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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 22, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. the kensington council chief executive quits over the response to the grenfell fire in which at least 79 people died. nicholas holgate says he was asked by the government to resign. he's described the fire as "heart—breaking" but says his continued presence would be a "distraction". good morning, it's thursday the 22nd ofjune. also this morning: as theresa may faces eu leaders today for the first time since the brexit talks began — she'll outline plans to protect the rights of european citizens in the uk. more than half of british summer fruit and salad growers could be short of migrant workers to harvest their crops this summer olivia campbell's mother tells us
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how she will remember her daughter. i don't want her to be remembered as a victim of somebody who killed her with a bomb. i want her to be remembered as olivia, the girl that she was. more than half of british summer fruit and salad growers could be short of migrant workers to harvest their crops this summer with many blaming the fall in the value of the pound and uncertainty following brexit and there's concern the shortage could get worse. sol soiam at so i am at this robbery farm this morning looking at strawberries and other fruits, to find morning looking at strawberries and otherfruits, to find out morning looking at strawberries and other fruits, to find out what it will mean for the industry. —— strawberry farm. he may play a crime boss in his latest blockbuster but we'll hear why kevin spacey says he's one of the good guys on set. it's ladies day at ascot. carol and sally are there. in sport, the lions team is named for the first test against new zealand. ireland's peter o'mahony skippers the side and there's some surprise inclusions amongst the backs. but it is one of the biggest days in the racing calendar, gold cup day. and it is ladies day. did you know you can arrive by helicopter? is that how you came this morning?
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carol, i think you know that we came ina van. carol, i think you know that we came in a van. yes. the weather forecast today's fresher than it has been for the last few days, and for many of us the last few days, and for many of us it will stay dry. there will be some showers, some of them thundery. we will be back with more later on. good morning. first, our main story. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned after criticism of the authority's response to the grenfell tower fire. in a statement, nicholas holgate said the government had demanded his resignation. he's described the fire as "heartbreaking" but says he would have been a distraction if he had stayed in his post. yesterday, the prime minister apologised for failing victims in the wake of the tragedy — and said she will put things right. tom burridge reports. how was this possible? will people be held to account? and why, as the prime minister herself has now admitted, was the response following
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the fire in adequate. the support on the fire in adequate. the support on the ground for families the fire in adequate. the support on the ground forfamilies in the fire in adequate. the support on the ground for families in the initial hours was not good enough. people were left without belongings, without roofs over their heads, without roofs over their heads, without even basic information about what had happened, what they could do and where they could seek help. that was a failure of the state, local and national, to help people when they need it most. as prime minister, i apologise for that failure. without apology after so much anger in the days following the fire. —— that apology. some of it directed at the government, some at the local council. now the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council says the government has forced him to resign. in a statement, nicholas holgate said: new flats have now been allocated
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for survivors of the fire. so far thatis for survivors of the fire. so far that is have received some £700,000 from the government. but a conservative government and council are still under pressure. were warnings ignored? why wasn't more done to improve fire safety and tower blocks before a tragedy on this scale could happen? theresa may is expected to offer certainty to eu nationals living in the uk when she meets with european leaders in brussels. it will be the prime minister's first encounter with the other 27—leaders since she lost her parliamentary majority and formal negotiations to leave europe began. our political correspondent ben wright reports. it was a queen's speech dominated by brexit. my government's hierarchy is to secure the best possible deal as the country leaves the european union. with britain set to leave the
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eu by march 2017 there is a vast amount of passed by a government with no majority in the house of commons. today theresa may heads to brussels for the first time since she lost her commons majority in the general election. brexit negotiations began on monday and one of the sticking point is how to secure the status of the more than 3 million eu nationals living in the uk and the 900,000 britons living overseas. this evening theresa may will set out her vision to the leaders of the 27 member states in brussels which she refused to be drawn on in the election campaign. labour says these rights should be guaranteed immediately. how this early pa rt guaranteed immediately. how this early part of the negotiation goes could be crucial to set the tone for the rest of the brexit talks. our political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. to what extent is this statement
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that theresa may will make in brussels, to what extent is it a change from what she said previously? people will be thinking back, her thinking seemed to have been that to say in advance or she would do would undermine her negotiation? that is right. the negotiations started with david davies effectively firing the starting gun on monday. he will meet the chief negotiator michel barnier. what they want to address was the question of eu citizen rights and uk citizens, 1 million of them living in the eu. they have come forward with proposals which we won't see until monday. i am surprised if they won't leak before that. theresa may will discuss it for half an hour at this two—day summit in brussels. we have heard it will be a generous offer to eu citizens. we will see how it goes down. what you are getting at is well is she said in the election campaign to voters to
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strengthen her hand and she is going with a weaker hand because of a lack ofa with a weaker hand because of a lack of a parliamentary majority and she hasn't got a deal with the dup, which makes it absolutely certain, i know it is likely, to make is certain she can stay in power during the negotiations. to an extent she has to give a peace offering to the eu from the outset to get on the front foot in these negotiations, having obviously not achieved a stronger mandate from the people that she might have felt would have given her a bit more clout when she was negotiating with the other 27 countries. thank you. the government is to spend £75 million trying to reduce the numbers of migrants crossing the mediterranean from africa into europe. the money will be used to meet the cost of paying for migrants to go home, and forfood, water and medical care. the un says 70,000 people have made the journey so far this year and almost 2,000 have died. the duke of edinburgh has spent
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a second night in hospital as a precautionary measure, after being admitted with an infection arising from a pre—existing condition. buckingham palace says prince philip, who's 96, remains in good spirits and is up and about inside king edward the 7th hospital. he missed yesterday's state opening of parliament, where his place was taken by the prince of wales, and a second day at ascot. two men have died after a crane collapsed at a building site in crewe. another man, who is believed to be the crane driver, is in hospital with serious injuries that aren't thought to be life—threatening. the occupants of a house damaged by the falling crane were not injured. british summer fruit and salad producers are struggling to recruit enough migrant workers to harvest their crops, according to a bbc survey. more than half of the businesses that took part weren't sure if they would have enough staff — many blame the weak pound and uncertainty over brexit. the vast majority of pickers come from bulgaria and romania. it's being claimed a growing number of young people are having cosmetic procedures such as botox because of online pressure.
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the nuffield council on bio—ethics says some social media sites where photos can receive positive or negative ratings, have increased levels of anxiety over body image. this report by our health correspondent, dominic hughes, contains flash photography. as social media brings us closer to the world of celebrity are younger people trying to look like their idols? the influence of those with millions of followers is hard to gauge. doctors who specialise in cosmetic work including botox and dermalfillers cosmetic work including botox and dermal fillers say when celebrities speak their fans listen. it may be a couple of pictures posted on instagram. they go out to tens of millions of followers. all of a sudden the girls are looking at it, and young boys as well. they see that as aspirational and associated
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with success, money, power. that is what they want. the cosmetic procedure industry is largely unregulated. numbers are hard to come by. for the last decade it has seen a come by. for the last decade it has seen a greater availability and affordability. most young people are living in social media. after a two—year study researchers are calling for better education, regulation and corporate responsibility. the social media industry, snapchat, instagram, should take more responsibility. we are not saying that they are promoting these things. it is through those media. the fear is social media, central to many lives, is also feeding anxiety about appearance and driving the growth in unregulated cosmetic procedures. many of the uk's top universities have failed to achieve the highest award in the first major assessment of teaching standards. more than half of those that entered the teaching excellence framework did not score a gold rating.
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our education correspondent gillian hargreaves reports. in future universities in england will bejudged on in future universities in england will be judged on the quality of teaching and be awarded a bronze, silver or gold rating. if they want to charge undergraduates £9,250 per year they have to prove students get value for money. nottingham trent which attracts many students from less well off backgrounds achieved the highest award. over all 59 universities gained a gold. 116 were rated silver and 56 achieved bronze. it is measuring how likely the university is going to be at helping you get a good job. it is measuring whether the university has systems in place to keep you on your course when things are tough. it is measuring the effectiveness and speed of feedback on your work. it
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is looking at the quality of library and other learning resources. some prestigious universities have scored less well. london school of economics, liverpool and southampton are members of the elite russell group but only achieved bronze. experts have warned students shouldn't just use these experts have warned students shouldn'tjust use these rankings to decide where to study. a song to raise money for those affected by the grenfell tower fire hit the number one spot on itunes just two hours after it was released. more than 50 music stars including stormzy, craig david and liam payne, recorded bridge over troubled water to support victims‘ families and survivors. # i refuse to be silenced. # i refuse to neglect you. the cover version of the simon and garfunkel classic was organised by simon cowell. it was unbelievably shocking and at
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the time i was thinking, what can you do, personally. everyone felt the same way. you want to do something. since i have a record label, what they can do is to make a record. i was thinking at the time raise money and i thought raise awareness and raise some support. i wa nted awareness and raise some support. i wanted it to be something that weeks, months later, when you hear the record, you remember what happened. talking about the single that has been released, bridge over troubled cattina water, and we will bring you more later. sally and carol are at ascot today. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mirror is looking at the g re nfell tower the daily mirror is looking at the grenfell tower blaze and this is the remains of the building as crews search the block for victims and
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assessed our victims were poisoned by cyanide following the installation gave off a lethal gas. yes, many stories emerging in connection with the investigations, or the lack of them. the guardian says the grenfell tower renovations inspected 16 times by kensington and chelsea council but they failed to prevent use of the flammable cladding which many people say was responsible for the fast spread of the fire. theresa may is the focus of the front of the times and she says she faces revolt over the brexit laws. and her vow to see brexit laws. and her vow to see brexit through has been thrown into doubt after the scottish parliament and house of lords could join hostile mps to block legislation. the daily telegraph looking at this as well. she has been warned of a looming brexit constitutional crisis. we will speak with philip
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hammond later on in about one hour or so hammond later on in about one hour orso and we hammond later on in about one hour or so and we will speak to him about how he thinks negotiations will go. the front of the daily mail have taken some clips of an interview that prince harry has done with a us magazine in which he was talking about issues around looking at the monarchy more generally and around how members of the royal family feel about the possibility of becoming king. you can see the headlines. they have taken some of the quotes from a us magazine. the daily express taking a note that prince philip is in hospital. he is being treated for an infection. and says the queen put on a brave face yesterday, going to ascot after opening parliament. he has spent a second night in the hospital. he was going tojoin the second night in the hospital. he was going to join the events. we are going to join the events. we are going to join the events. we are going to get all of the weather first part a couple of stories in
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relation to the weather. i am well aware that it wasn't everywhere. in various parts of the country it wasn't very hot. some ideas here. one study says if you work in an office they should give you time. people talk about staying out of the sun. this is suggesting you need a certain amount of vitamin d and you do it when it is safe with the requisite amount of cream on. do it when it is safe with the requisite amount of cream onlj do it when it is safe with the requisite amount of cream on. i am factor 50, you have to get your skin say. and we loved pet stories, don't we. can you imagine, it is hot enough for us, imagine if you have a fur coat. it will be even worse. fans, paddling pools, doggie ice cream. pet owners had been putting methods of keeping pets cool online. animal welfare volunteer charlotte fielder has kept her dog called by soaking a cleaning cloth. this bow on this dog is a cleaning cloth soaked in water and then fashioned
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asa soaked in water and then fashioned as a neckerchief. is it a myth that ice cream keeps you call? a hot cup of tea is supposed to keep you cool. it is less of a shock. that is right. what is the picture today with carol? you have a rather magnificent hat, carol. thank you. it is a bit easy, i hope it stays on. it is lovely here at ascot, not as human as it has been for the last few days. —— unit. that is the forecast for the next few days, it is going to be changeable and fresher. if you have had trouble sleeping, tonight will be easier. you can see behind me the royal box with the crest. the pink chair, too. that is where, historically, people propose. isay that if you propose to somebody on that if you propose to somebody on that pink chair, royal ascot will provide you with a bottle of champagne to celebrate. weather that
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is true or not i don't know, i haven't put it to the test. the weather forecast for ascot today is cloudy. we will see sunny intervals as we go through the day. the high temperature around 22. if you compare that to yesterday, when we have the warmest day of the year so far, that was 34.5 at heathrow. that is quite a drop in temperature. so much more pleasant if you are out and about. today we start off with some thunderstorms. we have got some across the south—east and east anglia. the pollen level is also very high. some of those i had been thundery. through the day they will push into the north sea. then we have another line of them coming in across north wales, heading in the direction of north—east england as we go through the day, particularly around yorkshire. one showers in scotla nd around yorkshire. one showers in scotland ahead of a band of rain in the north—west in the afternoon, but equally they will be lots of dry weather and sunny spells as well. it is the same away from the thundery showers in the north of england. in the midlands, more cloud than we
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have been used to, nonetheless there will be some sunny breaks. the re m na nts of will be some sunny breaks. the remnants of these showers across east anglia, and meanwhile, across southern counties of england, here too we have some brighter breaks. but more cloud again then in the last few days. temperatures also significantly lower. into the south—west, lots of dry weather around. what's of cloud across western areas. we will hang onto that as we go through the afternoon and the same for wales. brighter spells developing with 12 showers left. one to make showers not impossible across northern ireland. as we head through the evening and overnight we will see more rain coming in across northern ireland and scotland. the wind will also pick up. meanwhile, we see the showers exit into the north sea. for many of us, much more comfortable for sleeping and then we have seen lately. temperatures well down, for some of the last few days we have had temperatures in the high teens and even in the low 20s. they are going back down, closer to where they should be. as we head into tomorrow, tomorrow of course being
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friday. we are looking again at changeable conditions. the rain band comes out, heavy at times across the north and central areas. as it moves south, we will see that rain tending to weaken. most of it will be in the west on the hills. behind it, some sunny spells and also showers. saturday, rather windy across the north in particular. but it will be breezy wherever you are. more rain in the north—west, and some of us will see some showers. so more like what we would expect that this time of year. certainly the temperatures will be much more than we would expect at this time of year. if you are fed up with it being muggy and hot like it has been, this will be light relief coming your way. it's 06:20 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's been the saddest and most difficult of times, with four terror attacks in the space ofjust three months — three in london and one in manchester. in march, five people were killed in an attack on westminster.
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two months later 22 people, many of them young girls, lost their lives at a pop concert in manchester. eight people were then killed in a third attack on london bridge and borough market. and then on monday a mosque in finsbury park was targeted. this morning, four weeks after so many were killed at that manchester concert, louise has been speaking to the mum of one of those who died, 15—year—old olivia campbell—hardy. i will remember livia as the cheeky little girl that she was, always singing, laughing, jumping on my bed. —— olivia. just the typical olivia, really. # what are we going to do without your smart mouth? her singing and her dancing and her make up singing and her dancing and her make up were the three most important things in her life. her singing, she
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absolutely lives for her singing. everywhere she went, she saying. tell us a little bit about how she would have been at that concert, because she was such a huge music fan herself, wasn't she? she would have come out of that concert with the sorest throat ever, because she would have sung every word to every song at the top of her voice. i am surprised ariana probably didn't hear her singing above everyone else. she left here happy, as any young teenager would be common to go toa young teenager would be common to go to a concert. did you ever imagine that this sort of thing could happen? no, not in a million years, not ina happen? no, not in a million years, not in a concert that is aimed at children especially. no. it was nearly 24 hours before we actually got the phone call confirming that olivia had probably passed. it wasn't confirmed few days later that it was olivia, but we knew then that it was olivia, but we knew then that it was, because she wasn't anywhere else. please stay together, don't let this
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beat any of us. please, don't let my daughter be a victim. there has been a real sense across manchester, across so many communities, of hurt, and also coming together, hasn't there? yeah. yeah, there is a lot of hurt, and there is also a lot of hate. i don't wa nt there is also a lot of hate. i don't want people to hate. you are taking that hate and turning it into something that shouldn't be there. love, that is all we want. we want people to love. before we go any further i want to thank you all from the bottom of my heart for being here today. i love you also much. tell us about that concert. ariana grande wasjust tell us about that concert. ariana grande was just extraordinary in it, and to pull it all together, as well. i've got so much respect for that young lady. she did pull off the concert of a lifetime, she did it in memory of what happened, and
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she was there herself. i didn't thing she would do it, to be honest. and when she said she would, and we met her, she is as strong as i am, and she was in fact to buy it as well. i want to also say i had the pleasure of meeting olivia's mum a few days ago. and as soon as i met heri few days ago. and as soon as i met her i started crying and i gave her a big hard. and she said that i should stop crying, because olivia wouldn't have wanted me to cry. and then she told me a livia would have wanted to hear the hits. —— olivia. you have to sing the hits. that is what people heard that night and thatis what people heard that night and that is what olivia would have wanted. that is what she went to see, so why shouldn't all the other people have seen it? you have got a few tattoos, but you have a very special one now. yes, my little bee this olivia. she is close to my heart so she is always with me. i wa nt to heart so she is always with me. i
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want to keep my daughter alive. i wa nt want to keep my daughter alive. i want her to have all my dreams —— her dreams. she is not going to get them, i know that. don't get me wrong, i know she is not going to get them. but if that is the one thing i can do to her, that is what is going to keep the going. yes, our thanks to charlotte for sharing some of her thoughts with us in paying tribute to her daughter olivia. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council, who's resigned following the grenfell tower fire, says it would be a "distraction" if he stayed in his post. the authority's offices were the target of an angry protest last week, as residents condemned the initial relief effort as "absolute chaos. " in a statement, nicholas holgate said it was the council's "highest priority" to help families affected by the fire. the council's leader, nicholas paget—brown,
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said it was with "regret" that he'd accepted his resignation. meanwhile, an artist who died in the grenfell tower fire has had her work displayed at tate britain. the silkscreen print by khadija saye is being shown in the gallery's memorial space. it's been dedicated to the memory of all of those who lost their lives in the blaze last week. two people are still in a critical condition in hospitalfour days after the terrorist attack on muslim worshippers in north london. a 51—year—old man died after a van drove into a group of people giving him first aid in finsbury park. the cause of his death isn't yet known. nine others were taken to hospital. a 47—year—old man is still in custody. the bbc has learnt there has been an increase in the number of drug dealers from the capital targeting vulnerable people in other parts of the country. it is called cuckooing, and it is where criminals from outside of the area use people's homes to cell drugs. nearly 200 gang
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members from london, liverpool and other cities have been convicted of the crime in the south of the country since 2015. the tube is mostly running well, apart from the ongoing closure of the circle line and hammersmith and city line between wood lane and edgware road — that is of course because of the investigation at the grenfell tower site. let's ta ke let's take a quick look at bridge street, in westminster. that is close between parliament square and westminster bridge northside for various works. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was the hottestjune good morning. yesterday was the hottest june day for over 40 good morning. yesterday was the hottestjune day for over 40 years. we saw 34.5 degrees at heathrow. if that was too hot for you, much better news today. it will gradually better news today. it will gradually be turning cooler but it is still a very mild start to the morning. temperatures in central london have not dropped below 20 or might. i must stress that most places today will stay dry, but the met office hasissued will stay dry, but the met office has issued a weather warning for heavy rain and. there will be
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thunderstorms, very isolated, mostly through the late morning. that risk will transfer east as we head into the afternoon. try again by the afternoon. there will be plenty of cloud around for a time. the cloud will break up in the afternoon to leave us with a fine end to the day. a big drop in temperature. instead of the low meat 30s, we are looking at the lower mid— 20s today, with a westerly breeze as well. so some sunshine this evening and then overnight tonight a lot more co mforta ble overnight tonight a lot more comfortable for sleeping. it will not be quite as humid, but it will still be warm. lows of around 14 or 15 celsius. again tomorrow the westerly breeze will pick up, plenty of cloud around. sunny spells, should stay dry. there could be showers on saturday. that's all for now. i'll be back in half an hour with more from the bbc london newsroom. and you can also get the latest news, travel and weather on our website or on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: he was a flamboyant
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character who loved life, but it was tragically cut short in the manchester bombing. now martyn hett‘s mum will be here to tell us how we should all, "be more martyn". # i refuse to be silenced. # i refuse to neglect you. stars of the music world have come together to help those affected by the grenfell tower fire. we'll be speaking to simon cowell about the moment he realised he had to help. and 90% of fruit pickers in this country come from eastern europe. we're live on a farm to hear why this summer the majority of growers are struggling to find workers to harvest their crops. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned after criticism of the authority's response to the grenfell tower fire. in a statement, nicholas holgate said the government had demanded his resignation. he's described the fire as "heartbreaking" but says he would have been a distraction if he had stayed in his post.
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yesterday, the prime minister apologised for failing victims in the wake of the tragedy and said she will put things right. tom burridge reports. how was this possible? will people be held to account? and why, as the prime minister herself has now admitted, was the response following the fire inadequate? the support on the ground forfamilies in the initial hours was not good enough. people were left without belongings, without roofs over their heads, without even basic information about what had happened, what they could do and where they could seek help. that was a failure of the state, local and national, to help people when they need it most. as prime minister, i apologise for that failure. that apology after so much anger in the days following the fire. some of it directed at the government, some at the local council.
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now the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council says the government has forced him to resign. in a statement, nicholas holgate said... new flats have now been allocated for survivors of the fire. so far victims have received some £700,000 from the government. but a conservative government and council are still under pressure. were warnings ignored? why wasn't more done to improve fire safety in tower blocks before a tragedy on this scale could happen? theresa may will face the leaders of the other eu states today, for the first time since the general election and the start of brexit talks. she will raise the question of the future rights of eu citizens who live in britain, and of uk citizens who live
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in eu countries. our correspondent david eades is in brussels this morning. good morning. it is going to be interesting seeing the hand that theresa may has when she goes into these negotiations. it seems to be shifting all of the time. it will be interesting, that is certainly true. reflecting on what it is we understand she will be able to do and say — wrecks it is not on the formal agenda at all. this will be opened up during dinner this evening —— brexit. the prime minister will be given a slot to say what she wa nts to, be given a slot to say what she wants to, will it be about the reciprocal arrangement for the uk and eu citizens. there will be no discussion, that is it, the chance to lay that out. she will leave, as one ambassador put it, she will get
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a chance to rest and the others will continue discussing some brexit issues. they will be picking over who gets the two eu agencies currently based in the uk, the medicines authority and the european banking authority. there is a bit of a fight over who gets some of the benefits of britain leaving. just to add, naga, mrs may arrives with a lot of challenge on her plate, let's put it that way. one of the challenges is this, that thanks to the poster boy of the eu, and manual macron, the french president, there isa macron, the french president, there is a determined message coming out of brussels today that is perhaps the worst is over —— emmanuel macron. the huge disillusion caught in the last couple of years, maybe the tide is turning, maybe it is the time when courtesy of germany and france the eu can get together and push ahead. as long as that is the
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message, brexit frankly is not top of their agenda. how interesting. thank you. the government is to spend £75 million in an effort to reduce the numbers of migrants crossing the mediterranean from africa into europe. the money will be used to help migrants return home and for food, water and medical care. the un says 70,000 people have made the journey so far this year and almost 2,000 have died. the duke of edinburgh has spent a second night in hospital as a precautionary measure after being admitted with an infection arising from a pre—existing condition. buckingham palace says prince philip, who's 96, remains in good spirits and is up and about inside king edward the 7th hospital. he missed yesterday's state opening of parliament, where his place was taken by the prince of wales. two men have died after a crane collapsed at a building site in crewe. another man, who is believed to be the crane driver, is in hospital with serious injuries that aren't thought to be life—threatening. the occupants of a house damaged by the falling crane were not injured.
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prince harry has told a us magazine that no—one in the royal family british summer fruit and salad producers are struggling to recruit enough migrant workers to harvest their crops, according to a bbc survey. more than half of the businesses that took part weren't sure if they would have enough staff — many blame the weak pound and uncertainty over brexit. the vast majority of pickers come from bulgaria and romania. prince harry has told a us magazine that no—one in the royal family wants to be king or queen, adding that "we will carry out our duties at the right time." in an interview with newsweek, he suggests the royal heirs will take on the role of monarch because they have to, not because they want to. he also criticises the decision that was made for him to walk behind his mother's coffin before her funeral in 1997, saying no "child should be asked to do that." many of the uk's top universities have failed to achieve the highest award in the first major assessment of teaching standards.
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more than half of those that entered the teaching excellence framework did not score a gold rating. some of those ranked silver and bronze have questioned the criteria used in the scheme. this is measuring some core things about life at university, measuring how likely the university is going to be at helping you to get a good job, measuring whether the university has systems in place to keep you on course when things are tough, it is measuring the effectiveness and speed of feedback on your work. it is looking at the quality of library and other learning resources. those are things, they am not the only things that matter, but they do matter. it might have been the longest day for us yesterday but people in the southern hemisphere found novel ways of celebrating the winter solstice. researchers at australia's base
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in antarctica braved the icy waters for the traditional mid—winters swim. while in the tasmanian capital hobart, crowds bared it all for the fifth annual nude solstice swim. good for them. i would never do that. we chose those pictures carefully. sally is at ascot for us this morning. dressed up to the nine's. you look great! what do you mean? i wear these clothes every day. i can tell you, naga and charlie, a lot went into this, and there was a lot of frantic work going on. i think she has done a good job. we are at the royal ascot. not as sunny and warm as yesterday. we are going to talk about the racing in a second. we start the sport with news from the other side of the world. warren gatland has named his british and irish lions side to take on new zealand in the first test in auckland on saturday. peter o'mahony — on the left — skippers the side, with owen farrell — on the right — fit enough to play at fly half.
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elsewhere alun wyn jones is in the second row with liam williams and elliot daly included amongst the backs. the full team can be found on the bbc sport website. england's cricketers thrashed south africa by nine wickets in southampton in the first of three twenty20 matches. south africa were restricted to 142 for three. england were always in control and jonny bairstow made an unbeaten 60 as england won with 33 balls to spare. it is very important. we were lucky that we played so soon after a little disappointment. we learned a lot from that tournament and we have a long way to go in the lead up to the world cup. we are on the right path. today proves we are certainly believing in ourselves and we can back it up with that performance. naomi broady‘s defeat to petra kvitova at the aegon classic
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in birmingham meansjohanna konta is the sole remaining brit in singles action on grass this week. broady lost in straight sets to the two time wimbledon champion yesterday. konta plays coco vanderweghe in the last 16 later today. the upsets at queens continued as fifth seed jo wilfried tsonga lost in straight sets to luxembourg's gilles muller. it means four of the top five seeds are already out. 2014 champion grigor dimitrov came through unscathed though against france'sjulian benneteau. the sixth seed could be on course for his third title of the year. cristiano ronaldo scored the only goal of the game as portugal beat russia 1—0 in moscow in the confederations cup. portugal insisted ronaldo was concentrating on the match despite having this week received a court date for tax—evasion charges. and the queen came here after the state opening of parliament yesterday. she arrived in time to see the big race of the day, the prince of wales stakes, and the winner was highland reel, and it was the trainer's first win. decorated
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knight in second and ulysses in third. i know what you want to know. you want to know what's going to happen today. and who should we look out for today? it is gold cup day. the —— you look marvellous. it was a big day yesterday. we expect to see the queen here again today. it is gold cup day. this is one of the old est gold cup day. this is one of the oldest and most famous races in horseracing around the world. oldest and most famous races in horseracing around the worldm goes back to 1807. it is a fantastic race, signature race of the meeting. in the gold cup you have horseracing and long distance champions, these are the equine mo farahs of the horseracing world. it celebrates courses that come back year after year. the favourite order of st george had the race last year and
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the paula radcliffe of you like is simple verse. talk to me about the queen's involvement today. does she have a runner? she does indeed. her first of the week, these five days go into the diary before anything else, as you say, she came here yesterday after opening parliament, shows how much he loved it. she has had tremendous success, and dartmouth was a big winner this year. today a horse called mass prize goes in the fifth race. she will have a chance as well. she watches from a splendid box. she has the best view in the house. it is very posh here, isn't it? it is certainly a major part of the social scene. the great thing about royal ascot is you don't have to be posh. it stretches all the way down. come 2pm, just before the first race,
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there will be 70,000 watching the royal procession. they don't all have to dress like we do. they are encouraged to come smartly but further down you find more normal people. we will be looking for them. you talk about the horses, they have to be great long—distance runners. what makes a great classic asp got horse? they have to have speed and stamina —— ascot. there is a spot over their calls when we bought him at the furthest point from the grandstand and to walk there you know that you have climbed a big hill. you need to have speed as well. on these conditions the ground is pretty quick. although looking at the sky is it is possible we might get drenched later on —— skies. so the ability to handle the juice will be difficult. who will win? order of st george. the top team. aidan bryan
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has won this on seven occasions in the past. a fantastic record. he has the past. a fantastic record. he has the best horse in the race. for a bigger prize on the card is sweet selection each way. thank you. we will go to our very own sweet selection, because i have my mate with me, carol is here with the weather. apparently there are normal people down there. they might let us in. what you think? no, sadly, we are not normal. i like the forecasters will because lee said we would have some torrential rain. we might see one or two showers in the next one or two hours but it should be dry after that. and you will notice if you are coming to royal ascot or queens is that it won't be as unitand ascot or queens is that it won't be as unit and temperatures won't be as high -- as unit and temperatures won't be as high —— humid. we were talking about the dress code. it is strict in the royal enclosure. i want to read it to get it right. for ladies you need hats and headpieces at all times.
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fascinator is not permitted. dresses and skirts should be of modest length —— fascinators. i am going to get a thrill for sally's dressed in make it a little bit longer. she is a naughty one, that one. trousers and jumpsuits a naughty one, that one. trousers andjumpsuits are a naughty one, that one. trousers and jumpsuits are allowed to be warned this year. it must be full—length or ankle length. that is the ladies. gentlemen, a requirement to wear a waistcoat and dry, and black shoes —— tie. that is for the world enclosure. the weather as lee said is rain on the way this morning but nothing heavy and it then should be dry. there will be more cloud than yesterday and we will also see some sunny than yesterday and we will also see some sunny spells and the high is around 22 degrees. for most of us we are looking at a fresh day with some showers around. we have some at the moment. some of them are heavy and thundery. the heavy thundery ones are across east anglia and the south—east. we have more showers coming in across wales and through
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the day they will head in the direction of yorkshire and northern england generally. one or two showers across scotland. in the west there is more cloud around first thing. if we go into the afternoon 4pm across western scotland we have showers. later they will be replaced by rain. temperatures around 19 degrees in glasgow and edinburgh. south into northern england, that is where we have thundery showers, especially yorkshire, with dry weather and we will see sunshine coming through. for the midlands, more cloud than the last couple of days, the same for east anglia and the south. even so there will be some bright breaks and some sunny intervals. just a couple of showers left into the north sea. moving into the and southern counties, a lot of dry weather this afternoon with variable amounts of cloud, sunny intervals developing, feeling much more fresh. yesterday we hit 34.5 degrees, the war must so far —
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nothing like that today. wales will have variable cloud, sunny spells, one or two showers. northern ireland, sunshine and feeling co mforta ble. ireland, sunshine and feeling comfortable. not a huge difference in temperatures compared to the last few days. this evening and overnight showers for north—west of scotland are replaced with rain coming across scotla nd are replaced with rain coming across scotland and northern ireland and heading in the direction of northern england. the breeze will pick up and it will be a much fresher night. if you haven't liked it so uncomfortable to sleep in, tonight will be different where the elements have occurred. through the courts of friday the wrangle have occurred. through the courts of friday the wrangle move have occurred. through the courts of friday the wrangle move south. have occurred. through the courts of friday the wrangle move south. heavy at times for northern and central areas but tending to weaken as it moves south and most of the rain on the hills in the west. ahead of it we see sunny breaks and behind it will be a mixture of sunny spells and blustery showers. on saturday, changeable weather, showers, heaviest in the north—west where it will be windy, and it will
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be quite breezy with showers popping up be quite breezy with showers popping up here and there. day by day into the weekend you will notice temperatures will drop one or two degrees and for some of us it is very welcome news. certainly is. you look fabulous. look forward to seeing you later. we are going to talk about migrant workers now. these are people who ta ke workers now. these are people who take up sometimes temperate jobs, lots of them used in the farming industry. this morning we are particularly talking about fruit growers here in the uk. sean is at a farm this morning looking at perhaps why many people are struggling to recruit pickers. good morning. good morning. we good morning. we are good morning. we are at good morning. we are at a good morning. we are at a strawberry good morning. we are at a strawberry we are at a farm good morning. we are at a strawberry farm in surrey, they grow a few other things as well. miles and miles, 3000 miles of these kinds of strawberry rose all over the site. it isa strawberry rose all over the site. it is a big business. one of those that could be affected by the
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seasonal changes you were talking about. we have adriana here, one of the workers. overall, the industry employs about 80,000 seasonal workers. right across the industry, thatis workers. right across the industry, that is quite a big deal. lots of the workers here, the vast majority, are from eastern europe. the bbc has done this survey, asking lots of these growers what is going on in these growers what is going on in the industry generally. overall, they say they are facing problems, shortages over the summer. over three quarters say they might reduce uk production. harry is the boss of this farm. lots of growers are saying they could see some reduction in their production, if the migrant labour laws do not change or do not even stay the same anjou leave the european union. how much of a difference would it make for you? there is a strong correlation between the number of tickets you have, the number of workers you have, the number of workers you have, and the volumes of fruit you can produce. for every tom, or every
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five tons of crop we produce, we need one person, one member of staff, if you like. and about 40% of our costs are labour. it is a very intensive industry, although as you can see, we have managed to increase our productivity greatly. when you are looking at the productivity, you are looking at the productivity, you are looking at the productivity, you are looking to in crease this, strolling down this road, you are paying people a certain amount for this. why is it that british workers will not work here? why don't they have as much desire as those around europe? i think there has always been a history, over the decades, of people coming into the country and doing the horticultural work. people coming into the country and doing the horticultural worklj think that is always kind of being the way. we tried, aggressively in some ways, to implement incentives and initiatives to get local workers to come and work here. but we have really struggled. there might come for one or two days and then find it
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isn't for them. i am frustrated because more and more we make crop systems that are much easier to pick, so historically, you would have a devout 15 kilos are now on the floor, and now we can pick at 50 ona the floor, and now we can pick at 50 on a tabletop system like this. so we don't think the work is too arduous. we can't really see that there is a reason for it not to happen, but it just there is a reason for it not to happen, but itjust doesn't happen. we will talk about this moora the morning. we can catch up now with lawrence, who represents the whole of the british fruit industry. when we are looking here at the effects that it could have on the industry asa that it could have on the industry as a whole, we just heard about why it is tough to get british workers here, what kind of effect could it haveif here, what kind of effect could it have if you do not get what you want out of the brexit negotiations? absolutely disastrous. if we get half the requirement, and industry will be reduced by half. simple as that. there is a direct correlation between the number of workers we get and the size of the industry. when you look at the fruits here, you can see that it is prime time. is. ——
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prime time for strawberries. yes, they are doing a greatjob, and these are british bred varieties. size of the fruit means it is much more economical to grow and pick. what difference does it make if it is british or grown abroad? tremendous. the consumer wants british grown fruit. if we have to import, which we will do if the industry shrinks, we will important to consumer will suffer. lawrence, just before we go, we will quickly chat to nicholas. how long have you been working here? five years. if the rules change, if it makes it a little bit harder, either other places around europe or you might be able to work as well? it is very ha rd able to work as well? it is very hard for us. because we come here to make money, nowhere else, when you work, you pay the tax, and now with
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this brexit, everything... it is tricky, it is making it harder. so it is harderfor workers tricky, it is making it harder. so it is harder for workers like tricky, it is making it harder. so it is harderfor workers like nick and four owners of this is is like carrie. we'll be talking more across the morning about how it could have an effect on food prices long—term. thank you. from the usual suspects to house of cards with a spell at the old vic theatre in between, kevin spacey is an actor who's done it all. he's certainly no stranger to playing sinister baddies, but he reckons in real life he's one of the good guys. he's back as a crime boss in the new movie baby driver, and i've been to meet him. baby driver, ba by driver, that baby driver, that was fun. it looks like fun to make, because it was certainly fun to watch. edgar wright isa certainly fun to watch. edgar wright is a remarkable force. even from the very beginning, when you get the script, and with it comes a cd of all the tracks. so you get a sense from the very beginning when you reboot of the tone, the pace and the
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energy, and how music will in many ways try this particular story. there he is. hague, baby. why is he listening to music all the time? he had an accident when he was a kid. still got a hum in the drum. he plays music to drown it out. there isa plays music to drown it out. there is a soundtrack almost throughout it all. was it cleverly edited so that all. was it cleverly edited so that all your hand movements went with the music. no. how did that work? essentially, in addition to getting that cd when you first read it, that extends to when you come to the set and you are in certain scenes. edgar wa nts you and you are in certain scenes. edgar wants you to physically be moving to the rhythm of the music, so you have any week. they are counting down the music is going to start and then unite a certain point the music —— the dialogue will begin. literally, there are scenes were i am moving physically to the rhythm of the song thatis physically to the rhythm of the song that is going to play in that scene. how did you notjust break into
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dance? i did a couple of times, and edgar told me to stop shaking my shoulders. you are my lucky charm, and i'm not doing thisjob without you. your waitress girlfriend, she is cute. let's keep it that way. you went with some younger actors and some very established actors. how do you pitch yourself when you rock up? hi, i'm kevin spacey. if anything got passed down to me from the great jack lemon, who was my mental, it was that when you are playing a leading role, it is also a leadership role. and that you have an opportunity in every situation, whether it is a player a television series or a film, to leave the company. so you have to do lead —— leave stutters, ego, all of that stuff out the door. because it doesn't get you anywhere. i've seen exa m ples of doesn't get you anywhere. i've seen examples of people who, you know, this treat others on a sat. i call
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them out on it. i am a big believer in confrontation. woollies are not used to being confronted. you have spent a lot of time in london. we are very spent a lot of time in london. we are very mindful at the moment of the events in the uk and the feeling of community that seems to be heightened by the attacks on london. do you feel there is a change in the way that londoners are, or the uk, as you spend time here? look, i was in america won a lot of these events happened, and what was disheartening was to see how a lot of this was being referred to as london under attack, and wonder under siege, and thatis attack, and wonder under siege, and that is just absolutely not true. london is not under siege. these are isolated incidents by a number of cowards, i am isolated incidents by a number of cowards, iam not isolated incidents by a number of cowards, i am not even sure they deserve to be called terrorists. there is nothing particularly clever about what they are doing. i think we should just pay less attention to who they are and what they are about and more attention to the people who do these remarkable acts of
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kindness. it has been an absolute pleasure. thank you, kevin spacey. baby driver pleasure. thank you, kevin spacey. ba by driver is pleasure. thank you, kevin spacey. baby driver is in cinemas onjune 28. it was quite a moment beating kevin spacey. you know when you meet people you really admire? —— meeting kevin spacey. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council, who's resigned following the grenfell tower fire, says it would be a "distraction" if he stayed in his post. the authority's offices were the target of an angry protest last week, as residents condemned the initial relief effort as "absolute chaos. " in a statement, nicholas holgate said it was the council's "highest priority" to help families affected by the fire. the council's leader, nicholas paget—brown, said it was with "regret" that he'd accepted his resignation. meanwhile, an artist who died in the grenfell tower fire has had her work displayed at tate britain.
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the silkscreen print by khadija saye is being shown in the gallery's memorial space. it's been dedicated to the memory of all of those who lost their lives in the blaze last week. two people are still in a critical condition in hospitalfour days after the terrorist attack on muslim worshippers in north london. a 51—year—old man died after a van drove into a group of people giving him first aid in finsbury park. the cause of his death isn't yet known. nine others were taken to hospital. a 47—year—old man is still in custody. the tube is mostly running well, apart from the ongoing closure of the circle line and hammersmith and city line between wood lane and edgware road — that is of course because of the investigation at the grenfell tower site. let's take a quick look at bridge street, in westminster. that is close between parliament square and westminster bridge northside for various works. in wapping, the highway is part the
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blocks need glamour street following an accident on the way to limehouse link. and the woolwich ferry has just one vote this morning due to a technicalfault. —— just one vote this morning due to a technical fault. —— boat. good morning. yesterday was the hottestjune day for over 40 years. we saw 34.5 degrees at heathrow. if that was too hot for you, much better news today. it will gradually be turning cooler but it is still a very mild start to the morning. temperatures in central london have not dropped below 20 all night. i must stress that most places today will stay dry, but the met office has issued a weather warning for heavy rain. there will be thunderstorms, very isolated, mostly through the late morning. that risk will transfer east as we head into the afternoon. dry again by the afternoon. there will be plenty of cloud around for a time. the cloud will break up in the afternoon to leave us with a fine end to the day.
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a big drop in temperature. instead of the low to mid—30s, we are looking at the low to mid—20s today, with a westerly breeze as well. so some sunshine this evening and then overnight tonight a lot more comfortable for sleeping. it will not be quite as humid, but it will still be warm. lows of around 14 or 15 celsius. again tomorrow, the westerly breeze will pick up, plenty of cloud around. sunny spells, should stay dry. there could be showers on saturday. that's all for now. i'll be back in half an hour with more from the bbc london newsroom. and you can also get the latest news, travel and weather on our website or on bbc radio london. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the kensington council chief executive resigns over the response to the grenfell fire in which at least 79 people died. nicholas holgate says he was asked by the government to resign. he's described the fire as "heart—breaking" but says his continued presence would be a "distraction". good morning, it's thursday,
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the 22nd ofjune. also this morning: as theresa may faces eu leaders today for the first time since the brexit talks began, she'll outline plans to protect the rights of european citizens in the uk. exactly one month since 22 people died in the manchester arena terror attack, olivia campbell's mum tells us how she'll remember her daughter. i don't want her to be remembered as a victim of someone who was killed by the bomber, i want her to be remembered as olivia, the girl she was. good morning. more than half of british summer fruit and salad growers could be short of migrant workers to harvest their crops this summer
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so i'm in surrey to find out what it will means for farms like this one and what it will mean for consumers. it's ladies day at ascot. carol and sally have gone to the races. morning. yes, we are a royal ascot today. we are here all day. on the other side of the world, warren gatland has named his starting team for the first test against new zealand. here at ascot it is gold cup day. and it is ladies day as well and we could see one or two showers in the next one or two hours but it should be dry in the afternoon. for most of the uk there are thunderstorms around and equally some sunshine. we'll have more details on everything later on. thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned after criticism of the authority's response to the grenfell tower fire. in a statement, nicholas holgate said the government had demanded his resignation.
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he's described the fire as "heartbreaking" but says he would have been a distraction if he had stayed in his post. yesterday, the prime minister apologised for failing victims in the wake of the tragedy and said she will put things right. tom burridge reports. how was this possible? will people be held to account? and why, as the prime minister herself has now admitted, was the response following the fire inadequate? the support on the ground forfamilies in the initial hours was not good enough. people were left without belongings, without roofs over their heads, without even basic information about what had happened, what they could do and where they could seek help. that was a failure of the state, local and national, to help people when they need it most. as prime minister, i apologise for that failure. that apology after so much anger in the days following the fire. some of it directed at the government, some at the local council.
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now the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council says the government has forced him to resign. in a statement, nicholas holgate said... new flats have now been allocated for survivors of the fire. so far victims have received some £700,000 from the government. but a conservative government and council are still under pressure. were warnings ignored? why wasn't more done to improve fire safety in tower blocks before a tragedy on this scale could happen? theresa may is expected to offer certainty to eu nationals living in the uk when she meets with european leaders in brussels later. it will be the prime minister's first encounter with the other 27 leaders since she lost her
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parliamentary majority and formal negotiations to leave the eu began. our political correspondent ben wright reports. it was a queen's speech dominated by brexit. my government's priority is to secure the best possible deal as the country leaves the european union. with britain set to leave the eu by march 2017 there is a vast amount to pass by a government that does not have a majority in the house of commons. today theresa may heads to brussels for the first time since she lost her commons majority in the general election. brexit negotiations began on monday and one of the big sticking points is how to secure the status of the more than 3 million eu nationals living in the uk and the 900,000 britons living overseas. this evening theresa may will set out her vision to the leaders of the other 27 member states
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in brussels, something she refused to be drawn on during the election campaign. labour says these rights should be guaranteed immediately. how this early part of the negotiation goes could be crucial to set the tone for the rest of the brexit talks. our political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. the brussels meeting is an important one but there is an awful lot on the prime minister's plate. there is indeed, charlie, it it is astute of the prime minister to talk of an issue which the british government and the eu commission want to sort out early on in the brexit negotiations, and that is the question of eu citizens‘ rights, which is more difficult to sort out than you would imagine if they say that the european court ofjustice should guarantee those rights, something which the prime minister says she wants to leave. the difficulty for her is this — is set
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in the election she wanted voters to strengthen her hand in the negotiations. —— she said. although the dup welcome the queen‘s speech and the programme it is not clear if there will be a long—term deal struck with the dup which would lead to the stability which the government needs. she cannot go to brussels and say with absolute confidence and certainty that she will still be there at the end of the two—year negotiating period. will still be there at the end of the two-year negotiating period. for the two-year negotiating period. for the moment, thank you. the duke of edinburgh has spent a second night in hospital as a precautionary measure, after being admitted with an infection arising from a pre—existing condition. buckingham palace says prince philip, who‘s 96, remains in good spirits and is up and about inside king edward the 7th hospital. he missed yesterday‘s state opening of parliament, where his place was taken by the prince of wales, and a second day at ascot. two men have died after a crane collapsed at a building site in crewe. another man, who is believed to be the crane driver, is in hospital with serious injuries that aren‘t thought to be life—threatening.
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the occupants of a house damaged by the falling crane were not injured. british summer fruit and salad producers are struggling to recruit enough migrant workers to harvest their crops, according to a bbc survey. more than half of the businesses that took part weren‘t sure if they would have enough staff — many blame the weak pound and uncertainty over brexit. the vast majority of pickers come from bulgaria and romania. it‘s being claimed a growing number of young people are having cosmetic procedures such as botox because of online pressure. the nuffield council on bio—ethics says some social media sites where photos can receive positive or negative ratings, have increased levels of anxiety over body image. this report by our health correspondent, dominic hughes, contains flash photography. as social media brings us closer to the world of celebrity, are younger people trying to cosmetic procedures look
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like their idols? the influence of those with millions of followers is hard to gauge. but foctors who specialise in cosmetic work including botox and dermal fillers say when celebrities speak their fans listen. it may only be a couple of pictures posted on instagram. they go out to tens of millions of followers. all of a sudden these young girls are looking at it, and young boys as well. they see that as aspirational and associated with success, with money, with power. that is what they want. the cosmetic procedure industry is largely unregulated. so numbers are hard to come by. but the last decade it has seen a greater availability and affordability. most young people are living in social media. now after a two—year study researchers are calling for better education, regulation and corporate responsibility. the social media industries, like snapchat, like instagram,
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they should be taking a bit more responsibility. we are not saying that they are promoting these things. but it is through those media. the fear is social media, central to many lives, is also feeding anxiety about appearance and driving the growth in unregulated cosmetic procedures. a song to raise money for those affected by the grenfell tower fire hit the number one spot on itunes, just two hours after it was released. # i refuse to be silenced. # likea # like a bridge over troubled waters. more than 50 music stars including paloma faith, who you saw there, stormzy and liam payne, recorded bridge over troubled water to support victims‘ families and survivors. the cover version of the simon and garfunkel classic was organised by simon cowell. it was unbelievably shocking and at the time i was thinking, what can you do, personally.
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everyone felt the same way. you want to do something. since i have a record label, what they can do is to make a record. i was thinking at the time raise money and i thought raise awareness and raise some support. i wanted it to be something that weeks, months later, when you hear the record, you remember what happened. we will hear a bit more from him later and amongst other things they set up this recording studio and people were literally a rising and he said, ok, here is your slot. we will hear a little bit more about that later on. "a failure of the state — local and national — to help people when they needed it most." they‘re the words of theresa may as she apologised to those affected by the grenfell tower fire in the house of commons yesterday. now the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council
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has resigned amid criticism over the borough‘s response to the tragedy. the chancellor of exchequer philip hammond joins us from westminster. thank you very much forjoining us this morning on breakfast. please may we start with the grenfell tower, and nicholas holgate, chief executive, as we mentioned, of kensington and chelsea council. he says he was asked to resign by sajid javid, the communities secretary, is it true, and white? i can't speak for those conversations between the communities secretary and the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council. all i know is the chief executive has decided to resign to avoid being a distraction from the main effort that is going on to provide support to victims of this terrible disaster. as a cabinet minister, do you think it is appropriate for the government to ask him to resign? i don't know that my colleagues in government did
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speak to him about this, you are putting that to me. i have not been privy to any conversation that may have occurred. what the prime minister was pointing to yesterday was that we have an excellent set of first responses to emergency in this country, fire, police, nhs services responded superbly when a disaster of any kind occurs. where we have seen of any kind occurs. where we have seenin of any kind occurs. where we have seen in this terrible tragedy g re nfell tower seen in this terrible tragedy grenfell tower that we are less well organised is around the second line of response — how to support victims, how to deal with people who are made homeless, for example, by a disaster like this, notjust those directly affected by people in the surrounding area who might have to evacuate their homes. we leave that to local authorities. the important observation is local authorities va ry observation is local authorities vary enormously from large, well resourced authorities down to quite small authorities and kensington and
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chelsea is the smallest in london. the prime minister was talking yesterday about the decision to look carefully at whether we should create some kind of civil contingencies response unit so that there is a sort of cohort of response trained people who can go into reinforce a local authority facing a disaster on this kind of scale immediately to make sure that we give as good a response to the victims and survivors as we do in the first response by the police and fire services. let's talk about the queen‘s speech yesterday and theresa may in parliament. there are some concerns it has been flagged up that holyrood scottish parliament and the dup and the lib dems in the house of lords will not be necessarily supporting theresa may‘s government proposals. this puts the government ina very proposals. this puts the government in a very weakened position. how is
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she going to tackle that? if you are talking about the brexit legislation, the centrepiece of the programme for this session of parliament, and was always going to be the centrepiece, of course we expect robust debate in the house of commons in the devolved administrations and the house of lords on this legislation. it is very important constitutional legislation ringing back to the uk a set of legislation, a set of laws that have for 43 years resided in brussels, and preparing us for a world in which we are responsible for our own laws, borders, customs arrangements, vat collection and so on and so forth. this is obviously a very major set of legislation and we would expect that it was properly and thoroughly scrutinised by both houses of parliament and the devolved administrations who want to look at it as well. i am sure
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eve ryo ne look at it as well. i am sure everyone would hope it was thoroughly scrutinised and there would be robust discussion. the problem is the conservative party is weakened. the prime minister‘s hand is we can not only in parliament but also when she heads to brexit negotiations. she is a weak prime minister with not many cards to play. i disagree without. this is legislation there is a fact to leaving the european union. —— legislation to give effect. the two parties which commanded the overwhelming majority of votes cast at the election both supported. the overwhelming majority of voters at the general election endorsed the decision to leave the european union. and across—the—board, across the wide variety of views there are on the subject, the great majority of people now want us to get on with thatjob, do it affect ugly and officially, get the very best deal for britain, and make sure that in doing so we protect the british economy, british businesses and
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britishjobs. economy, british businesses and british jobs. what about other policies? even if brexit is supported by parliament, what about the other policies propose? it has been called a watered down queen‘s speech, watered down proposals, many of the proposals that when the conservative manifesto at the election not in there. the proposed repeal of the foxhunting ban, for example. the queen's speech is a programme for the first nearly two yea rs programme for the first nearly two years session of this parliament. it is not the whole programme for the whole of the parliament. our ma nifesto whole of the parliament. our manifesto at the election set out an agenda for the whole parliament. we a lwa ys agenda for the whole parliament. we always knew, and my cabinet collea g u es always knew, and my cabinet colleagues have been getting worn for the last nine months about this, that the covers of the heavy load of brexit related legislation, the first year or 18 months of this parliament, this period, was always going to be dominated by brexit
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legislation, and that is what the programme set out in the queen ‘s speech yesterday demonstrates. we have to do it now because we have to prepare the country for 29th of march, 2019, when all of those laws have to be repatriated and we have to start running for ourselves all those things which have been run from brussels for the last 43 years. theresa may was called an interim prime minister in parliament yesterday. there is doubt that she will be the prime minister of the uk at the end of the brexit negotiations. do you think she will be prime minister of the uk and leader of the conservative party by the end of this year? yes, i do. and i would remind you that when we formed the coalition in 2010, people, with the greatest respect, like you, were saying that it wouldn‘t last until christmas. but it proved extraordinarily resilient because it was doing a job dealing with the terrible economic and fiscal crisis that we faced in 2010. it was doing a job that the british
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people recognised had to be done. and what‘s this government will be doing is addressing the big challenges which the british people recognise this country has to face. getting a good brexit deal, making sure that our economy is working effectively, dealing with the challenge of delivering high—quality public services in the face of an ageing population. those are the big challenges. those are the challenges the government is committed to addressing. i am sure that the public will recognise that. chancellor philip hammond, thank you for your time. thank you. i will tell you another big challenge. keeping tabs on what carol is wearing today. don‘t say i don‘t pay attention, carol. not only has the heart changed, the whole outfit has changed. charlie, iam outfit has changed. charlie, i am so impressed. yes, you are absolutely right. i have my feathers and my hat matching the birds on my dress. thank you to noticing. i am at royal ascot today, it is ladies day, as well as being
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gold cup day. the queen has not missed one race meeting here at this time since her coronation, and if you remember yesterday, she was at the state opening of parliament in the state opening of parliament in the morning in a lovely blue outfit, and she got here in time for the races in the afternoon in a lovely sapphire yellow. she comes down with other members of the royal family attending along the racecourse, and she gets you around about two o‘clock in the afternoon. she then gets out of her carriage and heads up gets out of her carriage and heads up to the royal box, which you can see just up to the royal box, which you can seejust behind me, with the up to the royal box, which you can see just behind me, with the crest on it. today‘s weather, she may be pleased to hear, as many people will be, that it is much fresher than it has been. the weatherforecast be, that it is much fresher than it has been. the weather forecast for royal ascot, we will have a few showers in the next couple of hours, but then it will brighten up and the top temperature will be about 22. yesterday the highest temperature in england was at heathrow, 34.5dc, making it the hottestjune day in 40 yea rs, making it the hottestjune day in 40 years, and the hottest day of the years, and the hottest day of the year so far. it will be fresher
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today. we will start with some heavy and thundery showers across east anglia and south—east. we‘ve also got another arm of them coming in across wales. more cloud in the west this morning. more cloud generally, in fact, and a bit of dampers in there. as we go through the day we will start to see some sunshine developing. for north—west scotland, we will hang on to some showers, and later they will be replaced by some rain. in the afternoon it will be showers. we will see some brighter spells developing, in glasgow and edinburgh, around 195. as we come across northern and we will have some thundery showers crossing, especially for yorkshire. some of those could be heavy and thundery. as we move into the midlands, east anglia and southern counties, the thunderstorms continue to drift off into the north sea. residual cloud in theirwake, but into the north sea. residual cloud in their wake, but that will break up in their wake, but that will break up and we will see sunshine as well. much cooler in the south compare to lately, and much cooler in wales can head to lately as well, where we‘ll see some often sunshine developing and breaking through this morning‘s cloud. northern ireland and western
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scotla nd cloud. northern ireland and western scotland will see the lion‘s share of the sunshine. now, heading on through the evening and overnight, while there are showers in the north—west replaced some rain coming m, north—west replaced some rain coming in, we will see that pouring in across scotland and northern ireland and eventually getting into northern england as well. for the rest of us, a much better night for sleeping in. we are losing the committee, we are losing the high temperature values. it will feel much better. as we head on into tomorrow, the rain in the north, and through central areas, will be heavy at times but as it heads southwards through the rest of england‘s and also wales, it will tend to weaken, and most of the rain will be inhaled in the west. elsewhere you might see patchy rain. the head a vatican, we are looking at bright spells, some sunshine, and behind it, for northern ireland in scotland, lost three showers and sunshine. the changeable theme continues into saturday, with further showers, particularly so in the north, where some of them will be heavy. it will also be rather windy here. it will also be breezy
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more or less across the board, but that will ease as we head into sunday. i agree with charlie. but he failed to say that you look fabulous again. i love the thinking of the feathers matching the birds. so much goes into these outfits. carol, thank you very much. we will see later on. the time now is 7:22am. we will have all the sport coming up later as well. it‘s one month since 22 people were killed in a terrorist attack on a concert at manchester arena, and for the families of those who have died it has been an incredibly difficult time. 15—year—old olivia campbell—hardy was one of those who lost their life. her mum charlotte has told louise who she wants her daughter to be remembered. i will remember olivia as the cheeky little girl that she was, always singing, laughing, jumping on my bed. just the typical olivia, really. # what are we going to do without your smart mouth? her singing and her dancing and her makeup were the three most important things in her life.
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her singing, she absolutely lives for her singing. everywhere she went, she sang. tell us a little bit about how she would have been at that concert, because she was such a huge music fan herself, wasn‘t she? she would have come out of that concert with the sorest throat ever, because she would have sung every word to every song at the top of her voice. i am surprised ariana probably didn‘t hear her singing above everyone else. she left here happy, as any young teenager would be, to go to a concert. did you ever imagine that this sort of thing could happen? no, not in a million years, not in a concert that is aimed at children especially. no. it was nearly 24 hours before we actually got the phone call confirming that olivia had probably passed. it wasn‘t confirmed few days later that it was olivia, but we knew then that it was, because she wasn‘t anywhere else.
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please stay together, don‘t let this beat any of us. please, don‘t let my daughter be a victim. there has been a real sense across manchester, across so many communities, of hurt, and also coming together, hasn‘t there? yeah. yeah, there is a lot of hurt, and there is also a lot of hate. i don‘t want people to hate. you are taking that hate and turning it into something that shouldn‘t be there. love, that is all we want. we want people to love. before we go any further i want to thank you all from the bottom of my heart for being here today. i love you all so much. tell us about that concert.
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ariana grande was just extraordinary in it, and to pull it all together, as well. i‘ve got so much respect for that young lady. she did pull off the concert of a lifetime, she did it in memory of what happened, and she was there herself. i didn‘t think she would do it, to be honest. and when she said she would, and we met her, she is as strong as i am, and she was impacted by it as well. i want to also say i had the pleasure of meeting olivia's mum a few days ago. and as soon as i met her i started crying and i gave her a big hug. and she said that i should stop crying, because olivia wouldn't have wanted me to cry. and then she told me a olivia would have wanted to hear the hits. you have to sing the hits. that‘s what people heard that night and that‘s what olivia would have wanted. that‘s what she went to see, so why shouldn‘t all the other people have seen it? you have got a few tattoos, but you have a very special one now.
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yes, my little bee, for olivia. she is close to my heart so she is always with me. i want to keep my daughter alive. i want her to have all her dreams. she is not going to get them, i know that. don‘t get me wrong, i know she is not going to get them. but if that is the one thing i can do for her, that is what‘s going to keep me going. and our thanks to charlotte for sharing her thoughts with us. a couple of things stand out for me. that phrase, i don‘t want people to hate. very poignant. and acknowledging that the community has come together and will not be out by any attacks. —— will not be cowed. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council, who‘s resigned following the grenfell tower fire, says it would be a "distraction" if he stayed in his post.
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the authority‘s offices were the target of an angry protest last week, as residents condemned the initial relief effort as "absolute chaos." in a statement, nicholas holgate said it was the council‘s "highest priority" to help families affected by the fire. the council‘s leader, nicholas paget—brown, said it was with "regret" that he‘d accepted his resignation. meanwhile, an artist who died in the grenfell tower fire has had her work displayed at tate britain. the silkscreen print by khadija saye is being shown in the gallery‘s memorial space. it‘s been dedicated to the memory of all of those who lost their lives in the blaze last week. two people are still in a critical condition in hospitalfour days after the terrorist attack on muslim worshippers in north london. a 51—year—old man died after a van drove into a group of people giving him first aid in finsbury park. the cause of his death
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isn‘t yet known. nine others were taken to hospital. a 47—year—old man is still in custody. the tube is mostly running well, apart from the ongoing closure of the circle line and hammersmith and city line between wood lane and edgware road — that is of course because of the investigation at the grenfell tower site. meanwhile, various roads around the grenfell tower site are still closed — including bramley road, latimer road and lancaster road. in westminster, bridge street is closed. this it here, between parliament square and westminster bridge north side — various works taking place there. expect delays at times for traffic on westminster bridge and the victoria embankment. in wapping, the highway is partly blocked near glamis st following an accident. there are westbound delays to the limehouse link. and the woolwich ferry is down tojust one boat this morning due to a technicalfault. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was the hottestjune day for over 40 years. we saw 34.5 degrees at heathrow. if that was too hot for you, much better news today. it will gradually be turning cooler but it is still a very mild start to the morning.
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temperatures in central london have not dropped below 20 all night. i must stress that most places today will stay dry, but the met office has issued a weather warning for heavy rain. there will be thunderstorms, very isolated, mostly through the late morning. that risk will transfer east as we head into the afternoon. dry again by the afternoon. there will be plenty of cloud around for a time. the cloud will break up in the afternoon to leave us with a fine end to the day. a big drop in temperature. instead of the low to mid—30s, we are looking at the low to mid—20s today, with a westerly breeze as well. so some sunshine this evening and then overnight tonight a lot more comfortable for sleeping. it will not be quite as humid, but it will still be warm. lows of around 14 or 15 celsius. again tomorrow, the westerly breeze will pick up, plenty of cloud around. sunny spells, should stay dry. there could be showers on saturday. that‘s all for now.
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i‘ll be back in half an hour with more from the bbc london newsroom. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned after criticism of the authority‘s response to the grenfell tower fire. in a statement, nicholas holgate said the communities secretary sajid javid had demanded that he step down but accepted that he would have been a distraction, had he stayed in his post. he will stay in post until a successor has been appointed. earlier the chancellor philip hammond said more needed to be done to help victims. where we have seen in this terrible tragedy at grenfell tower that we are less well organised is around the second line of response — how we support the victims and deal with people who are
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for example made homeless by a disaster like this, notjust the people directly affected but people in the surrounding area who may have to evacuate their homes. we leave that to local authorities and the important observation is that local authorities vary enormously. theresa may is expected to offer certainty to eu nationals living in the uk when she meets with european leaders in brussels later. it will be the prime minister‘s first encounter with the other 27 leaders since she lost her parliamentary majority and formal negotiations to leave the eu began. our correspondent david eades is in brussels this morning. good to see you, david. so, what happens today? theresa may puts her proposals out, wuxi have —— will she have debate or discussion? she isn‘t. the question of brexit is not pa rt isn‘t. the question of brexit is not part of the formal council agenda. they will have to wait until dinner, so, fairly late in the evening
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before she can put forward her proposal as we understand, a generous offer as it was described about eu citizens living in the uk post— brexit. and of course the equivalent, which is citizens abroad in the eu post— brexit. it has been described as an overview and some principles but a message of reassurance. once she principles but a message of reassurance. once she has done that, whatever it is she has to say, you might think it is open to discussion. certainly not with her in the room. she will be able to go and rest, as one eu official put it, while the others will continue a bit of exeter talk, maybe 30 minutes, a chance to hear from the eu of exeter talk, maybe 30 minutes, a chance to hearfrom the eu chief negotiator michel barnier who started the negotiations at the beginning of the week —— brexit talk. and a chance for discussions as to which eu member states deserve to ta ke as to which eu member states deserve to take on those two eu agencies which are currently residing in the
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uk. there are jobs at stake there and procedure as well, so maybe a fight for that. the only other point i would make is the timing. it is late in the evening. there is a clear message here among eu supporters that this is a turning point for the eu. economic figures look better than before. a sense of optimism at a french president who is pro—eu. they want to concentrate on the positives, not the negatives. david, thank you very much. the duke of edinburgh has spent a second night in hospital as a precautionary measure after being admitted with an infection arising from a pre—existing condition. buckingham palace says prince philip, who‘s 96, remains in good spirits and is up and about inside king edward the 7th hospital. he missed yesterday‘s state opening of parliament, where his place was taken by the prince of wales. two men have died after a crane collapsed at a building site in crewe. another man, who is believed to be the crane driver, is in hospital with serious injuries that aren‘t thought
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to be life—threatening. the occupants of a house damaged by the falling crane were not injured. it‘s being claimed a growing number of young people are having cosmetic procedures such as botox because of online pressure. the nuffield council on bio—ethics says some social media sites where photos can receive positive or negative ratings, have increased levels of anxiety over body image. it says online companies need to take more responsibilty. prince harry has suggested that no—one in the royal family wants to take over from the queen. in an interview with newsweek, harry said "is there any one of the royal family who wants to be king or queen? i don‘t think so, but we will carry out our duties at the right time." he also criticises the decision for him to walk a long way behind his mother‘s coffin before her funeral in 1997. it might have been the longest day for us yesterday.
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those in the southern hemisphere found novel ways of celebrating the winter solstice. researchers at australia‘s base in antarctica braved the icy waters for the traditional mid—winters swim. that makes me shiverjust to watch it. while in the tasmanian capital, hobart, crowds bare it all for the fifth annual nude solstice swim. those pictures obviously before they took to the water. we chose pictures carefully. we certainly did. sally has the sport and is at ascot this morning. that hat is very smart. i thought i would keep you all entertained with various hats in the morning and at the end of the programme i want you to tell me which is your favourite. programme i want you to tell me which is yourfavourite. we programme i want you to tell me which is your favourite. we are at royal ascot this morning. it is not as glorious as yesterday. everyone is relieved because temperatures are
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down. it will be much more pleasant for those coming here, and for the horses. we will speak with a jockey about why today is special and what you should look for when you beat your horse for the gold cup. we will start the sport on the other side of the world. warren gatland has named his british and irish lions side to take on new zealand in the first test in auckland on saturday. peter o‘mahony, on the left, skippers the side, with owen farrell now fit enough to play at fly half. elsewhere alun wyn jones is in the second row with liam williams and elliot daly included amongst the backs. the full team can be found on the bbc sport website. england‘s cricketers thrashed south africa by nine wickets in southampton in the first of three twenty20 matches. south africa were restricted to 142 for three. england were always in control and jonny bairstow made an unbeaten 60 as england won with 33 balls to spare. it is very important. we were lucky that we played so soon after a little disappointment.
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we learned a lot from that tournament and we have a long way to go in the lead up to the world cup. we are on the right path. today proves we are certainly believing in ourselves and we can can back it up with that performance. naomi broady‘s defeat to petra kvitova at the aegon classic in birmingham meansjohanna konta is the sole remaining brit in singles action on grass this week. broady lost in straight sets to the two time wimbledon champion yesterday. konta plays coco vanderweghe in the last 16 later today. the upsets at queens continued as fifth seed jo wilfried tsonga lost in straight sets to luxembourg‘s gilles muller. it means four of the top five seeds are already out. 2014 champion grigor dimitrov came through unscathed though against france‘sjulian benneteau. the sixth seed could be on course for his third title of the year. all change on the grass. who else but cristiano ronaldo
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scored the only goal of the game as portugal beat russia 1—0 in moscow in the confederations cup. portugal insisted ronaldo was concentrating on the match despite having this week received a court date for tax—evasion charges. and let‘s get to the racing, shall we? the queen dashed to royal ascot after the state opening of parliament yesterday. her majesty arrived in time to see the big race of the day, the prince of wales‘s stakes. and the winner was the nine to four favourite highland reel, ridden by ryan moore, and was trainer aidan o‘brien‘s first win at this year‘s meeting. decorated knight was second, with ulysses in third. isaid we i said we would talk in detail about the racing and i am delighted to say iamjoined by the racing and i am delighted to say i am joined by liz kelly, the first female winner of a grade one race over thejumps. female winner of a grade one race over the jumps. yes. that happened two christmases ago at a racecourse not far from two christmases ago at a racecourse not farfrom here, two christmases ago at a racecourse not far from here, camden two christmases ago at a racecourse
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not farfrom here, camden park, followed up on the same course in spring. so a fantastic achievement and we are a family —based business and we are a family —based business and my parents trained horses and my mum owns that horse. is it fantastic to come and not have the pressure on you, because you‘re not writing? to come and not have the pressure on you, because you're not writing?|j am you, because you're not writing?” am thejumps you, because you're not writing?” am the jumps jockey and you, because you're not writing?” am thejumpsjockey and it you, because you're not writing?” am the jumps jockey and it has been excellent to come and the flat racing here —— riding? it is a totally different game. you can appreciate the horses that are here, looking at them in the paddock and quite how fast they go. to the untrained eye, what is the difference. when we pick the horse for the grand national or cheltenham, what is the difference when you are picking a horse for ascot? the difference mainly isn't a lot physically between flat horses andjump lot physically between flat horses and jump horses. primarily flat horses tend to be a little smaller,
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whereas you have jump horses tend to be a little smaller, whereas you havejump horses running over three orfour miles whereas you havejump horses running over three or four miles and they tend to be a lot taller and longer, whereas these are little pocket rockets, small, quick and flick and great fun to watch. if i was in the panic i would look for a horse who is not the biggest but has a lot of muscle. just very strong. and they are coming from all over the world. in terms of global racing‘s profile, is ascot up there? the leading contender. there are people who bring horses from all over the world, america, australia, france. that is fantastic, because it really is international. as you say, it really is global. that is a really lovely feel about the royal ascot. it is just lovely feel about the royal ascot. it isjust wonderful to lovely feel about the royal ascot. it is just wonderful to talk to you. i know that you have a really busy
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day lined up today. with that i will hand it back to you. ijust want day lined up today. with that i will hand it back to you. i just want to let you know that if you win the gold cup today i think you get about £220,000. the first gold cup in the 19th century was 100 guineas. how much is it in the old money? we think it is £105. someone will tell meiam think it is £105. someone will tell me i am wrong. well, you know more than me, sally. thank you, see you later. 7:42am is the time now. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned amid criticism over the borough‘s response to the grenfell tower fire, in which at least 79 people died and many more were left homeless. nicholas holgate claimed he was forced out by the communities secretary sajid javid. mrjavid has made no comment so far. john healey is the shadow housing minister and joins us from westminster. thank you very much for your time this morning. i wonder if you could first of all comment on the
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resignation, nicholas holgate has resigned from his position as chief executive of the kensington chelsea council. it was right to go. he had to go. his counsel went awol in the days after this terrible fire at a time when the victims‘ survivors, those looking for the family members missing needed help on the ground and above all someone to reassure them and ward the relief and helped efforts. —— and co—ordinate. the council was nowhere to be seen when i was there the day after the fire. he had no option and it was right to go. the process was as we understand it that $06 go. the process was as we understand it that sog javed had told him to go -- sog. who knows what went on. the important thing is he has resigned, he has gone, and he had no option after the prime minister said quite
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rightly this was a failure of the state, national and local, to help people when they needed that help most. she was also right to apologise. she was also right to say the government was slow to get to grips with the scale of this tragedy and she was right to take responsibility for making sure that it does. i am reading between the lines in what you‘re saying — people suggest way after they should have done the conservative party, the government is starting to get to grips with the problem and the aftermath of this terrible event. is that how you see it too? ministers we re very that how you see it too? ministers were very slow to grasp how grave this tragedy was, how much help and how complex the action was that has been needed. ourjob as official opposition is to make sure that
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those victims and survivors get all the help they need, that anyone who is demonstrated to be culpable is called fully to account and also that the changes in national policy and local practice are made so this never happens again. you are right. some of these things go beyond party politics. this is about people‘s safety. every night as people sleep in their beds. what confidence to you have of the process of identifying those at risk as we speak, what confidence do you have that the process is being handled correctly? this will be part of what we debate in the house of commons when i leave for labour on this first full a debate in the queen‘s speech. what‘s most important is that actually government can act now. it doesn‘t need to wait for the findings of the investigations or the public enquiry. it can act on the public enquiry. it can act on the two coroners report it has had forfour the two coroners report it has had for four years following similar
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tower block fires. that means starting as coroners recommended to install sprinkler systems in the highest risk high—rise blocks and starting the review of the building regulations on fire safety that they promised to overhaul but have done nothing since. i want to ask if i can in relation to brexit, as you are the labour spokesperson that we have, although it is not directly or area, but this question of some kind of consensus, this has been mentioned effectively for the first time by the government, consensus over how brexit goes forward. what‘s your thoughts on that? i think it is a recognition of the results of the election. we now have a prime minister with no majority, no mandate, no authority. that is very serious for this country as we go into these brexit negotiations. this is a recognition that she
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really has a mandate for that race to the bottom type of brexit, no majority to be able to force through ano majority to be able to force through a no deal is better than a bad deal approach. so she‘s got to change her tone. she‘s got to change her approach. she‘s got to start to put the interests of jobs, approach. she‘s got to start to put the interests ofjobs, businesses, the interests ofjobs, businesses, the economy, as well as ending freedom of movement, at the top of the negotiating priorities. and she‘s got to take the country and the houses of parliament with her when she does it. can you be more explicit for us? if she is talking about consensus, does that suit the labour party? are you prepared in any official way to be part of a more concerns you will approach —— consensual approach to how those brexit negotiations go? yes. we recognise, accept the result of the referendum last year, written is leaving the eu. what matters most now is the terms on which we live.
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sorry, my question was more to do with, if there is talk of consensus, what does that mean? if the conservatives come to the labour party are you prepared to get on board that project or are you going to stick your line which is that you are ready to go on your own in all issues? or are you prepared to somehowjoin forces, at least issues? or are you prepared to somehow join forces, at least to discuss issues? look, the hard truth for the government and the prime minister now is that they have no majority in the house of commons. if they want to legislate for brexit, if they want to legislate as the queen‘s speech suggests they will on some of the decisions we have to ta ke some of the decisions we have to take about a new immigration system, new arrangements for agriculture, fisheries and food, new trade powers, then they have to have the full acceptance across the house of commons. that means labour has a role to play. we will play that. but the ball is very much in theresa may‘s court in present. the ball is very much in theresa may's court in present. john healey, thank you very much for your time. john healey is labour was a shadow
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housing secretary, joining us from westminster. time to go back to ascot and talk to carol, to find out what is happening with the day‘s weather. good morning. good morning! it is a chilly start then it has been, that we are always talking at ascot and about these other race meetings about these other race meetings about these other race meetings about the going. somebody who knows all about what the going is is with me this morning. chris stickle ‘s is the clerk of the course here. good morning. what you mean the going? that is the description we used to describe how the track is going to ride. whether it is going to be fast or slow, we have descriptions from ferndown to heavy. —— firm down to heavy. it gives the jockey is an indication of how it will ride. heavy. it gives the jockey is an indication of how it will ridem must be soft today, because my heels are digging in! it is important for the horses, because different horses prefer different kinds? yes, different forces have a different action in their different gate. it
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depends on what they like. generally flat horses like far surface so they can skip across the ground. heavier built horses have a different action and hit the ground slab yard. they prefer an easier, softer ground. what is it today? have you tested it? today it is good to firm, watered. we wanted it because of that hot and dry weather we had yesterday. tell us about yourjob. it must be really hard, because the weather is so contrary. yesterday was the hottest day of the year so far, today it is cooler. and we may see showers today. yes, to be honest it is easier when we see a settled forecast stop we can water accordingly. when it is more u nsettled accordingly. when it is more unsettled those decisions are trickier. but, yes, it is a great job and! trickier. but, yes, it is a great job and i thoroughly enjoyed.” trickier. but, yes, it is a great job and i thoroughly enjoyed. i will let you get on with it. it has been a pleasure. well, this morning, as you are just hearing, it is a chilly start, not just here you are just hearing, it is a chilly start, notjust here at royal ascot but across the board, where it has been so muddy of late. the forecast at royal ascot, if you are coming down, is a temperature of about 22
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celsius. a bit more clout around. you could see more showers about. either time the races start those showers should have cleared and it will be starting to brighten up. for most of the united kingdom we have lots of dry weather, some thunderstorms, and it will be feeling fresher. this morning that a thunderstorms across parts of east anglia. we have got around oxfordshire, nottinghamshire, northampton at the moment. lots of cloud coming in from the west as well. equally, there is lots of dry weather and also some sunshine. the best of the sunshine today will be across scotland and northern ireland. even so, across north—west scotland, there are some showers. we will have those on and off through the course of the day. later they will be replaced iran. —— replaced by rain. so it should not be too dissimilar to yesterday, about 19 in glasgow and edinburgh. across northern england we have thundery showers crossing. those will particularly be in yorkshire this afternoon. equally there will be some sunshine, just not as muddy or hot as it was yesterday. as we comes out again, more clout across the midlands, east anglia and southern
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counties then we have had. nonetheless, we will see some of that turning over and we will see sunshine as this morning‘s showers continue to push off into the north sea. drifting towards the south—west, a lot of dry and bright weather, and it is the same across wales. temperatures lower than they we re wales. temperatures lower than they were yesterday. yesterday, as i said, we had 34.5 is the top temperature at heathrow. today it will be at least a good 10 degrees lower than that. then, as we head into northern ireland, once again we are looking at sunshine and temperatures not too dissimilar to yesterday‘s. through the evening and overnight, the showers in the north—west will be replaced by some rain, coming across scotland and then northern ireland, and later on again we will see that across scotla nd again we will see that across scotland and northern england. so it will be a muggy night across the south, so much more comfortable for sleeping in. —— a less muggy night. silly start tomorrow with the rain in scotland and northern ireland pushing southwards. heavier times across the north and through central parts of the uk as well. as it heads
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towards the far south it will tend towards the far south it will tend to fizzle. most of the rain will be in the hills in the west. ahead of that, some bright spells. behind that, some bright spells. behind that, for scotland and northern ireland, we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and blustery showers. on saturday the forecast is very changeable. lots of showers. the wind is picking up. it will be particularly windy across the north—west of the uk, where we will have the heaviest showers. day by day, what you will find is that the temperatures are just going down a little bit. it will continue to feel fresher, with temperatures closer to where they should be. i can see sally coming. it does feel much better, it must have been really boiling yesterday. i think it is a little bit chilly, if i‘m honest. anybody lucky enough to be coming here today should be prepared, maybe, for not quite so warmers yesterday. good advice. what do you think? i think that is very good advice. i would do with sally. i always feel cold. maybe bring up a shameen by lightweight jacket, i think. cold. maybe bring up a shameen by lightweightjacket, ithink. —— bring a pashmina. for a big, puffy
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anoraks. no, it will be 22 celsius. that is still 72 fahrenheit.” anoraks. no, it will be 22 celsius. that is still72 fahrenheit. i am worried that the first race is not until 2:30pm this afternoon. so we‘ve got quite a long time to amuse ourselves before then.” we‘ve got quite a long time to amuse ourselves before then. i wonder how you are going to do that. i wonder how that will pan out. well, we thought we might sing a few songs, have a cup of tea. there is a bandstand here. sounds great. we will see you two later. in what they could have? they could have some strawberries. yes, absolutely, which is where we are going next. we are down in surrey, on this robbery farm down there. —— strawberry farm. you have been addressing issues around migrant workers and people who were temporarily, tell us more about where you are? yes, so this is a farm in surrey, just one row of strawberries ready to be picked today. there are 3000 miles worth of these rows right across. this is a
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big business in itself. this isjust one of several farms that these guys own. but across the whole industry, 80,000 seasonal workers are employed by growers across the uk. the vast, vast majority of those are workers from eastern europe. the bbc have done a survey today which says that more than half of growers in the uk are worried that they will not have enough workers from overseas this summer enough workers from overseas this summer to be able to pick all their crop. of those businesses, nearly three quarters of them are thinking they might have to reduce uk production, if at all those brexit negotiations go through it doesn‘t quite go their way. what‘s have a chat to one of those workers who has been teaching me how to pick strawberries or warning —— morning. nic, you are from romania. why come all the way to the united kingdom to work, and then to go back to romania towards the end of the year. why are you doing that? because i need the money. i can buy a house for not too much money in romania. i can come
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here and work and make money. so what you make, when you hear about brexit and all the discussions around it, what do you think about it? i don't know. it is a big problem. it is a big bum because we don‘t know if we can come back next season or not. —— bigger problem. nobody knows nothing, it is very hard. too many british people work you? yeah. working on this fun? no, not many. just one in three farms. blimey. i will let you get back to finishing off this row. we will chat to your boss. wright, harry. very quickly. we were just speaking to. not many british people working in the farms that you own. why can‘t you get them to work you? well, the first thing is that there is long track record of people coming to this country to do the and work in horticulture, from 40 years ago. spaniards, italians, indians, africans, and the polish. and now
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the romanians, the bulgarians and the romanians, the bulgarians and the polish. so there is a long history of it happening. we have done extensive initiatives in terms of trying to recruit, and we have consistently failed. they have come along for a short while, a day or two, and for some reason it doesn‘t seem two, and for some reason it doesn‘t seem to work out for them. but you might need them at some point in the future? i just might need them at some point in the future? ijust don't see might need them at some point in the future? i just don't see that as a realistic option. look, we have built a business here for the last 20 years and we employ over 2000 people. it takes a hell of an effort to get that is working pool in place. it just isn‘t to get that is working pool in place. itjust isn‘t available in the uk. we have been talking about a sore morning. it is a big problem for the industry, those brexit negotiations are crucial. it could have an effect on your fridge in the uk in years to come. thank you, sean. we will see later on. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council,
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who‘s resigned following the grenfell tower fire, says it would be a "distraction" if he stayed in his post. the authority‘s offices were the target of an angry protest last week, as residents condemned the initial relief effort as "absolute chaos." in a statement, nicholas holgate said it was the council‘s "highest priority" to help families affected by the fire. the council‘s leader, nicholas paget—brown, said it was with "regret" that he‘d accepted his resignation. meanwhile, an artist who died in the grenfell tower fire has had her work displayed at tate britain. the silkscreen print by khadija saye is being shown in the gallery‘s memorial space. it‘s been dedicated to the memory of all of those who lost their lives in the blaze last week. two people are still in a critical condition in hospitalfour days after the terrorist attack on muslim worshippers in north london. a 51—year—old man died after a van drove into a group of people giving him first aid in finsbury park. the cause of his death isn‘t yet known. nine others were taken to hospital. a 47—year—old man is still in custody. the bbc has learnt there has been
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an increase in the number of drug dealers from the capital targeting vulnerable people in other parts of the country. it‘s called cuckooing, and it‘s where criminals from outside of the area use victims‘ homes to sell drugs. the tube is mostly running well, apart from the ongoing closure of the circle line and hammersmith and city line between wood lane and edgware road — that is of course because of the investigation at the grenfell tower site. westbound delays from the a13 north circular at the becton roundabout. in westminster, bridge street is shut tween par square and mr bridgnorth side. various works taking place there. expect delays at times for traffic on was mr bridge and the victoria embankment. and the woolwich ferry is down to one vote this morning because of a technical fault. —— boat. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was the hottestjune day for over 40 years. we saw 34.5 degrees at heathrow. if that was too hot for you, much better news today. it will gradually be turning cooler
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but it is still a very mild start to the morning. temperatures in central london have not dropped below 20 all night. i must stress that most places today will stay dry, but the met office has issued a weather warning for heavy rain. there will be thunderstorms, very isolated, mostly through the late morning. that risk will transfer east as we head into the afternoon. dry again by the afternoon. there will be plenty of cloud around for a time. the cloud will break up in the afternoon to leave us with a fine end to the day. a big drop in temperature. instead of the low to mid—30s, we are looking at the low to mid—20s today, with a westerly breeze as well. so some sunshine this evening and then overnight tonight a lot more comfortable for sleeping. it will not be quite as humid, but it will still be warm.
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lows of around 14 or 15 celsius. again tomorrow, the westerly breeze will pick up, plenty of cloud around. sunny spells, should stay dry. there could be showers on saturday. that‘s all for now. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the kensington council chief executive resigns over the response to the grenfell fire in which at least 79 people died. nicholas holgate says he was asked by the government to resign. he‘s described the fire as "heart—breaking" but says his continued presence would be a "distraction". good morning, it‘s thursday the 22nd ofjune. also this morning... as theresa may faces eu leaders today for the first time since the brexit talks began — she‘ll outline plans to protect the rights of european citizens in the uk. inspirational and an extrovert.
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martyn hett was just one of the 22 people who died in the manchester arena attack — we‘ll speak to his mum figen murray — exactly a month after it happened. more than half of british summer fruit and salad growers could be short of migrant workers to harvest their crops this summer with many blaming the fall in the value of the pound and uncertainty following brexit and there‘s concern the shortage could get worse. that‘s according to a bbc survey out this morning. so i‘m in surrey to find out what it will means for farms like this one and what it will mean for consumers... he may play a crime boss in his latest film — but we‘ll hear why kevin spacey says he‘s one of the good guys. it's it‘s ladies day at ascot and carol and sally are at both there. i am definitely here with one of the good guys. in sport, the lions team is named for the first test against new zealand. ireland‘s peter o‘mahony skippers the side and there‘s some surprise inclusions
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amongst the backs. but it‘s gold cup day here at ascot. plenty of glamour expected this afternoon. high temperatures of 22 expected this afternoon, for the uk asa expected this afternoon, for the uk as a whole, feeling fresher, bunder stores around, some of us seeing sunshine and we‘ll have more details on the sport and the weather later. good morning. first, our main story. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned after criticism of the authority‘s response to the grenfell tower fire. in a statement, nicholas holgate said the government had demanded his resignation. he‘s described the fire as "heartbreaking" but says he would have been a distraction if he had stayed in his post. yesterday, the prime minister apologised for failing victims in the wake of the tragedy — and said she will put things right. tom burridge reports. how was this possible? will people be held to account? and why as the
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prime minister herself has now admitted was the response following the fire in adequate? the support on the fire in adequate? the support on the ground for families the fire in adequate? the support on the ground forfamilies in the fire in adequate? the support on the ground for families in the initial hours was not good enough. people were left without belongings, roofs over their heads, without even basic information about what had happened and what they should do and where they could seek help. that was a failure of the state, local and national to help people when they needed it most. as prime minister, i apologise for that failure. that apology after so much anger in the days following the fire. some of the irish did at the government, some at the local council. now the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council says the government has forced him to resign. in a statement, nicolas aldgate said despite wanting to stay in the job and very challenging circumstances he risked becoming a distraction. he said his team had always worked with
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the interests of residence at heart. new flats have now been allocated for survivors of the fire. so far, victims have received £700,000 from the government. but conservative government and council are still under pressure. were warnings ignored? why under pressure. were warnings ignored ? why wasn‘t under pressure. were warnings ignored? why wasn‘t more done to improve fire safety in tower blocks before a tragedy on this scale could happen? theresa may is expected to offer certainty to eu nationals living in the uk when she meets with european leaders in brussels later. it will be the prime minister‘s first encounter with the other 27—leaders since she lost her parliamentary majority and formal negotiations to leave the eu began. our political correspondent ben wright reports. was a queen‘s speech dominated by brexit. my government's priority is to secure the best possible deal is the country leaves the european union. with britain set to leave the
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eu by march 2019 there is a vast amount of law to pass. by a government that does not have a majority in the house of commons. and today, theresa may head strip. the first time since she lost a commons majority in the general election. brexit negotiations began on monday and one of the big sticking point is how to secure the status of the more than 3 million eu nationals living in the uk and the 900,000 britons living overseas. this evening, theresa may will set out her vision to the leaders of the other 27 mistakes in brussels, something she refused to be drawn on during the election campaign. neighbour says he‘s right should be guaranteed immediately. how this early pa rt guaranteed immediately. how this early part of the negotiation goes could be crucial in setting the tone for the rest of the brexit talks. our political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster — the prime minister heads to brussels today but she‘s leaving with still no deal with the dup?
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the prime minister‘s position weak in terms of parliament? i don‘t know if you can hear that, they are currently taking down the infrastructure to report on the queen‘s speech yesterday, all the television facilities disappearing and that usually means the government has set out its legislative programme two years ahead and it‘s time to move on but it‘s not at all clear if it is time for a theresa may to move on because she goes to brussels about an overall majority, she said to voters during the election, strengthen my hand, the assumption among european leaders is that her position on brexit negotiations has weakened, she has to do a deal with the dup to get a strong government and we expect that the to be done before there is a vote on the queen‘s speech, it still hasn‘t yet been
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struck so she cannot go to brussels and say with absolute confidence, that she will even be here at the end of the two year negotiating process. what we are seeing for theresa may is a leader of a minority administration trying to negotiate to take britain out of the european union and to get eight separate pieces of legislation through parliament over the next two yea rs through parliament over the next two years without majority backing. thank you. the duke of edinburgh has spent a second night in hospital as a ‘precautionary measure‘, after being admitted with an infection arising from a pre—existing condition. buckingham palace says prince philip — who‘s 96 — remains in good spirits and is up and about inside ‘king edward the 7th‘ hospital. he missed yesterday‘s state opening of parliament, where his place was taken by the prince of wales. two men have died after a crane collapsed at a building site in crewe. another man, who is believed to be the crane driver, is in hospital with serious injuries that aren‘t thought to be life—threatening. the occupants of a house damaged by the falling crane were not injured. it‘s being claimed a growing number
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of young people are having cosmetic procedures such as botox because of online pressure. the nuffield council on bio—ethics says some social media sites where photos can receive positive or negative ratings, have increased levels of anxiety over body image. this report by our health correspondent, dominic hughes, contains flash photography. as social media brings us closer to the world of celebrity are younger people turning to cosmetic procedures to look and live like their idols? the influence of those with millions of followers on social media is hard to gauge. this is botox. .. but doctors media is hard to gauge. this is botox... but doctors who specialise in cosmetic work including botox and dermalfillers in cosmetic work including botox and dermal fillers say when celebrities speak, their fans listen. it may only be a couple of pictures that they post up, they go out to tens of millions of followers and all the sudden, these young girls are looking at it and young boys as well
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and they said that as aspirational, associated with success, with money and with power and that‘s what they want, they think that i‘m into that... want, they think that i‘m into that. . . the want, they think that i‘m into that... the cosmetic procedure industry is largely unregulated sow numbers are hard to come by but the past decade has seen a greater availability and affordability. most young people are living in social media... now after a two year study, researchers are calling for better education, regulation and some corporate responsibility. the social media industry like snap chat, instagram, they should be taking a bit more responsibility. we are not saying they are actually promoting these things but through those media... the fear is that social media, some central to many people‘s lives is also feeding anxieties about appearance and driving the growth in unregulated cosmetic procedures. many of the uk‘s top universities
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have failed to achieve the highest award in the major assessment of teaching standards. 21 universities to hard, eight were given a gold rating, some of those ranks of and bronson have questioned the criteria used in the scheme. the time is ten minutes past eight. inspirational. an extrovert. a young man who loved to be the centre of attention. 29 year old martyn hett was among the 22 people killed in a terror attack at a manchester concert one month ago today. after martyn died, thousands of people shared a hashtag on twitter with the words "be more martyn." we‘rejoined this morning by his mum figen murray and his stepdad stuart but first let‘s hear from martyn in his own words. my my name is martyn, i am a coronation
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street superfine, a deirdre barlow enthusiast, the boy who got the deidre tattooed, as you can see. hallo from michelle mcmanus. hallo, this lovely darling came all the way to see me and i'm so happy. thank you. i‘ve already failed at the first hurdle, these are the most uneven slices ever, unfortunately, one of us tonight is going to have less marrow than the other, but that‘s fine, i‘m on a diet anyway. i‘m particularly excited about these monks which we predict will be in the cabinet somewhere when we are 80. this is my unique tribute to... i love her, i hope you enjoy it. here is to deidre! i can't imagine what your thoughts are, watching
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some about. tell us... it makes me smile when i see it, he wasjust hilarious. constantly. you were able, i was watching you watching that, you were able to smile, you we re that, you were able to smile, you were chuckling as he saw it, one of the things for us who didn‘t know him, we are starting to get a sense of what he was like, that‘s one of the things that has come across. yes, loads and loads, even more than we even thought online, on youtube, on his facebook. he's all over the internet. mostly in an amusing way. the more martyn. absolutely. that's the message, how he embraced life and that‘s how you are determined to remember him and talk about him. and the way people have reacted, how has that made you feel, in this positive way, celebrating his life? very
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proud of the way and i'm proud of martyn. everybody who knows him is proud of him and proud to have known him and be part of his life.” proud of him and proud to have known him and be part of his life. i think it‘s impossible to talk to, to find a common ground almost among people who have lost a child, a loved one, in terms of how they react, we were hearing earlier from olivia campbell—hardy‘s mum charlotte and she spoke about her at and hate and how you react to what happened and she says there is a lot of hurt and had and! she says there is a lot of hurt and had and i don‘t want people to hate because you take that and turn it into something that shouldn‘t be there. lovers all we want and we wa nt there. lovers all we want and we want people to love. it‘s always amazing to hear parents who have tea m amazing to hear parents who have team through some watch to talk generously after being put through such hell. how do you feel? how do i feel? well, when martyn died i think what struck us is the night porter
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love that we received in terms of messages, cards, letters, flowers, people dropping off food and i'm sure that's kind of standard things that happen when you are grieved but the amount of messages, i mean, on my phone, other people have as well, i've had over 2000 messages literally from all over the world. i have received a little cross stitched mancunian bee from a lady in canada who sent me this latter, a lovely letter, who said she watched me and the canadian news, she felt compelled to do that little embroidery for me and send it over. it's lovely. sometimes it is, many people know this from the grieving process , people know this from the grieving process, it‘s almost the kindness of strangers that is the thing that gets you most. it really touched me. and i hadn't realised, as a family,
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we we re totally and i hadn't realised, as a family, we were totally gobsmacked as to how far reaching martyn actually was. everybody seems to know him. when you came in, and you are happy to show us, you have had a tough two done and can we get a shot... explain to people for that is, it is a bee, it is a mancunian bee. and i've had it engraved the more martin andl i've had it engraved the more martin and i am still not sure what a hash tag means. we are always confused by it ourselves. but it feels right and the lady who did it was going to do with the other way round and i said, i need to read it myself, i need to remind myself of the message. what would he make up the fact that his mother had had a tad too? he would find it hilarious. he would love it. it's your first? and last!”
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mentioned olivia‘s mum earlier and her attitude and i know you‘ve deliberately avoided knowing the name of the man who committed the attack. i'm not really interested in knowing his name, i think there is the letter 5 and i am a software but that's all i care about, having said that's all i care about, having said that i don't hate the guy, i absolutely feel and then i watch these things unfold at the mosque in london earlier this week while direct about it and i thought, gosh, people could have easily lynched the guy and some people started kicking him and hitting him and then suddenly i'd have no four, these people came, and they surrounded him to protect him. an imam. and i thought, well, that is humanity in action. because i think, they could
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have easilyjoined in but they chose not to. and i'm actually, it made me really think about what happened to martyn and i actually, although i don't know his name and i don't want to know, i actually have forgiven the sky and i don't feel any negative feelings about it. i note that may sound a bit controversial but it's genuinely howl that may sound a bit controversial but it's genuinely how i feel. ido if it is controversial, i think it would probably be surprising for me, and as i said earlier, everyone deals with grief in their own way and reacts to what happened in their own way. how long did it take you to come about this? has it been a place you have tried to get to? well, i was never really angry, was i? no, i think you can imagine how you might feel when this happens, and i guess ifi feel when this happens, and i guess if i had imagined, i might have imaginedi if i had imagined, i might have imagined i would have been angry,
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but with experienced —— but we have experienced such great emotions, such lows but then such almost highs of warmth and love that you wouldn‘t normally field, only when you are in this position, you experience that love and warmth and it is just undescribable. you have to go through it to understand it, i think. and have you had much contact with other people who are similarly bereaved? has that happen? some of the other families, occasionally we'd met them, but obviously i think everybody is in their own little bubble at the moment. i'm sure there will be in the near future times when we will meet up, or even chat online and staff. and share experiences and how we feel, and just connect. i'd like that.” experiences and how we feel, and just connect. i'd like that. i would imagine they would too. figen and
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stuart, you have touched the hearts of many people today, and whether you think it or not, incredibly brave to come on and share your experience and to share the memory of martyn as well, beemoremartyn, it isa of martyn as well, beemoremartyn, it is a great message to share. thank you for your candid honesty. it is just coming up to 20 minutes past eight. carol has got the weather for us. good morning from royal ascot were todayit good morning from royal ascot were today it is feeling a lot fresher than was yesterday. it would have been extreme temperature yesterday. it reached 34.5 just been extreme temperature yesterday. it reached 34.5just outside heathrow, making it the warmest day of the year so far, the warmest day injune we of the year so far, the warmest day in june we have of the year so far, the warmest day injune we have had since 1976. for some of us, temperatures will be a good 10 degrees at this lower than that. you can see here at royal ascot the beautiful racecourse at two o‘clock or thereabouts, her majesty the queen will come here in her carriage along with other members of the royal family that are
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attending, and then she will end up going to the royal box. you can see it with the coat of arms. right next to that, there are balconies, and thatis to that, there are balconies, and that is where there are some private boxes, somebody like simon cowell for example may have one of those. then behind me is the royal in closure, where there is a strict dress code to adhere to. you cannot wear short dresses or have too much of your shoulders exposed. then behind we have the corporate area. there are different levels you can come in to royal ascot in, that grandstand where the dress code is not quite as strict. the forecast for ascot is one that will be dry. temperature is 22 celsius, still 72 fahrenheit but nowhere near as my gm as oppressive and as hot as it was yesterday. also some thunderstorms in the forecast. thunderstorms across past shove oxfordshire,
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nottinghamshire, east anglia, heading in the direction of the north sea. we also have further thunderstorms coming in across the north of wales, which will drift across the north of england, eventually getting into the afternoon. for northern england, temperatures are down competitor yesterday. don‘t forget the thunderstorms, not all will be seeing them, some sunshine will come out, down towards the south coast, more clouded yesterday —— more clout than yesterday and it will start to break up as the day goes on. for wales, temperatures down compared to yesterday but feeling much more pleasant, less oppressive. again, the cloud breaking and we will see one or two sunny intervals pop up as well. for northern ireland, rather like scotland seeing the lion‘s share of the sunshine today, although you might later on see a
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shower. you will see those showers surface in north—west scotland and through this evening and overnight they will be replaced by some rain. moving across scotland, then coming in across northern ireland. the rest of the uk where it has been so muddy and temperatures have not fallen below the 20s in the last few days, it will feel much more comfortable. the rain in northern ireland will continue to drift southwards tomorrow. they will be heavy in the north and through some central part of the uk, but as it continues southwards, it will tend to weaken and the rain will be in the hills and the rain will be in the hills and the rain will be in the hills and the west. ahead of it, some bright spells, behind it in the north we are looking at some sunny spells and also some blustery showers. as we spells and also some blustery showers. as we move spells and also some blustery showers. as we move toward saturday, the unsettled changeable theme continues. there will be a lot of showers around, some heavy, particularly in the northwest. it will also be breezy. windy with gales with exposure across the far
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north—west, too. they buy day, temperatures just dipping by a smidgen, so temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage injune. carol, thanks very much. the time now is a 23 am. the top story. the chief executive of kensington and chelsea council has resigned amid criticism over the borough‘s response to the grenfell tower fire. we can speak to eartha pond who lives close to the tower and has been helping raise funds and organise support for those affected. shejoins us from our london newsroom. a very good morning to you. thank you for taking time out for us. just a first thought from you on the announcement of the resignation of the chief executive of kensington and shamsi council. what do you make of that —— kensington and chelsea. it is basic maths, to be honest, if you are not fulfilling yourjob description you should not be imposed and he has done the right thing to resign. it will not make any difference on the ground because
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they went there in the first place, but in regards to having someone there who can fulfil the job and is for the community, he wasn‘t doing that and he needs to be out of post. the part of this that you have been closely involved in is that community support, and so may people still praising those who have been involved locally. what kind of work is going on right now? as i said, it is going on right now? as i said, it is nine days on and there is still no one that is visual on the ground even from the organisations that have taken over. they have not come to injure dues themselves for there to injure dues themselves for there to bea to injure dues themselves for there to be a transparent handover or to say this is what is going on high, we are the people in charge, what do you need, where are you currently at? we are literally as a community still pulling together, making relief packs, still supporting the survivors and victims and it is still not good enough. it is staggering when you say like that, you are still literally not seeing any kind of official organisation process going on? definitely not. i
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am not saying they are not there, but in regards to us on the ground seeing them, or local people and victims seeing them in abundance, which they should be, it is not there. even last night, we went down to one of the centres where the officials were supposed to be, and the housing desks were not manned, the housing desks were not manned, the financial aid desks were not man. there should be people down there 24 hours a day, being there and waiting for the needs of these victims and people to support. the fundraising goes on, earth. i know that we have this charity single amongst other things raising money for those locally, and that process is ongoing. it is a fantastic initiative and it is welcome. it is needed, in regards to keeping things in the media, to making sure we getjustice. we have seen making sure we getjustice. we have seen with similar events such as in manchester there has been a concert that has been had, and that is something i am really keen to push on, in regards to getting artists to
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continue to support these victims, because it is not about today and next month and next week, it is long—term, we are looking at families and young people that have lost their support network and will need financial aid in abundance. i am talking about maybe people who have the idea of going to university whose parents are no longer here to support them. how can we ensure we have gathered enough aid to support these people long—term. it could even be in regards to medical issues, people who are suffering from post—traumatic stress who don‘t actually realise it yet. it maybe two or three months‘ time, or even three years‘ time, might happen is that triggers it and we need to be up that triggers it and we need to be up to support them in the long term. eartha, thank you for your time this morning, that is eartha pond who set up morning, that is eartha pond who set up the grenfell tower fund page. morning, that is eartha pond who set up the grenfell towerfund page. we will be hearing from simon cowell about how the single came about and all the stars that have been involved in that as well later on. a
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20 7am, time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. tha nkfully thankfully for today, it is becoming fresher for most of us. for many of us, after this morning‘s cloudy skies, some breaks developing in the cloud to give us sunshine, temperatures a good 10 celsius lower than they were at today. in the south—east of england it‘s less hot, still holding onto some warmth. through this evening, clear skies, more rain coming into the north west of scotland, moving south during friday, brighter skies developing. not much in the way of rain across the south, the rain breaking up as it moves southwards but much fresher, temperatures between 17 and 24. that‘s all from me. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. divided by brexit — as leaders gather for a summit in brussels — we look at what the other 27 eu members want out
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of britain‘s departure live from london, that‘s our top story on thursday 22nd june. immigration, trade, human rights or reform. as brexit talks continue, we‘ll assess what‘s at stake for the uk and the rest of the eu. also in the programme... the tussle over toshiba. overseas tech firms say they‘ll still want to buy the ailing tech firm, despite government efforts to keep it injapanese hands.
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