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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  June 22, 2017 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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an estimated 600 high rise buildings in england are covered in similar cladding to grenfell tower. urgent urge nt tests urgent tests are being carried out to see how many are combustible. so far it's been confirmed that three tower blocks do have combustible cladding. the prime minister says steps a re cladding. the prime minister says steps are being taken to make them safe. mr speaker, shortly before i came to the chamber i was informed that a number of these tests have come back as combustible. the relevant local authorities and local fire services have been mr speaker, shortly before i came to the chamber i was informed that tests are carried out on hundreds of samples. the prime minister says the full results should be confirmed in the next 48 hours and residents are being informed. also this lunchtime. eu leaders head to brussels to discuss brexit, as the president of
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the european council hence the uk could still change its mind. a former bishop convicted of abusing young men — an independent review finds that senior figures in the church of england "colluded" with him. mosul‘s famous al—nuri mosque is blown up by so—called islamic state as iraqi forces close in on their last stronghold. prince harry tells an american magazine that no—one in the royal family wants to be king or queen — but they will do it for the greater good. and its ladies day here at royal ascot, where it's all about the fashion and the gold cup, which is today's feature race. coming up in the sport on bbc news, lions head coach warren gatland urges his side to be courageous, as he names an attacking team ahead of the opening test with new zealand on saturday. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
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downing street has revealed that an estimated 600 high—rise buildings are covered in aluminium—type cladding — which could be similar to that used on grenfell tower, which was destroyed by fire last week. urgent tests ordered by the government have so far confirmed that three tower blocks are covered in combustible cladding. the tests are on—going, with samples from tower blocks all over the country being sent in for testing. 100 samples can be processed a day. the prime minister says steps are being taken to make the buildings affected safe and to inform residents. our political correspondent iain watson reports. and unimaginable tragedy, that's how the prime minister described the fire at grenfell tower. but was it unavoidable tragedy? and our tenants in the tower blocks at risk? local
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councils estimate 600 buildings may have similar cladding. there will be a public enquiry. politicians have been drawing their own conclusions. mr speaker, shortly before i came to the chamber i was informed that a number of these tests have come back as combustible. the relevant local authorities and local fire services have been informed and as i speak they are taking all possible steps to ensure buildings are safe, and to inform affected residents. the bbc has seen e—mails sent residents in this north london block, telling them the cladding here is similar to g re nfell tower. them the cladding here is similar to grenfell tower. but the flats do have the safety systems in place, including sprinklers. although the reason for the grenfell fire hasn't been firmly established, the labour leader wants councils to be given enough cash to replace cladding. leader wants councils to be given enough cash to replace claddingm obviously a huge cost involved in removing and re—cladding blocks that are found to have flammable materials included in them. that, resources that money that must be made available immediately because
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it's a hugejob made available immediately because it's a huge job of work. but while precautions are being taken now, some opposition politicians accused the government of being too slow to act and recommendations from four yea rs act and recommendations from four years ago following this fire at lakanal years ago following this fire at la ka nal house years ago following this fire at lakanal house in south london. the coroner said those deaths were avoidable, that there should have been sprinklers, that there should have been changing the fire instructions, that there should be greater supervision of contracts and fire inspection. the coroner did not, asi fire inspection. the coroner did not, as i understand it, say there should be sprinklers in every one of these types of properties. but what is important is that because of what underpins what she was saying was a necessity of making sure that people living in similar blocks are able to feel reassured about their safety. here in kensington the most senior official in the local authority has resigned. this was welcomed at westminster by the council —— while the council was criticised for a
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slow response to the crisis. the prime minister wants to see swift recommendations from the forthcoming public enquiry, but grenfell tower appears to be becoming something of appears to be becoming something of a political symbol of inequality and a political symbol of inequality and a new consensus seems to be emerging here in the house of commons that more priority should be given to people who live in rented housing. we have to learn those lessons, to make sure this tragedy is a turning point in our whole attitude and never again do people dying needlessly in a towering inferno, litigant poverty, surrounded by a sea of prosperity. long after the tv cameras have gone and the world has moved on, let the legacy of this awful tragedy be that we resolve never to forget these people and instead to gear our policies and our thinking towards making their lives better and bringing them into the political process. but more immediately the government needs to reassure tenants across the country that their safety is paramount. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. tom
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symonds is with me now. we have an estimated 600 tower blocks in england alone that have an aluminium type cladding. it's not confirmed yet apart from three, how many could be combustible. yes, as we are learning with this subject, the devil is in the details so 600 tower blocks with aluminium cladding added to the outside of those buildings are something councils do to improve the thermal insulation of the building and of course the look of the building. now what we don't know is how many of them might be an assault category that we think the g re nfell tower assault category that we think the grenfell tower materials were, which isa grenfell tower materials were, which is a category which enables them to burnin is a category which enables them to burn ina is a category which enables them to burn in a fire, combustibility of the industry calls it. that's crucial. as you heard the government said they've identified three, and so said they've identified three, and so those will need action taking, and also they are testing about 100 pieces of material from tower blocks the day, and that's quite an important and rigorous test. so there's a lot of work to do before there's a lot of work to do before the government can be clear about the government can be clear about the scale of its problem, but of
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course for every one of those 600 tower blocks there will be hundreds of residents very concerned. for that reason the government is not saying which tower blocks it's inspecting at this stage, but i think we are going to be a long list of those tower blocks, possibly a shorter list, depending on what they find, over the days to come. even before test results come back there some local authorities taking matters into their own hands. camden council has decided remove cladding from some tower blocks and the devil is in the detail in this one. it's very interesting the statement they've given us this morning, they have said that the aluminium panels involved are of a polyethylene core, so involved are of a polyethylene core, so that's a pe core, as its name. it's thought that is the same as the one used at grenfell tower. but they also say the panels that were fitted we re also say the panels that were fitted were not to the standard we had commissioned. so that suggests that somewhere along the line, for whatever reason, there's been a confusion or a deliberate piece of cost—cutting that has led to the wrong sort of panel being fitted to
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the tower block. of course that opens at the question that something similar happened at grenfell tower. we don't either way but it's a question for the investigation and the public enquiry, and of course the public enquiry, and of course the government will need to check that hasn't happened in other places around the country. let's go to ours assista nt around the country. let's go to ours assistant political editor norman smith in westminster. the prime minister says more results should begin in the next 48 hours but it goes to show the task the government have a head. what seems to be emerging out of the tragedy, the horror of grenfell tower, is potentially a much wider housing scandal centred on social housing and the quality of fire protection given to residents in there. and already we have had calls from some labour mps for those residents in towers potentially affected to be immediately rehoused. that would of course be a massive undertaking. ministers, while stressing that safety of course is paramount, are keen not to start any sort of panic.
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so they are saying that they hope to have the necessary tests on the tower blocks completed within days. those tower blocks which have similar cladding, fire experts will going to assess whether the buildings are actually unsafe. because it is argued just because there is some similar cladding does not necessarily mean those buildings are unsafe, because it depends how much cladding varies, where it is, what are the sort of preventative fire safety methods may be in place but what we can say is there seems to be an appetite for fundamental rethink about the attitude here at westminster towards social housing and the sort of priority it's given. norman smith in westminster, thank you. the prime minister this afternoon is in brussels. to meet eu leaders for the first time since she lost her parliamentary majority in the general election.
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brexit will be discussed and theresa may is expected to offer certainty to eu nationals living in the uk. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels. what sort of reception will she get? she made the comments at the beginning of the election campaign where mrs may accused some in the eu of trying to undermine her re—election prospects, so this is her first meeting since then. it's going to be interesting to see how she is received. she will address the leaders this evening at dinner about the issue of citizens‘ rights, what she says is this british uk offer to be put on the table. the eu side already has its offer. it‘s made it quite a few weeks ago, saying that all existing rights, that 4 million people have, uk citizens living in the eu, eu citizens living in the eu, eu citizens in the uk could, should be preserved, guaranteed for life, that‘s rights to work, pension rights, things like that, education rights. we will see of theresa may‘s offer matches that or not. but the
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leaders here will not engage with her in discussions about it. that is for the separate negotiation process which david davis is part of. so they will listen politely and then usher her out of the room, so that they can discuss brexit themselves and how they feel the start of talks is going. interestingly donald tusk, who is during these talks today, was asked today and said somebody asks could exist —— could brexit be reversed. he said, you may say i‘m a dreamer, but i‘m not the only one, quoting john lennon‘s imagine. there‘s a warning today from the horticulture industry that without access to seasonal workers abroad, their sector could face collapse. a bbc survey of soft fruit and salad growers found that more than half of those they spoke to aren‘t sure if they‘ll have enough migrant workers this summer. 20 % say they already have fewer workers than they need. here‘s our business correspondent, emma simpson. perfectly ripe and ready to be picked. the harvest‘s in full swing.
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right now, there are small armies of workers dotted around the countryside. work that needs a human hand. all this produce is home—grown, but not home—picked. that‘s because just about everyone here is from eastern europe. it‘s tough, seasonal work, especially in this heat and, with the weak pound and brexit looming, these jobs just aren‘t as appetising as they used to be. maybe next time i‘m going to germany or netherlands or bulgaria. because the money‘s better? yeah. it‘s surely better. georgi‘s thinking the same. he‘s been coming to this farm for the last ten years from his home in bulgaria. they are european union country and it will be easy for us there. because we are european union citizens. even before the brexit vote, recruitment was getting harder.
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but this year the boss of this farm says he‘s got 20% fewer workers than he‘d like. he says the industry won‘t survive if they stop coming. well, it means we won‘t be able to carry on growing food. i mean, they are the critical resource for us to be able to save our crop each year. and the logic of extension, of not being able to harvest that crop, is that we will need to import produce from europe or elsewhere in the world. he‘s not the only one. seven out of ten soft fruit and salad growers said they would consider reducing uk production if there were future restrictions on seasonal workers. and the industry is warning that, in an extreme scenario, a punnet of strawberries could rise by up to 37% if we had to rely solely on imports. why can‘t you get british workers to pick fruit?
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we do try very hard, but our experience has been challenging over the years. the fact that it‘s seasonal operation makes it difficult for people, and as well unemployment is very low in our part of the world. they‘ve been picking strawberries for decades in this corner of essex. the nationalities have changed through the years, but if we want to keep buying british, then growers say they need a seasonal workers permit scheme. the government says it also wants this industry to thrive but that there isn‘t sufficient evidence for such a scheme right now. emma simpson, bbc news, essex. an independent review has found that senior figures in the church of england "colluded" with a former bishop who was convicted for abusing young men. peter ball, who‘s now 85, was jailed in 2015 for historical sex offences against 18 teenagers and young men. a review found that the church
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failed to respond appropriately 0ur religious affairs correspondent martin bashir reports. a bishop for 15 years who claimed to bea a bishop for 15 years who claimed to be a close friend of the prince of wales, peter ball‘s fall from grace was sealed tee years ago. when he admitted to 18 sexual offences against young men and served 16 months in prison. but today‘s review, led by the former head of camden council, focuses on the church‘s management of peter ball when the allegations first surfaced in1992, and he when the allegations first surfaced in 1992, and he stood down as bishop of gloucester. entitled and abuse of faith, she says that the church couuded faith, she says that the church colluded with ball rather than seeking to help those he harmed. the church‘s response over many years is lamentable by any standards. in
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reality, colluding with ball‘s ambition to protect and promote himself, rather than seeking to help those he harmed or ushering the safety of others. the report is particularly critical of lord carey, who was archbishop of canterbury at the time. it says he received seven letters following ball‘s initial arrest and failed to pass them to the police. he also chose not to put ball‘s name on the lambeth list, a catalogue of clergy about whom there we re catalogue of clergy about whom there were serious questions about suitability for ongoing ministry. were serious questions about suitability for ongoing ministrylj am suitability for ongoing ministry.” am truly sorry that, as a church, we failed the survivors of abuse carried out by bishop peter ball. having read the report, i am appalled and deeply disturbed by its contents. appalled and deeply disturbed by its co nte nts. as appalled and deeply disturbed by its contents. as they moira says in her peter ball abused boys and men over a20 peter ball abused boys and men over a 20 year period and, as a church,
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we colluded and failed to act and protect those who came forward for help. there are no excuses. we understand the current archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, is written to lord carey asking him to consider his position as honorary assistant bishop in the diocese of oxford. it is lord carey‘s only remaining position in the church of england. prince harry has suggested that none of his family wants to be a future king or queen. in an interview with the american magazine newsweek, he said the royals were acting for "the greater good of the people". the prince also criticised the decision to make him walk behind his mother‘s coffin at herfuneral when he was 12 — saying no child should be asked to do that. here‘s our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. they were the images which came to symbolise a national and personal tragedy. the then 13—year—old prince harry, walking with his then 15—year—old brother, william, in the funeral cortege of their mother, diana.
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it was september 1997. now, nearly 20 years later, harry has spoken of the turmoil the event caused him. in an interview with the american magazine newsweek, he said: but it‘s harry‘s comments on what he seems to feel is the burden of being royal which may cause some surprise, particularly among older generations. the journalist who did the interview is sympathetic. prince harry is a huge admirer of the queen. he thinks she‘s absolutely wonderful. but he is now at an age where he can see the demands and the sacrifices that you have to make, and i think he and prince william
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want a more private, personal life. but a former member of the royal household is more critical. i don‘t think it‘s such a good idea to be quite so open. he has done a lot for mental health in bringing out his own true feelings. i think we‘ve got to a point now where enough is enough. in this day and age, harry is saying, and given a free will, few people, in his opinion, would choose to take on the role of monarch. but, of course, being royal means you don‘t have a choice, as he recognises. what we seem to have is harry off—loading his private thoughts, thoughts which, not for the first time, underline the downside, as he sees it, of being in such a privileged position. but, alongside his apparent doubts, there is also a strong sense of commitment. for the older members of the family — one of whom, the 96—year—old duke of edinburgh, left hospital this morning after the treatment of an infection — for them, the approach has always
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been, never complain, never explain. they may feel it‘s advice harry might now heed. nicholas witchell, bbc news, buckingham palace. 0ur our top story. an estimated 600 high—rise buildings in england have similar cladding to grenfell tower. urgent similar cladding to grenfell tower. urge nt tests similar cladding to grenfell tower. urgent tests a re similar cladding to grenfell tower. urgent tests are being carried out. so far, it‘s been confirmed that two do have combustible cladding. the releva nt local do have combustible cladding. the relevant local authorities and fire services have been informed and they are taking all possible steps to ensure buildings are safe and to inform affected residents. coming up in sport: will ireland be handed test playing status, as the international cricket council meet to decide whether to approve their inclusion amongst other test nations. iraqi forces say they are just a street away from the famous
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ancient mosque in the city of mosul that was blown up by so—called islamic state. the iraqi prime minister described the destruction of the great mosque of al—nuri as "an official declaration of defeat" by islamic state fighters in their last stronghold in iraq. 0ur correspondent, richard galpin, has the latest. iraqi troops fighting their way into mosul‘s old city. the last district still in the hands of so—called islamic state. the army is closing in now on the few hundred militants in what remains of their caliphate. and, in the midst of the fighting, stood this. the famous leaning minaret of the grand al—nuri mosque, built more than 800 years ago. it was here the islamic state leader, abu bakr al—baghdadi, made his only public appearance, after proclaiming the caliphate
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across northern iraq and syria. but, this week, people were horrified to see video showing the minaret and mosque being blown up by the militants as they retreat. although they blame an american air strike. and the destruction has been described by the iraqi prime minister as a declaration of defeat by islamic state. with overwhelming numbers of iraqi troops now concentrated in the old city, and with backing from a us—led coalition, it does seem to be only a matter of time before isis is finally driven out of mosul. translation: our forces on the ground are moving forward. they have now penetrated the old city. it is true, the advance is slow, but we are advancing carefully, taking into account the lives of the civilians trapped inside the city.
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but the upsurge in fighting is leading to many civilian casualties. this is mosul‘s general hospital. it now lies just a few hundred metres away from the front lines. these people, most of them are children. there are children, lots of civilian casualties, that you see here. most of them are fleeing, and on their way out, they are injured. with at least 100,000 people still in the old city, the number of casualties is likely to keep rising until the offensive to retake mosul from islamic state, which began in october last year, finally comes to an end. richard galpin, bbc news. the man who died at the scene of the terrorist attack at a mosque in finsbury park on monday has been named as makram ali. he was 51, and from haringey in north london. a preliminary postmortem examination found that mr ali died as a result of multiple injuries.
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our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, is at scotland yard. makram ali, the only person to have died in the attack on sunday night, going into monday morning, being formally named by police today. a 51—year—old who moved to the country aged ten from bangladesh, a man who had four daughters, two sons and two grandchildren, a man who had suffered from a weak leg and collapsed on his way back from prayers in the early hours of monday morning and was being looked after by fellow worshippers, expressing his desire to get home to the house in the next street when the white van ploughed into him, injuring many worshippers, and unfortunately killing him. he died of multiple injuries. his family today describing how devastated they are at his loss. his daughter speaking on behalf of the family. we wish everyone to know what a lovely man he was. he spent his whole life without any enemies,
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choosing a quiet life instead. we, as a family have always believed that the actions of one person cannot be a reflection of a whole people. we have no doubt that our father would not wish for there to be any retaliation or recriminations and would urge people to remain calm and to pray for peace in these difficult times. police are asking for anybody who saw that distinctive white van with a yellow logo on it over the attack at the weekend, and anybody who knows the main suspect in the spoken to him in recent weeks, to come forward. a 47—year—old man, darren 0sborne, is still in custody but hasn‘t yet been charged. single parents with children under two have won a high court challenge against the government‘s controversial benefit cap, after a judge ruled that "real misery is being caused to no good purpose". our legal correspondent, clive coleman, is at the high court. explain what this will mean. mr
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justice collins has ruled that the government‘s failure to exempt this specific group, parents with children under two years of age, to exempt them from the benefits cap, is an unlawful because it discriminates against very young children. emotive used. he said that real mystery is being caused to no good effect by the imposition of the cap. the cap itself limits the amount of state benefits, including housing benefit, that families can claim. some groups however are exempt. for instance, if you are a full—time carer, you are exempt. the claimants, two of whom were made homeless as a result of domestic violence, claimed during the case that the cap meant they had to make ha rd that the cap meant they had to make hard decisions between paying their rent or buying food. the government has been given permission to appeal, but thejudge has been given permission to appeal, but the judge expressed his view that they should think long and hard before doing so. the funeral for an american student, 0tto warmbier,
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who was held for 15 months in a north korean prison, will take place this afternoon. the 22—year—old died earlier this week after he was flown home in a coma. president trump has blamed the pyongyang regime for his death. 0ur correspondent, aleem maqbool, reports from the warmbier family‘s hometown of wyoming. fellow students pay their respects to 0tto warmbier, who travelled to north korea early last year, was arrested, jailed, and finally sent home to his parents in a coma. he died just days later. you look at north korea and you look at 0tto, beautiful 0tto. he went over there, a healthy, wonderful boy. and you see how he came back. 0tto warmbier was last seen in north korea publicly pleading for his freedom in a courtroom. that was in march last year. iaman i am an innocent scapegoat. but, instead, he was sent, sentenced to 15 years hard labour in
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a north korean prison. he had been accused of crimes against the country, and of taking a sign from the hotel he was staying at. another traveller in the same adventure tour group described the moment he was taken away. translation: otto was tapped on the shoulder and was asked to step aside. then people started going, someone is missing, where is otto? then the guide realises that someone is missing. she gets up and tries to get off the plane, but she is stopped from doing that. he decided, while travelling in china, to take what was supposed to be a quick trip across the border with a tour group. north korean officials now say that otto warmbier had been in a coma, for more than a year. apparently it was because he contracted botulism. american doctors say they have no evidence of that. there are fears for three other north american nationals also being detained in north korea. the mystery of otto warmbier‘s death remains.
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and washington now assesses its response to a regime that continues to provoke american anger. in the town where he grew up, residents are saying their final goodbyes to otto warmbier. right across this country people are asking what his death means for already incredibly tense relations between america and north korea. it‘s gold cup day at ascot — day three of the royal festival — the signature race happens at 4:20 this afternoon, with last year‘s winner order of st george starting as favourite. our sports news correspondent, richard conway, is at ascot. that is the feature race, the gold cup, at 4:20pm. order of st george is the favourite, 11—10 on with bookmakers to repeat last year‘s victory. he is trained by aidan o‘brien and ridden by ryan moore, and i‘m sure that bookies will not
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wa nt and i‘m sure that bookies will not want that on to win today, but there are others in the field that could rival him. it is ladies day at royal ascot. we have been seeing some bright and colourful fashions going through the gates. the milliners of britain have been doing a brisk trade over the last few months! back to the racing, at her majesty the queen will be arriving shortly after 2pm. she won the gold cup with her horse in 2013. she doesn‘t have a runner in the race today, but she does have a horse in the britannia sta kes at does have a horse in the britannia stakes at 5pm. maths prize will run for her in her colours, and she hopes that that will bring her a winner in this, one of her favourite weeks of the year. time for a look at the weather. what a difference what a difference a what a difference a day what a difference a day makes.

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