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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns were raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". i know it is difficult, but grenfell tower changes everything and i don't think we can take any risk with the safety of our residents and we need to put them first. the evacuation on the chalcots estate began late night. some residents spent the night in hotels or on airbeds in a leisure centre. other refused to leave. i intend to stay put. i intend to return tonight. the council need to be seen to be doing something, this is a knee—jerk reaction from them but it is pandemonium. ten days since the disaster, at least 14 states in nine areas of england are now known to have cladding that has prompted safety concerns. “— cladding that has prompted safety concerns. "14 cladding that has prompted safety concerns. —— 14 states. cladding that has prompted safety concerns. "14 states. ——
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cladding that has prompted safety concerns. —— 14 states. —— estates. good morning, it's saturday 24th june. also ahead — the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, tells broadcasters they should be more "patriotic" in their coverage of brexit talks. in sport, can the lions roar in auckland? they face the mighty all blacks in the first test at eden park — where new zealand are unbeaten for 23 years. # i wish i was special. # but i'm a creep... and 20 years since their first headline set, we'll get reaction after radiohead played the pyramid stage on the opening night of glastonbury. and stav has the weather. a big difference in the weather this weekend compared to last week and's headway. it looks cooler and fresher with more cloud and very windy in the north. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due
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to concerns about fire safety. camden council told people in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed. the buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. here is nick quraishi with the details. "we cannot guarantee your safety." the message from camden council as 4000 residents were told to leave their homes late on friday night. individuals are not being forced to leave, they are being told to leave for their own safety and it's up to them to decide. i intend to stay put and go back in their tonight. i think it is a knee—jerk reaction from the council. in the aftermath of grenfell tower, cladding here had been ruled unsafe. concerns have also been raised about fire doors and gas pipes. any area which was not completely to the best standards was a deep concern given the combination and that was the message from the fire services today.
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the issue is a combination of the two factors that is why we have taken the action we have taken tonight. at the leisure centre, air beds was assembled to cater for up to 100 residents. it will take up to four weeks to remove the external cladding and during that time, people are being urged to stay with family and friends or in hotels. camden council has already secured 270 rooms in london and has spent the night transporting people. some residents said the first they knew was on the news. children, families, babies, they have nowhere to go. and i just think they left everything too late in dealing with it. this time of night, it is half past one now, it is ridiculous. grenfell tower was destroyed from the bottom to the top. we now know the fire started in a kitchen in a lowerfloor. police have also confirmed what eyewitnesses said — the origin of the inferno
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was a hotpoint fridge. 14 buildings in nine areas of england are now known to have cladding which prompts concerns. ten days on from the worst fires since world war two, the shadow looms large over social housing. we can speak now to catriona renton who is outside the swiss cottage leisure centre in camden where some residents spent the night. good mining. many residents are not so good mining. many residents are not so clean to leave their homes despite the advice. good morning. that is very much the case. we have seen many people coming and going from here. we met people arriving here as late as half past four this morning and we have seen other people going away, being taken to hotels in temporary accommodation where they are able to stay for now.
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as you say, many of them are frustrated under happy about this, others accept that this is safety and that is why they are being moved from their homes and they are complying with it. i am joined by the chair of the telco ‘s residence society. this may have come as a surprise to many, you have been working with the council fire service over the last few days for a ever since the grenfell fire, the advice is being the key associations have been working to make certain we have been working to make certain we have all information put out to residents. we got the information out to residents straightaway as soon as the decision was made, letting them know what happened. we called the meeting on thursday for the residents and there was a lot of
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concern voiced. the result of the fire inspection, a lot of blocks had to be evacuated because the fire service said it was not fire safe. many people out to be safe while work can be carried on. some estates say they feel that they do not get information. can you help them with that? i don't know much myself. i've been dealing with the council all morning and i haven't been evacuated because my tower is a different design. contractors have been in their all—night to do what has to be done and there. they are working in tableau in the moment as well. there are many staff coming in this morning to make sure we get this
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done as quickly as possible and to make certain that everybody is ok. so people can be reassured? we hope people will be, because of what was done. they say was left too laid in the evening but the council did not get the information until late and we acted on that as quickly as possible. can you push the council into helping people who feel frustrated? i into helping people who feel frustrated ? i will into helping people who feel frustrated? i will be doing that as soon as frustrated? i will be doing that as soon as possible. that is the chair of the chocolates residents association. thank you for talking to us. —— chalcotts residents association. the question about how this could happen to buildings will be and saint and action. ——
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answered. we'll speak to the communities secretary sajid javid about this at ten past seven. the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. it has been a year... it would be helpful... it would be helpful if broadcasters would be patriotic. the country made a decision... unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron, has described andrea leadsom's remarks as "a sinister threat to the free media" — and said she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing after a landslide in south—western
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china. around a0 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. radiohead topped the bill on the opening night of lust and brick, 20 yea rs opening night of lust and brick, 20 years after that one of the most famous performances. today we will see katy perry and the foo fighters ta ke to see katy perry and the foo fighters take to the stage. # i wish i was special # for thousands of fans, radiohead really are special. receiving a rapturous reception in front of a packed pyramid stage. # i'm a creep, i'm a weirdo. this was the musical climax to a day that featured a few unexpected celebrity appearances. # by a tender a young maiden...
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earlier, kris kristofferson was accompanied on stage by a guitar—playing johnny depp. watching them, another hollywood star, brad pitt. and one more famous face admitted that this was set to be his very first glastonbury. yeah, 42 years old and it is my first festival. first time here. i am excited. slightly nervous because i don't know what to expect but, obviously, apart from the great acts and people having fun. i am looking forward to it. later today, names who will make an appearance on the main stage include katy perry, foo fighters and labour party leaderjeremy corbyn. we will find out how the weather is going to be for those festival—goers and for the rest of the country later in the programme. the time now is 11 minutes past seven and let's
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return to the top story. the decision last night to evacuate a number of tower blocks in camden because of fire safety concerns. speak now to the communities secretary who joins us from westminster. thank you for your time. first of all, we watched events unfold in camden and these evacuations of the tower blocks there. what is your understanding of what the decisive factor was in the council saying these people are not safe in this building and we need them out? i would like to say that it seems that evacuations have gone smoothly overnight and people have been very calm and good—natured about it. as a result of that, i have nothing but admiration for those residents of how they have handled something clearly very difficult and very distressing. the a nswer to difficult and very distressing. the answer to your question about the nature of this is that as we all now know in the wake of the terrible tragedy at grenfell tower, it was absolutely critical that we check
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across the country, notjust in camden but across the country, any similarly clad building, just to make sure the cladding is safe. camden is one of the councils that have sent their samples in very early on. the cladding was deemed not safe, it was combustible, and thatis not safe, it was combustible, and that is why we have required, in those cases, immediately, that the local fire rescue service is those cases, immediately, that the localfire rescue service is brought in to assess the building. where there are mitigating serpents are that, where they take place such as communalfire that, where they take place such as communal fire system alarms or wardens, view should happen and the fire services they are building a second that is the advice that should be taken. but in this case, what happened is that the fire service and the london fire commissioner said an inspection that there were multiple fire safety checks in those buildings and as a result, there is one clear decision which was to ask those residents to leave until the building could be made safe. i think that was absolutely the right decision and it must be followed and that is what
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camden has done. as we understand, currently there are 14 high—rise council buildings, specifically council buildings, specifically council buildings, specifically council buildings, and are subject to the same testing requirements. what is the difference between those buildings that have been evacuated in camden for safety of those people and those other remaining tower blocks in which people are still living? there has been 14 test results and for those buildings, tack cladding has also failed this testis tack cladding has also failed this test is that the difference is that in each case... the similarity is that in every case there is a requirement that the local fire and rescue service must make the fire assessment. not landlords, not politicians. and where the fire service have gone in and said they can take mitigating measures, such as what happened in some other areas like plymouth in manchester, they have installed fire wardens 24/7, they have put in place the clearance of the car park, they have checked and make sure all the other fire
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safety measures such as doors and things are in place. as the fire service has deemed that as they then thatis service has deemed that as they then that is the advice that has been followed. what was different here, very different, is that the fire service, the local fire service found that multiple other failures in the fire safety measures that should have already been in place in the towers and as a result of that, they have made this quite correct decision. so your understanding at present is that the other tower block will beings have not yet had the local fire service checks, which would get them to the point of saying we cannot guarantee the safety. that phrase seems to be the keyissue, safety. that phrase seems to be the key issue, the local fire safety officer saying we cannot guarantee the safety of people in the buildings. but it would not be unreasonable to assume that if any building that is clad in that material, no—one can guarantee their safety, can they? the logic would be to re m ove safety, can they? the logic would be to remove people from the other
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buildings as a precaution. allow me to be very clear on this. in those other buildings, first of all they have all had their cheque was and is. the first thing that happens if a test result comes back as negative, the local council, the landlord, and the fire safe the officer is formed some obtaining a sleek —— informed simultaneously. a fire check is carried out immediately and where the local fire services they can confirm all regular fire safety measures are in place but they can also take the mitigating measures, one of the better exa m ples mitigating measures, one of the better examples i guess if many of them have decided that they will have until the cladding can be removed, which may take weeks or in some cases months, they can have a 24—hour, seven—day a week fire wardens and measures of that nature, if the fire service feels that that, asa if the fire service feels that that, as a result, leaves the building safe for residents, then that is a decision that they can make and the
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landlord can then make their decision based on that advice. that is what has happened everywhere. the test has happened, the fire service has been in and if there are any tests of which there are a number of samples coming in all the time, we're turning them around as fast as we're turning them around as fast as we can. the results are passed on to local authorities immediately, but as soon as local authorities immediately, but as soon as those test results come through, you find across the country that the local fire services are in place and checking each of those buildings. being a lingam council has affected buildings and they are talking about what they will do. talking about the cost. is the position that, central, government will be paying for all the adaptations to the buildings? in birmingham, to install sprinklers. adaptations to the buildings? in birmingham, to installsprinklers. i know that is one of the once eve ryo ne know that is one of the once everyone will look at. are you making an up and pledged that if costs are incurred that they will be covered centrally, whatever the cost is? 0ur position has been very clear.
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public safety is paramount and you can't put a price on people's lives, so can't put a price on people's lives, so local authorities have to do whatever it takes to get their building safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we can work with them. absolutely. what does that mean, work with them? is that a pledge that all that money will be found? if there's a local authority and housing associations are let's not forget them, they owned many of the tower blocks, if they need financial support, not all of them will, we will work with them to make sure they have the resources they need to do this work, absolutely. birmingham council say they want a final set up birmingham council say they want a finalset up —— birmingham council say they want a final set up —— fund, specifically for sprinklers, for example. birmingham council just made for sprinklers, for example. birmingham counciljust made that decision. they haven't approached us with any proposals, but when they do we will work with them. whatever is necessary to keep people safe, that work should happen. it shouldn't be
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slowed down because of some debate about costs. it should be work that should go on immediately and any council, any housing associations on that needs financial support, we will make sure they get it. there are other buildings now which of course are being checked. i want to ask is you specifically about nhs buildings, specifically high—rise buildings. what do you know about any cladding? has any information come on to your desk about hospitals? that's an important point. the focus has been residential buildings, for obvious reasons. but of course when it comes to other buildings, including hospitals, and there will be private buildings, offices, they are also important. what happened in the wake of the grenfell tower tragedy is just really for people, owners of these buildings, in this case the nhs, to make absolutely sure that where those buildings are flooded it
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is the cladding that they expected, so is the cladding that they expected, so it is compliant. —— are cladded. do you know how many nhs buildings have been affected and are being tested ? have been affected and are being tested? nhs england is in contact with about 200 nhs trusts across the country and they have asked for all of that information and it's a priority for them. what they do have to go through the process of making sure, not just to go through the process of making sure, notjust using their central databases, but sure, notjust using their central data bases, but making sure, notjust using their central databases, but making sure they have asked the right questions and they get the immediate returns. we are in a situation where a lot of people are thinking we are ten days after the grenfell tower fire and we still don't know whether nhs buildings have that cladding. that seems extraordinary. you want to have a belt and braces approach to this. there are the central databases, where they will look at when buildings were renovated, whether cladding was put on. a lot of these hospitals are former pfi projects,
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so hospitals are former pfi projects, so they were perhaps done by different contractors. 0ne shouldn't assume how many buildings there are in terms ofjust looking centrally, you've got to go and ask the right questions. if i may give an example from my department, first of all we try to look at our own information we have in the department, but the only correct way, the only way you can make sure, was by contacting and speaking to all 166 local authorities in england, the 300 largest housing associations that account for all of the tower blocks and asking them to feedback that information, we can make absolutely sure that not a single building is left out. that's why we have also set upa left out. that's why we have also set up a free and operating testing facility on 100 can be done a day. if we need more capacity we can supply them. but there's no shortcut to this. we've got to make sure this is done properly. this is something we absolutely have to get right and make sure it remains a number one
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public safety priority. thank you very much for your time this morning. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. weather watchers pictures coming through. not all cloudy. there are good spells of sunshine, especially in the north—east of england. this is from newcastle. it is rather cloudy elsewhere. along the southern counties of england, the biggest of the cloud their with spots of rain. this low pressure system will bring windy weather to the northern half of the uk, especially the northern half of scotland and towards the northern ireland. the wind will pick up northern ireland. the wind will pick up through the day. also feeding in blustery showers. further south, a lot of cloud and a bit of brightness in central and eastern scotland. the best of the brightness in the north—eastern parts of england. the midlands, towards eastern wales. the
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weather front is struggling southern counties of england, especially the south—west, where it could be quite damp first south—west, where it could be quite dampfirst thing. south—west, where it could be quite damp first thing. damp weather in glastonbury through the morning, but it should be improving through the day and cloud will break up to allow some bright or even sunny spells. the wings further south will be and moderate. warm weather sunshine comes out, especially in the south—east and towards the north—east. rain pushing into north—west england and western parts of wales. after we shower is continuing in northern scotland, where we could see up to 50 mph gusts. feeling cool. elsewhere, quite warm and up to 25 degrees in the south—east. into this evening and overnight it stays blustery in northern areas. more cloud at times, especially in the west. it could be longer spells of rain pushing into the western hills. quite a mild night to come foremost. still blustery in the north of the country, especially in north—east scotla nd country, especially in north—east scotland and the northern ireland. the low pressure pushes away but it
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allows fresh air to moving across the country. with it, by the skies. scotland, northern ireland, and england, blustery showers. rather cloudy. especially for southern areas today. not quite as warm. temperatures about 19— 22. closer to the mid— teens in the north. thanks very much. last week the tv presenter ant mcpartlin revealed that he was receiving treatment for addiction problems with alcohol and prescription drugs. the story drew attention to a growing issue in the uk. the number of people using and abusing prescription painkillers is increasing, but doctors worry that a lack of awareness means they aren't always getting the help they need. we're joined now by dr yassir abassi, he's an addiction specialist for the nhs, and founder of the charity pain. also with us is the director adam patterson, he's made a documentary about prescription drug abuse in northern ireland. very good morning to both of you. it
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is funny sometimes when a celebrity is funny sometimes when a celebrity is linked to a problem and it gives it much more attention than it has previously had. just give us an outline of the scale of the problem. well, first of all i would like to commend ant mcpartlin for coming out with this. it not only shows the extent of the problem, what it has emboldened others to come out and not suffer in silence. the fact that prescription drug dependence is an underrated problem, we feel not enough is known about it. crucially speaking there are no truly established prevalence rates, so we don't know how many people are dependent. if you look at one aspect of it, painkillers, you would see that the prescription of these medications is nearly 50%, from nearly10— medications is nearly 50%, from nearly 10— 12 million to 4 million ina year. nearly 10— 12 million to 4 million in a year. so the prescribing is there. the problem is there. how
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many people are dependent, we aren't really sure. you have been looking closely at this around the uk. i just want to show people are clipped from your documentary. the recommendations really... what's shocking there is that sounds like someone who is on illegal drugs, is addicted to illegal drugs, but these are ones you can get from the doctor and it's not being managed, it seems. is that the impression you got? well, they are legal because they are prescribed by a doctor. so because of that there's this level of or societal acceptance. a problem that we see with kenneth is he feels he can't go outside or can't function in society without having his maximum daily
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dose, first thing when he gets up in the morning. he was originally on valium. he saw a lot of violence in the troubles. but we've seen the impact to the generations that the troubles is having. people who corrupt in areas that were still controlled by paramilitary groups. from 17 he was on valium. when he was imprisoned a few years ago he started and other drug, which he spoke about, which is used to treat nerve pain, epilepsy and in his case anxiety. but i'm not sure that checks and balances are in place. lot of people would be thinking there would be a doctor somewhere handing this stuff over to you, legally. where does the responsibility lie with those people? there is no easy answer. the doctors are faced with a very difficult situation. they've got someone difficult situation. they've got someone coming in and they have a short time to assess and in northern ireland there maybe isn't the full
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range of talking therapies that they may have in other places. so they say, you know, do they give them something to treat this or not? these kids arch teaching each other what to say to doctors that they can get these drugs —— are teaching each other. it's difficult for a doctor to assess whether this is happening to assess whether this is happening to them or not. you were speaking specifically about kenneth and his issues. but this isn't necessarily a lwa ys issues. but this isn't necessarily always the case, that there's been an extreme situation of in an environment. people almost seem to be addicted after says surgery and not being weaned off these drugs. where does the blame lies? you are doctor and you see people who want this painkillers. how do you manage that? the reasons are many. because... ant says a lot about pharmacological intervention. people wa nt to pharmacological intervention. people
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want to be pain—free and you are looking for a quick fix, without realising that there are so many other things you could do. people who have arthritic pain don't focus on the fact that their weight could be contributing to that and rather than working on that, they focus on medication. these are legitimate painkillers, prescriptions, which are required, but the problem is when we start misusing them. how does that interaction happened? as adam said you have a limited time with patients, when you see them. maybe patients are reluctant to keep coming to the doctor for this. maybe patients are reluctant to keep coming to the doctor for thism maybe patients are reluctant to keep coming to the doctor for this. it is important. anyone on painkiller prescriptions, if they are on them for a period of time, it is important for the prescriber to be aware of that and review the need for the painkiller on a regular basis, review the pain, the need, review if there are any other interventions that would take place. sometimes they are limited, but it is important to through that with a
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person, rather than putting on repeats and not coming back to it at all. thank you very much. thank you for your time this morning. details of organisations offering support with addiction are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time, to hear recorded information on 0800155 947. and drugs map of britain: belfast buds is available to watch now on bbc three's iplayer channel. headlines are coming up. see you shortly. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before eight holly will be here with the sport and stav will have this weekend's weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. camden council told people in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed. the buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. some residents were left feeling
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angry. there are children, families with babies. they have nowhere to go andi with babies. they have nowhere to go and ijust with babies. they have nowhere to go and i just think they left everything too late and dealing with it at this time of night, half one, it at this time of night, half one, it is ridiculous. in about 45 minutes we will talk to the leader of camden council. the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. it has been a year... it would be helpful...
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it would be helpful if broadcasters would be patriotic. the country made a decision... unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron, has described andrea leadsom's remarks as "a sinister threat to the free media" — and said she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing after a landslide in south—western china. around 40 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. katy perry and the foo fighters will top the bill at glastonbury today. last night, radiohead took to the pyramid stage, 20 years after first being the headline act
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at the festival. it's expected around 135,000 people will be in attendance over the weekend. those are the main stories this morning. time to talk sport now. good morning, holly. a big game coming up. just under one hour to go? less than an hour now. you can only imagine what the level of excitement is over in auckland this morning. we have been counting down to this for weeks now and this is the first official match. i know there are huge crowds over there, watching online and on listening on the radio but it will just online and on listening on the radio but it willjust be so much. you will be so exciting, but not easy. new zealand has a 23—year—old unbeaten record on home turf is i cannot think will be an easy ride but crossed. they feel confident, the captain —— coach and certainly is. we're less than two hours
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away from the first test between the british and irish lions and new zealand in auckland. the all blacks haven't lost in 23 years at eden park — the last side to beat them anywhere was ireland, back in november. were speaking out to katie in auckland. i can only imagine what the atmosphere is like that this will not be easy. notoriously difficult side. how confident will warren be feeling right now?“ difficult side. how confident will warren be feeling right now? if you has been plenty of fighting talk at his press conference, an ebb and flow of mind games between him and the opposing coach but i think he is confident in his players and that comes because of recent results on this tour. in unconvincing wins and has changed the complexion around the lines and around how they are viewed as well in the new zealand media here. at the start of the tour i don't think many people gave them a chance because of the scale of this challenge. it isn't thought of
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as the toughest test in rugby. this site have only known each other properly for a few weeks, coming to the home of the world champions, eden park, where they have not lost since 1994, before some of the current side were even born. but recent results and an adventurous tea m recent results and an adventurous team that warren gatland has named has given a sense of is and positivity. whether we see that at the final whistle is really the big question. the weather there over the last few days, there has been rain, what sort of advantage will that give to the lions. will it benefit them? the weather here has been unpredictable. 0ff them? the weather here has been unpredictable. off and on raining all day and now it looks clear. i am now carol, of course, but i don't think we can predict what the conditions will be like out there. warren gatland was asked whether another wet conditions might advantage his side because if you
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look at the games they have played so look at the games they have played so far, they have had great set pieces and a solid defensive game and we conditions suit them. here he dismissed it. he does not want to rely on conditions. he feels that the side he has named with a couple of surprises in there, liam williams and elliot daly, he feels that may be perhaps they will not match new zealand in terms of the rope and expensive play but they certainly enough to give them problems. i don't think it will be relying on the weather. not much longer before that begins and we are looking forward to it. scotland have lost their final match and ireland play japan in tokyo. jason roy became the first player in international t20 cricket history to be given out for obstructing the field, as england lost
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to south africa byjust three runs at taunton. england were cruising towards their target of 175 when south africa claimed roy had deliberately got in the way of a throw — and he was dismissed. england needed a four from the last ball — but liam dawson missed it. the series decider is at cardiff tomorrow. the women's cricket world cup starts today, with the icc hoping it'll be a turning point for the women's game. england go into the tournament on the back of some strong warm—up performances. they take on india in the opening match in derby, where a sell—out crowd of 3000 is expected. british men's tennis number three dan evans has been provisionally suspended after testing positive for cocaine. the test was taken in april but he was only told about it this week. he could be banned for up to four years. i was notified a few days ago that i failed a drugs test in april where i tested positive to cocaine. this was taken out of competition and the context was completely
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unrelated to tennis. i made a mistake and i must face up to it. i do not condone for one second that this was acceptable behaviour. i have let people down. my family, my coach, my team, sponsors, british tennis and my fans. i can only deeply apologise from the bottom of my heart. petra kvitova's comeback is still going well. she's through to the semi—finals of the aegon classic in birmingham after beating kristina mladenovic. this was kvitova's fifth match since returning to the circuit, after she was stabbed in the hand six months ago. prix. max verstappen dominated day one of practice for the azerbaijan grand prix. but he did give his red bull mechanics some extra work to do, with just seconds remaining of the second session. and the afternoon shadows caused problems for a few drivers — jolyon palmer struggling tojudge his braking distance. lewis hamilton almost collided with kimi raikkonen and could only manage tenth.
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the odds on favourite "winter" won the big race on day four of royal ascot. the fillies took centre stage in the coronation stakes and "winter", ridden by ryan moore and trained by aidan 0'brien, launched a late charge to add it to her english and irish 1000 guineas triumphs. castleford moved seven points clear at the top of super league with a 23—12 victory at yorkshire rivals leeds. zak hardaker scored a stunning solo try against his former club as castleford won their eighth league game in a row. hull are up to second after they beat wakefield and salford lost at st helens. the other game finished in a draw between wigan and huddersfield. not long now and we're looking forward to it. are we feeling positive? are we backing the lions? i think anything can happen. if you win one, the first is the one you
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want. you lay down a marker and then who knows what will happen. it will bea who knows what will happen. it will be a wonderful occasion. looking forward to it. since it started in finland, it's proved to be hugely successful at getting girls involved in sport. now hobby—horse show—jumping has arrived in the uk. ahead of this weekend's inaugural national championships we sent mike along for a canter round the course. it's the stuff of dreams for seven—year—old 0livia. her imagination running free in a real showjumping ring as she races against the clock, hoping for a clear round ahead of the inaugural national championships. i like jumping because you can go as high as you want and i find that really cool. here we have mike riding breakfast charlie. this horse is a great steed for him. for those of us who cannot
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afford a horse or have been challenged by lack of riding ability, this is an ideal way of experiencing a showjumping competition. it is my first one ever, and i am being put through my paces. it is all about the angles and getting as tight as you can around the course. the fences may not be huge, but in heat, in the summer it is certainly a physical challenge. exhausting. and try telling 5—year—old eli that this is somewhat silly. he did not know when he was beaten and had the stamina to keep going. he was glowing with pride when he eventually finished, especially because he had made his own horse. his name is invisible. he looks fantastic. did you enjoy that? everybody can get on. small kids can have a go and also the big kids. and, like so, not everybody has
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an opportunity to be around a horse but hobbyhorse are everywhere. they are far less work compared to a real horse as well. and less time involved on the training side, iam sure. it all began in finland to encourage girls, mainly in the inner city, to get more active in equestrian sport. now tens of thousands turn up for competitions. their story is told in a new movie, the hobbyhorse revolution, which reflects the height of the fences now and shows how competitive it has become. while for the show in berkshire, the first national championship was the answer when they could not show real horse jumping any longer. the olympics did great work for us and i think everybody is excited about horses. if we can bring more people into the game, that would be really good. you can see what it feels like when the horse jumps so you have that
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feel, the excitement. it is funjumping on. satisfying when you clear the jumps. there is now a dressage section. dancing to music with hobbyhorses. but it is the jumping that has most newcomers in the saddle. he has found a new sport. some people think this is an april fool but it is a real thing and they are really doing it. it is almost a quarter to eight. time for the main stories. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: hundreds of flats have been evacuated in north london tower blocks because of fire safety concerns following the grenfell tower tragedy. and radiohead have headlined the opening night of the glastonbury festival, 20 years after they first topped the bill on the pyramid stage. it might be sunny for those in
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glastonbury and the rest of us. let's find out what the weather holds. good morning. not looking too bad. a big difference to last weekend, where we have the high temperatures and sunshine. this weekend it will bea and sunshine. this weekend it will be a little bit of sunshine, cloud, breezy in the far north. much cooler thanit breezy in the far north. much cooler than it was. in the sunshine feeling quite pleasant and there's some good sunshine around. weather what the pictures coming through from the north—east. some sunshine through the midlands, towards eastern parts of wales. this area of low pressure is the culprit for bringing the windy weather to scotland. unseasonably windy into the afternoon across the northern half of scotland. we could have up to 40— 50 mph. for northern ireland and into southern and eastern scotland may be a little bit of brightness. a lot of cloud around. the best of the
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brightness in north—eastern england and into the midlands and eastern wales. southern counties quite cloudy. we will have light and patchy rain or drizzle. it could be a damp start at glastonbury. but it should dry up and maybe even brighten up into the afternoon. through the day the cloud coming and going. break into the east of high ground. eastern wales, east of the pennines, into the south—east of england and eastern scotland. notice the gales. it will be quite windy for the time of year. last wish i was blowing in and a bit of light rain over western hills. in the sunshine not feeling too bad. quite a warm afternoon, despite the cloud. this even in the showers continue. a few heavy ones perhaps in the south—east will clear away at most places will be quiet overnight. the cloud and light rain into the western hills. further blustery showers in the northern of scotland, where the winds will be a feature. low pressure pushes into scandinavia on sunday. a slow improvement. but
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notice the north—westerly breeze, which will feed in fresh air. but with its bright skies will follow on. the northern ireland, scotland and england, the cloud and rain pushing further south. the midlands southwards could be cloudy. a bit cooler as well. top temperatures 21— 22. further north, fresher, at at least you have sunshine to compensate. a mixed bag this weekend. thanks very much! time now for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch. many questions remain after the grenfell tower fire, but some viewers questioned whether bbc news coverage served to incite anger amongst residents. the fire service are... you could stop it spreading by spending £2 more... the interview emily maitlis conducted with theresa may last friday seemed to unfairly lay all blame for the fire personally with the prime minister. also... the sound of silence.
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how huw edwards occupied himself for the first four minutes of tuesday's news at ten. in the very early hours of monday morning, the sound of multiple police sirens was heard again on the streets of london. and the bbc‘s overnight news service reported the facts, as they became clear. we start with breaking news this hour. a number of people have been injured in north london after a vehicle collided with pedestrians. the muslim council of britain has said that worshippers were hit by a van as they left prayers at the finsbury park mosque. 0ne eyewitness has told the bbc that at least three people were seriously injured. some hours later, it emerged that one man, makram ali, died in the attack and that another, darren osborne, had been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and terror offences. before that, though, a number of viewers objected to the way the incident had
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initially been described on bbc news. one of them rang newswatch with his thoughts. i am calling about your recent coverage of the finsbury park attacks. ijust don't understand why the mainstream media right now is not calling this out as a terrorist attack. at the moment, which is very disappointing. considering that, if it was a muslim, you would be very quick to point out that it is a terrorist attack. but for a white guy or anyone else who's running people over, for some reason, you have a different way of describing the news. well, we put that view to bbc news and they told us... last friday afternoon, the distress and anger which had
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been building up in the wake of the grenfell tower fire found an outlet. here isjeremy cooke reporting on that night's news at six. a crowd storms kensington town hall demanding action. we wantjustice! they were demanding justice. we wantjustice! and demanding answers. get them out, get them out! how could this tragedy have happened, on this scale? in this city? in 2017? we need to be heard! that evening and through the weekend, bbc reporters heard many appeals and complaints of that kind from residents of the estate and others affected by the tragedy. i just want to know how many people have died.
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why did that building go up? what are you guys going to do? why are people being rehoused outside london? where are we going next? where are we going to move? what do we need? who, what and where? these are fundamental questions and only, we are days after this disaster. i have done the angry. i have got to get this done it is always the public that runs to rescue. where are the authorities? where are they? those questions were heard many times on camera through the streets of west london. and others were put to the prime minister on friday. that was in an interview by emily maitlis of newsnight. there were two types of material that could have been used in the cladding — one was flammable and one was fireproof, and the fireproof one cost £2 more. was that not £2 worth spending? we have yet to find out what the cause of the fire was. the fire service are doing that. you could have stopped it spreading by spending £2 more on the cladding. the fire service are looking
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at what the cause of the fire was. and it is important that we get to the bottom of this, that we find out exactly what happened. but you were recommended this, in 2013. you were in government, then, and the coroner said you could have stopped this with a sprinkler system in every block. and the government has taken action on the recommendations of the coroner's report. lots of reaction from newswatch viewers to that interview. typical was ian whitehouse, who recorded his thoughts for us on camera. we all have the utmost sympathy and sadness for the victims and their families. however, nothing can justify the appalling viciousness of the haranguing of the prime minister in an interview by emily maitlis. it was more like a kangaroo court diatribe, based on assumptions of responsibility and guilt which hadn't yet even been discussed, let alone proven. 0ther viewers contacted us with their concerns about reporting from nearby the grenfell tower.
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and the allegations and emotions expressed by residents. here are the views of david shute and alan cummings. the bbc was on the spot for immediate eyewitness accounts, in competition with rivals which reached fever pitch, recently. and because of that their obligations for broadcasting accurately and with accountability is being compromised. they have proved, in the event, to being totally inaccurate, highly emotive and often personally influenced accounts broadcast repeatedly on the bbc news loop. i think that in the recent grenfell tower tragedy we saw reporting which was actually starting to incite violence, incite further trouble, which is not what reporting is about. another viewer who got in touch on the subject wasjon brookes, and hejoins us now from our ipswich studio. jon, there were lots of concerns about coverage of the grenfell tower fire. last week, a number of viewers commented on it being used as a backdrop to news bulletins
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when it was still burning. was that a concern of yours? yes, that was the main one. there was no real need to have somebody on the scene standing in front of a burning tower. it almost seemed as though you were dwelling on... ..0n people's sorry and disaster. in a way, it was a type of hysteria, because in the end it wound a lot of people up to make protests when they might otherwise not have done. the bbc need to realise that perhaps they were part of the megaphones talk by a lot of people, including politicians, who incited those people to behave like that. in filling the air time in the days after the disaster, did you have views about people discussing what might have been the cause of it? that was the point. normally, when this happens anywhere, in any factory, the health and safety people come in, the police and the inspectorates, and they decide what's caused it. but the speculation on there was massive.
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by people who didn't know the facts. all speculating about the panels. it may well be, that it was the panels, it seems to be the case, but speculation without the knowledge is not on. one of the other issue you wanted to raise and some other viewers did, was about interviews with the prime minister and the way she was treated in relation to the fire. mrs may, i'm not one of her supporters, but how could she be held responsible or blamed for what's happened there? now we know that those panels are in place all over the uk and that is down to planning people making sure that they are installing fireproof panels. she can't be responsible for that, and yet, some people were blaming herfor it. you think the bbc was doing interviews in an irresponsible way? i don't think you helped matters by allowing those people to say what they were saying, particularly outside when they were protesting at the town hall. well, as you know, we did
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want to talk to someone from the bbc to answer those questions. but no one came on. and they have given us this statement. any thoughts in response to that statement, particularly when they talked about accountability in interviews? yes, how can you judge accountability when you have no facts to back up the claims that it was the cladding? at that stage nobody knew. i've never heard a producer admit
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he is wrong about anything. they can waffle all they like but, in this case, i think they are wrong. they have overdone it. to accentuate it to the degree that they did. after all, there was no need to have them there every day in front of that building. and i just think that people who had relatives in there, how do you think they must have felt? jon brookes, thank you very much. finally it has been an extremely busy news period, most of it very bad, so it is understandable if some of the audience, perhaps even some of the journalists wanted it all to occasionally just calm down and stop. on tuesday night it did just that as those watching the ten o'clock evening bulletin on news channel were treated to this... there followed four minutes of huw edwards waiting patiently,
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checking over his script and taking notes, all interspersed with some rather random visual material. viewers on bbc one only had a bit of that before the presentation announcer took over with a holding message and some music. what on earth was going on? apparently the bbc news technical system crashed seconds before ten o'clock and although huw edwards wasn't told he was on air for a couple of minutes, having heard pandemonium in the background, he thought he would take the conservative approach and just sit there, quietly. the glitch prompted a flurry of reaction on twitter. john reid thought... ian ford posted this... thank you for all your comments this week. please send us your thoughts on bbc
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news and current affairs. in written or spoken form. you can contact us at: that's all from us. we'll be back next week. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns were raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". i know it's difficult but grenfell changes everything and ijust don't believe we can take any risks with
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residents' safety and we have to put them first. the evacuation began late last night. some residents spent the night in hotels, on air beds in a leisure centre. 0thers refused to leave. i'm staying put. i intend going back in there tonight. it's a knee—jerk reaction. they have to be seen to be doing something. it's creating chaos and pandemonium.
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