Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 23, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

9:00 am
hello it's friday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm chloe tilley. welcome to the programme theresa may puts an offer on the table about three million eu citizens living in the uk — they will be allowed to stay here after brexit. i want to give eu citizens certainty but i also want those same rights for uk citizens living in the european union. we'll have all the details and we'll be hearing from eu citizens living here in britain. it's neitherfair, it can't be a serious offer. we feel it falls short in so many different ways. as residents in eleven tower blocks in england are told they may not be safe, we'll ask how many more buildings could be affected once all the checks are done. what about your school, your hospital, your leisure centre, the place you work that's clad? do you know that's not the same material? how do you know?
9:01 am
an urgent appeal has been launched to find more black blood donors for help with those with sickle cell disease. we will speak to two families of those living with the disease. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. we'd love to hear from you if you're an eu national living in the uk. are you reassured by what you hear? we're also talking about fire safety this morning. if your flat is covered in cladding, has your landlord been in touch about measures to keep you safe? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. german chancellor angela merkel has described theresa may's offer to give european citizens rights after
9:02 am
brexit living in the uk is a good start. at a summit last night, the prime minister said nobody in the uk lawfully would be forced to leave on the day of brexit, nor did she want to split up families. in return the eu would have to operate in parallel dealfor eu nationals. —— offer a camp parable deal —— offer a comparable deal. a year to the day since the uk voted to leave the eu, european leaders are digesting the offer made to them by theresa may over dinner at this summit. she said she wanted no families to split because of brexit. eu citizens with five years residents would have settled status, meaning lifetime access to health, education and benefits. and there will be a grace period for new arrivals to build up enough time to qualify. the eu's prime ministers and presidents made their own proposal on this huge issue earlier this year. this is the first time they have heard the british view, and they are waiting for the small print to be published in parliament on monday. translation: theresa may made it clear today that eu citizens who have been in great britain for five years can keep their full rights. that's a good start,
9:03 am
but of course, there are many, many other questions about brexit — about finances, about the relationship with ireland — which means we still have a lot to do until october. but mrs may could be walking into a big row. the eu wants a role for european judges — she doesn't. they want more rights for families — she doesn't seem so sure. and that's before a potential argument that could be even bigger — how much money does the uk owe the eu? adam fleming, bbc news, brussels. we can speak to our correspondent in brussels, david eades. what's the reaction so far to theresa may's proposal? i think it's fair to say that so far it's muted. interesting that so far it's muted. interesting that last night there was no opportunity for discussion at all. the only comments we got on what mrs may had to say it were a brief one from german chancellor angela merkel saying it was a good start but there
9:04 am
was an awful lot of work to be done, and a similarly brief one from the austrian chancellor. he has spoken again this morning to spell out, a jab in the ribs for britain, saying brexit will cost britain growth and harm the standard of living. but he did point out it was a good first start, the offer theresa may has put on the table. other than that, not a huge amount of response, and i don't think that's accidental. it's worth bearing in mind that while brexit is obviously the big issue for all of us obviously the big issue for all of us in the uk, and all those living in the uk and british living abroad, there is a message here, and the message coming from the likes of angela merkel and new french president emmanuel macron, is that brexit an issue we have to deal with, but we have our own fish to fry, our own problems and opportunities, and this should be moment of optimism and not pessimism on how people see the eu. brexit is
9:05 am
here but it's not front and centre in the minds of most of the other 27 eu leaders. david eades in brussels. we will be speaking about this throughout the programme. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. the government says samples of cladding from 11 high—rise buildings in england have been found to be combustible. safety checks have been carried out because of the grenfell tower fire. the checks across eight council areas including planners, manchester and camden in north london where cladding is being removed from five tower blocks. it took a tragedy to change fire safety in britain. it's so frustrating that we have been asking for the building regulations to be reviewed every year, to nothing at all has year, and nothing at all has happened until now. already, in another london borough, they are stripping off cladding from five tower blocks. the cladding here is similar to that used on grenfell tower. camden council claims it was misled, and was told the cladding used on these buildings was a safer type.
9:06 am
the cladding will be a key part of the investigation into the fire at grenfell tower. like many other buildings, its outer skin was an aluminium composite material. the best cladding has a mineral core, which doesn't burn. but the core at grenfell was polyethylene, which might have been a factor that caused the fire to spread. the government says it's now testing 600 buildings, but there are reviews under way on privately owned buildings, too. premier inn has told the bbc that three of its hotels did not appear to comply with government guidelines for tall buildings. the company said it had received independent expert advice that the hotels could stay open given other fire safety measures. but many other buildings owned by others elsewhere could be in a similar position. the prime minister, booed again, on a visit to north kensington. the deadly fire at grenfell tower
9:07 am
will change how buildings are built. the political legacy is still unravelling. tom burridge, bbc news. the public spending watchdog has criticised the economic case for the new nuclear power station being built at hinkley point in somerset. the national audit office says ministers have locked consumers into a risky and expensive project with uncertain benefits. state—controlled firms in france and china will run the plant and are paying the £18 billion construction bill. a senior police officer has warned forces in england and wales would face a real challenges in dealing with large—scale face a real challenges in dealing with la rge—scale outbreaks face a real challenges in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder because of budget cuts. the chief constable of the west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would disappear unless there was fresh investment. home secretary amber
9:08 am
rudd has acknowledged police resources a re very rudd has acknowledged police resources are very tight but said she wouldn't rush into releasing extra money. there is an urgent appeal to find more black blood donors for sickle cell patients. the nhs blood and transplant campaign follows a rise in the number of people with an african or caribbean background being diagnosed with the disease. it's caused by a faulty gene that effects how red blood cells develop and is particularly common among black people. the disease affects 15,000 people in the uk and more than 300 babies are born with it each year. a former american diplomatic officer has been arrested and charged with giving top secret defence documents to a chinese agent. kevin mallory is alleged to have travelled to shanghai earlier this year — he told fbi agents he believed the person he met there was working for a chinese think tank. virgin media has told 800,000 customers to change their passwords to protect against being hacked. an
9:09 am
investigation by which? found hackers could access the provider's super hub two ruta allowing access to smart appliances. virgin media said the risk was small but asked users to update passwords immediately. performances begin on the main stages at the glastonbury festival today. radiohead lead the line—up exactly 20 years after their first headline appearance that also includes the veteran american singer, kris kristofferson. there is extra security at this year's festival which will open with a minute's silence this morning, to honour those affected by the recent tragedies in london and manchester. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9:30. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now withjohn — and there's been more success for england's young footballers — it's becoming a bit of a habit, isn't it?
9:10 am
i think the senior side will certainly be looking at the relative success the younger teams have been having because it's been a great few months for english football. the u17s side reached the final of the european championships. then the u20$ european championships. then the u20s won the under 20 world cup in two weeks ago. and now the u21s have reached the semifinals of the european championships following a 3-0 european championships following a 3—0 victory over poland last night. they haven't reached the semifinal since 2009. relative success across the board. demarai gray got the england opener after six minutes last night. norwich's jacob murphy. the second. lewis baker got a third from the penalty spot. you have to say, definite signs of progress across the board in english football. as english football fans we get excited and get ahead of ourselves. we ask if it's a new iraq for in this football, but it maybe
9:11 am
it's just the journalists. it's a lwa ys it's just the journalists. it's always easy to get carried away when we see success in a national teams, but what's significant here is the weights across the board across the age groups. —— is the way it's across the board. let's look at some of the reaction following the 3—0 victory. chelsea player nathaniel chalobah who played last night, did. tammy abraham, also of chelsea, said to be signing for swansea on loan was on the substitutes bench last night but has been significant in the performances so far... some debate about who would take the penalty for the third goal last night! good to see young players taking responsibility. and david james, the former england goalkeeper offered his congratulations. we will wait to see who they face. there are still big teams left in,
9:12 am
spain and germany among the favourites. if we look at the senior side, what impact will it have? will it affect gareth southgate's plans? significant to hear what gareth southgate had to saint following the success of the u20s when they won the world cup. he said it's down to the world cup. he said it's down to the top sides in the premier league to give young players opportunities. he will point to the success of saint georges park, as will be fa, the national centre of footballing excellence where all the young players go through. signs that the development of young players is working at the fantastic site in burton upon trent. what's key is the often point to some of the failings that senior players have had, certainly in the latter stages of tournaments. what is key here is that big tournament experience for younger players at each age group, playing in big games at the latter stages of tournaments will serve them well when they potentially make them well when they potentially make the move up to the senior team. big
9:13 am
tournament experience counts and at the moment these young players certainly have it. we will catch up withjohn again in around half an hour. so, exactly a year to the day since britain voted to leave the european union, theresa may has given more details on the rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. any eu citizen who's been here for five years or more will be allowed to stay. they'll have a new immigration status. that will give them access to education, healthcare and other benefits. mrs may told fellow leaders that the offer would apply only if the eu offered a reciprocal dealfor british expats. it's thought around three million eu citizens living in britain would be affected. well, there's yet more talking this morning but initially, the plans have been given a cautious welcome by eu leaders, with the german chancellor mrs merkel describing them as a "good start". a short time ago, theresa may said that this was a fair and serious offer that would offer comfort to eu citizens living in the uk. last night, i was pleased to be able
9:14 am
to set out what is a very fair and serious offer for eu citizens living in the united kingdom, and the government will set out more detailed proposals on monday. i want to reassure all those eu citizens who are in the uk, who have made their lives and homes in the uk, that no one will have to leave. we won't be seeing families split apart. this is a fair and serious offer. i want to give those eu citizens in the uk certainty about the future of their lives, but i also want to see that certainty given to uk citizens living in the european union. of course, there will be details of this arrangement, which will be part of the negotiating process, but we have made what i believe is a very serious and fair offer that will give reassurance and confidence to eu citizens living in the united kingdom about their future. anne—laure donskoy is the founding member of the3million — the grassroots organisation set up to lobby the government to protect the rights of eu citizens living in the uk. she told me of her disappointment
9:15 am
at theresa may's statement. we feel it's a really disappointing statement. it's neitherfair, it can't be a serious offer. we feel it falls short in so many different ways. it doesn't give any indication of ourfull ways. it doesn't give any indication of our full indivisible rights ways. it doesn't give any indication of ourfull indivisible rights being protected. it also doesn't talk about the jurisdiction of the european court of justice about the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice that would act as an arbiter in terms of our rights during the withdrawal of the article 50 agreement. what theresa may is saying is if you have been here five years or more, you would be able to stay and have full benefits as an eu citizen in this country. it doesn't say that at all. what it says and what it mentions is if you have been here lawfully,
9:16 am
which leaves potentially a lot of people out, because a lot of people currently do not meet permanent resident status. not only because they haven't been here for five yea rs, they haven't been here for five years, but because they don't mean certain criteria that is in contradiction with eu legislation. like who, for example? people who might not know about it because it wasn't advertised. that would include a lot of students. stay at home mothers and fathers, for instance. people who are deemed self—sufficient. a number of retired people. people in self—employment, some categories. theresa may also saying that if you haven't been here for those five years, you can build up for those five years, you can build up those rights and be here for a shorter period of time, but you can still build up the rights to be able to stay. so people have the opportunity to ensure they can stay, evenif opportunity to ensure they can stay, even if they arrive now. we don't know what the new rules
9:17 am
will be. as usual, the devil will be in the detail. at the moment, the statement is quite vague and we need to see what the detail will be in order to make a properjudgment. when you have spoken to people, your organisation, representing people here in britain, what are the concerns they have? what is it they wa nt to concerns they have? what is it they want to hear to put their minds at rest? they want certainty. this does not offer certainty. the statement talks about certainty, but then, in the next point or so, it talks about aiming to be able to offer those rights. so when you are aiming, you cannot offer certainty. you have got a meeting, haven't you, with civil servants, and with the brexit secretary david davis next week, what are you going to be saying and what are you going to be saying and what do you want to hear in return? it is just what do you want to hear in return? it isjust a what do you want to hear in return? it is just a technical meeting, so we will be looking at some aspects of the potential for a
9:18 am
we will be looking at some aspects of the potentialfor a registration scheme that has been mentioned this week. although we want to know more about it, what are the motivations behind it, for what purpose, because having just a registration scheme on its own means nothing. and as we know, there will be more details announced about this proposal on monday, probably monday morning. but what the statement does is give an indication of the direction of travel, potentially. if what is in there, which we can read us potentially, because there are two little words in there, which are really important, settled status. settled status as a precise meaning in law. in this case, it means that we would be, potentially, we don't know yet, but it sounds like we could be treated in the future as third country nationals, and this is why we are saying that this is not fair, because we came here under a com pletely
9:19 am
fair, because we came here under a completely different set of rules. ifi completely different set of rules. if i came to the uk as a non—eu person, i would expect to be treated asa person, i would expect to be treated as a third country national. however, i didn't. we did not. therefore, all of a sudden, all our acquired rights will be gone. alexandrine kantor was born in france and made her life here in the uk in 2014. she works as an electrical engineer in oxford. good to speak to you today. theresa may was saying she wants to give certainty to people like you. do you feel this announcement has given you that certainty? not at all, because i don't have five years requirement, andi i don't have five years requirement, and i even don't know if i am ok with that status. and most important, i don't know if i will be 0k important, i don't know if i will be ok with that new immigration system. i don't really know what will happen. tell us about your personal
9:20 am
situation here, how this has affected you. i arrived in the uk three years ago. i moved into the oxford area. i work as an electrical engineer for the oxford area. i work as an electrical engineerfor the uk oxford area. i work as an electrical engineer for the uk government, oxford area. i work as an electrical engineerfor the uk government, and i have a finance plan with my car, i cannot break it for three years, i have a mortgage that i cannot break for the next two years, and it is on 35 years. i am here on my own, so i have no family here, so i really love myjob. i really love my family. i have my finance commitments, and i feel like family. i have my finance commitments, and ifeel like i am stuck here on theresa may. i am anxious. you sound very emotional. it is emotional because i am not sure if i did the correct career
9:21 am
choices. i know that i am helping my new country because i am feeding a shortage of skills, they don't have enough electrical engineers. on a personal point of view, was it a very good choice to come? i don't regret, but i am left in limbo, and i don't know if i am in the middle ofa i don't know if i am in the middle of a situation that i didn't have a fault, i didn't choose and nobody warned me. what effect has this had on you in the last year? it is a year to date since the brexit referendum, how tough has that year been for you? it's tough because in some point, i lost my nan, so i had money to buy a house, but i postponed because i wanted to know what would happen to me. i postponed, but i didn't have any a nswer postponed, but i didn't have any answer from the government. so at some point, i said, answer from the government. so at some point, isaid, i answer from the government. so at some point, i said, i can put my whole life spendings on hold. i did,
9:22 am
but life goes on. i am committing to that house, and now we have an offer and it is not generous at all. now i feel like i am stuck. my family in europe doesn't really understand me, because we thought that it could never happen in europe. it isjust now. . . never happen in europe. it isjust now... ijust don't... i did maybe some bad choice... i don't know. do you have friends here in the uk who are also from france or other parts of the eu? i wonder how they have been feeling over the last year and whether you have spoken to them about this latest proposal. yes, i work ina about this latest proposal. yes, i work in a very international research centre, so it is quite full of europeans. some of us decide to
9:23 am
go abroad. they want to leave the uk. some want to stay, but they are not very confident. some want to leave, yeah. what would your message be to theresa may? my message to theresa may is, you are just going to trade people to gain some economical deal. we are humans, human beings, we are british friends, colleagues, the situation doesn't only affect us, it affects the british citizens, they need to be protected, they need to have theirfamily with be protected, they need to have their family with them. and the economy needs the eu workers. eu citizens are contributing, it is just not fair and it's not serious, and it's definitely not generous at all. thank you for speaking to us
9:24 am
today. i appreciate your time. breaking news, jean—claude juncker has said that britain's preliminary offer on the status of eu citizens in the uk after it leaves the block is not sufficient. as we went into the second day of eu summit, he was askedif the second day of eu summit, he was asked if he had a clearer idea if he knew what kind of brexit the british government wanted. he answered that he had a brisk and emphatic no. theresa may told the summit on thursday that any eu citizen that had been in the uk forfive thursday that any eu citizen that had been in the uk for five years would have two be given a new immigration status, which will give them access to education, health ca re them access to education, health care and other benefits. but as we have heard from our guests, concerns about there being no meat on the bones of the offer. let's bring in ian watson, our political correspondent. the two guests we have spoken to spoke on the heart
9:25 am
about how worried they are about their future. about how worried they are about theirfuture. alexandrina about how worried they are about their future. alexandrina said there is no certainty from theresa may, despite what the prime minister has told people. tell us what we know, what is concrete about this proposal? i am wondering if ian can't hear us now. ian, can you hear us? that is frustrating, because he is only down in westminster. we will try to re—establish that. we will talk about this story throughout the programme here. if you want to get in touch, if you are an eu citizen in the uk, get in touch with us, dave facelock says, i have no issue with people that pay their way. working migrants having enriched our country and helped us to prosper, and michael has e—mailed to say it is already enshrined in law that any
9:26 am
foreign citizen who has illegally entered the uk can apply for indefinitely to remain. this is not an offer by mrs may, she cannot stop it happening unless she changes the law. she is offering nothing. still to come: as the government finds 11 buildings with combustible cladding across england, we'll be asking some of their residents whether they feel safe. and, the nhs wants more black blood donors to come forward to treat the fastest growing genetic disease in the uk. we'll be discussing the rise in sickle cell cases. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. the german chancellor angela merkel has described theresa may's offered to guarantee rights or eu citizens living in britain after brexit as a good start at a summit in brussels last night. but one minister said
9:27 am
that no one in the uk lawfully would be forced to leave on the day of brexit, but in return, the eu would have to offer a comparable deal for british national ‘s. i want to reassure all those eu citizens who are in the uk, who have made their lives and homes in the uk, that no one will have to leave. we won't be seeing families split apart. this is a fair and serious offer. i want to give those eu citizens in the uk certainty about the future of their lives, but i also want to see that certainty given to uk citizens living in the european union. of course, there will be details of this arrangement, which will be part of the negotiating process, but we've made what i believe is a very serious and fair offer that will give reassurance and confidence to eu citizens living in the united kingdom about their future. in the last few moments, we have heard from the president of the european commission jean—claude juncker in response to the proposals from the uk. mrjuncker saying they area from the uk. mrjuncker saying they are a first step, but that step
9:28 am
isn't sufficient. more for you on that through the morning. 11 residential high—rise buildings in england have been found to be covered in combustible cladding during urgent safety tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london. cladding is being removed from fire tower blocks. premier inn has revealed its concern that cladding on three of its hotels don't meet government guidance. the public spending watchdog has criticised the economic case for the new nuclear power station being built at hinkley point in somerset. the national audit office says ministers have locks consumers into a risky and expensive project with uncertain benefits. state—controlled firms in france and china will run the plant and are paying the £18 billion construction bill. virgin media has told 800,000 customers to change their passwords to protect against being hacked. an investigation by
9:29 am
which centres back found that hackers could access their routers. virgin media said the risk was small, but advised customers using default network and food passwords to update them immediately. performances will begin on the main stages at the glastonbury festival. radiohead lead the line up 20 years after their first appearance. also includes the veteran american singer, kris kristofferson. there is extra security at this year's festival which will open with a minute's silence this morning, to honour those affected england's under 21 team reached the semifinals of the u20s european
9:30 am
championships. they beat poland 3—0. demarai gray got the opening goal. the u20s recently won the world cup a little under two weeks ago. in rugby, wales ended their to test summer tour on rugby, wales ended their to test summertourona high rugby, wales ended their to test summer tour on a high with a victory over samoa. they beat tonga in their opening tour match. johanna konta was hugely devastated after being knocked out of the aegon classical stop she lost in straight sets. she said afterwards that just stop she lost in straight sets. she said afterwards thatjust because i'm number seven in the world doesn't mean i'm entitled to win every match. in cricket, they are saying farewell to a true great of broadcasting. henry blofeld is hanging up his microphone after 20 yea rs hanging up his microphone after 20 years in thejob. if hanging up his microphone after 20 years in the job. if anyone hanging up his microphone after 20 years in thejob. if anyone is not familiar with his work on test match special, where have you been? his voice is some must with the sport and he will be missed. 11 tower blocks in eight
9:31 am
local authority areas in england including plymouth, manchester and camden in north london have been found to have cladding which could catch fire. about 600 buildings with cladding are being checked as a result of the grenfell tower disaster last week, in which at least 79 people died. meanwhile, the bbc has learned that premier inn is "extremely concerned" about cladding on three of its hotels. our reporterjim reed is here. just remind us what kind of cladding talking about? the first thing to say is not all cladding will be affected by this. the way cladding works, you have two metal sheets on the outside of the building. in the grenfell tower they we re building. in the grenfell tower they were aluminium. another material is sandwiched between those sheets and it's that sensual sandwich filler material which is controversial. in the case of grenfell they used a particular brand the brand used at grenfell was something called reynobond.
9:32 am
three different types with different levels of flammability. the government guidance appears to say it should only be using this one above 18 metres — the most fire retardant. thatis that is the height fire ladders can go to. at grenfell we believe — although not confirmed — they were using the pe version here. the most flammable. and some believe that could have been one reason why the fire appeared to spread so quickly. presumably one not just presumably one notjust talking about tower blocks. it ends up being about tower blocks. it ends up being a bit misleading. they came out to say there were 600 tower blocks across england that could be affected. the 600 figure is the total number cladding in some way. they are working at how many of the
9:33 am
600 have the more flammable form of cladding on. so far they have said 11 but they are doing 100 tests per day, so we can expect to see the number go up day, so we can expect to see the number go up over day, so we can expect to see the number go up over the weekend. the pictures are from camden yesterday where they were taking some panels down already. they found out they we re down already. they found out they were the more combustible type. the council bear said big desperately cancel there said they were surprised because they thought they had ordered the more safe version. we thought we were dealing with reputable companies and we feel let down, and our tenants feel let down. my absolute priority is to make sure our tenants feel safe which is why we are putting in safe 24/7 fire wardens and why we are reacting quickly to take down those extra panels. what happens now? more checks going on over the weekend. sample is being sent from council buildings, housing associations, to the company that has been commissioned by the
9:34 am
government to test fire samples. but there are plenty of private buildings across the country that will be higher than 18 metres with cladding attached. the bbc newsnight programme last night reporting that premier inn says it's very concerned about three of its sites in maidenhead, brentford and tottenham that it says they do not seem to apply for government guidance for tall buildings, but they don't appear to be the version as at g re nfell tower, appear to be the version as at grenfell tower, slightly more flame reta rda nt. grenfell tower, slightly more flame retardant. there are other forms of accommodation, student flats have gone the cross country recent times. in the meantime, police are carrying out a criminal investigation as to what happened at grenfell itself. we expect to hear more in the next 2a hours over the cladding at that building, from the police, about whether it was illegal or not in their minds. that will be significant when it comes through this afternoon or tomorrow morning. let's speak now to nigel rumble, who lives in a tower block
9:35 am
on the chalcots estate in camden where the north london council says it is going to remove cladding from five blocks of flats including nigel‘s. graham worrall, who lives in a nine storey building in salford and tests are being done on the cladding of his building and others in the area to see if it is similar to that of grenfell tower. nigel, thank you for coming in. this must be an incredibly worrying time, not just for you, but must be an incredibly worrying time, notjust for you, but everybody living in your plot. it's been a terrible time. i have spoken to many people and many people have spoken to me on the way, and people, especially higher up in the building, i had one lady, a family of three, and she has told me the day after the fire that she hasn't been able to get any sleep at all because she was actually from the 19th floor overlooking the grenfell
9:36 am
tower. she could see the fire and see the flames. next day she found out what it was she was seeing and how much death she was witnessing. she hasn't been able to sleep. it's been very painful and there have been very painful and there have been many typical stories like this. i have had some sleepless nights and have been so dreadfully upset for what has happened over there. in the context of, we felt on our estate that the work carried out was never done to the highest standards. that the work carried out was never done to the highest standardslj wa nt done to the highest standards.” wa nt to done to the highest standards.” want to bring in graham as well. i'm keen for you both to discuss this. at the moment you don't know about the cladding on the side of your building, but that must be worrying in itself. that's correct. since the fire in london, myself and quite a few of the tenants have been rather concerned regarding fire safety and what kind of cladding has been put up what kind of cladding has been put up on the outside of the building after the refurbishment. quite a few
9:37 am
vulnerable tenants are really concerned and need to be reassured about the whole fire safety procedure, what's in place, what are the council doing and what are the local authority doing? what is the housing association doing? i'm interested to know what both of you have been told, whether it's from your landlord or the people who maintain the building, about the cladding. graham, were you ever told anything about the cladding before it went up? nothing at all. we weren't told what kind of cladding was going to be put up. what kind of insulation would be installed behind the cladding. it was a complete refurbishment of the whole block. it was part of a pfi project. we have been informed the cladding is aluminium acm that was fitted
9:38 am
correctly according to the manufacturers specification and assessed by an independent expert. that's the information we have had from our landlord. nigel, have you had much information since camden council decided to take the cladding off your building. how much have you been told? the day after the fire there was a reaction from the leader of camden council. and the cabinet memberfor housing of camden council. and the cabinet member for housing of camden council, who wrote to all the residents explaining they would start investigations and there would be tests. yesterday a letter was published to everybody on the estate. it was hand dropped, so it arrived through everybody‘s letterboxes. the letter did confirm that we had exactly the same cladding that was used at grenfell. that was a shock to stop it was the third paragraph of the letter and it stated that it was exactly the same
9:39 am
material with the polyethylene plastic composite in the centre. that was the confirmation. they said they would set about to remove the panels over the forthcoming weeks.” was going to ask how long it would take, it is weeks? this is the interesting point. camden offices, principally councillors, not technical experts, they obviously need to be advised by experts, so they have given their best opinion, which is that it needs to come down. the expert opinion, it needs to come down and be replaced by safe material. that's what we as the residents want and demand. however, five tower blocks, and just to paint a proper perspective here, when the work was done originally in 2006, 2007 and 2008, the work for one building took eight months. to get the equipment ordered, to do the
9:40 am
work, and that was to install it. to change it, and i am notan work, and that was to install it. to change it, and i am not an expert, but i do have an informed opinion, it will take months, not weeks. it will be a long process. to do all five tower blocks, you are probably looking at at least a minimum of one year to do the work. to read you some of the comments coming in this morning. chris says he lives in woolwich in south—east london, a low—rise seven story block. the landlord is pa housing association. we were told yesterday our homes meet all current fire safety standards, even though there are no fire extinguishers in tenants homes or communal areas and no fire alarms, no sprinklers in homes or communal areas. single stairwells. nigel got in touch and he used to live in a tower block in maidenhead. the council decided to demolish it in 1995. while still in residence
9:41 am
they boarded up the fire escapes. only after hours on the phone debate remove the boarding. going forward, graham, whatare remove the boarding. going forward, graham, what are the conversations you are having with people in your block? do they feel safe to be there right now? as i said earlier, there are quite a few vulnerable tenants, disabled, partially sighted tenants and families with young children. we need to know and be reassured about what we need to do. we need an answer. what kind of cladding it is. the main thing is, the tenants need to be reassured that the housing executives and the local authority leaders are being fully compliant with the health and safety regulation and fire safety guidelines. and consultation with
9:42 am
the fire service leaders has been sought and gained prior to the renovations commencing in salford. it's ultimately what you both said, it's having that reassurance and knowing the truth and being able to make an informed decision. thank you both for taking the time to speak to us both for taking the time to speak to us this morning. local groups in west london are still working hard to support those caught up in the fire, especially vulnerable children. dale youth boxing club was based in the tower. it's helped nurture dozens of champions at all levels including olympic gold medal winner james degale and current world champion george groves. now, some of its boxers have returned to show their support. they've been talking to catrin nye. dale youth amateur boxing club is famed. it has produced boxing stars like james de gale. it was based in glenfell tower. it is now homeless and today
9:43 am
is about fundraising and giving some of the boys who practised there a chance to spar with the pros. hi, my name is charlie edwards. i'm currently the british super flyweight champion. i used to go down dale youth when i was younger. i used to go down there sparring with a lot of boys. i have some great memories down there. to come and see what has actually happened, to look at it face on, it is horrible. it is bad. i feel for the kids. they've lost their gym, and some of these kids, that gym is their life. i met someone today actually who lived up the seventh floor and he is lucky to be alive. he got out. when you meet people like that and they actually do tell you their story, until you meet somebody you do not realise how bad and how unfortunate they were, but like i said he is lucky to have got out.
9:44 am
a lot of people wasn't. they were a big part of this community. we have been here at least 30 years i would say. it is important for everybody to recognise that we were a part of the tragedy. we have been made homeless through the tragedy. how has the last week been? it has not been good, you know? friends have been affected. it is too close to home. your club has produced some real talent, right? yeah, we have produced a lot of talent over the years. obviously the biggest ones are james degale and georgie groves. many a fighter has come through and we have the new ones coming through now.
9:45 am
so hopefully some of these might follow in their footsteps. can you point out which ones? this is the safari brothers. we call him manny. he is the nearest thing to pacquiao. are you guys going to be boxers? yeah, i'm a boxer. yeah? yeah. what's good about it? you train more, you train hard, you have to beat someone. you are fit and healthy, aren't you? what about yourself? i am a two time national schoolboy champion. how do you feel about the building that had the fire? i was sad, yeah. very sad. feeling sad now. we have come to train but we are going to make a new dale youth boxing club and we are going to train hard. yeah, i'm 19 years old, i've been boxing for dale youth since i was five. i turned pro in february. how has it been for you
9:46 am
watching what happened? yeah, it's sad watching the news, a lot of memories in that building. i know a lot of people round there. my friend was filming the actual thing at 1am and that is when i saw it, and ifound out it was the actual tower. i was devastated. the professional boxer, zak chelli. you can hear gabriel in the background, we will talk to him in the next few minutes about sickle cell. pendleton together, which maintainsa number of cell. pendleton together, which maintains a number of high—rise blocks in yorkshire, lancashire and pendleton, including the one that graham worrell lives in. they have sent a statement. we would like to
9:47 am
ensure all our customers and nearby residents that we are doing everything possible to ensure they are everything possible to ensure they a re protected everything possible to ensure they are protected and kept safe. we are, however, as a precaution, double—checking all procedures today and over the coming weeks. we will reissue fire safety advice to our customers. an urgent appeal has been launched to find more black blood donors for sickle cell patients. the nhs blood and transplant campaign follows a rise in the number of people within the black community being diagnosed with the disease. if patients don't receive blood which has a close enough match, then there is a risk that they can suffer reactions to the donated blood or develop additional antibodies which will make it harder to find matching blood in the future. we can speak now to edith victoria and her four—year—old son gabriel who has sickle cell. davinia caballero, who we just saw in ourfilm, who also has sickle cell disease.
9:48 am
she is co—director of sicklekan, a london based support charity. and nadine eaton from nhs blood and transplant. while gabriel sits down and we get settled, let's look at the story of sickle cell disease. there are different types of pain. there is the bone pain, which is in the bone, and painkillers will numb the pain or probably take the pain away a bit, but it is still underneath. you have to distract yourself from it. and then there's the pain where you can have pain that's the worst crisis i've ever had, the lungs. no doubt.
9:49 am
it's every breath you take is pain. it's like a stabbing pain and it vibrates through your whole body so you cannot think of nothing else. you can't concentrate on anything. it'sa pain... there are many times i have made my mum cry because i have said i don't want to be here no more. i want to be out of this world. if this is what life is, i don't want it. these are my two blood pressure tablets. because when i'm going through a sickle cell crisis, my blood pressure tends to rise because my body is under intense pain, so this isjust to keep my blood pressure under control. my folic acid, which increases the red blood cell production, because sickle cell patients, our red blood cells only last for ten days, compared to normal red blood cells which last for 120 days. thisjust increases the production of the blood cells. this is penicillin v. this is because our immune systems are very low so it is like an antibiotic that
9:50 am
boosts the immune system. why do you take the medication? because... ? because you are sickle cell? go on, because of your... sickle cell. there you go. nice one. edith, i want to talk to you about gabriel's condition. you found out he had sickle cell disease when he was only a few weeks old.” he had sickle cell disease when he was only a few weeks old. i knew i had the sickle cell trait is. my genotype is as. if the other parent has the same genotype, as, the child can take the s from both parents, meaning the child will have sickle cell. it came as a surprise, and i think that the nhs have been amazing
9:51 am
with regards to how they have sort of explain how we need to take care of explain how we need to take care ofa of explain how we need to take care of a child that has sickle cell disease. although i knew i had a sickle cell trait, i had no knowledge about the disorder. what effect does it have, gabriel was wandering around, and he seems like a happy, normal little boy, how does it affect his life? we have to take a lot of extra care with him. things like the cold are bad for him. he has to stay hydrated, meaning he is co nsta ntly has to stay hydrated, meaning he is constantly drinking, meaning that through the night, the kidneys may function slightly differently. there is bedwetting that will continue until later than with other children. extreme temperature changes could cause a crisis. he could fall and hurt himself, that could fall and hurt himself, that could cause a crisis. his most recent crisis, the one that saw him go to hospital and require a blood transfusion and a blood exchange, they can't work out, the nursery, what exactly happened. he was playing fine. the everything we can
9:52 am
assume is that he actually got com pletely assume is that he actually got completely exhausted from playing. gabriel, as you are wandering past me, do you sometimes feel poorly? no? you always feel well? you can guarantee four—year—olds will disagree with mum. i've grown up and i'm not sick. that is good to hear, we wa nt i'm not sick. that is good to hear, we want you to stay well. i want to bring into vienna as well. you also have sickle cell disease, and am i right, you are having a kidney transplant next week? yeah, my brother david is giving me a kidney next week. i have been on dialysis for a year now. the thing about it, i never knew growing up, it could affect your kidneys or organ failure, it was not something i was aware of. i found out in 2013 that there is a possibility i would have to have a transplant in my life. what we are hearing is there need to be more black blood donors to come forward. you have both said you did not know much about it, would you
9:53 am
say that there is a lack of understanding within the black community, i hate that community, but you know what i mean? there is a lack of awareness, sicklekan is a charity formed by myself and the quy: charity formed by myself and the guy, kenny, in the video, and we decided that awareness is needed from the patient's side of view. they don't understand the pain we go through, the difference in being able to live an ordinary life, it is not easy for us. it is spreading awareness and getting it out there. people may decide they can help and donate blood. please do. madine, how important as this? we need more donors to come forward to donate in the next couple of years. we have seena the next couple of years. we have seen a 75% increase in r0 blood. there is an urgent need for people to come forward. what is the best way, first of all, tell... hello,
9:54 am
lovely. be careful not to fall over or you will get me in trouble. come and sit down next to me. or you can perch on the edge. just be careful. iam perch on the edge. just be careful. i am interested in what you think, but what is the nhs doing to engage people so black blood donors come forward and give blood? i am interested to know if you think that is the right strategy. working with charities like sicklekan, also working with mobo, working with artists such as lady leash, we are doing advertising on facebook and instagram. and we are doing educational talks, instagram. and we are doing educationaltalks, going instagram. and we are doing educational talks, going to events where we know more of the back population will be attending. it is outreach, but there is more work to be done. what do you think? the work the nhs is doing at the moment is great. black people do need to
9:55 am
realise that you shouldn't have to wait until something affects you before you come forward and make a blood donation. it is something that should be part of your everyday routine. you can donate up to four times ina routine. you can donate up to four times in a year. you should put that into your diary, likely would put into your diary, likely would put into a into your diary, likely would put intoa diary into your diary, likely would put into a diary a birthday. these blood donations are vitalfor into a diary a birthday. these blood donations are vital for cancer treatment, leukaemia treatments, and... he has seen you on the tv. isn't it cool to see mum on tv, is that good? ! people need to realise that good? ! people need to realise that these blood donations save 70 people. one blood donation can save up people. one blood donation can save up to seven babies, six children, and be used on three adults. you could be saving someone's life without realising. it actually costs you nothing. it is a painless procedure. it takes less than an hour of your time from the moment
9:56 am
you walk in to make the donation until the moment you leave. you leave feeling fine and there is no reason why so many healthy people over the age of 17 aren't registered, they should be registered, they should be registered on that register. divina, you said you have your kidney transplant next week, an incredible gesture from your brother, you look pretty well, and i am sure that does not help because i know you are very unwell. do you feel that people don't really understand ? unwell. do you feel that people don't really understand? exactly. they see you looking healthy, and think you are not sick. that is what is horrible about it, it is an invisible illness, you can't see what is going on inside. if it wasn't for blood donations, i wouldn't be here now. i have one on monday to prepare me for my operation, sol monday to prepare me for my operation, so i don't have a crisis on the operation table. it is important the black community get out and support us. if they know how it does affect us and how important it does affect us and how important it is to donate blood, they will support us. if they can see from the
9:57 am
tales i share through social media, get up and out and help. it is getting the main media to push us out there, because there is a stigma in the black community about sickle cell. some of us are ashamed. because we go through so much, i have had pain everywhere you can think of, i have lost a spleen, a gall bladder, i have had a written detachment, get blood leaks. you don't know what you are going to get from one day to the other, so it is important they support us, because ifa dog, important they support us, because if a dog, who will? if you don't see gabriel this morning and what to help, i don't know what will. gabriel, thank you for coming in. you are done now. you don't want to go now? always the way. thank you for coming in. coming up, we live at new scotland ya rd coming up, we live at new scotland yard as the police give more details the fire at grenfell tower in london. let's get the latest weather update — with matt taylor. what a week of weather in the uk, we
9:58 am
have seen extreme heat for those in the south—east of the country, temperatures peaking short of 35 degrees. severe storms across parts of europe, central europe in particular. a stormy night last night. for us, it is hitting the reset button for summer. temperatures back closer to where they should be for this time of year. it has been a lovely start for one or two. the sun is still there. the scene in hackney earlier, clear blue skies. but for others, more typical of summer, we have seen rain falling. in southport and blackpool, we have seen scenes more like this. raining heavily at the moment. the rain is coming courtesy of a riverfront introducing fresh air towards the uk for this weekend. even fresher than this morning. this zone of cloud, right across the
9:59 am
central swathe of the uk, top and tail, sunshine to start the day. northern scotland not too bad, southern part of england. cloud but sunshine breaking through. these areas dry and bright. the heaviest rain is in north—west england, pushing into western parts of wales into the afternoon. whilst we have patchy rain and drizzle across parts of southern scotland and northern ireland, that will be limited to the far south east of northern ireland by the end of the afternoon. dry and sunny spells. present with a breeze, east scotland could hit 20 celsius this afternoon. but it stays grey, parts of northern england, to be high ground, and cheshire, a few brea ks high ground, and cheshire, a few breaks in cloud and sunshine. rain and drizzle at times, particularly in the pennines. wet across western wales, eastern wales should stay dry. south east midlands into east anglia, cloud with sunshine, temperatures in the low 20s. we could get that at glastonbury today. most of the time, drive this weekend, but on saturday this is
10:00 am
when we could see a little bit of rain. it wouldn't be glastonbury without this forecast. the rain edging southwards, fairly fragmented, producing damp conditions towards the southwest approaches, including glastonbury. monkey tonight across southern areas, fresher in the north with clearer skies, but turning increasingly windy. that is another story this weekend. unseasonably windy weather of scotland. severe gales with the low pressure, gale force winds through the central belt of scotland. sunshine and showers here, northern ireland. northern england will brighten up after a cloudy and damp start. we could see showers across the south, including a damp start a customary. temperatures in the low 20s in the south—east. elsewhere, dropping down, lowerfor this time south—east. elsewhere, dropping down, lower for this time of year. the breeze will be with us on sunday, north—east in particular. sunday, north—east in particular. sunday, one or two showers in the west, central and eastern areas will
10:01 am
be dry. enjoy your weekend. it's friday at 10am. good morning. and you plan to allow about 3 million eu citizens living in the uk to stay here after brexit. but do eu expats feel reassured? i really love myjob, i love my family. i have my financial commitments, and ifeel like i'm stuck here on the will of theresa may. i want to give those eu citizens in the uk certainty about the future of their lives and i also want to see that certainty given to uk citizens living in the european union. we will have the latest reaction from westminster and brussels. we will be live at scotland yard as the police give more details about the fire at g re nfell tower give more details about the fire at grenfell tower in london. and we will talk to a panel of experts about how tenants in other blocks can be kept safe. when mum goes to prison — we've been given rare access
10:02 am
inside of one of america's prisons taking part in a pioneering scheme to give locked—up women the support to see their children. good morning. here's annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. britain's preliminary offer on the rights of eu citizens in the uk after brexit has been described as insufficient by the president of the european commission. jean—claude juncker. the prime minister has said that no—one in the uk lawfully would be forced to leave on the day of brexit, but, in return, the eu would have to offer a comparable deal for british nationals. i want to reassure all those eu citizens who are in the uk, who have made their lives and homes in the uk, that no one will have to leave. we won't be seeing families split apart. this is a fair and serious offer. i want to give those eu citizens in the uk certainty about the future of their lives, but i also want to see
10:03 am
that certainty given to uk citizens living in the european union. of course, there will be details of this arrangement, which will be part of the negotiating process, but we've made what i believe is a very serious and fair offer that will give reassurance and confidence to eu citizens living in the united kingdom about their future. the government says samples of cladding from 11 high—rise buildings in england have been found to be combustible. safety checks have been carried out because of the grenfell tower fire. the the buildings across eight council areas including plymouth, manchester and camden in north london where cladding is being removed from five tower blocks. premier inn has also revealed the cladding on three of its hotels doesn't meet government guidance. a senior police officer has warned forces in england and wales would face a real challenges in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder because of budget cuts.
10:04 am
the chief constable of the west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would disappear unless there was fresh investment. the government said it will not rush into the leasing additional money. virgin media has told 800,000 customers to change their passwords to protect against being hacked. an investigation by which? found that hackers could access the provider's super hub 2 router, allowing access to users' smart appliances. virgin media said the risk was small but advised customers using default network and router passwords to update them immediately. performances begin on the main stages at the glastonbury festival today. radiohead lead the line—up exactly 20 years after their first headline appearance that also includes the veteran american singer, kris kristofferson. there is extra security at this year's festival which will open with a minute's silence this morning, to honour those affected by the recent tragedies in london and manchester. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10:30. let's catch up with the sport now.
10:05 am
english football is enjoying a run of relative success after the england u21s reached the semifinals of the european championships. it follows the u20s victory at the world cup and then the u17s who made the final of the euros back in may. not often you have success right across the board all at once, but fair to say, it's all going well for the young lions. the under 21s reached the last four of the euros, after a pretty comfortable win over the hosts poland. demarai gray hit a cracking opener, with jacob murphy and lewis baker, also scoring in a 3—0 win. to think it's only two weeks since the under 20s won the world cup. we're definitely getting stronger, you know? the higher we get, the more important the games are. the boys have been in important games before. we had the toulon tournament where we won. we are used to playing in important matches. it's fantastic for us, we are through to the semis now and we are fully focused.
10:06 am
a lot of rugby at the moment — away from the british and irish lions in new zealand — wales beat samoa in their final tour match, to make it two wins out of two on their summer tour. several young players have been given the chance to impress. 22—year—old steff evans scored two tries in the 19—17 win. with several other key players away with the lions, wales ending their tour on a high. it was a frustrating day forjohanna konta at the aegon classic in birmingham, where she lost in straight sets to coco vanderweghe in the second round. she'll now play at eastbourne — the last event before wimbledon. and cricket is saying farwell to a great of broadcasting. henry blofeld is hanging up his mic after 45 years. and not only is it his voice listeners of test match special will miss, but his ability to set a scene wherever he may be commentating from. blowers, as he is known, will retire
10:07 am
at the end of the summer, covering three more matches. and here's a taste of what you'll be missing. none of our seagulls today, they a lwa ys none of our seagulls today, they always gorged themselves on worms yesterday and for breakfast this morning. one of them over there is looking rather top—heavy. iwant morning. one of them over there is looking rather top—heavy. i want to tell you about a moment of stark ingratitude. i was walking home last night and ingratitude. i was walking home last nightand a ingratitude. i was walking home last night and a great lot of seagulls we re night and a great lot of seagulls were eating on the road. a car disturbed them, they flew up and over me and they deposited on me... i thought i was in a hailstorm. you almost indecently brown, have you been on a sunbed? how is your spanish coming on? si! been on a sunbed? how is your spanish coming on?. laughter a lot of those clips are available to watch on the five live website. a special man and a special occasion when he retires. i'm in great
10:08 am
company. i was touring around the country and was in aberdeen ahead of the general election and a seagull deposited on my chin. ifeel better, in good company, if it happens to henry as well. it might be hard to believe with everything that's happened recently, but tomorrow marks just one year since the uk voted to leave the eu. theresa may has given more details on the rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. any eu citizen who has been here five years or more will be allowed to stay. they will be allowed access to education, health care and other benefits. mrs may told other leaders the offer only applied if the eu offered a similar deal to british expats. it's thought around 3 million eu citizens living in britain would be affected and the offer has been described as insufficient by the leader of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. german chancellor angela
10:09 am
merkel described it as a good start. ina merkel described it as a good start. in a moment we will speak to kevin conneuy in a moment we will speak to kevin connelly in brussels. first our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. what has the prime minister said? the prime minister has said it's a generous and fair offer, because it's guaranteeing what would be called settled status to eu citizens who are already in the uk at the moment. after five years they would get the same rights as british citizens to welfare, pensions and education. there would also be a two—year grace period, so if people are coming here between now and brexit in 2019, they could come here and build up to their five years and get the full entitlement subsequently. there are some sticking points. this is entirely dependent on getting a reciprocal offer from the dependent on getting a reciprocal offerfrom the eu dependent on getting a reciprocal offer from the eu and that isn't there yet. theresa may offering reassurance to eu citizens, but many
10:10 am
don't feel too reassured at the moment because it's yet to be negotiated. the second sticking point is what will happen to people's families? will they get the same rights as people coming here? and the cut—off date of when you are allowed to come here and build—up to your five years, that is not clear yet. it could be when article 50 was triggered in march this year, or it could be when we leave the eu in 2019. both labour and the liberal democrats say this is too little, too late and what's theresa may should offer is unilateral rights to eu citizens, not depending on reciprocal rights at all. they should still get the full rights they have currently under freedom of movement rules. we can head from westminster to brussels to speak to kevin connelly. how has this been received in brussels? it's important to say that this is a per little gesture from theresa may designs to set the tone
10:11 am
of the debate and show britain is taking a positive view of the brexit process and isn't trying to exclude anybody or make the lives of ordinary people more uncomfortable ordinary people more uncomfortable or anxious. but the european union response, the way politicians talk about things here, isn't to respond to that big politics, if you like, it's to see it as a very bureaucratic and legalistic process of negotiation. one european leader from the netherlands said he thought the proposal left thousands of questions to be answered. it was a horrifying prospect for the british negotiators who will have to sit down and answer all those questions. one of the problems is, if you give people rights, you have to have a legal system to enforce those rights. a big row coming up here and something we will talk about again in the future is what court system you use. the uk says british courts are excellent and you can use them to enforce your rights. the european
10:12 am
union wants that to be the business of the european court ofjustice. theresa may's government has said the involvement of the european court ofjustice in british affairs isa court ofjustice in british affairs is a red line. plenty to disagree and talk about. kevin connelly in brussels. it might be hard to believe with everything that's happened recently, but tomorrow marks just one year since the uk voted to leave the eu. the british people have spoken and the answer is, we're out. i love this country, and i feel honoured to have served it. and i will do everything i can in future to help this great country succeed. he hums, "do-do-do-do. right."
10:13 am
i couldn't possibly achieve more than we managed to get in that referendum, and so i feel it's right that i should now stand aside. i have just been to buckingham palace, where her majesty the queen has asked me to form a new government, and i accepted. brexit means brexit. means brexit. as far as i'm concerned, let's wipe that slate clean from today and get on with the work we've got to do as a party together. if you think for one single second that i am not serious about doing what it takes to protect scotland's interests, then think again. this is an historic moment from which there can be no turning back. now i have concluded that the only way to guarantee certainty
10:14 am
and stability in the years ahead is to hold this election and seek your support for the decisions i must take. it will be a choice between strong and stable leadership in the national interest, with me as your prime minister, or weak and unstable coalition government, led byjeremy corbyn. let us resolve to do things differently — invest in education, invest in health, invest in housing, invest injobs, invest in a future for all of us. and what we're saying is the conservatives are the largest party. note they don't have an overall majority at this stage. young people and old people all came together yesterday, very high turnout, huge increase in the labour vote, and they did it
10:15 am
because they want to see things done differently, and they want hope in their lives. reporter: what's your plan? my government's priority is to secure the best possible deal as the country leaves the european union. those involved in the campaigns have had time to reflect on what they did right, and what they did wrong. will straw campaigned for the uk to remain in the eu —
10:16 am
he was the executive director of the campaign group britain stronger in. and on the other side of the fence, richard tice was the co—founder of leave.eu, one of two major groups that campaigned for britain to leave the european union. what had he made of the last year? it has certainly been full of surprises with the general election a few weeks ago. the referendum a year ago had a clear result, and that meant we were going to leave the european union. the big question was, what did that mean? theresa may was, what did that mean? theresa may was over pay, saying brexit means brexit. she then put her version of brexit. she then put her version of brexit to the british people in the general election, and they rejected it. so we are back in a period where we are not sure what our brexit strategy looks like. of course, a number of people now say that we need to take a different approach to quite the extreme view of brexit theresa may was suggesting. we need to make sure we don't end up with no deal, which was one of the things she said she would be prepared to countenance if there wasn't a deal
10:17 am
on the table. no deal better than a bad deal. it is dead in the water now. secondly, there are concerns about the border with ireland, and that means that parliament will probably stay in the customs union. the mayor of london saying yesterday that to avoid bridgen's economy coming offa that to avoid bridgen's economy coming off a cliff edge, we have do have a transition deal at the end of the talks in 2019. that might mean staying in the single market. let's be clear, over 80% of the electorate in the general election voted to leave the customs union and to leave the single market, because that is what both manifestos said. the general election was about domestic issues, asjeremy general election was about domestic issues, as jeremy corbyn general election was about domestic issues, asjeremy corbyn did very well and the tories didn't do very well. the whole point about the process is it is taking too long. it should have been sorted within the first month or two months after the referendum. why has it taken too long? the conservative government
10:18 am
was willing to make the offer, which they making today, but the eu said they making today, but the eu said they are not ready to start negotiations. we should have shame them into it. could theresa may have said anyway? not in negotiations, but this is what we will do?” said anyway? not in negotiations, but this is what we will do? i said on question time last met them, that is what you should have done. it is taking too long. the whole process from here is still taking too long. in business, if we were negotiating this, you would sit down, greeted in a month and put it into lawyers's hands. they are spending a week negotiating and three weeks going back and talking to the media and their respective parties, that is not the way to give certainty for both sides. richard and i agree disagree on lots of side of the debate, but we agree that it is outrageous for theresa may to have waited a year to make the offer to 3 million people. these are human beings, these people's partners, husbands and wives, colleagues. they
10:19 am
have been in limbo for the last year. i actually think, as richard says, we should have put the eu under pressure and said, we are going to unilaterally offer rights to these people and say you can stay in the country. we expect the eu to do the same for other people, for brits living abroad, rather than people being treated as pawns in hs much. because theresa may has a minority government, she hasn't got a huge landslide which she hoped she would have to go to the eu negotiations and say she had a mandate. does it mean britain has a much weaker position at the negotiating table? theoretically, no. if parliamentarians stick to what is said in the manifestos, because both committed to leaving the cigar market and the customs union, the reality is, if you want to control your laws and borders, and trade, you had to leave those things. i don't think people are interested in the technicalities, they want a proper british brexit, they want a proper british brexit, they don't want a fudge. if you go into a negotiation and are prepared
10:20 am
to walk away, as david cameron found when he tried 18 months ago, you end up when he tried 18 months ago, you end up witha when he tried 18 months ago, you end up with a bad deal. you have to be prepared to walk away. the right way to negotiate is to say, we either agree by next march, q12018, or we pa rt agree by next march, q12018, or we part as friends and plan for going into wto rules, because that is the alternative option. are we in a wea ker alternative option. are we in a weaker position because of the minority government? only while our position is unclear, but richard is not right about the manifestos. he is right that the conservative ma nifesto is right that the conservative manifesto said we should leave the single market and customs union, which was rejected by the british public. the labour manifesto said to get a ccess. public. the labour manifesto said to get access. but... the reality now is, the important thing is the election produced a hung parliament, and you have the labour party saying it wants an economy first, jobs first brexit. you have the
10:21 am
chancellor of the exchequer... the wto rules would mean large tariffs for aspects of the economy. what we have to do is ensure the deal at the end is at least as good as what we have at the moment and we don't have a cliff edge in 2019, which is why i think sensible people like sadiq khan are saying that have a transitional arrangement to stay in the single market... i don't think ordinary... we are out of time, but the green room is through there, so continue, over there. thank you both. there are two hundred thousand women in america's prisons. that's one third of the world's incarcerated women. about two in three of these women are mothers and as many as one in ten are pregnant whilst in jail. following the grenfell tragedy, it's emerged a number of high rise buildings are covered in the same cladding that experts say
10:22 am
contributed to the ferocious speed at which last week's fire spread. tests are now being carried out on 600 high rise building across england. the department for communities and local government is co—ordinating the tests, which can take place at rate of 100 per day. let's speak now to tony bird who worked for kensington and chelsea council's housing department when the tenants management organisation that managed grenfell tower was established, russell curtis, who's a london architect who often works with local authorities and on social housing jane philpott, deputy assistant commissioner, london fire brigade. and conservative mp sir david amess, the chairman of the all—party fire safety and rescue group who joins us from chelmsford. we are also going to be talking and bringing you in the next few minutes a live police press conference from new scotland yard. the microphones are set up. nobody there at the moment, but they will do a press
10:23 am
conference, bringing us the latest on the grand hellfire. thank you for coming in. tony, you worked as a housing opposite in the 1970s, you were there involved in it. what are your memories of grenfell.” there involved in it. what are your memories of grenfell. i work for a couple of years as part of the lettings team at kensington and chelsea, and we let homes at grenville tower. it wasn't the most popular of blocks, because it was a tower block —— grenfell tower. in 1995, however, iworked tower block —— grenfell tower. in 1995, however, i worked as part of an independent team that helped set up an independent team that helped set up the tenant management organisation. i would like to correct one thing, it is widespread in the media that it was an outsourced thing by the council. it wasn't, it was set up because the te na nts wasn't, it was set up because the tenants served a notice on the council. they had a legal right to set upa council. they had a legal right to set up a tenant management organisation, and i was responsible
10:24 am
for putting together their film and their mantra when they set it up, "we can do it better." they believe they took over the management because they could do a betterjob the tenants, and they did do for a long time. russell, if you look at g re nfell long time. russell, if you look at grenfell, in your view, long time. russell, if you look at grenfell, in yourview, is long time. russell, if you look at grenfell, in your view, is this an issue purely about cladding, or is it more so? so many people have got in touch to say we don't have fire extinctions, fire alarms, is it about cladding or is it a wider issue? you are absolutely right, it issue? you are absolutely right, it isa issue? you are absolutely right, it is a much wider issue. the cladding clearly in this case seems to have beena clearly in this case seems to have been a contributing factor, but buildings are very complicated things. the behaviour of fires within buildings is very corrugated, sol within buildings is very corrugated, so i think it is still too early to point the finger at anyone particular element of the building. i think there are much wider issues
10:25 am
around how we achieve building refurbishments like this, in terms of the processors, in terms of regulations, which we need to address the coming years. how much is the fire brigade consulted? if there is a fire wherever else, and they are looking at sticking cladding on or what ever, do they speak to the fire brigade and get your view? the fire brigade is certainly in touch with local authorities. it is a local authority 's authorities. it is a local authority '5 want ability in terms of safety, —— despondency. we have officers go out and ensure the firefighting facilities and fire safety is up—to—date. facilities and fire safety is up-to-date. presumably, though, you would want to see sprinklers in every building, you would want to see fire extinguishers, because that means that your men and women are less likely to have to go into events like rain fell tower. absolutely. we would love to see spankers in every building ——
10:26 am
g re nfell tower. spankers in every building —— grenfell tower. whether spankers in every building —— gre nfell tower. whether it spankers in every building —— grenfell tower. whether it is extinguishers or the blockage of fire exits. the part that can be played is to ensure walkways are clear, that there aren't piles of rubbish or scooters in the way. the means to get out in the event of a fire, they need to speak to the building owner, they shouldn't have fire doors which open, they are there to hold back the fire. i would urge that they get out and look at their buildings. we have had an e—mailfrom peter, their buildings. we have had an e—mail from peter, i their buildings. we have had an e—mailfrom peter, i live in a block in trafford. we have had a cursory letter saying our block isn't clad like the grenfell tower. there are no excuses, no alarm i know of, and
10:27 am
a single access their case into a totally fla m ma ble a single access their case into a totally flammable entrance hall built on the outside, and we have been told nothing. we have heard so many stories. i want to bring in sir david. you are chairman of the all—party fire safety and rescue group. how many times have we heard these comments from people in the last week since the greenfeld disaster was that we know ministers from the conservative party were warned it was time to review safety regulations and nothing has happened. very, very frustrating. the truth of the circumstances of this fire will come out in the public enquiry, but it has taken this disaster, on sprinklers and reviewing building regulations, and we have asked for action on both of those measures and it has taken this tragedy for our voice to be heard.
10:28 am
when making recommendations in the past, what have you been told by the housing minister ‘s? for example, we know that gavin barwell, the former housing mr, now cheese of —— chief of staff for theresa may, has been criticised for not acting. i will not focus on one minister, because this goes back to the government between 1997—2010. ministers are not experts on these issues, they depend on advice. what issues, they depend on advice. what is crystal clear is ministers have been consistently given advice, which frankly has been wrong. i think the issue of sprinklers has been known for quite a long time there. 2009, you have the lateral fire in southern. there were a lot of conferences there. tenants who had had the sprinklers retrofitted from
10:29 am
sheffield, toured the country, to spread the gospel of how effective it was. it was also remarkably cheap. they told it was £2000. cheaper than cladding? it is different protection. cladding is about installation with the materials. but sprinklers save lives. seriously, if we talk about a lack of cash, is it more important to put cladding on the outside to keep a building warm, or save lives? just to finish my point, if you put sprinklers in the building there, it is my view you can negotiate a very significantly lower is my view you can negotiate a very significa ntly lower insurance rate. so you make the savings by the cost of insuring the buildings, which are colossal, you can get a much lower rate if you have sprinklers in there. no one has ever died in a building that has sprinklers there. they put them into new bill, but the retrofit once, they don't want to do it. it is about the culture of no regulation. russell, can you pick up
10:30 am
on that? there is a challenge around this, because tall buildings aren't inherently unsafe. i think one of the misconceptions is that it is either cladding or sprinklers, but actually, in the 1960s and 1970s, a block that is refurbished, if you are fundamentally changing the character of the building, and you are introducing new cladding around it, i would argue that that essentially changes the confederation of the building to an extent where you do need to put riveting. the problem is, fires in tower blocks are not uncommon, actually. but it is the effect of those fires, which we need to look at. in 60s and 70s box that generally have a concrete or brick outer skin, they don't tend to spread from the flat, they are suppressed within the flat, they don't spread to other homes. in this
10:31 am
case, the cladding appears to have had a contributing factor in the spread of that cladding from one small fire to a much wider extent. they need to be questions asked as to whether over wrapping a building ina new to whether over wrapping a building in a new skin fundamentally alters the character and nature of the building. i don't know if you can answer this, but when you attend fires, have you seen a difference in the way fires have behaved on buildings that have this new style of cladding? it's important to remember the grenfell firewall is unprecedented. i have certainly never, and nobody had ever seena fire certainly never, and nobody had ever seen a fire like that. we take it building by building on an individual basis. our crews continue to be out inspecting premises all through the year and ensuring that all the facilities are for us so we can make sure we can make safe entry to the building and carry out our
10:32 am
firefighting work, and make sure they are up—to—date and ready to be used. what would each of you say to people watching now who are living in tower blocks, where ever they are. maybe they know they have the same cladding on a building that was on grenfell. maybe it's still being tested or maybe they have been told it's not the same. we heard earlier on in the programme, one woman living in a tower block in camden, she hasn't slept since grenfell. she can see the flames from her window and she has to put her kids to bed at night. what would you say to people in those tower blocks right now. i would like to reassure the public. it's important they understand, our policy hasn't changed. predominantly you are safer to remain in your dwelling, within that flat and call us out. tell the fire brigade where you are. the issue in regards to whether you should leave your building or you should leave your building or you should stay, it comes down to
10:33 am
whether fire is. if there is a fire in pinching on your dwelling, you will know because it is hot or smoky, then you want to make your way out. the best thing you can do is to make sure you know how to get out and your family know how to get out and your family know how to get out and you have a plan for that. inside your building and in the flat, let's make sure everybody has a working smoke alarm.” flat, let's make sure everybody has a working smoke alarm. i think lots of local authorities are now taking action and that is to be applauded. i don't think we should panic. be vigilant, but don't panic. thank you for coming in today. it is now 10:33am. with the news, here's annita in the bbc newsroom. the president of the european commission jean—claude juncker has said theresa may's offered to extend the rights of eu citizens in the uk doesn't go far enough. she has offered to extend those citizens who
10:34 am
have lived in the uk for five years. 11 five years. 11 residential high—rise buildings in england have been found with cladding which raises safety concerns, during urgent safety tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the buildings are spread across eight local authority areas, including camden in north london, where cladding is now being removed from five tower blocks. premier inn has also revealed that it's concerned that cladding on three of its hotels doesn't appear to meet government guidance. a senior police officer has warned forces in england and wales would face a real challenges in dealing with large—scale outbreaks of disorder because of budget cuts. the chief constable of the west midlands, dave thompson, said neighbourhood street patrols would disappear unless there was fresh investment. the government said it will not rush into releasing additional money. people at glastonbury can expect extra searches this year as security
10:35 am
stepped up at the festival. a minute's silence this morning, to honour those affected by the recent tragedies in london and manchester. that's a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. let's catch up with the sport now. england u21s reach the semifinals of the european championships with a 3-0 the european championships with a 3—0 victory over poland tomorrow night. they haven't been this far in the competition since 2009. it follows the u20s victory at the world cup and then the u17s who made the final of the euros back in may. a lot of rugby at the moment — away from the british and irish lions in new zealand — wales beat samoa in their final tour match, to make it two wins out of two on their summer tour. 22—year—old steff evans scored two tries in the 19—17 win. practice is under way ahead of the
10:36 am
azerbaijan grand prix. it is only the second year of the grand prix. and cricket is saying farwell to a great of broadcasting. henry blofeld is hanging up his mic after 45 years. and not only is it his voice listeners of test match special will miss, but his ability to set a scene wherever he may be commentating from. blowers, as he is known, will retire at the end of the summer, covering three more matches. some breaking news coming from nhs england. the latest figures on people still receiving hospital treatment after the grenfell tower fire, a total of nine people in hospital and we are told three are in critical care. kings college hospital has five patients with two in critical care. chelsea and westminster has two patients, the royal free hospital westminster has two patients, the royalfree hospital one, in critical care, and st mary's hospital also has one patient. that the information we are getting on the
10:37 am
number of people still in hospital a week on from the fire in grenfell tower. we also expecting a police press co nfe re nce tower. we also expecting a police press conference in the next minutes. you can see all the microphones are trained and waiting for somebody to come out to give an update on the grenfell tower investigation. as soon as they begin speaking we will head straight to new scotland yard. we had an e—mail from kim who says she lives in a block that eight floors high. there are no sprinklers, just one exit and no fire doors in communal areas. our sister blog had a fire four years ago in the electrical cupboard and they couldn't get out and had to go back to their flats and wait for the firemen. we had a letter put through our block saying that we are now safe and they had a safety check in the last nine years. keep your communication coming in. an nhs trust has been fined £300,000 after a young patient fell to his death from an industrial chimney. 20—year—old adam withers, who suffered from an acute psychotic illness, died after gaining access
10:38 am
to a chimney at epsom hospital in surrey three years ago. the health trust, surrey and borders partnership, admitted health and safety breaches at a previous hearing. an inquest found it had failed to reassess mr withers' risk levels. his family spoke to our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan. they witnessed the fall. we will come back to that story in a couple of minutes because we can cross to new scotland yard where we are expecting that press conference to ta ke expecting that press conference to take place. we are hearing that nine people are still in hospital one we gone from the grenfell tower fire. three people still in critical care. we are expecting police to come out and update us in the next few minutes. we thought they would come out right now but the people coming out right now but the people coming out of the building, they don't look like the officials coming out to
10:39 am
address the media. we know at least 79 people died in that fire, and the discussion we had a few moments ago with a member of the fire brigade, they said very much that the view was that you should remain in your flat if there is a fire because you are much safer there than if you come out. many people getting in touch with us throughout the morning and sending comments, telling us about their experiences. so many people concerned that whether or not they have cladding that is similar to g re nfell they have cladding that is similar to grenfell tower, they still say they have no fire extinguishers or sprinklers, and many don't feel they have adequate protection. we have something coming in from our home affairs correspondent tom symonds while we wait for the press conference to begin a new scotland yard. police say the insulation and cladding fitted to grenfell tower has failed a small—scale test which
10:40 am
was carried out by the metropolitan police to ensure public safety. the met will investigate whether the law was broken by fitting both to the outside of the tower. detectives have also confirmed that the fire started within a hotpoint fridge freezer. manufacturers have been warned. we don't want there to be victims of the tragedy we don't know about, say detectives. if people we re about, say detectives. if people were not here legally, it doesn't matter. they just want to were not here legally, it doesn't matter. theyjust want to know were not here legally, it doesn't matter. they just want to know who was ina matter. they just want to know who was in a tower. police also telling us no was in a tower. police also telling us no extra people have shown is missing. nine people have been confirmed as dead and formally identified, but 79 are missing and they are now sadly assumed to have died. the police say they need public help to ensure that none of the victims have been missed. detective chief superintendent fiona
10:41 am
mccormack has said the priority is to understand who was in grenfell tower. they are not interested in why somebody was there, whether they we re why somebody was there, whether they were there legally or not, theyjust wa nt to were there legally or not, theyjust want to get to the bottom of who was there. police have said a huge team of 250 specialist investigators are working hard on all aspects of the investigation and the response of the emergency services. police have confirmed the fire was started deliberately. we can cross over live to new scotland yard. we are now over a week into our investigation of the catastrophic fire at grenfell tower. i can confirm that the numbers we have of presumed dead, confirmed dead or missing still remains at 79, with nine people being formally identified as dead. i know there is a fear that number is a lot higher, and i do not want any
10:42 am
hidden victims of this tragedy. through our family liaison officers and local council networks, we prioritise in establishing exactly who was in grenfell tower that night. the home office has assured us night. the home office has assured us that they will not use this tragedy to check people's immigration status, and neither will the police. i urge people now who know people were in that tower that night, either as a resident or people visiting, to phone the incident room on 080003211359 and let us incident room on 080003211359 and let us know who those people are. this is one of the largest and most complexes investigation is the metropolitan police has ever undertaken. there are currently more than 250 specialist investigators working on all aspects of this investigation. it will establish how
10:43 am
the fire started and this bead and spread that it took hold of the building. there are two points of priority for me. the speed that it did spread through the building, and also the internal safety aspects of the building. on the first point, we are examining with experts the aluminium cladding and the insulation behind the cladding, how the tiles were fixed to the building, and how it was installed. preliminary tests on the installation samples collected from g re nfell tower installation samples collected from grenfell tower show that they combusted soon after the test started. the initial tests on the cladding tiles also failed the safety tests. such are our safety concerns on the outcome of those tests, we have shared our data with the department for communities and local government, and we have been
10:44 am
assured that communication data has been shared with every council. we are also concerned about the fridge freezer in this matter and we have been working with the department of energy, business and industrial strategy, who are working with hotpoint on the safety of that fridge. we know this fire was started deliberately. and we know that the fridge freezer in this matter has been never subject to a product recall before. further tests are ongoing on the fridge. to elaborate on other parts of the investigation that we are doing so far, we have seized a huge amount of cctv and we have received over 70 images and moving footage following the appeals last week and i am grateful for everybody that has sent in their images will stop please continue to do that and let us know if you have any images or other
10:45 am
information regarding this fire. 600 909 calls were made to the police and we have listened to every one of those to truly understand the fire. some calls are over one hour long and are truly harrowing in their content. we have started to ta ke their content. we have started to take statements from the occupants and visitors to grenfell tower that night, and this work will continue. in terms of seizing relevant material for a number of organisations, i can confirm that has already started and is under way. i want to be as transparent as ican in way. i want to be as transparent as i can in regards to this investigation, because at the same timei investigation, because at the same time i need to protect the integrity of my investigation. if i find out that individuals or organisations committed offences, then i must be
10:46 am
ina committed offences, then i must be in a position to positive without prejudice to any proceedings. our search of grenfell tower to recover all those inside and return them to their loved ones continues. the working conditions at grenfell tower are difficult and distressing in many ways. i have personally spoken to the teams down there, and i totally understand their commitment in ensuring that we recover everything we can from that tower. and provided back to the families of those that died in that fire. such is that devastation down at the scene, this may take at least until the end of the year. and there is a terrible reality that we may not find or identify all those that died during the fire. which is why i appeal to people that know the people which are still missing, so please come forward. we will do everything we can with the utmost
10:47 am
sensitivity and dignity. we want to provide the best possible answers for all those that have been so deeply affected by the tragedy. also the corporation are you getting?- the corporation are you getting?- the moment, the corporation has been excellent, i have got to say. we have been provided information straightaway, and we have been able to send that on. we are not rating, we have seized occu pa nts. the families of the survivors simply do not believe the figures released about the dead and missing, they think you are trying to hide the scale of it. the figures that we have got so far are the figures that have been accumulated to date by the amount of calls we have had, huge amount of calls we have had, huge amount of calls we have had, huge amount of calls we have had into us, along with the number of people in hospital and the number of people we
10:48 am
have been able to confirm as dead. we are working through a number of other lists we have been given by various organisations to ensure that we have captured every figure we can. that is why this appeal today to yourselves, really, it is to please phone us. we are working with the home office to get the assurances that they will not use this to check immigration status, because i really want to ensure... there is stress and anger... absolutely. they are the numbers, and this is painstaking work going on 211—7. we have been open ifear i fear there ifear there are more, i do not know who they are at the moment, and that is why i am pleading with the public
10:49 am
to please call us on our freephone number on this. as you can imagine, this is a huge fire, very, very intense heat, it is a dangerous scene, and so the investigation has to be done extremely sensitively. working with the coroner, doctor fiona wilcox on this, her and my absolute wish is that we cover everything that we can from that scene, and that we treat everybody there with integrity and dignity. so that will take a long period of time. the tests were done by the building
10:50 am
research establishment, i am not a person that can answer that question. you said you don't have any interest in checking the immigration status, but there may be reasons are the people don't want to pull two, subletting, things either. would you back an amnesty, would it make your job easier? i think that is too wide reaching at the moment. minor things like subletting, we can talk to the council about, it would depend what the other offences are that you are talking about at the time. how many organisations have you seized documents on? we are looking at every criminal offence from manslaughter onwards. we are looking at every health and safety and fire safety offence, and we are reviewing every investigation, every company
10:51 am
at the moment, involved in the building and refurbishment of g re nfell tower. that is detective chief superintendent taking questions from journalists outside new scotland yard. she said that currently the numbers of people who are dead and missing, presumed dead, is at 79, but they have real concerns that the number isa but they have real concerns that the number is a lot higher. the point she made was, we don't want to have any hidden victims in this. if you, for example, were in the building because of an immigration status that would put you at risk. normally if there is a family worried about that, it doesn't matter for these purposes. they say they want to know the weather who was in there, they will not use the tragedy to check people's immigration status. if you do have information on people inside the tower 0800 0324539. 250
10:52 am
specialist officers there. interesting she said they have carried out tests on the cladding used on the side of grenfell tower, saying it combusted soon after the test began. they are looking at the details of that. they said they received 600 emergency calls, and have listened to every one of them. incredibly harrowing, saying it will ta ke incredibly harrowing, saying it will take until the end of the year to com plete take until the end of the year to complete the investigation. an nhs trust has been fined £300,000 after a young patient fell to his death from an industrial chimney. 20—year—old adam withers, who suffered from an acute psychotic illness, died after gaining access to a chimney at epsom hospital in surrey three years ago. the health trust, surrey and borders partnership, admitted health and safety breaches at a previous hearing. an inquest found it had failed to reassess mr withers' risk levels. his family spoke to our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan.
10:53 am
he was up there like a whippet. and once he was up there he just kept looking at me. i kept saying to him, "adam, what are you doing? you need to get down." and he was walking to the left—hand side... and as he walked across, i followed him with my eyes. that's the first time i saw the chimney with the ladder, and the ladder just glinted in the sunlight. it really... she sobs. i'm sorry. itjust really gets your attention. i suddenly thought, no, no! when i looked back, adam had gone. i thought, i can't do it. i can't stand here and watch because if he comes down safe, i will see him. but i can't see him fall. so i turned round and i walked away from him.
10:54 am
and i'm sure he saw me, because he just stayed. and the last time i turned around, before you go round the corner when you can't see the chimney any more, he was just getting on to the very top. we just stood at the front of the hospital, no staff, nobody at all, we just stood and held each other. all of a sudden, you hear all these gasps, these horrible, horrible gasps, and then people just screaming and screaming. and then you get the nurses coming round the corner as pale as sheets, and you know they have seen something horrific. i went to point to my mum, and that's when she collapsed to the floor and just screamed this horrible, horrible scream. that's how we found out he'd died, because she screamed, and they were... that's not how you find out somebody died.
10:55 am
michaeljoins me now. difficult to watch that, michael. how are adam's mother and sister feeling now after the court case? how are adam's mother and sister feeling now after the court case 7m isa feeling now after the court case 7m is a bittersweet moment for them, because clearly, they have pushed this case as far as they can go legally. the inquest found the trust had failed, they had contributed to adam's death. the support of the health and safety executive putting for this prosecution, this £300,000 fine. but optimally, acknowledged by thejudge fine. but optimally, acknowledged by the judge yesterday, delivering the verdict, talking about money and the law, this is how the law works. but ultimately, nothing can bring adam back. that is clearly what the adam would like. just to go over how they found out about this. the way they we re found out about this. the way they were dealt with on a human level is just desperately sad. it is. it is
10:56 am
very, very, very sad. the mother had gone to visit him, and he went out into the courtyard of the ward. he skipped onto a low—level building that gave him access to the ladder, the maintenance ladder, it was only meant to be there for a day, it had been there for several days. he had managed to go up. she couldn't watch all of it, so she couldn't watch what was happening. what she was living through was the reactions and screams of everybody else. people we re screams of everybody else. people were saying to her, ultimately, that is not the way you want to find out your son has died. the trust were prosecuted because they knew that this ward he was on was a risk. this ward and the courtyard in particular, and getting onto the low—level building nearby, that was a well—known risk. they were told in 2012 it was a danger, they were told in 2013, and they were told in 2014 it was a danger. a couple of weeks
10:57 am
before adam died, he absconded using this particular route. there were repeated warnings. despite the repeated warnings. despite the repeated warnings, the trust hadn't put in any anti—climb measures that could stop people getting up there. what has the health trust said in response to the fine? the trust have accepted thejudgment response to the fine? the trust have accepted the judgment and the fine. they have reiterated their apologies to the family, which contributed to adam's death. they go on to say that u nfortu nately adam's death. they go on to say that unfortunately his death has had a profound impact on the trust, and they have put in safety measures, and in particular this unit at epsom general hospital in surrey, which has now been closed down, the psychiatric patients have been moved to another site. thank you for talking to us about that story. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. victoria is back on monday. all of the details, the fallout and reaction to that police press
10:58 am
conference about the grenfell tower fire. stay tuned to bbc newsroom live and anita will bring the details to you. great to have your company today. have a good weekend. the cloud is prone to breaks today. sunshine coming and going across southern counties of england, later through east anglia. the scotland and northern ireland, things brighten up. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year, between 16 and 24. overnight, damp weather continuing to work southwards. rain in the bristol channel, ab spots in glastonbury, but not a huge amount. the cloud and breeze keeping the temperatures up. lows of 15 or 17. looking ahead to the weekend, low pressure to the north of the uk, bringing weather, showers across the northwest, but many of us will see sunshine with temperatures similar to those of today.
10:59 am
this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. police will consider manslaughter charges as part of the investigation police the installation and tiles caused the fire. police will consider manslaughter charges as part of the investigation into the grenfell tower disaster. preliminary tests on the insulation samples from grenfell tower showed that they combusted soon after the test started. the initial test on the cladding tiles also failed the safety tests.
11:00 am
eleven tower blocks are found with cladding which raises safety concerns in the wake of the grenfell tower fire disaster. theresa may's offer to guarantee the rights of eu citizens in the uk doesn't go far enough — according to the president of the european commission. i want to reassure all those eu citizens who are in the uk, who've

100 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on