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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 23, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. giving eu citizens the right to stay in the uk after brexit. the prime minister says around three million people could get a new "settled status". she unveiled the plan at her first summit since the general election, but the labour party says it's "too little, too late". it's a year since the uk voted to leave the eu. a lot has happened since then, so do those who voted change their mind? i'm speaking to both sides in south—west london. good morning, it's friday the 23rd ofjune. also this morning: as hundreds of tower blocks are tested after the grenfell fire,
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combustible cladding is found on 11 tower blocks in england. a premier inn says it's extremely concerned about three of its hotels. there is still sniper fire going there is still sniperfire going on. welcome to raqqa, the capital of a caliphate under siege. inside a city engulfed in violence: as so—called islamic state struggles to hold on to raqqa, we have a special report from the front line. in sport, the young lions win a game. the under—2is are into the semi—finals of their european championship, after brushing aside the hosts poland. 135,000 people descend on worthy farm as the glastonbury festival gets under way with heightened security. what will the weather be like? the good news is there will be a lot of dry weather through the next three days, but there will be a
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bit of rain and that sums up the forecast as we go into the weekend. all the details in the next 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. around three million eu nationals living in the uk will be allowed to stay after brexit, under proposals outlined by the prime minister. speaking at a summit in brussels, theresa may said that those who had lived here for more than five years would be allowed continued access to healthcare, education and other benefits. mrs may said the deal was dependent on eu states guaranteeing britons the same rights. from brussels, adam fleming reports. a year to the day since the uk voted to leave the eu, european leaders are digesting the offer made to them by theresa may over dinner at this summit. she said she wanted no families to split because of brexit. eu citizens with five years residence would have settled status, meaning lifetime access to health, education, and benefits. and there will be a grace period for newer arrivals to build up enough time to qualify. the eu's prime ministers
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and presidents made their own proposal on this huge issue earlier this year. this is the first time they've heard the british view and they are waiting for the small print to be published in parliament on monday. translation: theresa may made it clear, today, that eu citizens who have been in great britain for five years can keep their full rights. that's a good start, but of course there are many, many other questions about brexit, about finances, about the relationship with ireland, which means we still have a lot to do until october. but mrs may could be walking into a big row. the eu wants a role for europeanjudges. she doesn't. they want more rights for families, she is not so sure. and that's before a potential argument that could be even bigger: how much money does the uk owe the eu? 11 residential high—rise buildings in england have been found to be covered in combustible cladding, this after urgent safety tests were carried out following
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the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london, where cladding is now being removed from five tower blocks. more details from our correspondent tom burridge. it took a tragedy to change fire safety in britain. it's so frustrating that we've been asking for the building regulations to be reviewed every year, and nothing at all has happened, ‘til now. already, in another london borough, they are stripping off cladding from five tower blocks. the cladding here is similar to that used on grenfell tower. camden council claims it was misled and was told the cladding used on these buildings was a safer type. the cladding will be a key part of the investigation into the fire at grenfell tower. like many other buildings, its outer skin was of an aluminium composite material.
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the best cladding has a mineral core, which doesn't burn. but the core at grenfell was polyethylene and that might have been a factor that caused the fire to spread. the government says it is now testing 600 buildings, but there are reviews under way on privately owned buildings too. premier inn has told the bbc that three of its hotels did not appear to comply with government guidelines for tall buildings. the company said it had received independent advice that the hotels could stay open, given other fire safety measures. but many other buildings, owned by others, elsewhere, could be in a similar position. b00|ng yesterday, the prime minister booed again on a visit to north kensington. the deadly fire at grenfell tower will change our —— how buildings are built. the political legacy is still unravelling. tom burridge, bbc news. a senior police officer has warned that forces in england and wales would face real challenges in dealing with large—scale
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outbreaks of disorder, because of budget cuts. the chief constable of west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would "disappear" unless there was fresh investment. the home secretary amber rudd has acknowledged police resources are very tight, but said she wouldn't rush into releasing extra money. virgin media has told its 800,000 customers to change their passwords to prevent their accounts being hacked. an investigation by which? found that hackers could breach security on the virgin's super hub 2 router. the hackers were then able to control other smart appliances, including a child's toy and home cctv cameras. facebook has revealed new plans to tackle extremism by educating charities and other organisations on how to counter hate speech. the social media giant has launched the online civil courage initiative, which it said would allow charities and other non—profit organisations to share their experiences of extremism and develop ways to tackle the issue both on and offline. the planned new nuclear power plant
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at hinkley point is both risky and expensive, according to the national audit office. the public spending watchdog says the government has not sufficiently considered the impact on consumers. here's our business reporter rob young. it will be britain's first new nuclear plant for a generation. hinkley point c has been plagued by delays, but building work has already started on the somerset coast. it will produce 7% of britain's power, replacing older and dirtier plants which have gone off—line. hinkley has been given a guaranteed price for its electricity, which could cost bill payers as much as £30 billion. the public spending watchdog is critical. what we found is that the government has committed a very risky and expensive deal, with uncertain economic benefits. the
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government's case for proceeding with the deal last september wasn't clear cut and while it will be several decades before it is known whether this deal is value for money, what we've concluded is the government didn't do enough to consider the costs and risks of the dealfor consumers. consider the costs and risks of the deal for consumers. the government maintains nuclear should be part of a diverse energy mix. it points out it provides clean and reliable electricity. the project's majority shareholder edf in this it's good value compared with alternatives and says costs for future plans will be lower. hinkley‘s construction and operation is expected to create more than 26,000 jobs and apprenticeships, boosting the local economy. but it's impact could be national, with new nuclear plants to follow. the 35th glastonbury festival gets officially under way today with heightened security after recent terror attacks 135,000 music lovers are expected on site over the weekend, with radiohead the main headliners tonight.
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hollywood starjohnny depp caused controversy last night during a special appearance, when he made a joke about donald trump. when was the last time an actor assassinated a president? i want to clarify, i'm not an actor. i live for a living. clarify, i'm not an actor. i live fora living. —— clarify, i'm not an actor. i live for a living. —— lie. he never shies away from controversy! wild chimpanzees in uganda appear to have changed their hunting strategy in response to being watched by scientists. yes, researchers from the university of st andrews have been studying their behaviour for years. they say their presence may have stopped the chimps from hunting in groups. their findings show how sensitive chimp society is to the presence of humans. which kind of figures. why would you
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enjoy being observed by humans? if you were busy hunting a pig or a dearand if you were busy hunting a pig or a dear and suddenly someone started watching you, it would scare the animals off! it affects the privacy and secrecy of the quiet tracking. someone rustling in the bushes... you can kind of understand the change in behaviour! yes. it got me that story, interesting. good. i have got a mental image of a chimpanzee spearing. .. maybe they do, they are very clever. they use tools. we are talking about the england lions. another exciting dawn perhaps for english football. we've been there before, something happens to there before, something happens to the english players and as they develop they don't get enough premier league experience. let's hope it is different this time.
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it was a really dominant display from england's under—21s, set on their way by this amazing shot. it finished 3—0 against the hosts, poland, to make it through for the first time in eight years. there was frustration for britain's number one, johanna konta, who was knocked out of the aegon classic in birmingham, beaten in straight sets in the second round by co co vandeway. it was a fantastic turnaround for england's men in the hockeym —— hockey, as they beat canada to qualify for the 2018 hockey world cup in india. they'll next face the netherlands, in the semi—finals of world league three, in london. and pipped on the line by a nostril. big orange won the big race on ladies‘ day at ascot, the gold cup, holding off last year's winner order of st george in a photo finish. did you get that?
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pipped on the line...by big orange! i shouldn't be amused by that, but i am.just to i shouldn't be amused by that, but i am. just to clear i shouldn't be amused by that, but i am.just to clearup i shouldn't be amused by that, but i am. just to clear up the chimpanzee spear issue. a quick look on internet reveals that a troop of chimpanzees in senegal have been seen using chimpanzees in senegal have been seen using spears. the point is, it isn't routine. they we re the point is, it isn't routine. they were unusual. they are clever. they are. shall we do the weather before we have a look at the newspapers? good morning, matt! good morning. it is the weekend of glastonbury and the weather has to change a little bit. a bit of rain on the cards for today. there will also be a lot of dry weather around, especially at the top and tail of the country. some fresh conditions, even fresh
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airon the way some fresh conditions, even fresh air on the way for this weekend and it comes behind this zone of cloud, pushing southwards from scotland and northern ireland. still a lot of cloud to take us through the morning. not a cloud to take us through the morning. nota huge cloud to take us through the morning. not a huge amount of rain and the east of high ground we have and the east of high ground we have aof and the east of high ground we have a of hazy sunshine. brightening up quickly in the north and west. heavy bursts of rain through the next few hours, west of the pennines and into parts of north and west wales. heavy rain on the hills. clearing in the isle of man over the next hour or two. south of that, only the isolated chance of a shower in the midlands. much of southern england is dry. some sunshine to greet the day. feeling fresher than of late, but still a warm enough start. the breeze picks up and we see some of the rain in northern england clear through. we continue to see that across western parts of wales. the odd splash of rain into the north—east of england. scotland and northern ireland brightening up. watch of northern england stays cloudy. southern areas, a bit of
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sunshine. still temperatures about 23- 24 in sunshine. still temperatures about 23— 2a in the south—east. back to where we should be, in the high teens, for most. glastonbury could get 21 today, with sunny spells, but there will be patchy rain around tonight and tomorrow. that's the only wet weather to come to glastonbury. it comes courtesy of the cloud. nudging further southwards. patching rain and drizzle. much of the south—east stays dry and it will be a mild night, with temperatures in the midteens. the north is much fresher. scotla nd midteens. the north is much fresher. scotland and northern ireland. in india as well. low pressure to the north of scotland brings unseasonably strong winds. —— windier. maybe severe gales into the hebrides. some rain into north wales and parts of northern england, although brightening up. we will have early patchy rain in the south and then one or two showers later. we will have a bit of dry weather at times and a bit of sunshine, but
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temperatures starting to go down bit by bit, especially where we have the breeze. remain strong to the north—east. a lot of you will have a dry day on sunday. the best of the brightness to these of high ground. a couple of showers. even in northern ireland only a few spots of rain. this weekend it gets fresher and breezy and there will be a bit of rain, but a lot of dry weather too. a lot of people will be breathing a sigh of relief and i think they will be sleeping a little better. thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the german chancellor, angela merkel, has welcomed theresa may's offer to let other eu citizens stay on in the uk after brexit. it's emerged 11 high rise blocks in england have the same combustible cladding as the grenfell tower. the premier inn is extremely
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concerned about three of its hotels. let's take a look at this morning's papers. many of the papers divided between the beaches emerging last night from the beaches emerging last night from the meeting, there is angela merkel and theresa may. and the pledge, we will ask questions about what it means for the 3 million eu citizens who can stay in britain and the terms and conditions around the offer later on. and the story we will talk about this morning as well, thousands of residents to be evacuated from the potentially dangerous tower blocks, 11 of them now, local authority buildings a nyway now, local authority buildings anyway that have been deemed to have dangerous cladding. the daily mail looking at the announcements, migrants can stay in the uk, only if britons in europe are protected and
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debate over the cut—off date for the residency rights. front of the daily telegraph, that story is dominating. 3 million eu migrants, and that is naga knocking things off the table. the other important story of course about concerns over the tower blocks. the tests are going on as we speak. we are finding out more about those tower blocks affected. the daily mirror looking at thousands more living in tower deathtraps with fears 600 buildings have the little and falcao adele style cladding. this caught my eye. —— grenfell style cladding. they were told they we re style cladding. they were told they were not allowed to wear shorts when the weather was really hot. they we re the weather was really hot. they were annoyed, because girls can wear skirts and be cooler, so they turned up skirts and be cooler, so they turned up in skirts at this academy in exeter yesterday. they were sent home after. one boy said he enjoyed
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the nice breeze his skirt had afforded him. it makes sense. if you do it en masse it is hard to punish them. it is a fair point well made. talking of points made, it isn't often that the fa listen to joey barton. he was banned for 18 months for 1200 bets he placed on football. he said you cannot punish me when you are in bed with betting companies because the fa had lucrative deals with betting companies. now they have entered a deal with ladbrokes and they are ending financial associations with bookmakers. it seems joey barton's advice has been heeded. bookmakers are advice has been heeded. bookmakers a re closely advice has been heeded. bookmakers are closely involved. and very exciting, the start of the women's cricket world cup, hosted here in england, england start against india
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tomorrow in derby. if you are looking for players to watch, nat is a fantastic player. australia are the favourites. england have won the world cup both times before it has been held in their own backyard.“ it the official technology? is that batsmen? opening batter. it sounds odd, doesn't it? this is a cartoon in the daily telegraph. whether or not you like the politics, the imagery is fantastic. period of transition. i think it is rather cleverly done. theresa may and philip hammond. it is a face swap. yes, there you go. we will see you later on. thank you. a new offensive is taking place in syria to gain control of raqqa —— the city which so—called
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islamic state regards as the capital of its declared caliphate. in the past few days fighting has intensified between syrian democratic forces backed by the us and the fighters of the islamic state group. our correspondent gabriel gatehouse, producer peter emmerson, and cameraman fred scott are the only british broadcasters to have ventured inside raqqa and have sent this report. this has been a long and brutal road. we're inside raqqa now, driving towards the centre with the syrian democratic forces, the sdf, a coalition of kurds and arabs. they have onlyjust retaken this street off the fighters that call themselves islamic state. here is is often unseen but all the more dangerous for it. a noise in the sky signals the presence of a drone. what's happening, we havejust driven down this narrow sidestreet and suddenly there's
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gunfire overhead. everyone's looking up in the sky, searching in the sky for these is drones. the sdf is advancing on three sides. as they push forward, carts emerge flying white flags. some of these families have spent years trapped inside a nightmare. there are tens of thousands of people still in raqqa, hostages essentially. is has been killing anyone caught trying to leave. the sdf has made rapid advances towards the centre. they have support from american air
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strikes and artillery. but now they're within a few hundred metres of the old city. islamic state is hemmed in, almost surrounded, and they're fighting back. sniper. snipers, booby—traps, suicide bombers. is has weaponised here. they have done this perhaps more successfully than any other group. but these fighters seem immune to terror. this war has been going on for longer than world war two. this is about as far forward a position... gunfire. ..as far forward as they have managed to go but as you can see there is sniperfire going on. welcome to raqqa, the capital of a caliphate under siege. among the kurds, men and women fight
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alongside one another. even on the front lines there are no distinctions. delilah is 22 years old. she was studying to become a nurse but here she has found her true calling. returning from the front, fighters described intense all—night battles as islamic state uses its network of tunnels to stage sneak attacks behind the sdf lines. this is going to be a long, hard fight. if is loses raqqa it will surely mean the end of the caliphate. but then what? will the ideology die along with it? probably not. it certainly won't be the end of syria's long war or the violence it has spawned around the world. it's exactly a year since the uk
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voted to leave the eu. ben is at a french cafe in west london, discussing what's next for brexit. gradually we are learning a little more information on how this will affect people and you will explore that this morning for us. yes, you are rightand that this morning for us. yes, you are right and how time flies. it is are right and how time flies. it is a year since we voted to leave the eu, a yearsince a year since we voted to leave the eu, a year since we decided to change our relationship with the eu and turn our back on that membership. they're as been a lot said since then. claim and counter claim, whether it will be good for the economy, jobs, imports. when and where better to come and assess what
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has happened in the last 12 months than with the regular breakfast rested panel. lindsey, you voted to remain. let's talk about what we have heard over the last year. there has been so much discussed. has it made you change your mind? good grief, i don't think anyone who voted for brexit could have foreseen the amount of disruption to the country and the economy and the mess we are in. no, i have not changed my mind. what have been the standout moments for you, the headlines, the discussions over the last 12 months that standout? the one thing more than anything is the election and the fast it turned out to be. the prime minister thought the country was behind her —— farce. that was a standout moment. what worries me is out standout moment. what worries me is our image on the world stage. everyone is looking at that. we are a lone soldier. without europe we
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are a lone soldier. maybe in the united states, can we really rely on relationships to trade at fair prices? lindsey, thank you. iwant to introduce you with damien. you voted to leave. same question i put to lindsey. what have you heard in the last 12 months, have you changed your mind? my perception has changed. i think for the better. when i worked in a restaurant, i ordered ordinary food. now i look only for the british and i support local suppliers. that is a good thing for brexit. we can support our own goods and farmers, which is from the chef perspective. thank you. as you can see, we have beenjoined by the regular panel and we will speak with them this morning to get a sense of what has changed in the last 12 months and what we have heard and whether any other on both
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sides really weigh up. join us later. a lot to think about. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the met has launched a new campaign to prevent the theft of motorbikes and scooters often used in so called snatch and grab robberies. officers are calling on owners to use more security as thieves are less likely to target bikes with two locks. more than 15,000 motorbikes and scooters were stolen last year, with more than half then being used to commit crime like robberies and transporting drugs and weapons. utility companies have pledged to help former residents of grenfell tower. suppliers have agreed to write off outstanding energy bills for those residents who lost their home in the blaze last week. the business and energy secretary greg clark says, "he's pleased energy companies have come together to support families." and today pupils at more than 50
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schools in west london will be raising money to help the survivors of the fire in grenfell tower by paying a pound to wear something green. some schools in the capital started earlier this week. the money raised will go to the red cross, which is helping to co—ordinate the relief effort. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, and the circle and hammersmith & city line are still part closed due to the grenfell tower fire. minor delays on the district line due to a signal failure at ravenscourt park. on the roads, the m25 clockwise, the slip road onto the eastbound m4 is closed after a lorry overturned last night. it is expected to remain closed throughout rush hour. the a2 has queues into town from the south circular to the kidbrooke interchange.
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in chislehurst the a222 summer hill is closed between chislehurst station and old hill for repairs. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. the fresher weather continues and it is a slightly cooler start to the morning than we have seen. yesterday there was plenty of cloud around. today we stand a greater chance of something brighter. some sunny spells through the day and it should be dry. some sunshine through the morning, particularly in eastern areas. gradually the cloud will increase through the day. quite a lot of thick cloud iran. it should be dry. bright spells at times. top temperatures 22— 23 degrees and a brisk south—westerly wind. this evening, it will be dry with a little brightness, possibly sunshine at times. a weather front will push from the north through the night. we
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could see a couple of spells of rain and drizzle. mostly dry. a mild night to come and we start the weekend on15— night to come and we start the weekend on 15— 16 degrees. tomorrow at weather front here is right across us at weather front here is right across us and it could give us some outbreaks of light and patchy rain and drizzle. a lot of dry weather. lots of cloud through the morning. maybe something brighter into the afternoon. top temperatures 22— 23 degrees. sunday is a greater chance of sunshine but it could feel a touch cooler. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning: with concerns being raised about several other high rise buildings following the grenfell tower fire, we'll ask an industry expert how worried residents should be. we'll also be at glastonbury this morning, where festival—goers face strict new security measures following the recent terror attacks in manchester and london.
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it's the legendary diamond with a murky past that some believe to be cursed. we'll speak to the writers who've investigated how the koh—i—noor became one of the crownjewels. but now a summary of this morning's main news. around three million eu nationals living in the uk will be allowed to stay after britain leaves the european union, under proposals outlined by the prime minister. speaking at a summit in brussels, theresa may said that those who had lived here for more than five years would be allowed continued access to healthcare, education and other benefits. she said the deal was dependent on eu states guaranteeing britons the same rights. from brussels, adam fleming reports. a year to the day since the uk voted to leave the eu, european leaders are digesting the offer made to them by theresa may over dinner at this summit. she said she wanted no families to split because of brexit. eu citizens with five years residence would have settled status, meaning lifetime access to health, education, and benefits.
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and there will be a grace period for newer arrivals to build up enough time to qualify. the eu's prime ministers and presidents made their own proposal on this huge issue earlier this year. this is the first time they've heard the british view and they are waiting for the small print to be published in parliament on monday. translation: theresa may made it clear, today, that eu citizens who have been in great britain for five years can keep their full rights. that's a good start, but of course there are many, many other questions about brexit, about finances, about the relationship with ireland, which means we still have a lot to do until october. but mrs may could be walking into a big row. the eu wants a role for europeanjudges. she doesn't. they want more rights for families, she is not so sure. and that's before a potential argument that could be even bigger: how much money does the uk owe the eu? 11 residential high—rise buildings
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in england have been found to be covered in combustible cladding, during urgent safety tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london, where cladding is now being removed from five tower blocks. premier inn has also revealed that three of its hotels don't appear to meet building rules. a senior police officer has warned that forces in england and wales would face "real challenges" in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder, because of budget cuts. the chief constable of west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would "disappear" unless there was fresh investment. the home secretary, amber rudd, has acknowledged police resources are very tight, but said she wouldn't rush into releasing extra money. virgin media has told its 800,000 customers to change their passwords to prevent their accounts being hacked. an investigation by which? found that hackers could breach security on the virgin's
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super hub 2 router. the hackers were then able to control other smart appliances including a child's toy and home cctv cameras. the planned new nuclear power plant at hinkley point is both risky and expensive, according to the national audit office. the public spending watchdog says the benefits of the plant are uncertain and the deal was not good value for money. state—controlled firms in france and china are paying the project's £18 billion construction bill, which the government says is an "important strategic decision". the 35th glastonbury festival gets officially under way today with heightened security after recent terror attacks. 135,000 music lovers are expected on site over the weekend. radiohead will be the main headline act tonight. hollywood starjohnny depp caused controversy last night during a special appearance, when he made a joke about donald trump. when was the last time an actor assassinated a president? i want to clarify, i'm not an actor.
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i lie for a living. johnny depp at glastonbury. slightly and —— bill using the audience. but there we go. it is always bad when you get the time wrong! 6:35am is the time. very encouraging for english football at the grassroots. the youngsters in a big tournament tomorrow. england couldn't win it but it is what happens in the development years, whether they get enough exposure playing at the premier league level. the under 17 have gotte n premier league level. the under 17 have gotten to the finals. now the under—21 is doing really well as well. it's all going very well for the young lions, england's under 21s are into the semi finals
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of the european championship, after a pretty comfortable win over the hosts poland. demarai gray hit a cracking opener, with jacob murphy and lewis baker also scoring in a 3—0 win. it's only two weeks since the england under 20s won the world cup. liverpool managerjurgen klopp has captured one of his prime targets. he's paid roma about £34 million for the egypt winger mohamed salah, who played for chelsea a couple of years ago. klopp said salah's pace was "incredible". johanna konta declined to speak to our reporter after being knocked out at the avon classic. —— aegon. she said afterwards, just because i am 17 world, doesn't mean i am entitled to win every match. the top seed left at the aegon championships, marin chilich is safely through to the next
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round after a straight sets win. he took the first set against stefan kozlov, 6—o, before taking the decisive second set 6—4 to book his place in the quarterfinals. ireland will be able to play test cricket for the first time in their history after a decision by the sport's governing body yesterday. the international cricket council approved ireland and afghanistan as the first new members since the year 2000. it means they could now play the likes of england and australia in the five day game. what i am hoping is that this success and this decision today will help us to become much more i guess pa rt help us to become much more i guess part of the cultural landscape of ireland. i might be overly ambitious to say as much as gay —— gaelic football, but we'll get there. ross ford is poised to become scotland's record cap holder after being named in the side to face fiji. it is the final match of their summer it is the final match of their summer tour after wins over italy and australia. to get a start when you break the record is great and deserved. he has
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played really good and has driven the standards and he is in a very competitive position. they played really well last weekend and off the bench against italy. and as if you need reminding, it is the british and irish lions tomorrow morning. widnes are off the bottom of rugby league's super league, after they thrashed the team that were just above them, leigh centurions. and it was the australian duo chris houston and here corey thompson who scored a brace of tries each england's men have qualified for the 2018 hockey world cup finals in india, after coming from behind to beat canada 11—2 at lee valley centre, and late on they stole the win. team sky's geraint thomas has recovered from the injuries, that forced him out of the giro d'italia, to ride in support of chris froome in this year's tour de france.
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it has got tens of thousands of girls active in the sport in finland, but it may surprise you to hear that hobby horse showjumping has arrived in the uk, with the first national championships taking place this weekend near redding. of course the hobby horses are low maintenance and gets people who can't afford a real horse to get involved in showjumping. a new high in my career. see what happens on tomorrow's programme as ijoined the british hopefuls. defence got higher, but not as high as they are in finland, where the sport has been developed. the competition gets very intense and in finland there is now a movie out about it as well. more on that on breakfast tomorrow. i'm confused. why are? you could just do jumping,
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i'm confused. why are? you could just dojumping, running andjumping. but then they wouldn't get the equestrian experience. why do you need to stick the puppet in between your legs? in finland they see the horses as real. they keep them in a room and look after them and compete on them. the idea is it gives you an idea of competing in annex —— in an equestrian sport. you get all of the things that come with real showjumping and it only to splash out on an expensive course. so we are going to see more on that tomorrow? yes. thank you very much. it has been one year since the uk voted to leave the eu and formal brexit negotiations are finally getting under way. ben is at a french cafe this morning. not for fun, he ben is at a french cafe this morning. not forfun, he is therefore work. we are getting a picture of sorts emerging and people
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are asking more questions about what brexit will really look like. yes and that's the thing. it has been one year since we voted to leave the eu. 12 months of course of debate and claim and counter claim about what it all means for the economy and jobs and imports and exports. so we've come down to a french bakery in southwest london and you can see the gets getting ready to go into the gets getting ready to go into the oven. all systems go here, but of course it is one of the questions that everyone is talking about. what will it mean for businesswill it mean for european nationals living in this country? of course we have heard a bit about that overnight, but there's a lot to discuss and a lot to debate and whether or not people have heard enough over the past 12 months to change their mind. we will speak to our regular panel of brexit get the moment. first, a quick reminder of how that tumultuous few hours played out. that's a result of this referendum,
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which has been preceded by weeks and months of argument and is dispute at all the rest of it. the british people have spoken and the answer is we're out. the british people have made a very clear decision to take a different path. and as such, i think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. it's a victory for ordinary people, decent people. a victory against the big merchant banks, against the big businesses and against big politics. that was how those 2a hours played out and there's been so much debate since then about whether it's good news or bad news for the uk, for europe and the money in our pockets. with me, our regular panel of brexit guests and i want to introduce them to you. on the left they boasted leave, on the right, remain.
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starting with you, lance. it has been quite a year. what have been the standout moments? the standout moments? i think article 50 is one of them. yeah, article 50. to be honest, there has been so much. too much to remember! there have been so many claims about what it will mean for all of us. as any other to make you change your mind and think differently about leaving the european union? it has actually solidified my original opinion. if there had been a conference of plan, because we see europe as being transparent about what is happening, yet we see our government not giving us anything whatsoever. if our government had given us something to government had given us something to 9° by government had given us something to go by then i think i would be a little bit more inclined to be influenced, but i haven't seen any
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other. i haven't seen anything tangible about brexit. of course it will happen, but the worrying thing is there's nothing tangible about it thatis is there's nothing tangible about it that is being given to normal people. why is there not a plant? we we re people. why is there not a plant? we were told they would be a plan and it would all be in hand. it has been a bit ofa it would all be in hand. it has been a bit of a celtic 12 months, hasn't it? that the understatement of the year! political climate in the last three weeks has changed dramatically and it is very difficult when you've got a government, if you are honest, isn't really brexit. even the prime minister was very much a remainer, even though she kept her powder dry. i think the thing we've got to look at is brexit means brexit. it isn't ha rd at is brexit means brexit. it isn't hard or soft... what does that mean? that we are leaving. first and foremost david davis gave a concession on monday, to say we would leave trade aside. we would discuss money and the citizens‘
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rights to stay where they are. well done, shows good faith. secondly, yesterday prime minister may brilliantly came out with it. of course 3 million people should be allowed to stay here. no more concessions now. it is now hard—nosed concessions now. it is now ha rd—nosed negotiations. concessions now. it is now hard—nosed negotiations. we will love it in the future, trust me! damien, iwant love it in the future, trust me! damien, i want to ask you about that reassurance, what does it mean? just in time. i am here for 15 years. lots of polish people, people who came from the eu, we pay taxes, open businesses and employ people. it is the best time to get proper rights in the country and finally we can vote as well. spot on with that one. lam vote as well. spot on with that one. i am really happy. a final word, lindsey. you voted to remain. it has been a busy 12 months. do you think any differently, have you changed your mind? absolutely not. i am very
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glad to vote to remain and i wish we didn‘t start brexit in the first place. it has led to a disaster in the economy. it has led to us looking ridiculous... it has gone past the stage of party politics. i think the parties should work with businesses to make it work if it happens at all. perhaps we wouldn‘t have had brexit after all. please, let‘s not have brexit after all. have had brexit after all. please, let's not have brexit after all.|j think you might be waiting a little while for that wish. thank you very much. thank you to all of you. i will stay safely down the middle and keep these two separate. we‘ll have more from these guys after 7am. thanks very much. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. it is undoubtedly a change in the weather. the extreme
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heat has gone, as have the thunderstorms. for a couple of you the wind has gone and this is a shot from cambridgeshire over the last hour. it has been different in cumbria. not pretty up the window this morning. you can barely see the hills with the rain on the horizon. this area of cloud is producing the rain. to the north of that, fresh airon the rain. to the north of that, fresh air on the way. inching into northern scotland, with the morning cloud braking and the light and patchy rain and drizzle we at here and there, not quite as wet as it looks on the chart, and that will gradually depart. cumbria, it is throwing it down. over the next couple of hours it will move into lancashire. not much rain in the pennines, the odd shower into the midlands. in western wales the rain will be heavy and persistent later on. southern counties of england have a dry start, as you saw from
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jeff in cambridgeshire. a lovely start for one or two. much of southern england will be dry. a bit of sunshine. sunshine coming out in scotla nd of sunshine. sunshine coming out in scotland and northern ireland in the afternoon. northern england is cloudy, much of the midlands and wales. east of the high ground, you might geta wales. east of the high ground, you might get a couple of breaks. not much rain at all. for most of you, temperatures back to where they should be. just pushing 21 at glastonbury. a lot of dry weather to come. saturday will be the only time you see rain around. the cloudy sea across central part of the country moves further south tonight. —— the cloud you see. much of east anglia and the south—east is dry. scotland and the south—east is dry. scotland and northern ireland with clear skies. showers pushing into the north later on and we will see the
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wind strengthened. it is quite unseasonably windy for the northern half of the uk. gales and severe gales thanks to this low pressure. strong wind along the hebrides and shetland. cloudy in northern england. it will brighten from the north. wales is cloudy and wet in the west. some of the rain pushes into the midlands. southern counties with patchy rain and drizzle. skies will brighten. temperatures may be into the low 20s. they start to fall away in the north and west. as they will do on sunday in the breeze, strongest along the north and east of scotland. eastern areas are dry and bright with only a couple of many will be pleased to hear it. thank you. it‘s a risky and expensive project that offers consumers little value for money. that‘s the damning verdict from the national audit office on plans for a new nuclear power station at hinkley point. the project on the somerset coast is being financed by france and china and has been described as "strategically important"
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by the government. so what impact will it have on our energy bills? mark todd is from energy helpline and hejoins us now. thank you forjoining us. i will talk to you about the energy bills ina talk to you about the energy bills in a moment. can you explain why hinkley point is so expensive? someone said it is the most expensive project on the. that is correct. the most expensive man—made object on earth when it is built. effectively the government don‘t wa nt to ta ke effectively the government don‘t want to take the risk to decommission their nuclear power station. that is why it is costing a huge amount of money with old power stations. they ran an auction process and the only french company, at edf, were left. we will pay double the price for electricity now for nuclear power. edf are taking on all the risk of decommissioning the plant and that is what the government didn‘t want to take on.
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how is that translated into us paying more money through electricity bills? i thought this was supposed to generate more electricity cheaply? it generates a lot of electricity but it isn‘t cheap, that is clear. it is not cheap, that is clear. it is not cheap electricity. if you generate electricity by offshore wind it costs about £120 a megawatt hour, thatis costs about £120 a megawatt hour, that is enough to light a thousand old lightbulbs for an hour. the electricity from hinkley point will be £92.50, so it is not as expensive as offshore wind but gas and coal is £40 to £50, so it is double the price we are paying. fortunately it is not all electricity, just a part of it, but it will push up people‘s bills. the government has said it is reliable, low carbon electricity. it is not depend on wind or son and we
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need some of this in the mix so we have reliable electricity going forward which doesn‘t stop when the wind stops blowing watersun stops shining. my annual electricity bill, how is it going to change and for how is it going to change and for how long? it is difficult to say exactly. certainly it would be going up exactly. certainly it would be going up in the future when we are getting this low carbon electricity. it will also be going up when we are using more wind generated electricity and solar, because that is more expensive. technically it could go up expensive. technically it could go up 20 or £30 to pay for hinkley point. it could be. we would have to look into the figures quite intensely to see the exact number it is going to cost each home. ok, mark todd from energy helpline, thank you for explaining all of that for us this morning. we have had a government response as well in response to this report. a
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government spokesperson said that building the plant was an important strategic decision to ensure that nuclear is part of the diverse energy mix. the government says it will provide clean, reliable energy powering 6 million homes. the population of somerset will soar by more than a third over the next few days, as the glastonbury festival gets into full swing. 135,000 music lovers have been arriving at worthy farm, where radiohead will headline the pyramid stage this evening. but security at the event has been stepped up this year, as lizo mzimba explains. for yea rs for years there has been significant security surrounding the glastonbury site. recent events mean there is now a lot more. as thousands of people come into the festival bag searches and body searches, and it is not just at searches and body searches, and it is notjust at entry points. across the festival site security are checking out random individuals.
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along with a police presence that is ha rd to along with a police presence that is hard to miss. the organisers tried to make sure festival—goers feel safe without affecting their enjoyment. but people here feel they have got the balance just right. enjoyment. but people here feel they have got the balance just rightm isa have got the balance just rightm is a self policing place. everyone is a self policing place. everyone is here for everyone else. we are looking after each other. you feel safe ? looking after each other. you feel safe? totally. there was more security and time to get through the gates, although it is for a good reason. everyone is having a great time and behaving really well and everyone has been so kind to each other. none of it seems to have taken away from the reason of course that people come here, the music. the main stages don‘t get under way until later but there is still plenty going on. and being here is experienced by people of all ages.|j am 62 and i am coming for the first time, while i am young enough to
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sleep in a tent. what has the atmosphere being like? far better than i expected. it is awesome. this is our first time and it is absolutely stunning. we are blown away by it all. everywhere you look there is something to look at. why didn't we do it years ago? many people live here with great memories and few can save heirs are as special as this, so, dan proposing. what is it like? is where we met at the most beautiful place ever and it means so the most beautiful place ever and it means so much. with the increased security some festival—goers may be feeling more anxious than in previous years but so far those worries don‘t seem to be showing. the party has started. have you
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been? no, never. i bet they are hoping for decent weather. been? no, never. i bet they are hoping for decent weatherlj been? no, never. i bet they are hoping for decent weather. i think it will be ok. i would like to go if i could do it without all of the mud. that is what is going to be good this weekend, not as much mud. there‘s full coverage from glastonbury all weekend across the bbc. tv, online and radio. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: it‘s much harder to keep girls interested in keeping fit and being active than boys according to new research. we‘ll be at a school that‘s trying a different approach to the problem in the next hour. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the met has launched a new campaign to prevent the theft of motorbikes and scooters often used in so called snatch and grab robberies. officers are calling on owners to use more security as thieves are less likely to target
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bikes with two locks. more than 15,000 motorbikes and scooters were stolen last year, with more than half then being used to commit crime like robberies and transporting drugs and weapons. utility companies have pledged to help former residents of grenfell tower. suppliers have agreed to write off outstanding energy bills for those residents who lost their home in the blaze last week. scientists at guy‘s hospital are hoping to make a breakthrough in bladder cancer research after receiving a donation worth £2 million. it‘s hoped the cash will be spent on finding new treatments. the money has been given to the trust by the widow of a man who was a patient at the hospital. for this particular type of cancer, bladder cancer, there are not the range of options for treatment that there are four other common cancers. and what we felt was that we should be helping that research in the future.
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on the tube, the circle and hammersmith & city lines continue to have no service between wood lane and edgware road, following the grenfell fire. there are delays on the district and piccadilly lines, after a signalfailure. on the roads, the m25 clockwise, the slip road onto the eastbound m4 is closed after a lorry overturned last night. it is expected to remain closed throughout rush hour. the m25 anti clockwise has queues from junction 13 for staines to junction 12 for the m3. the a2 has queues into town from the south circular to the kidbrooke interchange. in chislehurst the a222 summer hill is closed between chislehurst station and old hill for repairs. let‘s have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. the fresher weather continues and it is a slightly cooler start to the morning than we have seen of late. yesterday there was plenty of cloud around. today we stand a greater chance of seeing something brighter. some sunny spells through the day
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and it should be dry too. some sunshine through the morning, particularly in eastern areas. gradually the cloud amounts will increase through the day. quite a lot of thick cloud around. it should be dry. bright spells at times. top temperatures 22—23 degrees and a fairly south—westerly wind too. this evening, it will be dry with a little brightness, possibly sunshine at times. we‘ve got a weather front pushing from the north through the night. we could see a couple of spells of rain and drizzle. mostly dry. a mild night to come and we start the weekend on 15—16 degrees. tomorrow we‘ve got a weather front here is right across us and it could give us some outbreaks of light and patchy rain and drizzle. a lot of dry weather. lots of cloud through the morning. maybe something brighter into the afternoon. top temperatures 22— 23 degrees. sunday we stand a greater chance of sunshine but it could feel a touch cooler.
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i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. giving eu citizens the right to stay in the uk after brexit. the prime minister says around three million people could get a new "settled status". she unveiled the plan at her first summit since the general election, but the labour party says it‘s "too little, too late". it‘s exactly a year since the uk voted to leave the eu. a lot has happened since then, so would voters change the way they voted and now think differently about brexit? good morning, it‘s friday the 23rd ofjune. also this morning: as hundreds
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of buildings are tested after the grenfell fire, combustible cladding is found on 11 tower blocks in england. and premier inn says it‘s extremely concerned about three of its hotels. the pe gender gap: as research finds that two—thirds of girls under nine are failing to be active for one hour a day. in sport, the young lions roar again. england‘s under—21s reach the semi—finals of their european championship, just two weeks after the under 20s won the world cup. 135,000 people descend on worthy farm as the glastonbury festival gets under way with heightened security. what will the weather be like? the glastonbury forecast sun bed up for a lot of us. a bit of sunshine today and into the weekend, and also rein in the forecast. i will tell you when and where that will strike in the next 15 minutes.
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good morning. first, our main story. around 3 million eu nationals living in the uk will be allowed to stay after brexit, under proposals outlined by the prime minister. speaking at a summit in brussels, theresa may said that those who had lived here for more than five years would be allowed continued access to healthcare, education and other benefits. mrs may said the deal was dependent on eu states guaranteeing britons the same rights. a year to the day since the uk voted to leave the eu, european leaders are digesting the offer made to them by theresa may over dinner at this summit. she said she wanted no families to split because of brexit. eu citizens with five years residence would have settled status, meaning lifetime access to health, education, and benefits. and there will be a grace period for newer arrivals to build up enough time to qualify. the eu‘s prime ministers and presidents made their own proposal on this huge issue earlier this year. this is the first time they‘ve
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heard the british view and they are waiting for the small print to be published in parliament on monday. translation: theresa may made it clear, today, that eu citizens who have been in great britain for five years can keep their full rights. that‘s a good start, but of course there are many, many other questions about brexit, about finances, about the relationship with ireland, which means we still have a lot to do until october. but mrs may could be walking into a big row. the eu wants a role for europeanjudges. she doesn‘t. they want more rights for families, she doesn‘t seem so sure. and that‘s before a potential argument that could be even bigger: how much money does the uk owe the eu? later we will get a reaction from a bulgarian woman who has been living in britain for the last 5.5 years. 11 residential high—rise buildings
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in england have been found to be covered in combustible cladding, this after urgent safety tests were carried out following the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london, where cladding is now being removed from five tower blocks. more details from our correspondent tom burridge. it took a tragedy to change fire safety in britain. it‘s so frustrating that we‘ve been asking for the building regulations to be reviewed every year, and nothing at all has happened, til now. already, in another london borough, they are stripping off cladding from five tower blocks. the cladding here is similar to that used on grenfell tower. camden council claims it was misled and was told the cladding used on these buildings was a safer type.
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the cladding will be a key part of the investigation into the fire at grenfell tower. like many other buildings, its outer skin was of an aluminium composite material. the best cladding has a mineral core, which doesn‘t burn. but the core at grenfell was polyethylene and that might have been a factor that caused the fire to spread. the government says it is now testing 600 buildings, but there are reviews under way on privately owned buildings too. premier inn has told the bbc that three of its hotels did not appear to comply with government guidelines for tall buildings. the company said it had received independent advice that the hotels could stay open, given other fire safety measures. but many other buildings, owned by others, elsewhere, could be in a similar position. b00|ng yesterday, the prime minister booed again on a visit to north kensington. the deadly fire at grenfell tower will change how buildings are built. the political legacy is still unravelling. tom burridge, bbc news.
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ijust want i just want to make a short clarification. the premiere in has told us it is very concerned about three big as explained in that hotel. —— premier inn. it says the cladding doesn‘t seem to apply with government guidance, earlier we said building guidance. government guidance. a senior police officer has warned that forces in england and wales would face real challenges in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder, because of budget cuts. the chief constable of west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would "disappear" unless there was fresh investment. the home secretary amber rudd has acknowledged police resources are very tight, but said she wouldn‘t rush into releasing extra money. virgin media has told its 800,000 customers to change their passwords to prevent their accounts being hacked. an investigation by which? found that hackers could breach security on the virgin‘s
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super hub 2 router. the hackers were then able to control other smart appliances, including a child‘s toy and home cctv cameras. facebook has revealed new plans to tackle extremism by educating charities and other organisations on how to counter hate speech. the social media giant has launched the online civil courage initiative, which it said would allow charities and other non—profit organisations to share their experiences of extremism and develop ways to tackle the issue both on and offline. the planned new nuclear power plant at hinkley point is both risky and expensive, according to the national audit office. the public spending watchdog says the benefits of the plant are uncertain and the deal was not good value for money. state—controlled firms in france and china are paying the project‘s 18—billion pound construction bill, which the government says is an "important strategic decision". it says it will provide clean and
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reliable electricity, powering 6 million homes. the 35th glastonbury festival gets officially under way today with heightened security after recent terror attacks. 135,000 music lovers are expected on site over the weekend. radiohead will be the main headline act tonight. our reporter lizo mzimba is there. lizo, the stars have already started arriving? as well as the festival—goers? absolutely. thousands of people are beginning to wake up across the festival site. there have already been event yesterday. a special visit byjohnny depp has caused quite a lot of controversy, with remarks that he made about president donald trump. when was the last time an actor assassinated a president? i want to clarify, i‘m not an actor. i lie for a living. he then appeared to row back later
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from those comments, or clarify, indicating that he wasn‘t really talking about president trump but about the assassination of president lincoln. but it is already one of the big talking point is right the way across the glastonbury site. things will start on the main pyramid stage. at 10:45am it will be a one minutes silence remembering the recent tragic events in london and manchester and tied in a way to thatis and manchester and tied in a way to that is there has been an increased security presence right across the festival. there have been bag searches and random searches throughout the site and it seems to be making people feel safer, before the music starts over the weekend. i‘m sure they will have a great time. lizo, thanks very much. let‘s go back to one of our main
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stories. thousands of people living in 600 high—rise buildings across england are waiting to find out if their homes are covered in combustible cladding, as urgent tests are carried out following the grenfell tower fire. so far 11 blocks in eight areas have been identified as dangerous and camden council is already removing cladding from five buildings. fire safety specialist arnold tarling is here to tell us more, but first let‘s hear from holly hamilton, who‘s been to see a concerned resident in halifax. i would like to say... richard has been living in this high—rise flat in halifax for over 15 years. living on the top floor, 15 stories high, he has been left feeling concerned for his own safety after his building was named as one of 600 under urgent investigation. i'm not an expert in cladding or anything like that. i can see the difference between hours and theirs, but i still want to know if it is fireproof or not. i‘m not
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frightened, but i am concerned. like thousands of people this week, richard received a letter reassuring him that all five assessments and procedures are up—to—date, but events in london have left him feeling anxious. as far as they know, that block was safe. it proved not to be. so what‘s to say that this isn‘t? . —— isn‘t safe? iwould feel better if someone knocked on my door and said, feel better if someone knocked on my doorand said, i feel better if someone knocked on my door and said, i am sorry, i want to reassure you that the cladding on your block is 100% safe. 11 blocks of flats in eight local authority areas have been found to have flammable facades and while this building is yet to be tested, the body that maintains the block says the correct safety checks have been put in place. no matter how many safety checks you put in place, fires can happen. we know from our initial test and from an initial visual inspection that this cladding is not the same as grenfell. we will
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still go through proper testing. until the test results come through it is an anxious wait for thousands of residents, many of whom are simply waiting for some reassurance and answers. you simply waiting for some reassurance and answers. you are simply waiting for some reassurance and answers. you are just not 100% until they come and say there is no risk at all. they said everything was done to fire regulations at the time, but the thing is our those regulations strong enough? we have also heard from premier inn, which says it is concerned about three of its buildings. it brings into question how many other types of buildings are at risk? fire safety expert arnold tarling joins us now. is the cladding just for aesthetic or is there a purpose? there is a lwa ys or is there a purpose? there is always a purpose for the cladding system. some of them are actually
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sandwiched with the installation in them and that is to reduce carbon dioxide. other ones like this, you have actually got a different system where the installation to improve the energy efficiency of the building has been stuck on the building has been stuck on the building and then you need to keep the rain off it and ensure that any condensation gets out. so this is a rain screen cladding. it is installed with an air gap between bat and the installation of the building. but there are many other types of installation put on buildings, which are made up. one in shepherds bush was plywood and it had a fire. it was expanded polystyrene with sheet metal stuck to the front. when that fire went off of course the polystyrene shrinks away and all of the sheet metal falls. can shrinks away and all of the sheet metalfalls. can you help us shrinks away and all of the sheet metal falls. can you help us with some of the terminology that is being used at the moment? so, on some buildings, it appears the
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cladding can be within building regulations, but not compliant with government regulations. are there jew separate standards? has the government stipulated something but it could still be on a building because it isn‘t within the regulations? if there are other regulations? if there are other regulations why aren‘t they in the building regulations? there are suggestions that these external panels should be treated as installation, but even then when you read the building regulations it says flammable installation can be clad on both sides. the insurance industry, quite a number of years ago, in the late 1990s, early to thousands, —— 2000s, had catastrophic losses with cladding on warehouses and it was the insurance companies which banned it, not the government. now the government has
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launched the safety enquiry. there is criticism from labour and the lib dems that this is too late. what do you think? it should have been done years ago. it should have been done years ago. it has been successive labour governments when it was first put on buildings in the early days in the 19805. buildings in the early days in the 1980s. in the year are qualified in 1984, my goodness, experts back then we re 1984, my goodness, experts back then were warning about fire risk in cladding on bill -- buildings. how does that work, why is it still being applied? if you pardon the comment, there is a firewall between experts and government. the government has its own advisers in—house. you have to ask the advisers in—house what they have told the government and why anything hasn‘t changed. why have successive ministers of state and deputy ministers of state and deputy ministers of state at every time
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said the same as the previous person? parrot fashion. you are not here to talk about politics. what is your understanding of why anyone involved in government would ignore what a very clear message is coming from safety advisors? there is no advantage in that? does cost come into the picture? it is not a government issue. the government are there to set laws which are to keep there to set laws which are to keep the public safe. we used to have laws in london which did, the london building act. the original building, g re nfell tower, building act. the original building, grenfell tower, could never happen in this way. they have changed things in grenfell tower, they have gas pipes in the stairwells! that was never a loud. you had it in its own fireproof duct, vented at the top and bottom. now you have gas pipes which can create a massive explosion! we don't want to
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speculate much on what has happened as the investigation continues. there are many people concerned in other types of buildings as well. are there others using from being a surveyor in the trade that you think should be under investigation or should be under investigation or should be under investigation or should be looked at closely? yes. how do you know this isn‘t in your local hospital, how do you know it isn‘t in your leisure centre, on your children‘s school? how do you know there are not other products out there? how long would that take? to assess these buildings and how quickly can it be done? when i was testing industrial buildings it can be done very quickly. you get a hole cutter, you use it at slow speed, you cut out a small sample of a panel and then you take it away and you try to set fire to it. if it burns you know it is wrong. when the building is built, is it not on the
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spec, is it not specific, what you use, can you not look at it and compare it with what was tested previously and what hasn‘t? compare it with what was tested previously and what hasn't? you could look at it and do that. when you look at the building regulations in the appendix a, items of 13 and 18, which talk about composite panels and this type of plastic thermoplastic, it says if the core is covered with two sheets of nonflammable material, you ignore the call. how important is it... one of our correspondence has done an investigation and looked into cladding and spoke recently with premier inn and they said they are concerned with three of its hotels. how important is it that companies come forward and take on the responsibility themselves of testing? any sensible business, any
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sensible owner of large buildings clad with this would be testing it straightaway. they would be making investigations. in response. . . ? straightaway. they would be making investigations. in response...? in response to this. thank you very much. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. our weather over the next couple of days closer to what it should be this time of year compared with the week so far. there will be sunshine. some of you will wa ke will be sunshine. some of you will wake up to it this morning. here is the view from eastbourne, east sussex. it is a different story for clare in county durham. look at the grey skies. there is rain in the forecast not just today grey skies. there is rain in the forecast notjust today but grey skies. there is rain in the forecast not just today but through the weekend. the rain today is linked to this zone of cloud. to the north of that, fresh air on the way,
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especially scotland and northern ireland. the overnight rain is clearing, sunny spells develop, a fresh breeze already. cloud for northern ireland, southern scotland, producing rain and drizzle. parts of north—west england, cumbria especially, where it is raining heavily and things improved party pushes into lancashire. in county durham and yorkshire we will see some spots of rain. not as wet as the west of the pennines. the same in wales, west in the west. east anglia and the south and east midlands start with dry weather. most will be dry and fine. the best of the sunshine further east. around the bristol channel as well. cloud amounts come and go. it will be dry. scotla nd amounts come and go. it will be dry. scotland and northern ireland will be bright in the afternoon with sunny spells. northern england is fairly cloudy with occasional rain and drizzle. temperatures close to where they should be for the time of year, pleasant at 24, but of course
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if you are used to the heat it will be feeling on the cool side. the same for glastonbury at 21 degrees, very pleasant. most of the time drive through the weekend with the small chance of rain as i will show you. it will come in central areas pushing southwards, introducing rain to glastonbury, southern wales and south—west england at the end of the night into saturday morning. mainly dry and fairly mild in the south—east but much further further north with sunny spells to start on saturday and a strengthening wind. low pressure to the north of shetland will have some unseasonably wet weather forjune in scotland. maybe gale force winds in the central belt, severe gales can‘t be ruled out in the hebrides. southern scotla nd ruled out in the hebrides. southern scotland largely dry. northern england brightening up after a cloudy start. further rain through the midlands and wales. early patchy rain or drizzle the midlands and wales. early patchy rain ordrizzle in the midlands and wales. early patchy rain or drizzle in southern counties of england. skies will brighten before we see showers to end the day. temperatures 22. feeling
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fresher in the wind. that will be the case on sunday. strongest winds in the north and east of scotland. eastern areas will have the best of the sunshine on sunday. showers in the sunshine on sunday. showers in the west, west of scotland and north—west england but even here there will be some dry weather. temperatures by then in the midteens and still potentially low 20s in the south—east corner. it‘s exactly a year since the uk voted to leave the european union, and for the first time we now have some clues as to what that could mean for eu citizens living here. at a summit in brussels, the prime minister said people from the eu who have lived here for more than five years would be given "settled status" with access to health, education and benefits. let‘s speak to our europe correspondent kevin connolly who is in brussels. morning. even though we have heard this five—year period of time there is uncertainty as to the timeframe of the five years — where it ends
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and begins. there is plenty of scope to argue over the details of what theresa may proposed to eu leaders last night. of course there is. it is an immensely complicated area. i think the headline from this you are right is there is a little flash on the bones now. for the first on european leaders have a sense of the vision theresa may has got for how things are going to work in the future and she started wisely with that issue of what‘s going to happen to those eu families who live and work in the uk and of course also british expatriates who live, work or have retired in other eu countries and britain is proposing essentially that those eu citizens who are in the uk will be able to stay, will be able to access pensions, welfare where appropriate and healthcare. pensions, welfare where appropriate and healthca re. you pensions, welfare where appropriate and healthcare. you are right, there isa and healthcare. you are right, there is a question over some of the detail — when will the five—year period start? around the date of the brexit referendum, or maybe on the
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date when the uk finally leaves. i think what theresa may has done is created space for negotiation. and in return there is going to be an argument over which court system should sit injudgement argument over which court system should sit in judgement on any disputes over all of this. the europeans want the european court of justice. britain might want the british courts. you can see the ground for argument and grounds for compromise. the big news is theresa may has started to set out the uk‘s vision. thank you very much. maria spirova is originally from bulgaria but has been living and working in britain for the last five and a half years. shejoins us now. so, maria, tell me what have you learnt from theresa may as regards your circumstances? are you any clearer about what will happen for you? good morning. i am very glad to be here. maybe that could have been
quote
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a happier topic. abi could have been morejubilant. a happier topic. abi could have been more jubilant. as it a happier topic. abi could have been morejubilant. as it stands now it is testament to the fact that i have accustomed to british culture and i am keeping a stiff upper lip. i am panicked on the inside. i know nothing more specific than what was obvious yesterday. it was obvious yesterday that people who have means to produce a residency and to prove residency for five years will be allowed to stay in this country, this was obvious and well known to all european citizens. do you qualify on that basis?|j all european citizens. do you qualify on that basis? i would possibly qualify... there are two things to be kept in memory here. one of them is, are the rules theresa may envisions for this living or residing for five years the same as they apply now? the same rules which apply now don‘t work for a great part of european citizens.
quote
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for instance, if you don‘t have p6o for five years you cannot qualify for five years you cannot qualify for residency. as you know, nobody in this country for 20 or 30 years has been told that they have to have universal healthcare has been told that they have to have universal healthca re paid has been told that they have to have universal healthcare paid separately in order to qualify if they haven‘t worked for five years. what we have now is this term, i don‘t know if it is new, settled status. this term is settled status. if i understand it rightly, i am sure you are looking at your circumstances. if you dated back five years, march 2019, dated back five years, march 2019, dated back five years to march 2014, does it mean... did you arrive before that point? i arrived before 2014 foot all. the thing is most of us have arrived at some point in time -- 2014 have arrived at some point in time —— 2014 for sure. mrs may isn‘t talking about living in this country. she is talking about legally residing. the other circumstances you have to have a
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treaty right. the short answer and why we asked you hear is you don‘t feel any more secure than you did before theresa may... ? feel any more secure than you did before theresa may. . . ? that opens more questions than it answers. we we re more questions than it answers. we were sort of expecting to be honest most european union people, and that includes me and the friends i know, we thought eventually there would be unit actual —— unilateral guarantee, because we didn‘t vote, we had no control over our future as part of this country. as such, being used in negotiations means that if there is no deal and mrs may has said there might be no deal, what happens to us? ok, maria. i appreciate you coming in. i think we will hear a little bit more from theresa may. she has spoken with reporters in brussels about the ongoing negotiations and we can hear what she said. last night i was pleased to be able to set out what is a fair
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and very serious offer for eu citizens who are living in the united kingdom and the government will set out more details proposals on monday. i want to reassure all of those eu citizens who are in the uk who have made their lives and homes in the uk that no one will have to leave will stop we won‘t be seeing families split apart. —— no one will have to leave. i want to give those citizens in the uk certainty about the future of our lives and i want to see that certainty given to uk citizens living in the european union. of course there will be details of this arrangement which will be part of the negotiation process. we have made what i believe isa process. we have made what i believe is a very serious, very fair offer that will give reassurance and confidence to eu citizens living in the united kingdom about their future. many here in brussels think they have — — future. many here in brussels think they have —— you have given them what they wanted, and on sequencing as well, so does that mean things are going well for the eu? it was a
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constructive start to the talks at the beginning of the week. we have set out the issues that we want to start talking about early in the negotiations. i have said from the beginning i want citizens‘ rights to beginning i want citizens‘ rights to be the early negotiations, and it will be. we have set out what i believe is a serious and fair offer that will give the reassurance to eu citizens in the uk that they have made their homes, they have made their lives in the uk and they will be able to stay and continue to do so. be able to stay and continue to do so. thank you. theresa may speaking earlier, just a couple of moments ago, with reporters. more on that through the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the met has launched a new campaign to prevent the theft of motorbikes and scooters often used in so called snatch and grab robberies. officers are calling on owners to use more security as thieves are less likely to target bikes with two locks. more than 15,000 motorbikes and scooters were stolen last year, with more than half then being used to commit crime like robberies and transporting drugs and weapons.
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scientists at guy‘s hospital are hoping to make a breakthrough in bladder cancer research after receiving a donation worth £2 million. the money has been given to the trust by the widow of a man who was a patient at the hospital. for this particular type of cancer, bladder cancer, there are not the range of options for treatment that there are for other common cancers. and what we felt was that we should be helping that research in the future. utility companies have pledged to help former residents of grenfell tower. suppliers have agreed to write off outstanding energy bills for those residents who lost their home in the blaze last week. the business and energy secretary greg clark says, "he‘s pleased energy companies have come together to support families." let‘s have a check on the traffic. on the tube, the circle and hammersmith & city lines continue to have no service between wood lane and edgware road, following the grenfell fire.
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there are delays on the district and piccadilly lines, after a signalfailure. jubilee line is also part suspended — no service between waterloo to willesden green. on the roads, the m25 clockwise, the slip road onto the eastbound m4 is closed after a lorry overturned last night. it is expected to remain closed throughout rush hour. the m25 anti clockwise has queues from junction 13 for staines to junction 12 for the m3. and on the north circular there‘s queues southbound from park royal to hanger lane because of an ealier break down. let‘s have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. the fresher weather continues and it is a slightly cooler start to the morning than we have seen of late. yesterday there was plenty of cloud around. today we stand a greater chance of seeing something a bit brighter. some sunny spells through the day and it should be dry too. some sunshine through the morning, particularly in eastern areas. gradually the cloud amounts will increase through the day. quite a lot of thick cloud around.
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but we should stay dry. bright spells at times. top temperatures 22—23 degrees and a fairly brisk south—westerly wind too. through this evening, it will be dry with a little brightness, possibly sunshine at times. we‘ve got a weather front pushing from the north through the night. we could see a couple of spells of rain and drizzle. but mostly dry. a mild night to come and we start off the weekend on 15—16 degrees. tomorrow we‘ve got a weather front here is right across us and it could give us some outbreaks of light and patchy rain and drizzle. a lot of dry weather. lots of cloud through the morning. maybe something brighter into the afternoon. top temperatures 22— 23 degrees. sunday we stand a greater chance of sunshine but it could feel a touch cooler. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty
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and charlie stayt. around three million eu nationals living in the uk will be allowed to stay after britain leaves the european union, under proposals outlined by the prime minister. speaking at a summit in brussels, theresa may said that those who had lived here for more than five years would be allowed continued access to healthcare, education and other benefits. she said the deal was dependent on eu states guaranteeing britons the same rights. labour has criticised the plan as "too little, too late". 11 residential high—rise buildings in england have been found to be covered in combustible cladding, during urgent safety tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london, where cladding is now being removed from five tower blocks. premier inn has also revealed that it‘s concerned that cladding on three of its hotels doesn‘t appear to meet government guidance. schools around the uk are having a special day to raise money for those affected
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by the fire today. our correspondent tom burridge is at the fulham cross girls‘ school, where they‘ve started the green for grenfell campaign. what is it about? i‘ve got my green trousers on. i‘ve dug up my green t—shirt. yes, my dad‘s old green cap. when you get dressed this morning put on some green. members of staff over their getting in the spirit. the idea is to show some solidarity for the ideas affect the. it is only a couple of miles away from here. we are in the borough of kensington and chelsea. people are getting in the spirit of things. what sort of message did you want to send out by doing this?” what sort of message did you want to send out by doing this? i think it isjust really send out by doing this? i think it is just really important to send out by doing this? i think it isjust really important to be send out by doing this? i think it is just really important to be able to show your solidarity and come together as a community. that's
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something that is really important for the whole of the nation, to do, in the tragic event we have had. we've seen some terrible terrorist incidents in the past but it is when these completely preventable... incidents in the past but it is when these completely preventable. . m is close to home. lots of children affected. we are going to chat to all of the guys later and some of the girls are going to come along, because it is two schools really. get those photos coming in and make sure you use the hashtag. green for grenfell. a senior police officer has warned that forces in england and wales would face "real challenges" in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder, because of budget cuts. the chief constable of west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would "disappear" unless there was fresh investment. the home secretary amber rudd has acknowledged police resources are very tight, but said she wouldn‘t rush into releasing extra money. the weather will be coming up. we
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are also getting more comments from theresa may. she is still in brussels and she will be talking about her plans for eu nationals living in the uk as well. let‘s find out what‘s happening in the sport, with mike. at youth level england‘s footballers are at youth level england‘s footballers a re pretty at youth level england‘s footballers are pretty much dominating! de under—20s one in their world cup recently. now the with —— the under—21s are doing it as well. if you are a really good england 19—year—old, dear play in the under—20s or under—21s? —— do you play. you tend to move up according to your ability, what there is flexible de according to your age. if you are under—20 you
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play for the under—20s. presumably if you are good enough you play for england anyway. it is about bringing them all at the same pace. it is a bit complicated. it just struck me itjust struck me that it just struck me that there itjust struck me that there are a lot of classifications. anyway, they are doing well! they are, they are impressive. it‘s all going very well for the young lions. england‘s under—21s are into the semi—finals after a pretty comfortable win over the hosts poland. demarai gray hit a cracking opener, with jacob murphy and lewis baker also scoring in a 3—0 win. it‘s only two weeks since the england under 20s won the world cup. obviously the higher we get the more important the games are and the boys have been imported games before, because we had another tournament we won, so because we had another tournament we won, so we are used because we had another tournament we won, so we are used to playing in important matters and it is fantastic for us. we are through to the semis now and fully focused. liverpool managerjurgen klopp has captured one of his prime targets. he‘s paid roma about £34 million for the egypt winger mohamed salah, who played for chelsea a couple of years ago.
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klopp said salah‘s pace was "incredible". johanna konta declined to speak to our reporter in birmingham, after being knocked out of the aegon classic. she lost in straight sets to coco vandeweghe in the second round and said afterwards: "just because i am seven in the world does not mean i am entitled to win every single match". the top seed left in the men‘s event at queen‘s is the number four marin cilic and he‘s safely through to quarter—finals, after beating stefan kozlov in straight sets. and the man who knocked out andy murray has now been beaten himself. australia‘sjordan thompson lost in three sets to sam querrey in the second round. they‘ve been knocking on the doorfor years, and finally ireland have been allowed into the elite group of countries allowed to play test match cricket. the icc reckon ireland and afghanistan are now good enough, and it means money for grassroots and they can now play the likes of england and australia, in the five—day game. it could transform the way the game
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is seen in ireland. what i am hoping is that this success and this decision today will help us to become much more i guess part of the cultural landscape of ireland. i might be overly ambitious to say as much as gaelic football, but we‘ll get there. ahead of the first test for the british and irish lions against new zealand tomorrow, wales are in action right now in samoa. it‘s another new line up for wales, after they beat tonga in auckland, in the first tour test. scott williams has been dropped to the bench for their second tour match in apia, which kicked off a few minutes ago. it‘s currently scoreless. a lot of changes for the lions as well. sam warburton, the captain, is on the bench. hard to call that one! we‘ve got some more.
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chris froome will have a really strong support crew around him, as he goes for a fourth tour de france triumph. geraint thomas has recovered from the injuries that forced him out of the giro d‘italia so he‘s in the line—up. the race starts a week tomorrow. and pipped by a nostril. big orange squeezed out every last drop of energy to hold off the challenge of the favourite, order of st george, to win the gold the gold cup at ascot on ladies day. if you want i can do a bit more research on the under—17s, 20s and 21s. presumably if it is the under—21s they‘d all be 20. i will check! it is well known that some teenage girls become much less physically active, compared to boys, when they get older and become more self—conscious about their appearance. but researchers at the university of bristol have found the gender gap opens much earlier
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in the first years of primary school. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is in leicester this morning. he is with a group of children, obviously staying very active this morning. i hope you have been joining in, tim! they are staying very active. a very interesting report from the university of bristol. this drop in physical activity amongst girls in particular appears to be occurring earlier than people thought, from the age of eight and nine. it is thought to thirds of girls are doing one—hour of exercise a day, as opposed to two thirds of boys. these kids are being very active. they feel the way they teach pe could either way other schools to it as well. we will talk to the kids in a moment. you are an ambassador for women in sport. why is this happening? why are girls becoming less interested in sport, even in primary school? even at that young age confidence is a massive factor. it's age confidence is a massive factor. it‘s not just age confidence is a massive factor. it‘s notjust the age confidence is a massive factor. it‘s not just the fact that all is a naturally driven the sport, because
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there are so many more role models, but it‘s a confidence thing. they wa nt to but it‘s a confidence thing. they want to feel they can join in. simply catching the ball can sometimes be more of a challenge, so we have to build confidence and work together to try to make sure we keep active. according to this research, from the ages of five and six the rate at which girls spend more time doing nothing increases faster than boys. what can be done? i don't think parents realise just how little physical activity their children are doing and we know it increases health and well—being. it's increases health and well—being. it‘s a case of parents and schools doing more and making it part of everyday life. the kids are having a great time, which is good to see. i am going to talk to jane, the head teacher and karen who teaches pe. what have you noticed from the way girls and boys interact with pe at this age? we've tried to provide a range of activities, notjust competitive sport, something that
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will appeal to everyone, girls and boys. some are competitive, some arts, and we want to give them something. i think karen is a teacher who is very keen on being active, but who is dedicated to it, which is unusual in a primary school. some people say you need to have competitive sports and that‘s what kids should be doing.” have competitive sports and that‘s what kids should be doing. i think they could be active in other ways. tonight we've got 53 children camping overnight, being outside and enjoy, doing team games and being cooperative. just being active in other ways. thanks very much. let‘s have a chat to some of the kids. what do you think about the way pe is taught here? both girls and boys are having a great time. does it work? i think we have a brilliant system of how half the class goes to pe, half of the class does work, so it really helps you work in school when you are doing a lesson. in some schools it seems girls are left ——
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less interested than boys. more girls are enthusiastic about sport than some of the boys. i think it is equal parts. but sometimes it can switch out. you carry on. i like this game. keeping a ball up in the airona this game. keeping a ball up in the air on a parachute. isabel, you are air on a parachute. isabel, you are a highjump air on a parachute. isabel, you are a high jump medallist. air on a parachute. isabel, you are a highjump medallist. when you were young were you as involved as boys, with pe? ijust generally enthusiastic about giving things a go trying stuff. the same went for sport. at my school, in hampshire, we had a chance to try everything and it was lucky that we tried high jump and it was lucky that we tried high jump because i loved it from the start and it suits me. i think it has being taken too seriously. you do too much of one sport and it is too rigid. when you are child you wa nt too rigid. when you are child you want to have fun. when you are an
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adult, you should have a chance to have a taster of different sports and find what suits you. banks very much. we will talk more later. hopefully by that point the kids will be completely exhausted. he will be completely exhausted. he will be completely exhausted. he will be camping tonight in those tense over there, so there will be a lot of activity today. the primary school thinks they‘ve got it right. in other schools it seems girls are less interested in pe than boys. thank you very much. the youngsters camping out, what will the weather be like? it will be a little damp in glastonbury later on and i will show you the forecast shortly. it is a contrasting start this morning. look at this glorious view in hackney. blue skies and you can see as far as the eye can see really but it is a different story in cumbria. it is an unpleasant wake—up when you cast aside the curtains. the rain is coming from this cloud separating the warm airand
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coming from this cloud separating the warm air and a fresh conditions into the weekend. it will push across scotland. the overnight rain is departing. brighter skies working in. light rain or drizzle in northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland. heavy rain in cumbria. it will shift into lancashire through the next one or two hours. and rather cloudy to the east of the pennines, only one or two spots of rain, the same for midlands. wales is set to get wet in the west but across southern counties you saw the sunshine from hackney. the best in east anglia and the south—east. cloud further west. the cloud breaks will come and go for southernmost counties today. most for southernmost counties today. m ost pla ces for southernmost counties today. most places will be dry. as an end of sunshine. nowhere near as hot as it has been. sunny in scotland and northern ireland. northern england has rain. not as much as this morning. heavy rain in western wales, splashes in the midlands and some getting away dry. for many of you temperatures where they should be for the time of year. it will be
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cold in the breeze. that includes those of you in glastonbury with 21 degrees this afternoon. much more cloud around on saturday and that is where the chance of rain comes. this cloud in central areas through the latter stage of friday that will shift southwards, turning down in south—west england, patchy rain or drizzle, a strengthening breeze, clear skies for southern scotland and northern ireland but the recently and northern ireland but the rece ntly got and northern ireland but the recently got here and temperatures drop into single figures. most will stay in double figures and midteens in the south. it is fresher than a couple of nights ago. it will be fresh into the weekend. the cold front works into the near continent. unseasonably windy weather in scotla nd unseasonably windy weather in scotland on saturday. gales or severe gales in hebrides and shetland. the driest and brightest south and east. isolated showers in northern ireland. midlands, south—west england, fairly cloudy, occasional rain, a little brightness. south—east corner have
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some showers in the afternoon with temperatures in the low 20s. on sunday it remains fairly windy in the north and east of scotland. sunshine, one or two showers mainly in the west but most have a dry day on sunday and that sums up the weekend. it is turning fresh, breezy, sunny weather to get out and enjoy but one or two showers as well, which will least pleased some of the gardeners anyway. thank you very much. see you later on. it‘s been a year since the uk voted to leave in the eu. with the formal brexit negotiations now under way, we‘ve sent ben to a french cafe to see what our brexit panel make of how things are progressing. then, are we disturbing your breath as? iam as? i am looking at the brexit issues —— brea kfast? i am looking at the brexit issues —— breakfast? we are here talking about that, one year anniversary since we voted to leave the eu and what a
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year it has been. so much debate, sunny claims and counterclaims about everything that will affect the economy, jobs, import and export and some say it is for the better, some say for the worst. we will talk about those issues in a moment but here is a reminder of that mulchers 24 hours. and that's the result of this referendum which has been preceded by weeks and months of argument and dispute and all the rest of it, the people have spoken and the answer is, we are out. the british people have made a very clear decision to take a different path and as such i think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. it is a victory for ordinary people, decent people, it isa for ordinary people, decent people, it is a victory against the merchant banks, against big businesses and against the politics. with me to talk through some of those issues
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are voters on the breakfast brexit panel and on one site i have those who voted to leave and on the other i have those who voted to remain. there is a lotta get through. lindsay, let me start with you. you have been worried about the economy with running your business. what does brexit mean for the economy and where are we 12 months on? 12 months on we have an economy where the pound is still very low, there is no stability really in investments and with my business, as a business person, i have a portfolio, i have some money and i want to travel and it is costing a lot of money. and for the people i work with, they are over 50, they are in the same boat as me. some want to enjoy their lives and the economy is costing more money the way it is right now. and also some of the people i work with want is that our businesses. they need to clear about the trading partners, how do we get supplies, where are we going to sell them to?
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i think brexit right now we are not ina happy i think brexit right now we are not in a happy place. not in a happy place, david. is it fairwhen in a happy place. not in a happy place, david. is it fair when we look at the economy and the uncertainty? that charming young lady has a negative stance on life. lam lady has a negative stance on life. i am upbeat. let me try and explain why. the fact remains we have had instability. for the economy in the uk to perform as well as it has we have put the establishment to the sword. and although growth is coming down and inflation is up at 2.9% what happened with mrs may and the european union yesterday should be uplifting. this problem of immigration and whether we will get the people we need for education and for the scientific and technology, farmers and the rest of them, that hopefully is a worry of the past. some clarity on that issue when it comes to migration and rights for workers and no clarity on the trade deal we will have, the relationship we will have in the single market,
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what it will mean for imports and exports — there is no clarity. what it will mean for imports and exports - there is no clarity. to ask for clarity is silly. what i am trying to say is we love each individual european country because we do lots of business with them. we don't like what the european union stands for. there are 169 trading nations around the world that i would like to embrace. we have treated the commonwealth disgracefully over the last 25 years. the united states of america, mrtrump will years. the united states of america, mr trump will prove difficult, but there are things to be done. south america, howjoyous, africa, asia, let's embrace these people and carry on with the relationship with the european union as individual countries. don't expect much from the single market. don't expect much from the customs union. deal with each country on its merit. david says we are being negative about this. should business be optimistic and think, we are in a position, it will happen, we will leave the eu
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and we had to find opportunities? although i voted to remain, when the vote was ta ken although i voted to remain, when the vote was taken i was optimistic myself and i thought, let‘s embrace it and myself and i thought, let‘s embrace itand do myself and i thought, let‘s embrace it and do the best we can to move on. the period of instability right now i didn‘t expect. i didn‘t expect it to go on for so long. i expect it to hear something about plans. early on we didn‘t hear anything about the plans. how are we moving on without that? i think the instability is taking confidence away from people. lindsay and david, and we will speak with lands and damien as well. the debate will continue here over coffee —— lance. loss for us to talk about. join us again after eight m. i will see you then —— 8am. the population of somerset will soar by more than a third over the next few days, as the glastonbury festival gets into full swing. can you imagine that happening with where you live? 135,000 music lovers have been arriving at worthy farm,
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where radiohead will headline the pyramid stage this evening. but security at the event has been stepped up this year, and that is the live picture that you can see this morning, it is slightly cloudy and you have a sense of the immediate area in front of the stage, empty at the moment and then in the distance you can see all of the campus and festival—goers. organisers have ta ken of the campus and festival—goers. organisers have taken in concerns in light of recent manchester and london attacks and that has been stepped up this year. for years, there‘s been significant security surrounding the glastonbury site. recent events mean there‘s now a lot more. as thousands of people come in to the festival, bag searches and body searches. and it‘s notjust at the entry points — across the festival site, security are checking out random individuals, along with a police presence that‘s hard to miss. the organisers try to make sure festival—goers feel safe without affecting their enjoyment.
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the people here feel they‘ve got the balance just right. it‘s a self—policing place. everyone‘s here for everyone else, we‘re all looking after each other so i‘m sure we will all be fine. so you feel safe? yeah, totally. although there was a bit more security and a little bit more time getting through the gates, it is for a really good reason and i think everyone isjust having a great time and behaving really well and everyone is being so kind to each other. none it seems to have taken away from the reason, of course, that people come here — the music. the main stages don‘t get properly under way until later but there is still plenty going on. and being here is an experience that is enjoyed by people of all ages. i'm 62! and i‘m coming here for the first time while i‘m still young enough to sleep in a tent! what is the atmosphere been like — what you expected? yes, but far, far better than what i expected. it‘s awesome. this is our first time and it'sjust absolutely stunning. we're blown away by it all.
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everywhere you look, there's something to look at. why didn't we do it years ago? many people leave here with great memories. few can say theirs are as special as this, though, dan surprising his girlfriend emily with an on—stage marriage proposal. tell me what it means to you, this happening here of all places. it is where we met, it is the most beautiful place ever, and itjust means so much. it means so much. with the increased security, some festival—goers may be feeling more anxious than in previous years but so far, those worries don‘t seem to be showing. all sing: take me on! we‘ll be back live at glastonbury in about half an hour.
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we will wake up some campers.” we will wake up some campers. i am sure they will be delighted. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the met has launched a new campaign to prevent the theft of motorbikes and scooters often used in so called snatch and grab robberies. officers are calling on owners to use more security as thieves are less likely to target bikes with two locks. more than 15,000 motorbikes and scooters were stolen last year, with more than half then being used to commit crime like robberies and transporting drugs and weapons. scientists at guy‘s hospital are hoping to make a breakthrough in bladder cancer research after receiving a donation worth £2 million. it‘s hoped the cash will be spent on finding new treatments. the money has been given to the trust by the widow of a man who was a patient at the hospital. for this particular type of cancer, bladder cancer, there are not the range of options for treatment that there are for other common cancers.
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and what we felt was that we should be helping that research in the future. utility companies have pledged to help former residents of grenfell tower. suppliers have agreed to write off outstanding energy bills for those residents who lost their home in the blaze last week. the business and energy secretary greg clark says, "he‘s pleased energy companies have come together to support families." let‘s have a check on the traffic. on the tube, the circle and hammersmith & city lines continue to have no service between wood lane and edgware road, following the grenfell fire. there are delays on the district and piccadilly lines after a signalfailure. jubilee line is also part suspended, no service between waterloo to willesden green. on the roads, the m25 clockwise, the slip road onto the eastbound m4 is closed after a lorry overturned last night. it is expected to remain closed throughout rush hour. the m25 clockwise has queues from junction 5 sevenoaks to clacket lane services due to a collision. on the north circular
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there are eastbound queues from colney hatch interchange to bowes park after a collision. let‘s have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. the fresher weather continues and it is a slightly cooler start to the morning than we have seen of late. yesterday there was plenty of cloud around. today we stand a greater chance of seeing something a bit brighter. some sunny spells through the day and it should stay dry too. some sunshine through the morning, particularly in eastern areas. gradually the cloud amounts will increase through the day. quite a lot of thick cloud around. but we should stay dry. bright spells at times. top temperatures 22—23 degrees and a fairly brisk south—westerly wind too. through this evening, it will be dry with a little brightness, possibly sunshine at times. we‘ve got a weather front pushing from the north through the course of the night. we could see a couple of spells of rain and drizzle. but mostly dry. a mild night to come and we start off the weekend on 15—16 degrees. tomorrow we‘ve got a weather front sat right across us and it could give us some outbreaks of light and patchy rain and drizzle.
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a lot of dry weather. lots of cloud through the morning. maybe something brighter into the afternoon. top temperatures 22—23 degrees. sunday we stand a greater chance of sunshine but it could feel a touch cooler. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. giving eu citizens the right to stay in the uk after brexit — the prime minister says around three million people could get a new "settled status." she unveiled the plan at her first summit since the general election — but the labour party says it‘s "too little, too late." no one will have to leave. we won‘t be seeing families split apart. this is a fair and serious offer. it‘s a year since the uk voted to leave the eu so as the formal brexit negotiations get under way
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i‘m at this continental patisserie this morning with our breakfast brexit panel looking at what the vote has meant for them and for the country. good morning. it‘s friday 23rd june. also this morning: as hundred of buildings are tested after the grenfell fire — combustible cladding is found on 11 tower blocks in england and premier inn says it‘s extremely concerned about three of its hotels. the pe gender gap, as research finds that two—thirds of girls under nine are failing to be active for one hour a day. in sport, the young lions roar again. england‘s under—21s reach the semi—finals of their european championship, just two weeks after the under 20s won the world cup. 135,000 people will descend
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on worthy farm as the glastonbury festival gets underway with heightened security. and matt has the weather. the glastonbury forecast for the next few days and sums it up for all of us, dry, a little bit of sunshine, but also a little bit of rain and a strengthening breeze. good morning. first, our main story. around three million eu nationals living in the uk will be allowed to stay after britain leaves the european union, under proposals outlined by the prime minister. speaking at a summit in brussels, theresa may said that those who had lived here for more than five years would be allowed continued access to health care, education and other benefits. our europe correspondent damian grammaticus is in brussels for us this morning. the prime minister has been speaking in the last few minutes about what
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she has proposed. she has. she was arriving again for the morning session here at the summit, putting the broad outlines of the proposal on the table yesterday in front of other leaders and laid out, as you we re other leaders and laid out, as you were saying, a plan that would see roughly 3 million people who are there legally now, before brexit, having the chance to stay permanently in the future with some rights guaranteed. she was asked about that this morning. we have set out the issues that you want to start talking about in early negotiations. i have said right from the beginning that i want citizens rights to be one of those early negotiations, and it will be. we have set out what i believe is a serious and fair offer that will give reassurance to eu citizens living in the uk. they have made their homes and lives in the uk and they will be able to stay and continue to do so. she is saying that she has set out a serious
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offer. sometimes when you set out your offer it leads to more questions. the first question people asked of her was, if the cut off date for eu citizens arriving in the uk to get this new settled status would be march 2019. she was asked that question, so what is the cut—off date? are we clear about what it is? no, we are not. because the proposal as we know it has a range in which it could fall. it could be the date article 50 was triggered, that was in the past, earlier this year. or it could be brexit ‘s day itself. almost two yea rs‘ brexit ‘s day itself. almost two years‘ time, the date the uk leaves. that‘s something the eu has insisted on from the outset, saying you shouldn‘t treat somebody differently who comes today from somebody who has been in the uk since last year. that would be discriminating against people who all have the same rights
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at the minute. that‘s one area of contention when things are not clear. another area of contention where i think the eu will be concerned, because remember the eu has tabled its own proposal that has been on the table for a few weeks. that proposal guarantees all existing rights for uk citizens in the eu and eu citizens in the uk. that includes more rights than this would. in particular what the eu will look at is who does it extend to. it‘s offer said it should extend to. it‘s offer said it should extend to children, future spouses. they should enjoy the same rights. the other thing that‘s clear, the eu says it should be policed by —— the uk says it should be policed by uk courts in the future. the eu says it‘s overseen by the european court ofjustice at the moment, and it should continue to be so. some
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people are saying they are glad this is on the table, they are glad there is on the table, they are glad there isa is on the table, they are glad there is a promise not to deport people, people will not be asked to leave the uk, but they want to see the details. that‘s what the austrian chancellor said last night. damian grammaticas reporting from brussels this morning. 11 residential high—rise buildings in england have been found to be covered in combustible cladding — this after urgent safety tests were carried out following the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london, where cladding is now being removed from five tower blocks. premier inn has also revealed that its concerned about three of its hotels. here are more details from our correspondent tom burridge. it took a tragedy to change fire safety in britain. it‘s so frustrating that we have been asking for the building regulations to be reviewed every year, to nothing at all has happened until now. already, in another london borough, they‘re stripping off cladding from five tower blocks.
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the cladding here is similar to that used on grenfell tower. camden council claims it was misled, and was told cladding used on these buildings was a safer type. the cladding will be a key part of the investigation into the fire at grenfell tower. like many other buildings, its outer skin was aluminium composite material. the best cladding has a mineral core, which doesn‘t burn. but the core at grenfell tower was polyethylene, which might have been a factor that caused the fire to spread. the government says it‘s now testing 600 buildings, but there are reviews under way on privately owned buildings, too. premier inn has told the bbc that three of its hotels did not appear to comply with government guidelines for tall buildings. the company said it had received independent expert advice that the hotels could stay open given other fire safety measures. but many other buildings owned by others elsewhere could be
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in a similar position. yesterday, the prime minister, booed again, on a visit to north kensington. the deadly fire at grenfell tower will change how buildings are built. the political legacy is still unravelling. tom burridge, bbc news. a senior police officer has warned that forces in england and wales would face "real challenges" in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder, because of budget cuts. the chief constable of west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would "disappear" unless there was fresh investment. the home secretary, amber rudd, has acknowledged police resources are "very tight" — but said she wouldn‘t "rush" into releasing extra money. virgin media has told its 800,000 customers to change their passwords to prevent their accounts being hacked. an investigation by which? found that hackers could breach security on the virgin‘s super hub 2 router. the hackers were then able to control other smart appliances
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including a child‘s toy and home cctv cameras. facebook has revealed new plans to tackle extremism by educating charities and other organisations on how to counter "hate speech". the social media giant has launched the "online civil courage initiative", which it says will allow charities and other non—profit organisations to share their experiences of extremism and develop ways to tackle the issue both on and offline. the planned new nuclear power plant at hinkley point is both risky and expensive, according to the national audit office. the public spending watchdog says the benefits of the plant are uncertain and the deal was not good value for money. state—controlled firms in france and china are paying the project‘s £18 billion construction bill. the government says hinkley point is an "important strategic decision" and will provide clean and reliable electricity, powering six million homes. the 35th glastonbury festival gets officially underway today with heightened security after recent terror attacks.
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135,000 music lovers are expected on site over the weekend. radiohead will be the main headline act tonight. hollywood starjohnny depp caused controversy last night during a special appearance, when he made a joke about donald trump. when was the last time an actor assassinated a president? let me clarify, i‘m not an actor. i lie for a living. laughter we‘ll be live at glastonbury in about 15 minutes time. a second world war veteran‘s appealing for the return of his service medals after losing them at a motorway service station in the west midlands. 95—year—old alfred barlow had stopped off on the way back from a pilgrimage to normandy when he realised they were missing. his grandson retraced their steps but they were nowhere to be seen. i‘m so proud of them. i earned them.
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i earned them in battle, and it means... they‘re priceless to me in monetary terms. that‘s heartbreaking, alfred barlow speaking there, so if anyone in the west midlands comes across them, or perhaps knows anybody who comes across them, please get in touch. the weekend weather is coming up in a few minutes time. 79 people are presumed dead or missing after the grenfell tower block fire, but as politicians and experts search for the cause, concerns are being raised about how many other buildings could be affected by any problems. this morning, we‘ve heard that premier inn is concerned about the cladding in
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some of its buildings. surveyor and fire safety specialist, arnold tarling joins us now. good morning. we will talk about the local authority buildings in a moment. the premiere in our talking about their own buildings. —— the premier inn. any authority will be asking about cladding on their buildings. high-rise and low-rise. it's buildings. high-rise and low-rise. it‘s more dangerous in high rise but it poses a greater risk in low—rise. i have never had any problems setting fire to timber, so these materials affect low rises as well. people are putting flammable materials on their houses. expanded polystyrene protected by wafer thin silicon render. how is this allowed? i thought there would be regulations
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to protect us in public, private buildings, commercially owned buildings. if you are saying it‘s dangerous, why are they allowed to be put up. because they comply with building regulations. why aren't the regulations more stringent if you advise that they are not safe enough? because advisers are not telling government ministers that they need to be changed. they have had warnings time and time again. my minister was a taxi driver. i don‘t expect my minister to expect building regulations. i don‘t expect him to have a clue about it, but he is the mouthpiece you see talking about it, and he is reliant on his experts behind him. you are only as good as your experts. what's emerging now is that successive governments were in possession of information from a fire safety experts that certain materials were combustible, but the building
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regulations carried on allowing them to be used legally in tall buildings. yes, they did. the regulations for 2000, word for word identical in regards to this kind of cladding. in 2006 as well, and it was revised in 2010 and 2013, without revising anything about cladding. it‘s missed opportunity after missed opportunity. we had a fire in 2009 and it was declared by the adviser to the government in that inquest that the materials there, which burned through in four or five minutes, complied there, which burned through in four orfive minutes, complied with building regulations. that was 2009. its 2017 now and nobody has done a thing who could and should have done things. there was a review but there we re things. there was a review but there were questions over how much the recommendations in the review have been followed. we have heard this morning from —— premier that it is
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concerned about three of its buildings. they have taken a look in materials in its buildings. three of its buildings. how important is it that private buildings look at their businesses now and say they are taking action on this? i take my hat off to premiere in, they have shown they are caring for their customers. if there is any other building owner out there who hasn‘t yet started checking their buildings to see whether they are safe, they should start today. there is no time to lose. talk us through the checking procedure. that is the business happening now. how do you go about checking the outside of a building to see if it presents a danger? you basically have to do invasive opening up, you can take a co re invasive opening up, you can take a core sample through, taking care not to overheat the material. literally
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cutting a hole in the material? yes, you can cut a hole in the material, or remove a panel completely. some panels are easier to remove than others. you also have to consider that the panel might be ok. but what is the material behind it? i did a survey on an eight story block in south—east london, built by a major blogging company, countrywide building company. and when i went in there i was looking at damp. i was asked to look in the power sockets to the party wall, but warned that divides your property from your neighbour. and i opened it up, all i could see behind was a plastic bag box, only half a millimetre thick, i took that outcome i could see the one next door. the fireproofing material that should have been there wasn‘t. the fire could spread through. then we have a wall taken down to the outside, the party wall. two layers of plasterboard either
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side. the external cavity wall only had one layer of plasterboard. we took it down. i could see all the way along the building, every single flat. when i then tested the material behind the window, i took some outcome a ticket to a safe place and set it on fire, it was highly flammable polyurethane, which releases dense, black toxic smoke. this is why i am saying, it is not just cladding, it is every form of material on the outside of the building, is that safe?” material on the outside of the building, is that safe? ijust material on the outside of the building, is that safe? i just want to make clear, did you mention the company named there?” to make clear, did you mention the company named there? i did not mention the company name. company named there? i did not mention the company namem company named there? i did not mention the company name. it has been really interesting talking to you, an old. thank you for your thoughts. many people concerned, and as you said, investigations are ongoing. let‘s hope people can stay saving their homes. thank you. 8:17, we will take a moment to spend
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some time with matt. how does it look today? someone has hacked the sommer reset button —— sommer reset button. some . this is sussex. same in scotland, in between grey skies, and nothing says some are like grey skies and rain over blackpool at the moment. but it will not rain here all day long. as possible for the rain, an area of cloud, a strip of cloud pushing southwards. right whether to this out of it, and fresh whether in the north. patchy rain over scotland and northern ireland, light and patchy, departing in the next couple of hours or so. rather grey across northern england, wettest weather to ta ke northern england, wettest weather to take us into mid—morning, clearing
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from cumbria and will be across parts of manchester, lancashire, not too much rain in merseyside into cheshire. rain getting heavier over the west of wales, dry to the east, if you showers in the midlands, much of southern england and east anglia, a positive start. some breaks in the cloud. coming and going through the day. the sunshine will be pleasant, but a breeze and fresher than you are used to lately. rain in northern england, with you through the afternoon, light and patchy this morning. mainly to the west of the pennines, wet across western areas of wales. scotland and northern ireland continued to see dry weather develop, and sunny spells. highs of 20 to the east of scotland. 22—24 to the south—east. in between, it will be glastonbury, 21. sunshine today, cloud at times through the weekend. dry weather to come. dry rain coming to glastonbury and southern parts of england through tonight. the area of rain will push into the south—west,
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mainly light rain with a bit of a breeze to take that into saturday morning. rain at times in the north and midlands, dry to the south—east corner, mild here. a fresh start to scotla nd corner, mild here. a fresh start to scotland and northern ireland. breezy on saturday, overall pressure pushing to the north, and for shetland and orkney, and the hebrides, severe gales. central scotla nd hebrides, severe gales. central scotland could see gales. sunny spells, one or two showers. cloud and rain in northern england, brightening up later on. patchy drizzle towards the south. that will clear and one or two showers later, nice in the sunshine, but temperatures on the way down, and further into sunday, windy conditions to the north and east, a view showers in the west, and a good day for all of you. dry and reasonably sunny weather. not as hot as it has been lately. iam fairly i am fairly pleased about that, i like the hot weather, but the people
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in kents. a bit of rain, but not too bad. just a drizzle. that is good news for all of us. what are we showing you now? camp is getting ready for a weekend of music. no mud so far. in the foreground, you can see the main stage area, in the distance you can see all the campers. almost eve ryo ne can see all the campers. almost everyone asleep at this stage. lizo is there for us, chatting to some of those already set up. good morning. good morning. the festival site is beginning to wake up. it has been going for the past couple of hours, people enjoying the breezy and warm start to the day. the main event gets on later on the pyramid stage. it will begin with a minute of silence, remembering people who lost their lives in recent tragic events
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both in manchester and london. of course, tied into that, people have been noticing much more security around the site, bag searches as they come in, searches across the festival area. it doesn‘t seem to be harming many people‘s enjoyment of the festival itself so far. they here for the music. it starts later. the is waiting up. i am joined by a customary regular and a newbie. this is your first glastonbury, what do you make of it so far? it is nice and chill out. it is britain at its best. everyone getting along and there are no issues. martin, your fourth. yeah, i came a while back when amy whitehouse was here. i am looking forward to this one. it is a mixed cross—section of music. looking forward to this one. it is a mixed cross-section of music. how are you finding the security so far? has it interfered and how does it make you feel? yesterday, it was so
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quiet coming in, but they were firm, but not aggressive. nice and friendly. everything was searched pretty well. what kind of music are you looking forward to today? who is your new glastonbury list? ed sheeran is a favourite with his modern ballads. i have some mates dj m, modern ballads. i have some mates dj in, shuffle, an eclectic mix of music. i have a diverse taste, anything from the jacksons to the foo fighters, i can't wait to get started. is that one of the good things about glastonbury? the range of stuff? coming with a big group of people, you have different tastes. you can do your own thing but you come together at the end of the night. it is cool like that. using you will come again based on your experience? i was chatting to my
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sister a minute ago. we will come again. she is hiding at the back! we won‘t embarrass her on—screen. thank you very much for talking to us. the one thing that glastonbury is just as famous for as music is mud. as you say, the good weather has been greeted with absolute huge smiles across the site. they are looking forward to a music field and a mud free weekend here in somerset. someone has a big armchair in the background. they have come supplied. there‘s full coverage from glastonbury all weekend across the bbc on tv, online and radio. hopefully it is mud free. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: it‘s exactly a year since the uk voted to leave the eu. ben is discussing what next for brexit at a french cafe in west london. good morning to you, welcome to west
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london. 12 months since we voted to leave the european union, what a 12 months it has been. all sort of debate and claims, counterclaims about what wrecks it will mean for us, what it will mean for our day—to—day lives. what could it mean for our economy, jobs, imports and exports. we are here speaking to our regular panel of brexit voters. good morning, guys. we will speak to them later for you because it morning, guys. we will speak to them laterfor you because it is interesting, the divide. two leavers and two remainers. remember, there is so much to be determined. we heard from theresa may giving some clarity on the future for the 3 million or so eu citizens here in the uk. they will be offered what is cold uk —— called uk settled status. some clarity on that score, because
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of course, we still need to hear from the 27 remaining states. at the same time, lots of uncertainty around imports and exports, will we be part of the single market? will we still be a member of some of the key organisations that we belong to? will there be funding for development? all those questions are still unanswered. the business and individuals, workers and staff, a lot of uncertainty still. we are here this morning speaking to voters. we have spoken to local people in this area about what it could mean for them. there is a feeling that perhaps if there was another vote, some people would vote to change their mind. we will get more from here later, but before that, let‘s get the news, travel and weather wherever you are having brea kfast weather wherever you are having breakfast this morning. the heaviest rain will be heading from cumbria into lancashire and wales in the next few hours, certainly west wales. some showers
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in lincolnshire, east anglia and the east midlands. the temperatures are about average for this time of year. it will be quite breezy at times today. looking at the glastonbury forecast, the weather will stay largely dry through friday and the weekend. the chance of seeing a bit of rain as we go through the night—time. the weather front is continuing to sink southwards. the weather sinking through the bristol channel towards glastonbury, but just a few spots. it stays mild for england and wales. temperatures of 15-17 but england and wales. temperatures of 15—17 but cool and fresh across scotland. the weather this weekend, fairly u nsu btle scotland. the weather this weekend, fairly unsubtle patterns, bright and breezy for much of the weekend with some rain dotted around. —— fairly unsettled patterns. rain around england and wales and maybe northern
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ireland. the weather becomes dry and brighter through the afternoon with some sunshine and temperatures between 15 and 22 degrees. a band of rain getting into the western isles and northern isles through the afternoon. the wind strengthening on sunday and feeling cooler in the wind, particularly across the north—west, where there will be showers. sunny spells getting through and ties between 15 and 22. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and rachel horne. as us energy producers ramp up production, can the opec cartel halt the decline in oil prices? live from london, that‘s our top story on friday 23rd june. oil falls prey to the bears. crude is down some 20% this year —
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despite opec‘s attempt to prop it up — and it could have further to go. also in the programme, we‘ll cross live to asia where the world‘s biggest bank has moved to calm fears over the level of debt held by chinese companies. it's it‘s caused some
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