. the weekend forecast dry weather, bright sunny spells, temperatures generally into the high teens to low 20s. the heatwave coming to an end but for some it
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will end of a bang. tonight at six — a queen‘s speech with a difference — several key pledges from the tory manifesto are missing. no crown, no gown — some of the pomp and ceremony was missing too. the queen read out what‘s left of the government‘s programme. it‘s dominated by brexit. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others to build the widest possible consensus on the country‘s future outside the european union. theresa may had hoped to dominate this parliament — but it‘sjeremy corbyn who‘s smiling now. a threadbare legislative programme from government that‘s lost its majority and, apparently, run out of ideas altogether. the test for all of us is whether we choose to reflect divisions or help the country overcome them.
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