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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns have been raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". i know it is difficult but grenfell tower changes everything and i don't think we can take any risk with the safety of our residents and we need to put them first. the mass evacuation on the chalcots estate has been taking place ten days since the grenfell tower disaster. there's been angerfrom residents who were forced to spend the night in hotels or on airbeds in a leisure centre. i intend to stay put. i intend to return tonight. the council need to be seen to be doing something, this isa be seen to be doing something, this is a knee—jerk reaction from them
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but it is pandemonium.. good morning, it's saturday 24th june. also ahead... the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, tells broadcasters they should be more "patriotic" in their coverage of brexit talks. in sport, can the lions roar in auckland? they face the mighty all blacks in the first test at eden park — where new zealand are unbeaten for 23 years. # i wish #iwish| # i wish i was #iwish|wasa # i wish i was a special # but i am a creep... and 20 years since their first headline set, we'll get reaction after radiohead played the pyramid stage on the opening night of glastonbury. a big difference in the weather this weekend compared to last weekend's heat wave. it is cool, fresh with more cloud this week and windier in
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the north. details on 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. camden council told people in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed. the buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. here is nick quraishi with the details. we cannot guarantee your safety. the message from camden council as 4000 residents were told to leave their homes late on friday night. individuals are not being forced to leave, they are being told to leave their own safety and it's up to them to decide. i intend to stay put and go back in their tonight. i think it isa go back in their tonight. i think it is a knee—jerk reaction from the council. in the aftermath of debt and phillip tower, cladding he had
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been ruled unsafe. concerns have also been raised about fire doors and gas pipes. in the area which was not completely to the best standards was a deep concern given the combination and that was the message from the fire services today. the issueis from the fire services today. the issue is a combination of the two factors that is why we have taken the action we have taken tonight.- the action we have taken tonight.- the leisure centre, air beds was assembled to cater to what 100 arrested in finesse. assembled to cater to what100 arrested in finesse. it will take up to four weeks to remove the external cladding and during that time, people are being urged to stay with family and friends or in hotels. camden council has already secured 270 rooms in london and has spent the night transporting people. some residents of the first they knew was on the news. children, families, babies, they have nowhere to go. and ijust think they babies, they have nowhere to go. and i just think they left everything to late and dealing with it. this time a night, it is half past one now, it
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is ridiculous. grenfell tower was destroyed from the bottom to the top. we now know the fire started in a kitchen in a lowerfloor. police have also confirmed what eyewitnesses said — the origin of the inferno was a hotpoint fridge. many buildings in england are now known to have cladding which proms concerns. ten days on from the worst fires since world war two, the shadow looms large over social housing. we can speak now to catriona renton who is outside the swiss cottage leisure centre in camden where some residents spent the night. catriona, how much information have people been given? you have been there through the night talking to people and gauging their reaction to this. what have they been telling you? good morning. there is so many people coming through here through the night and we have been here all night. we saw
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people still arriving here at around half past four in the morning. as you heard, some people were saying they heard what was happening from they heard what was happening from the news and others say they had a knock on the door from council officials or the fire service. certainly some confusion here. i spoke to one man at three o'clock this morning who was turning up at the rest centre here, not knowing where to go or what to do. he said that he had a knock on the door from the fire service at about two in the morning advising him to leave. he had been getting ready to go to bed so had been getting ready to go to bed so he was shocked. another family with a five—month—old baby. the father said they believed they were safe in the property but then they got a knock on the door and help us to the morning and he and his family came here trying to find shelter, not really knowing what to do. he said one of his children has eczema and he was worried because the child was itchy and needed some care. 0ther
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was itchy and needed some care. other people have been frustrated. some have been here all night. we heard the amount of frustration, looking for someone to go and stay. people are being sent to hotels. they had secured around 270 rooms so we saw people making their way there. again, what next was to mark they do not know what the long—term is. this could be lasting for a round four, five weeks. the councils that they have to do this, they had to act on fire safety adviser but they also understand that the stress people are going through and they say thank you for being with them at this difficult time. thank you very much. we will talk to you all morning and various other people as well. we will also speak to georgia gould, the leader of camden council and in the next hour we will speak to the community secretary to get a bigger picture as to what the housing department plans to do about this move. helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom has said it would be
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helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected boss of sessions saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. sessions saying it was a good start. of course it is very early daysm has been a year... it would be helpful... it would be helpful if broadcasters would be patriotic. the country made a decision... are you accusing me of being unpatriotic third and questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today the european union. the remarks have been described as a sinister threat to free media and said she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing after a landslide in south—western china.
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about 40 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. radiohead topped the bill on the opening night of glastonbury, 20 years after one of their most famous performances at the festival. today will see katy perry and the foo fighters take to the pyramid stage, as our entertainment correspondent lizo mzumba reports. # i wish #iwishl # i wish i was special # for thousands of fans, radiohead really are special. receiving a rupture was reception in front of a packed stage. # i'm a creep, i'm a weird oh. this was the musical climax to a day that featured a few unexpected celebrity appearances. # we attend a
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young maiden... earlier, chris kristofferson was accompanied on stage by a guitar playing johnny depp. watching them, another hollywood star, brad pitt. and one more famous face admitted that this was set to be his very first glastonbury. yeah, 42 years old and it is my first festival full first time here. i am excited. slightly nervous because i time here. i am excited. slightly nervous because i don't know what to expect but, obviously, apart from the great acts on people having fun. iam the great acts on people having fun. i am looking forward to it. later today, names who will make an appearance on the main stage include katy perry, foo fighters and jeremy corbyn. in just a few hours time, the british and irish lions will take to the field in auckland for the first test against new zealand. the all blacks haven't lost at eden park for 23 years and are seen as the clear favourites. let's speak now to our sports correspondent katie gornall, who's in auckland.
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it isa it is a sense of the task that faces the british and irish lions? well, i think if you had to describe it you would say that this was most difficult test in rugby. the team that have only gotten to know each other in the past few weeks come here to face the world champions on their home turf. when you think about the statistics, they are in favour of new zealand. you mentioned eden park, this fortress where the all blacks have not lost since 1994. but for some of the players in the british team were even born. and many think about the fact that lions have not won a series in new zealand since 1971. it is a challenge ahead we have seen tens of thousands of fa ns we have seen tens of thousands of fans arrive here in auckland, some arriving on buses now ahead of the
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game. i think there is a genuine sense of hope among those fans because of recent results on this tour that they can do something special here. they can achieve history here tonight. i think it is mixed with a dose of realism because, as i say, the incredible record of the all blacks... yes, it is great should sport whenever the all blacks play. especially with their haka all blacks play. especially with their ha ka before all blacks play. especially with their haka before the game begins, that always set things up in an extraordinary way. it is incredible. and nothing about the haka, a maori war dance, anyone who performs it is not just representing war dance, anyone who performs it is notjust representing their war dance, anyone who performs it is not just representing their country here tonight, their family, not just representing their country here tonight, theirfamily, it is the heritage and you have to give 100% otherwise you are not doing yourself justice. it 100% otherwise you are not doing yourselfjustice. it really does make the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. goodness knows what it will be like for the lions facing it. it will be a special occasion as well for the captain of the lions, a player who many people did not
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expect to see on this tour. it three months ago he was not even a regular starter for ireland. but now a great run of form since then, a great run of form on this tour as well means he is keeping tour captain out of the side and he will lead the lions out here today in just a few our‘s time. very much. live from eden park in new zealand. kick—off at 830 this morning. we will keep you updated as things progress. i think i have underestimated just how popular this game is. many people have been getting in touch on social media saying they will not watch us this morning. they will be watching the game. and many people making different plans. rearranging their day. so that they can watch this. it is partly or because a tour for the lions happens so rarely. but a quick look now through the papers. the front page of the daily telegraph the main story there and you will are before about what other
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buildings may be affected by the cladding issues. questions are being asked this morning in the telegraph linked to hospital buildings. officially they have been asked to check the construction of the high—rise hospital buildings and f across the uk. we will have more on throughout the morning. many papers taking a look at the grand cell tower and the issues surrounding that. the evacuation of people in other buildings. —— grenfell tao. the times is looking at the manchester suicide bomber and how he came about planning the atrocity that he committed. it says he used videos from youtube and other websites to help build the device that killed 22 people in manchester. on the front page of the daily mirror they are doing some work in connection with what is known to be the cause, the original cause of the blaze in grenfell tower. that is the fridge freezer. many question marks, the five chief quoted in the paper
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as saying it was 90 seconds before the kitchen would have been engulfed in those circumstances. you can see some of the test they have done an fridge freezers themselves. it is quite sobering to look at these images and it is a clear area of concern as they continue the investigations. the sun is looking at eastenders saying that the soap opera, the series is in crisis after its production had left amid claims of bullying and falling ratings. the executive producer sean o'connor saying he had left after a meeting of bbc headquarters. one other story on the daily mail. taking their own league this morning. this is using quotes from a book written by penny junor, which presents camilla ‘s side of the story. a new biography detailing her life and, of course,
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you can see a lot fascination in that story. a dog? a picture of a dog? look at his year. you have the dog? look at his year. you have the dog and then another dog on his ear. i see. the nose and the eyes...” said it is actually a female dog. she was born with those markings, obviously, but that is what i wanted to show you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: hundreds of flats have been evacuated in north london tower blocks because of fire safety concerns following the grenfell tower tragedy. and radiohead have headlined the opening night of the glastonbury festival, 20 years after they first topped the bill on the pyramid stage. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. good morning! i have put a fairly
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nice picture of behind me because i think things will improve after this cloudy start. what a difference this weekend, compared to last weekend when we have the high temperatures and high humidity. cooler this weekend, especially in the north, and very windy in the far north of scotland. showers in the forecast and sunshine as well. this is the culprit bringing strong winds. very tightly packed isoba rs culprit bringing strong winds. very tightly packed isobars for this time of year. windy start, a of cloud in northern ireland and towards scotland. bit of brightness may be in east, but generally cloudy and the wind will pick up through the day, a bubbly peaking in the afternoon. further south in england and wales we have a damp feel to things. certainly across southern counties towards the south—west as well. although it is fairly mild, a rather damp start for the glastonbury festival. it should improve through the day and we
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should get sunshine developing in the afternoon. still fairly warm and muggy. but today a fairly breezy day. the wind is really picking up on the northern half of scotland. gales, gusts of up to 50 mph. there could be some disruption to the ferries. quite a mild day. 20 celsius for many and we could have the mid— 20s in the south—east of england and east anglia. showers continue to come and go, especially in western areas, and overnight. longer spells in the northern half of scotland. further strong winds here. a mild night for most. cloud blanketing the warmth. the midteens. the low pressure still with us in the north into sunday, but it will be moving away, winds gradually easing down. more of a west, north—westerly wind. temperatures will be cooler across—the—boa rd. north—westerly wind. temperatures will be cooler across—the—board. a similar picture, a lot of cloud around and a few showers in northern and western areas. the best of any
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sunshine developing in the northern half. the temperatures are mid to upper teens. we could see up to 22 in the south—east. a much cooler and fresh weekend than last weekend. lots of people will be breathing a sigh of relief. the cause of the hot nights. a good night's sleep. i bought a portable air—conditioner. it was absolute bliss! i should have done it years ago. or opened the window. it was too warm! on the top floor. thank you. the main stories in a moment. but now, mark kermode joins ben brown for this week's film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so, mark, what do we have this week? very interesting bunch this week.
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we have in this corner of the world, a very impressive japanese anime. transformers: the last knight, the saga rumbles on. and hampstead, a film which does exactly what it says on the tin. so, in this corner of the world, a war movie with a difference? interesting. it is an anime based on a manga of the same name. it goes from the ‘30s to the mid—405. a young girl, when she gets to the age of 18, marries someone she has barely met before. she goes to live in a different home and start a new life of which she makes the most, but meanwhile the spectre of war is looming in the background. but normal life carries on. here is a clip. what is impressive about this is that, like a film like grave of the fireflies, it talks about a very dark subject matter, in a way that has
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an innocence and universality that a live—action movie couldn't do. we saw from that clip the cloud that we know is moving towards hiroshima. and our heroine is an artist, and at certain moments in the movie she looks up and sees explosions in the sky as explosions of paint. there are moments when the narrative deals with very dark stuff that you would get in a war movie, but it does so by the animation unravelling and becoming drawings and becoming fragments of animation, and, by looking at global events and tragedies through the eyes of a particular character, it manages to watch as if from a distance or slightly sculptured, without ever looking away from harsh realities. this opens on wednesday, and if you like a film like your name, which was a big hit, and is returning to cinemas soon, i think this is well worth checking out. it has won numerous awards and it's easy to see why.
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a real integrity to it. the triumph is it approaches a difficult subject matter in a way that, to me, seems universal. and it does that thing that animation can do that a live—action film can't do, to look at the world in a different way, to make us see these events in a different and personal way. i liked it very much and i think you will too. thank you. and transformers: the last knight — i suspect you don't like it as much and i suspect i won't either. let's talk about it. it's one of the least offensive of the transformers movies. it's the latest michael bay smash. it looks back to the past to arthurian legend and wibbles around in stonehenge and looks for mysticism and out to outer space for an interplanetary conspiracy. it's basically transformers meets monty python and spinal tap, but without the jokes. anthony hopkins is in it and he's laughing all the way to the bank, as this kind of eccentric aristocrat who has a butler who is like c3po from star wars. he believes the only way to save the planet is to bring together an historian
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and mark wahlberg'sjunkyard king to save the world, which, frankly, on the evidence of the film, is not worth saving. on the plus side, there are less leering shots with the camera looking up the skirts of its performers than we have had in previous michael bay movies. his pornographic sensibility is toned down slightly. the plot makes no sense whatsoever, despite the endless scenes of people explaining the plot to each other, and indeed pointing at things that are happening on screen and telling us what we are looking at. it is massively incoherent, staggeringly dull and whoppingly overlong, although in terms of the rest of the transformers movies it is less offensive. i was not offended, i was just bored. it was like being shouted to sleep. did you fall asleep? no, i have to say, my job is to stay awake. believe me, there were many moments in which i was going, you have to stay awake, something interesting might happen. no, it's ok, it is not going to.
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got it. now, hampstead, a romcom for the older audience? you've seen the poster, right? that tells you everything you need to know, as does the title. thinking about hampstead, the heath, expensive properties and some artisan residence. over there is highgate cemetery and a pond... at the centre of it, brendan gleeson is a beardy wild man living in a shack he's built on the heath under the radar. he is under threat of eviction from property developers, and along comes diane keaton, the recently widowed hampstead resident, who tries to help him save his shack and gets very little thanks for her work. may i ask you something? sure. yeah, it's about what happened the other day, and those people — they really wanted to help you and i do too. i don't need any help. of course you do. we all need help. i didn't ask for any. well, what do you mean? look, i'm no—one's charity case, ok? i'm a man who lives as he chooses to, and i'm not going to any court
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or any hearing either. no—one is taking my home from me! 0k, all right, mr angry. 0k, listen, there's no reason to wake the dead here — none. the dead make more sense to me. oh, my god. ok, that's enough. i don't know... how can you expect anyone to put up with all this nonsense? all right, i'm sorry, i'm sorry. i was wrong. well, i don't know. no, i'm sorry. i really am. it won't happen again. here is the thing with this film, i like both of those performers and you would have to be pretty hard—hearted to get annoyed with the movie, although i have read that some reviews have taken against it. it is basically... you know the movie you think it is? it is exactly that movie. in the back of it there is a true story, isn't there? there really was a guy who had a shack and he had to fight a legal battle, although i have to say this
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film's relationship with reality is inspired by that true story, but it's passing at very best. compared to this, notting hill, the richard curtis movie, looks like a really hard—hitting, tough and gritty film about urban grime. or something like truly madly deeply suddenly looks like a scary gothic horror movie in comparison. it is about as twee as it's possible for a movie to be. and itjust does all the things you expect this kind of movie to do. but i didn't dislike it, because i like those two performers. i like their characters. despite the fact i don't believe in any of it at all, it is a film which is best summed up as perfect wednesday afternoon viewing, which will go down well with a cup of tea and a biscuit, and that's the kind of movie it is. and it is supposed to be a romcom — is it romantic and funny? it is romantic and i laughed a couple of times. a lot of the scenes in hampstead, you watch, thinking, no, you could not afford
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to get a cup of tea there, you couldn't get a parking space there. there is no way that would happen! now, best out at the moment. by the time it gets dark, you will have to search this movie out because it is a limited release and an extraordinary thai movie by anocha suwichakornpong. it starts off as a film about an atrocity that happened in the mid—19705 and somebody trying to make a film about this. and then what happens is it becomes a much more amorphous study of the relationship between memory and history, and the inability of cinema to capture history perfectly. it's a film which takes in the whole history of cinema right back to melies and forward to digital technology. it's witty and moving and it's strange. it keeps looping back on itself and is clearly a film which cannot be described in terms of plot, but if you like the films of, say, apichatpong weerasetha kul, which i know you do, then it's really well worth seeking out.
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but it's a very small release and you will need to seek it out, but i was knocked out by it. i went in with no knowledge of it at all and, although i did not understand a lot of it, it was really fascinating. i really enjoyed it. it's called by the time it gets dark. ok, and best dvd is a movie you have talked a lot about. here's the thing with moonlight, you cannot say too many times how good it is. this became a major award winner. when first seen, it was considered to be a little independent arthouse movie with limited appeal, but i think it is beautifully directed and fantastically played, story of a life in three separate chapters, and it does everything that you want cinema to do. it tells a story that makes you feel involved in the characters, even if your life is nothing like theirs at all. it's compassionate and humane and thrilling in terms of its cinematic construction. and i confess i have seen it four times now,
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and i will probably go back and watch it again. wow. i have seen it once. but you loved it? i did love it. see it again, you will love it even more. ok, fine. now, a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week, though. thanks for watching. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before seven, holly will be here with the sport and stav will have this weekend's weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. camden council told people in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed. the buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. we can speak now to catriona renton
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who is outside the swiss cottage leisure centre in camden where some residents spent the night. catriona, how much information have people been given? many must be confused about what the next few weeks may have in store for them. that is correct. we have been here all night and seen a steady strea m here all night and seen a steady stream of people coming here, some quite confused about the situation, being evacuated from their homes so quickly. one of the people who was told to leave their home is surely hejoins me now. surely it is told to leave their home is surely he joins me now. surely it is the president of the taplow tower, one of the first to be evacuated. what happened. what happened to you last night? i saw something on sky news saying they were evacuating my flats. i went downstairs to speak to someone who told me we all had to
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get out of our block and come over here. of which we done and we have been here all night. and you have been here all night. and you have been here all night. and you have been here since half past eight last night. have you been getting information that you need? no, i haven't. they called me over, someone shouted my name out and i we nt someone shouted my name out and i went over to be told that a hotel i’ooiti went over to be told that a hotel room for me, the holiday in when i got there they said someone else had taken it. and, of course, you have your dog with you. that held you back? it has to a certain extent because they are trying to say that a lot of hotels won't take dogs. the ones that we rung round said that they will take dogs. do you feel... obviously overnight there has been food and water and people to talk to. etihad support? in the rest ce ntre to. etihad support? in the rest centre i've had support but not from the official people who are meant to be helping us. what do you need to here? i went over to ask them a
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little while ago how much longer before we get put somewhere and they told me no sooner than this evening. i hope that your situation does resolve quickly. we have heard from the council who have said that they had to do this. they had to act on fire service advice and they thank the people of the estate for bearing with them. they say they know this is distressing and there will be issues on such a large—scale operation as this is. they say they are working as hard as they can to resolve the situation for the residents of the state as quickly as possible. katrina will be speaking to people throughout the morning, residents and people from the residents and people from the residents association as well. we will speak to the communities secretary later in the programme and the leader of camden council will be joining us from camden a little later. the leader of the house of commons,
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andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected boss —— politicians saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. it has been a year... it would be helpful... it would be helpful if broadcasters would be patriotic. the country made a decision... unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron, has described andrea leadsom's remarks as "a sinister threat to the free media" — and said she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing
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after a landslide in south—western china. about 40 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. katy perry and the foo fighters will top the bill at glastonbury today. last night, radiohead took to the pyramid stage, twenty years since their first headline appearance at the festival. it's expected around 135,000 people will be in attendance over the weekend. those are the main stories this morning. now it is time for sport. yes, talking about a muddy field at glastonbury, i think it will be muddy in auckland as well as it gets under way. we have been waiting for this for quite sometime and it has been getting exciting. it feels that there has been more media coverage than there has been previously. this kicked off on june than there has been previously. this kicked off onjune three. they have had ten gruelling matches with just
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two victories so it could be a big match. many people watching. many people up early on twitter already there is a lot of excitement building but it will not be easy. we're less than two hours away from the first test between the british and irish lions and new zealand in auckland. the all blacks haven't lost in 23 years at eden park — the last side to beat them anywhere was ireland, back in november. really, really optimistic that they can cause a huge upset. anyhow they are probably one of the greatest by are probably one of the greatest rugby victories ever. it is that difficult a task that they have. they do seem confident with the quality they have, i don't see any reason why not. ido i do know what is coming. it is hard to prepare yourself exactly for what it will be like. a different beast to different games i have played so you need to adapt quickly. we have
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learnt over the last few years as a team to adapt and adjust and whatever gets thrown away we will try to overcome it. scotland have just lost their final tour match — they went down 27—22 to fiji. meanwhile ireland have kicked off against japan in tokyo. jason roy became the first player in international t20 cricket history to be given out for obstructing the field, as england lost to south africa byjust three runs at taunton. england were cruising towards their target of 175 when south africa claimed roy had deliberately got in the way of a throw — and he was dismissed. england needed a four from the last ball — but liam dawson missed it. the series decider is at cardiff tomorrow. the women's cricket world cup starts today, with the icc hoping it'll be a turning point for the women's game. england go into the tournament on the back of some strong warm—up performances — they take on india in the opening match in derby, where a sell—out crowd of three—thousand is expected. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson.
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in derby, a group of professional sportswomen prepare for a competition which aims to be noticed around the world. they are england and england as work began. in 1973, birmingham hosted the final of the first—ever women's world cup, and hung by england and this play is basically had to pay to play. he denied his one—year intellect captaincy of the current england team. first game against india, the winning nation this year, gets 666 thousand dollars. money has come a long way. it is the incentive? something the players will think about to go into the i don't think so. it is a nice touch by the icc to show whether women's game is at the moment. i think it is a good statement by them in terms of practicalities of fries it doesn't change it. globally, the key is to unlock the potential of india. that
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is the market for cricket. signs of progress, well, there was eight kit launch featuring women's players alongside the men. india's women have never won the world cup and are outsiders again this year. but victory would speed up the quality. this is a stage where most of the matches are televised and broadcast and it increases the viewership and, you know, india is a country where cricket is a religion. boys in state schools in england and wales still got more opportunity to play cricket than girls. a new survey has been done. inspiration often comes from the top. the world cup, the opening batter will miss this match through injury. the captain is fit, calm and ready. british men's tennis number three dan evans has been provisionally suspended after testing positive for cocaine. the test was taken in april but he was only told about it this week. he could be banned for up to four years.
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i was notified a few days ago that i failed a drugs test in april where i tested positive to cocaine. this was taken out of competition and the context was completely unrelated to tennis. i made a mistake and i must face up to it. i do not condone for one second that this was acceptable behaviour. i have let people down. my behaviour. i have let people down. my family, my coach, my team, sponsors, british tennis and my fans. ican sponsors, british tennis and my fans. i can only deeply apologise from the bottom of my heart. gilles muller's impressive run at queen's continued, when he beat sam querrey in straight sets — muller now faces marin cilic in the semi—finals, with grigor dimitrov and feliciano lopez in the other tie. and petra kvitova's comeback is still going well. she's through to the semi—finals of the aegon classic in birmingham after beating kristina mladenovic. this was kvitova's fifth match since returning to the circuit, after she was stabbed in the hand six months ago. max verstappen will have his eye on claiming pole position
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for the azerbaijan grand prix after dominating practice in baku. with just seconds remaining of the afternoon session he gave his red bull mechanics some extra work to do. it was a bad day for britain's two drivers. jolyon palmer's practice ended early and lewis hamilton could only manage tenth. the odds—on favourite winter won the big race on day four of royal ascot. winter was the winner as the fillies took centre stage in the coronation stakes. victorious in the english and irish 1000 guineas, winter was ridden byjockey ryan moore and trained by aidan o'brien. castleford have extended their lead at the top of the super league table to seven points with a 23—12 win over leeds at headingley. zak hardaker scored a superb individual try as castleford bounced back from their challenge cup quarter—final defeat to hull. it's castelford's eighth successive super league victory, and the third time they've beaten leeds this season.
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it will kick off in just over two hours time. six games they have had so far, and only four wins. two losses and, performance wise, we know that the all blocks... they have a huge record there in auckland. it will not be easy. 23 yea rs auckland. it will not be easy. 23 years at eden park and they have never lost on that ground. that is extraordinary. an extraordinary reckitt and they have that on the back of their mind today. thank you, holly and we will see you later full. stick with the sporting theme. one sport that began in finland has proven to be successful at getting girls involved in sport. but now hobbyhorse showjumping has arrived in the uk. it has proved controversial, as well. ahead of the national championships this weekend, we sent michael long. it's the stuff of dreams for
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seven—year—old olivia. her imagination running free in a real showjumping ring as she races against the clock are hoping for a clear round ahead of the inaugural national championships.” clear round ahead of the inaugural national championships. i like jumping because you can go as high as you want and i find that really cool as you want and i find that really cool. here we have mike rating breakfast charlie. this horse is a great steed for him. for those of us who cannot afford a horse or have been challenged by lack of writing ability, this is an ideal way of experiencing a showjumping competition. it is my first one ever, and i am being put through my paces. it is all about the angles and getting as tight as you can around the course. the fences may not be huge bite in heat in the
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summer it is certainly a physical challenge. exhausting. and try telling 5—year—old eli that this is somewhat silly. he did not know when he was beaten and had the stamina to keep going. he was glowing with pride when he eventually finished, especially because he had made his own horse. his name is invisible. he looks fantastic. did you enjoy that? everybody can get on. small kids can have a go and also the big kids. and, like so, not everybody has an opportunity to be around the horse but hobbyhorse of vile. they are far less work compared to a real horse as well. and less time involved on the training side, i am sure. it all began in finland to encourage girls, mainly in the inner city to get more active in equestrian sport. now tens
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of thousands turn up for competitions. their story is told in a new movie, the hobbyhorse revolution, which reflects the height of the fences now and shows how competitive it has become. while for the show in berks, the first national championship was the answer when they could not show real horse jumping any longer. the olympics did great work for is and i think everybody is excited about horses. if we can bring more people into the game, that would be really good. you can see what it feels like one of horse jumps so you have that feel, the excitement. it is fun jumping on. satisfying when you clear the jumps. there is no dressage. dancing to music with hobbyhorses. —— there is now a dressage section. but it is thejumping is now a dressage section. but it is the jumping that has most newcomers in the saddle. we spoke about that with mike
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yesterday. i won't say any more other than somebody just tweeted yesterday. i won't say any more other than somebodyjust tweeted me asking if it was april fools' day. they are having fun! and that's what life is about. are you going to have fun in the sun today? let's ask stav. good morning. a bit of sunshine today. it into tomorrow. it will be cloudy and a different weekend to what we had last weekend, with the hot and what we had last weekend, with the hotand humid what we had last weekend, with the hot and humid weather. sunshine and showers this weekend. long spells of rain. windy in the far north, which introduces cooler air. this low pressure is the culprit for the windy conditions. especially the northern isles, where we will have gales, wherefore this time of year. a blustery morning in northern areas. set to get stronger. showers as well and maybe will spells of rain. in scotland and northern ireland, generally a cloudy start. similar for ireland, generally a cloudy start. similarfor england ireland, generally a cloudy start. similar for england and ireland, generally a cloudy start. similarfor england and wales. the
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winds are less of a feature, but a lot of cloud around and a couple of showers in the north. damp weather in southern counties, especially to the south—west. it is quite a mild start. a bit of a dismal start at glastonbury. a few spots of light rain. through the afternoon it should improve. sunshine breaking through, which will lift the temperatures into the low 20s celsius. not a bad looking day. where we get the sunshine it will feel pleasant. the northern half of the country will bear the brunt of the country will bear the brunt of the strong winds, especially northern scotland. blustery showers, maybe longer spells arriving later. the couple of showers developing further south. quite warm. we could see the mid— 20s in the south—east. overnight it stays cloudy. still windy in the north, as the low pressure m oves windy in the north, as the low pressure moves off towards scandinavia. but the wise, not bad. 10- 12 in scandinavia. but the wise, not bad. 10— 12 in the north. the mid— teens in the south. we will start to see
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slightly fresher air pushing on from the north—west as we head through sunday. this low pressure moves up into the near continent. a windy stop a scotland particularly. —— starred in scotland. rather cloudy through the afternoon in the south, with sunshine developing in scotland and northern ireland and northern england, but with its slightly cooler air. midteens to high teens celsius, maybe 21— 22 in the south—east. the quite a mixed weekend. it certainly is! speak to you later. now it is time for click. la la la los angeles. a city of many sights.
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there's the movies. the beaches. the high life. and in between each of them... ..a whole lot of this. with hardly any rail alternative, the traffic here drives the locals to distraction. it's led some of the bigger thinkers to suggest radical alternatives. electric car and space travel guru elon musk has even started digging a tunnel. he envisions an asimovian network of car and passenger carrying tubes underneath cities in the future. how boring. meanwhile, back in the almost real world of marina del rey, a more modest way to reduce traffic. two electric cars that belong to a whole apartment block. envoy operates a closed car share system. the vehicles can be booked out by residents only and used for up to three hours at a time.
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now this is not a car that you would use to drive to work and back because you'd end up paying for and hogging it for the whole day. this is much more a car that you would use for convenience, popping out for the occasional errand. we believe that if it's a two car household we can hopefully reduce that to one. experts say that for every shared car it takes 11 off the road. so we are working with developers on communicating that with policymakers in the city, saying if we include car sharing within communities, we should be able to reduce our parking requirements on new developments. the abundance of everything here in the us is evident, and it's thanks in no small part to having one of the best educated and most skilled workforces in the world. and it is from right here that the xprize in education was born. now this is a competition that encourages entrepreneurs
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to use technic to teach. now the finalists have been announced in london this week and dan will take a look at some of them in a minute. but first he travels to tanzania to see what's in store for those hoping to offer something new to the next generation. we are travelling a long way from any town or city to visit some of the 200 children in a village in northern tanzania. we are booting up a tablet, the first one. the interesting thing here is that most of these children, about all of them, have not seen a tablet before. but not only that, a lot of them wouldn't have gone to school even before, so the learning process itself is brand—new. the whole programme is in swahili so the local children can understand.
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i think they are going to need more tablets! laughter this is one of about 150 villages in tanzania chosen as the test—bed for the global learning xprize. within a few months, 4000 tablets will be given out. the challenge, to teach a 7—11—year—olds to read, write and do maths over the next year. the most effective app will win $10 million. the prize here though will be much more valuable. older children can walk up to four hours to get to and from school. for younger ones, like seven—year—old amina, that's simply too far. she's been lucky, she is one of those that's been chosen to take part in the xprize challenge. at the start she has not seen a tablet before, so she's not used to touching screens.
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and when it comes to reading, she doesn't know more than one or two words in a sentence. butjohn, who is with the project, thinks the tablet will help her eventually to read fluently. back in the capital, dar es salaam, the world food programme is testing solar panel stations that will monitor the progress of each child when they recharge. that way if a tablet breaks, the youngster can get a new one without having to start lessons from the beginning again. in london this week, 11 semifinalists from seven different countries were chosen from the nearly 200 teams that entered. they will refine their software before the final five are chosen to go to tanzania to start the year—long project with the children. so the problem is that there are about 60—100 million kids who have no access to school because school is too far. then you have 250 million more who go to school and leave without ever having learned to read
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or write a word. and these are kids in botswana, boston, brighton — it doesn't matter. kids go to school all over the world and they go, they don't learn and why is that? that's the question we are trying to address. in our greatest desire, every single child on planet earth has access to a world—class education in the palm of their hand. every single child has his or her potential fulfilled. that's the dream and it's not a far—fetched dream. it is possible. we are hoping to be back next year to see how the teams get along but for now it's time to say goodbye. we've brought some biscuits to say thank you and suddenly the difficulties the team will face when they arrive become clear. with just 20 or so tablets per village there simply won't be enough for everyone to take part. to reduce potentialjealousy, the tablets will be locked to only run the educational software. but everyone wants one. a village mama has been chosen
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to settle any disputes, and the scheme's partners unesco will be asking some other important questions about tablets too. we are doing an assessment of the social and emotional impact of such learning. because we expect quite some criticism from that side. we are engaging with the psychologists, anthropologists, educationalists, to try to understand what does it do to the child? is that an option that is ethical? because children go to school, they are socialised also, it's not only the learning, it's learning much more, to be part of the group. it's just like back at home. now they've got tablets they are not really talking to anybody. this is my first time to see people learning by using tablets. it's my first time. so the scene is set, there are about six or seven
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children around each individual tablet and we've seen more. the education department from tanzania is here too looking at this project so there's a lot at stake. it's notjust $10 million, it could be the answer to the whole country's education problems. and even the whole of africa's. right, what should we play, what's your favourite game? i think we should do... we should do flags and i'll take you both on. that was dan, and now time for some fun and games with these two clowns. not being rude, they are actually trained circus clowns. but they're also the bosses of a company called two bit circus, and they want to build an enormous high—tech fun house in downtown los angeles. protect that ball.
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so we are building what we call a micro amusement park. it's a 50,000 square feet entertainment complex dedicated to the future of fun. the future of fun! that's a catchphrase. well, you know, here's the thing. there is this period of time when kit comes out of the lab, before it's ready for the home, that it's perfect for out—of—home. you know, you can do some vr in your home right now, but it is so much cooler if it's social like this and has environmental effects and all sorts. motion platforms, your friends can play with you. brent and eric have been making high—tech games and showpieces for corporate events for a few years. their planned amusement complex will be a permanent home to some of their greatest hits. along with new experimental experiential oddities being developed by their team of computer scientists, roboticists and engineers. we've got machines that can cut metal and cut wood, we can prototype our circuit boards here, we have people
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writing software. and the beautiful thing about this place is that at the end of almost every day, there is something new to play with. it's maximum fun. the philosophy here seems to be tinker first, think later. i don't actually know the point of this game. neither does anyone else here. this is the ultimate play space and a great coming together of people with many different skills. we are drawing on multiple industries. so, we have a lot of people from the games industry here. so all of the development that's gone into sophisticated 3—d game engines like unity and unreal, we can put that to work building immersive environments. my background and the background of some others here is in robotics and sensors. and we bring...we come with a completely different toolkit. but the combination of those two things makes programming around here really exciting. but there is still one
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big build remaining. we are standing right in the middle of our micro amusement park. most of it is going to be a big open space. the kitchen will be in that corner. a100 seat interactive supper club is going to be over there. with $15 million backing from companies including intel and japanese ventures, brent hopes that this 50,000 square feet space in downtown la will become the first of many two bit circuses around the world. you are opening in... february? early, early 2018. ok, i think you've got a bit of work to do. we've got some work to do, it's a little empty, you can see, it will be a lot more fun when we are done. but, yeah, from the moment we break ground to the moment we are ready to open, its four, five months. well, if they can pull it off this is going to be an incredible space and a perfect excuse for us to come back here in january to see how they got on.
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ok, that's it for this week, follow us on twitter and facebook for loads more stuff throughout this and every week. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns were raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". i know it is difficult, but grenfell tower changes everything and i don't think we can
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take any risk with the safety of our residents and we need to put them first. the evacuation on the chalcots estate began late night. some residents spent the night in hotels or on airbeds in a leisure centre. other refused to leave. i intend to stay put. i intend to return tonight. the council need to be seen to be doing something, this is a knee—jerk reaction from them but it is pandemonium.
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