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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 22, 2017 9:00pm-9:30pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source, live from the eu summit in brussels, where we have had - news. may where we have had - news. m :.....77 where we have had - news. “w < where we have had - news. itfii‘it eu will be allowed to remain citizens will be allowed to remain after brexit is complete. it is the prime minister's first appearance in brussels since she lost a majority in parliament after the recent election. european union leaders are approaching the bloc‘s future with renewed optimism, even to the point of leading the door open on brexit. who knows? you may say i am a dreamer, but i am not the only one! hello, bbc, how are you?” dreamer, but i am not the only one! hello, bbc, how are you? i am fine. all the bloc‘s biggest leaders are here — migration and jobs are all high on the agenda. as is security. after a number of recent terror attacks in europe — including one here in brussels just two days ago —
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pressure will be on leaders to combat the threat. if you have any questions, whether on the breaking news about eu citizens in the uk, or about brexit in general, send it my way. our contact details are on the screen throughout the programme. in the last few minutes, we have learned that uk prime minister theresa may, whom we knew would be speaking to other eu leaders about theissue speaking to other eu leaders about the issue of citizens‘ rights, well, she said that eu citizens currently living in the uk will be allowed to stay after brexit, but she has rejected calls by the eu for a
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european courts to oversee these rights. let‘s bring in damian, who has been working on the story all day long. tell us more. it is interesting. theresa may finished her breathing in the last few minutes, so we have all been passed the details. in the past, she was talking about a big and generous offer. what she has tabled, she said, isa offer. what she has tabled, she said, is a fair and serious offer, which i think when you look at it will come in below the eu expectation, so this will be tricky. why is it coming in below expectations? there are several areas of contention. the first, who will best apply to? she says it will apply to any eu citizen living in the uk who is there lawfully. there will be questions, and the devil will be questions, and the devil will be questions, and the devil will be in the detail. she says you will be in the detail. she says you will be in the detail. she says you will be able to get a settled status. in uk law, i think that is
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called a definite leave to remain. will it apply to students, to someone will it apply to students, to someone who is undocumented, to someone someone who is undocumented, to someone who is undocumented, to someone who is undocumented, to someone who is there not working but caring for someone else, will it apply to their children? eu law says the rights pass to your children. eu law says it will apply to your wife. there are all sorts of people who would lose rights under this. another difficulty, who governs this. she has said british courts, they have said eu court. and this is all with reference to eu citizens in the uk, and i may be some watching right now. there are also people across europe watching on bbc world news thinking, where do we fit into this? good question. theresa may says she wants reciprocal rights, the same sorts of rights guaranteed for british people in europe. the eu has said it would be willing to guarantee full rights, the ones that
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eve ryo ne guarantee full rights, the ones that everyone has today, in perpetuity. the eu still has on the table an offer that is higher and offers more rights further into the future. what will this uk offer mean for uk citizens and what will the eu side say about that? we don‘t know. also, which rights? there are quite a few! the right to work, the right to health care, to a pension and social security benefits. the eu will want to look at that very carefully as well. thank you very much. if you get more details, please come back. significant developments here, with theresa may confirming that eu citizens currently in the uk will be able to remain after brexit. as damian has just said, able to remain after brexit. as damian hasjust said, this is an issue that is far from being resolved. if you‘re thinking, perhaps they are talking about it now, they are not. theresa may has left for the day, and it was always made clear this would not be
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negotiated. theresa may made that this —— made a statement, there was no discussion. it will be picked up by the negotiating teams. that will not happen at this summit. brexit is a big issue here at this eu summit, and it has been at every eu summit since this time last year. there is a lot of discussion about the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland. and then there is the divorce bill, the figure that the uk may have to pay to get out of its long—term financial commitments to the european union. some big issues to grapple with. before we go further,
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let me play you a little bit of what theresa may told the bbc earlier. i will set out today clearly how the united kingdom proposes to protect the rights of eu citizens living in the rights of eu citizens living in the uk, and see the rights of uk residents living in europe protected. it has been an important issue, and we wanted it to be one of the early issues considered in the negotiations. that is now the case, that work is starting, and we will step out —— set out how rights will be protected for eu citizens in the united kingdom. that was the prime minister arriving at the european council. president of the european council donald tusk appears to still be hoping it won‘t happen at all. you hear different predictions coming from different people about the possible outcome of these
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negotiations. hard brexit, soft brexit, or no deal. some of my british friends have asked me whether brexit could be reversed, and whether i could imagine an outcome whether uk stays part of the eu. i told than that in fact —— i told them that in fact the european union was built on dreams that seemed impossible to achieve. so, who knows? you may say i am a dreamer, but i am not the only one! yes, that‘s right, donald tusk quoting john lennon. he is hinting that the uk could make a u—turn on this. let‘s bring in chris morris, who often helps us on european matters. every time i mention that a
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senior eu figure has even hinted that a u—turn might be a puzzle, lots of viewers who support a brexit come back and say, what are they doing, this isn‘t helpful. come back and say, what are they doing, this isn't helpful. if you are an eu leader and you are asked at the door is still open, in a sense, it would make more news if you said the door was completely closed. it was perhaps a deliberate message being sent out to those who would like a slightly different type of brexit than the one being promoted by theresa may. i‘m not sure it will be seen by all his eu collea g u es sure it will be seen by all his eu colleagues as a helpful thing to say at the moment, because a lot of them are saying, it has been one year since the referendum, let‘s get on with it. mr tusk has his position and he likes putting out these lines occasionally. i‘m not sure there is an expectation of a u—turn. i think most people think brexit will happen. the question is, what type of brexit and under what conditions? picking up on that point, i was surprised to hear the netherlands
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prime minister saying earlier that it would be great to know exactly it what kind of brexit britain wants. that‘s astonishing. what kind of brexit britain wants. that's astonishing. and that was one of the messages of the recent uk election. we still haven‘t come to a determination about what kind of brexit we want. don‘t forget what the question was in the referendum last year: do you want to remain in the eu do you want to leave? it did not discuss details of the single market, customs union, soft or hard brexit. one of the big things we will see in the next few months, both within the uk parliament and within the conservative party, is manoeuvring proposition as people try and decide what we are going to do for brexit, and what bits of the eu might we do business with. critically, what kind of transition to get us from where we are now to where we might be in the future? it is allup
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where we might be in the future? it is all up for grabs. politics in the uk has never been so fluid. we were in pretty much the same spot a year agojust after brexit, in pretty much the same spot a year ago just after brexit, and the mood here was not great, frankly. contrast that with the message, and from the new leaders of ireland and france, and you wonder if things have shifted. i wonder if you buy that, a fundamental shift? as you say, president macro, and a new leader in ireland, —— emmanuel macron. there are some positive signs, even though the fundamental architecture of the eurozone still need quite a bit of work. there are splits. in the response to brexit, we saw genuine unity between the other 27. i don‘t think i have seen quite that level of unity on any other subject. there are other issues up legal rights, human rights, on which you can see splits between some of the old countries in western europe and the new countries
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in eastern europe. emmanuel macron seems to be putting down markers in the sand to countries such as poland, saying this is a community values, and if we don‘t share values in the future, it could become a problem. chris, don't go far, i have more questions. as have those of you watching. if you want to contact us, our contact details are on screen. this is where a lot of people who fundamentally believe in the idea of the eu go about their work. i am in the eu go about their work. i am in the european council, just a couple of hundred meters away from the european commission, the civil service of the eu, and very close to one of the european parliaments as well. what is interesting is that
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leader after leader arriving today was emphasising that we‘re notjust here to talk about brexit, and far from it. the issues that they raised as priorities: migration — there are still many thousands of people coming into the eu — and how the eu discourages people from doing that or manages them when they arrive is still a pressing issue. then there is defence and security. there are regular terror attacks in the eu at the moment. and there are lots of questions about how the eu organises defence. then there is the economy — jobs and growth getting a lot of emphasis. let‘s bring chris back in on the issue of the fence, because i think people in the uk will be quite surprised to see the eu moving so far so fast on this. there are many issues, but one of them on which the uk has held back the rest of the eu has been defence. for years, the uk has been defence. for years, the uk has been defence. for years, the uk has been the country saying, we have nato, we don‘t need more integrated
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structures at eu level. it is duplication and a waste of money, and we are not comfortable with it. with the uk on the way out, we think, then it means that the big impediment to moving forward on european defence cooperation has gone, and germany and france are particularly keen on it. we have seen movement and we will see movement over the course of the rest of this year as well. i think it is something that will be significant. jean—claude juncker said today that most of the research and development was done at national level, and why are we doing that in a union of 28, soon—to—be 27, countries? there are things that we could do together to save money and resources, and produce better results. why do we have 19 different types of tank when we could have one or two? we will come back to you in a minute. i have got a message saying: is nigel farage there? i saw him walking in
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and asked him what he made of how brexit is going. he said, it was a terrible idea to have that election. the decision has been taken and now it is being undermined. he is in brussels, still a member of the european parliament. keep the questions coming. safety officials are carrying out urgent checks on hundreds of high rise buildings across the uk to ensure there is no repeat of the fire which spread through grenfell tower. seven residential blocks in four local authority areas have been found to have cladding which could catch fire. panels are already being removed from some high rise blocks in north london. dozens of mps questioned the prime minister about the issue in the commons this morning, including this intervention by labour‘s hilary benn. was cladding of the type used in g re nfell tower was cladding of the type used in grenfell tower compliant with the fire safety and building regulations
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applicable at the time when the refurbishment was undertaken — yes or no? they are testing the cladding on the building, and they expect to make the results of this public in the next, ithink, in the next 48 hours. this is outside source, live from the bbc newsroom. “ we “ we are —— we are live at the eu summit. theresa may has said in the last few minutes that she will allow eu citizens living in the uk for five years the right to stay, but she has rejected the eu call for the european court to oversee those
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rights. let‘s ta ke let‘s take a break from european politics and talk about american politics. the us senate has finally revealed its plan to replace obamacare. this has been largely fashioned by the republicans. let‘s begin by hearing senator mitch mcconnell. we agree on the need to free americans from obamacare‘s policies. we will repeal it so that americans are no longerforced we will repeal it so that americans are no longer forced to buy insurance that they don‘t need or can‘t afford. we will repeal the employer mandates that americans no longer see their hours and take home pay cut by employers because of it. we agree on the need to improve the affordability of health insurance and policies contained in the discussion draft will do that. we
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will eliminate costly obamaca re taxes that are passed onto consumers so we can put downward pressure premiums. and this is the perspective from the democrats. the senate republican bill is a wolf in sheep's clothing. we are potentially voting on it in one week. no committee hearings, no amendments in committee, no debate on the floor, save for ten measly hours on one of the most important bills we are dealing with in decades. laura bicker is in washington. hi, laura. i think some people were expecting some bigger changes to this bill? i think a number of people were wondering what kind of d raft people were wondering what kind of draft would come out, and what we
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have seen is basically quite similar to what the house of representatives came outwith. there are some key changes. the cats that the house proposed to medicaid, the system for the poorest in america —— beat cuts to that are not as deep and they roll—out over a longer period, so they will eventually bite, which is one of the concerns of health groups and democrats, who say there will be and democrats, who say there will be a tax cut for the wealthy in the us. the reason they are cutting back taxes because that is what fun is the affordable care act. they are cutting taxes for the wealthy, and yet the poorest in america, who require health care, might not get the care they need under this bill, and that is the main criticism you are seeing from the democrat side. and is this a done deal, bora? earlier in the year, there were a
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rather —— there were other efforts that fell down because the republicans couldn‘t get their numbers together. well, well, we will have to wait and see. one of the reasons why this has all been drafted behind closed doors is to stop the controversy that has dogged republicans over this key campaign pledge. they simply cannot agree, and when it comes to this bill, it is no different. you have already had those from the far right saying this does not go far enough, that this does not go far enough, that this is obamacare — light. then you have more moderate conservatives saying that this goes too far and made cut health care for women. when it comes to those two sides, they will have to reconcile. —— it may cut health care for women. the congressional budget office will look at this bill, an independent
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body, and try to figure out how many americans will lose health care. under the previous draft, they said 23 million americans. so, early next week, expect that score, and that could come the whole vote. laura, thanks for taking us through that. iam i am live that the eu council. theresa may has just announced that eu citizens who have been in the uk for five years will be able to remain beyond the point of brexit. this is a place unlike any other that i have reported on. it is vast, like a rabbit warren, there are various speeches and events relating to the different leaders who are here. i‘ve spent the day walking around this building, speaking to the eu‘s leaders and trying to get answers from them. there is a new building and a new
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red carpet here, and it affords all the leaders more time to think about whether they want to stop for those of us gathered to ask questions, or not. chancellor merkel, bbc news — can brexit be done in two years? what are you hoping to hear from theresa may later? are you satisfied with the cooperation you‘re getting from the uk on security measures?” cooperation you‘re getting from the uk on security measures? i hope to keep a good relation with the uk for security, but also for the future of europe. this is the cafeteria where you see journalists and sometimes politicians. last year, just over there, nigel farage bought a pint of beer and was enjoying celebrating brexit. he is not in a mood to celebrate since the last uk election result. if you come over here and we leave the journalists behind, result. if you come over here and we leave thejournalists behind, as result. if you come over here and we leave the journalists behind, as you head through, you can see there are rooms where people are working, but all over, we‘re left with things
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like this, which give us the indicated programme for the media and briefings we can expect. this is the press bit at the european council — absolutely huge, full of journalists from all over the eu. on the screens, we have feeds coming in from press conferences that are happening. that is the president of the european parliament, whom i spoke to earlier. and there is a big huddle in the middle of this floor, where politicians will give briefings to journalists. that press conference i just showed briefings to journalists. that press conference ijust showed you a pretty sure was taking place in the “is; 5ng e sto- jean-claude the in press ' ”' "*' " it is from the press conferences that the come up the that the politicians come up the stairs and back out into the press bit on the way to their cars. so,
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